Sample records for development phase coordinates

  1. Development/Plasticity/Repair Nuclear Factor I Coordinates Multiple Phases of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gronostajski, Richard M.

    Cell Development via Regulation of Cell Adhesion Molecules Wei Wang,1 Debra Mullikin-Kilpatrick,1 James of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Program in Neuroscience, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, 2E. K. Shriver Center/University of Massachusetts Medical School, Waltham

  2. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres. 1: Coordination of CLEERS Project; Pres. 2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation CLEERS...

  3. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation (8744, 8746) Jae-Soon Choi Oak Ridge National Laboratory CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data...

  4. Development and Validation of the Transition Coordinators Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjorkman Wade, Diana K.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to create a valid and reliable instrument for the field of secondary special education and transition by developing and validating the Transition Coordinators Survey (TCS). Transition coordinators are professionals who...

  5. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral Tridentate Ligands. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral...

  6. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part II Availability of Flow and Water Quality Data for the Rio Grande Project Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cruces, NM 88003 (575) 646-4337 i i Acknowledgement This document and the underlying pr oject activities detailed in this report reflect the joint efforts of many people working with the Paso del Norte Watershed Council (PdNWC). The authors... wish to acknowledge and extend our grat itude to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the generous financial support extende d to the PdNWC for development of the Coordinated Water Resources Database and Model Developm ent Project (called Project...

  7. Coordinating Permit Offices and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinating Permit Offices and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal Energy 2013 Geothermal-Scale Geothermal Overview 1. Background and other Analysis 2. Specific Coordinating Permit Office Examples 3 and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal Background 2011 Islandbanki Report · Report stated on average

  8. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Friederike Bostelmann

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference results. The status on the Monte Carlo modeling of the experimental VHTRC facility is also discussed. Reference results were obtained for the neutronics stand-alone cases (Ex. I-1 and Ex. I-2) using the (relatively new) Monte Carlo code Serpent, and comparisons were performed with the more established Monte Carlo codes MCNP and KENO-VI. For the thermal-fluids stand-alone cases (Ex. I-3 and I-4) the commercial CFD code CFX was utilized to obtain reference results that can be compared with lower fidelity tools.

  9. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral Tridentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yu; Hu, Han-Shi; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Li, Jun; Gibson, John K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESI of 1:1 mixtures of Th(ClO?)? and ligand TMOGA in acetonitrile resulted in the observation of the TMOGA supported tetracation, Th(L)???, in the gas phase. Three TMOGA ligands are necessary to stabilize the tetrapositive thorium ion; no Th(L)??? or Th(L)??? was observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the Th(L)??? complex possesses C? symmetry with the thorium center coordinated by nine oxygen atoms from three ligands, which forms a twisted TPP geometry. Actinide compounds with such a geometry feature a nine-coordinate chiral actinide center. The Th-L binding energy and bond orders of Th(L)n?? decrease as the coordination number increases, consistent with the trend of concurrently increasing Th-O distances. The Th-O bonding is mainly electrostatic in nature, but the covalent interactions are not negligible. CID of the Th(L)??? complex mainly resulted in charge reduction to form Th(L)?(L-86)³?oss of neutral TMOGA was not observed. The protic ligand methanol stabilized only tri- and dications of ligated thorium. The intensity of the Th(L)??? peak was reduced as the percentage of water increased in the Th(ClO?)?/TMOGA solution.

  10. Coordinating Low Emission Development in Columbia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Butheau, M.; Sandor, D.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colombia's economy has grown more than 4 percent per year for a decade, but climate change is posing new risks to sustaining that development. With the nation's coastal areas, mountain ranges, rain forests, plains, and river basins vulnerable to changing weather patterns and growing seasons, Colombia is building resilience to climate change while working to curb emissions and pursue new options for low emission development.

  11. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  12. Coordinating Permit Offices and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K.; Witherbee, K.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permitting is a major component of the geothermal development process. Better coordination across government agencies could reduce uncertainty of the process and the actual time of permitting. This presentation highlights various forms of coordinating permit offices at the state and federal level in the western United States, discusses inefficiencies and mitigation techniques for permitting natural resource projects, analyzes whether various approaches are easily adaptable to utility-scale geothermal development, and addresses advantages and challenges for coordinating permit offices. Key successful strategies identified include: 1. Flexibility in implementing the approach (i.e. less statutory requirements for the approach); 2. Less dependence on a final environmental review for information sharing and permit coordination; 3. State and federal partnerships developed through memorandum of understanding to define roles and share data and/or developer information. A few of the most helpful techniques include: 1. A central point of contact for the developer to ask questions surrounding the project; 2. Pre-application meetings to assist the developer in identifying all of the permits, regulatory approvals, and associated information or data required; 3. A permit schedule or timeline to set expectations for the developer and agencies; 4. Consolidating the public notice, comment, and hearing period into fewer hearings held concurrently.

  13. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  14. Leadership and Multicultural Development Programs Maricela Alvarado, Coordinator of Greek Life September 12, 2009 www.fullerton.edu/greeklife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Leadership and Multicultural Development Programs Maricela Alvarado, Coordinator of Greek Life, Leadership and Multicultural Development Programs (LMDP) provides training opportunities and out-of-classroom experiences that encourage CSUF students to assess and develop the skills recommended for effective leadership

  15. Federal ESPC Process Phase 3: Project Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During phase 3 of the energy savings performance contract (ESPC) procurement process, the agency and energy service company (ESCO) work to develop and award a task order. The task order includes descriptions of the energy conservation measures (ECMs); baselines; and financial schedules showing estimated savings, guaranteed savings, itemized prices, and agency payments.

  16. Leadership & Multicultural Development Programs Maricela Alvarado, Coordinator, Greek Life May 13, 2011 www.fullerton.edu/greeklife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Leadership & Multicultural Development Programs Maricela Alvarado, Coordinator, Greek Life May 13, 2011 www.fullerton.edu/greeklife DEPARTMENT MISSION STATEMENT: The Dean of Students Office, Leadership that encourage CSUF students to assess and develop the skills recommended for effective leadership

  17. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Xu, Ke; Suter, Jonathan D.; McCloy, John S.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in experiments, special experimental methods were devised to create similar boundary conditions in the iron films. Preliminary MFM studies conducted on single and polycrystalline iron films with small sub-areas created with focused ion beam have correlated quite well qualitatively with phase-field simulations. However, phase-field model dimensions are still small relative to experiments thus far. We are in the process of increasing the size of the models and decreasing specimen size so both have identical dimensions. Ongoing research is focused on validation of the phase-field model. Validation is being accomplished through comparison with experimentally obtained MFM images (in progress), and planned measurements of major hysteresis loops and first order reversal curves. Extrapolation of simulation sizes to represent a more stochastic bulk-like system will require sampling of various simulations (i.e., with single non-magnetic defect, single magnetic defect, single grain boundary, single dislocation, etc.) with distributions of input parameters. These outputs can then be compared to laboratory magnetic measurements and ultimately to simulate magnetic Barkhausen noise signals.

  18. Office of Business Development UTSC Farmers Market Programmer and Logistics Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    and Logistics Coordinator The terms and conditions of employment are governed programming and Farmers Market logistics including but not limited to; confirming

  19. Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development Rogério de Lemos. Exception handling has been traditionally associated with the design phase of the software lifecycle, during not received enough attention /Avizienes 97/. Ideally, for each identified phase of the software lifecycle

  20. RCSP Development Phase | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help support regulatory development and industry in commercialization and deployment of CCS. The storage types and formations being tested are considered regionally significant...

  1. Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) |Information 6thGeothermal Analysis JumpPhases

  2. Development of dense-phase pneumatic transport of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horisaka, S.; Ikemiya, H.; Kajiwara, T. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Kashima, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense phase pneumatic transport system has been developed to reduce entrained particles as is seen in the belt conveyor system. High mass flow rate and dense phase (Loading ratio = 50--100kg-coal/kg-N{sub 2}) transport has been achieved by applying this plug flow system to pneumatic conveying of coal (Average particle diameter = 2.5 mm).

  3. Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2 Jonathan Humphrey1 , Mike Smith1 reproduced from Ordnance Survey material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller...............................................................................11 3.5 Construction of landuse change scenarios

  4. Development of a database for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis: Summary report of the third research coordination meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, Richard M.; Firestone, Richard B.; Pavi, ???

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main discussions and conclusions from the Third Co-ordination Meeting on the Development of a Database for Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis are summarized in this report. All results were reviewed in detail, and the final version of the TECDOC and the corresponding software were agreed upon and approved for preparation. Actions were formulated with the aim of completing the final version of the TECDOC and associated software by May 2003.

  5. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest status and plans are presented.

  6. Information Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security Research and Development Information Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security Research and Development GAO recommends that...

  7. Developing an energy design tool: Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidell, J.A.; Deringer, J.D.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the planning phase of a proposed four-phase project for creating computer software to provide energy expertise in a manageable form to architects and engineers - thereby decreasing energy use in new buildings. The government sponsored software would be integrated with commercially developed software for use in the design of buildings. The result would be an integrated software package to aid the designer in the building design process and to provide expert insight into the energy related implications of a proposed design.

  8. Assessment of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative: Addressing Environmental and Siting Issues Associated with Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; States, Jennifer C.

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) is a consensus-based stakeholder group comprised of representatives from the utility, wind industry, environmental, consumer, regulatory, power marketer, agricultural, tribal, economic development, and state and federal government sectors. The purpose of the NWCC is to support the development of an environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable commercial market for wind power (NWCC 2010). The NWCC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since its inception in 1994. In order to evaluate the impact of the work of the NWCC and how this work aligns with DOE’s strategic priorities, DOE tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a series of informal interviews with a small sample of those involved with NWCC.

  9. The coordination between public and private sectors: the role of partnerships in ecotourism development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekartjakrarini, Soeharrtini

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    community development. In this sense, ecotourism is seen as a partnership between public agencies and the private sector. Such a perspective on ecotourism is aligned with current policy directives of the Indonesian government. Seven partnerships in nature...

  10. Feasibility analysis of coordinated offshore wind project development in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Mimi Q

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is one of the cleanest and most available resources in the world, and advancements in wind technology are making it more cost effective. Though wind power is rapidly developing in many regions, its variable ...

  11. Expanded Application of a Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor through Strain Development and New Feeding Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Expanded Application of a Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor through Strain Development and New bioreactor (TPPB). TPPBs are characterized by a cell- containing aqueous phase and an immiscible

  12. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  13. Investigation of a high spatial resolution method based on polar coordinate maximum entropy method for analyzing electron density fluctuation data measured by laser phase contrast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuo, K. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Iguchi, H.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser phase contrast is a powerful diagnostic method to determine the spatial distribution of electron density fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas, although its applicability depends on magnetic field configurations. The spatial resolution of fluctuations is linked with the resolution of the propagation direction that is derived from the two-dimensional spectral analysis of the wavenumber for the fluctuations. The method was applied to fluctuation measurements in a compact helical system. In order to improve the resolution of the propagation direction with a relatively small number of data points, the maximum entropy method with polar coordinates was employed. A spatial resolution of the order of 1 cm was obtained, which is satisfactory in a plasma with a 20 cm minor radius.

  14. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  15. Sodium Heat Engine Development Program. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

  16. International Assistance for Low-Emission Development Planning: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Inventory of Activities and Tools--Preliminary Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, S.; Benioff, R.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) is a voluntary network of international practitioners supporting low-emission planning in developing countries. The network seeks to improve quality of support through sharing project information, tools, best practices and lessons, and by fostering harmonized assistance. CLEAN has developed an inventory to track and analyze international technical support and tools for low-carbon planning activities in developing countries. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the inventory to help identify trends in assistance activities and tools available to support developing countries with low-emission planning.

  17. Real options in action : vertical phasing in commercial real estate development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Jason R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real estate development is inherently a risky endeavor. Developers encounter varied risks during the different phases of a development project, from permitting to construction and through lease-up and stabilized operations. ...

  18. FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ley, Josh (UQM Technologies, Inc.); Lutz, Jon (UQM Technologies, Inc.)

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is to design and develop an advanced traction motor that will meet the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) 2010 goals and the traction motor technical targets. The motor specifications are given in Section 1.3. Other goals of the program include providing a cost study to ensure the motor can be developed within the cost targets needed for the automotive industry. The program has focused on using materials that are both high performance and low costs such that the performance can be met and cost targets are achieved. In addition, the motor technologies and machine design features must be compatible with high volume manufacturing and able to provide high reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness while simultaneously reducing weight and volume. Weight and volume reduction will become a major factor in reducing cost, material cost being the most significant part of manufacturing cost at high volume. Many motor technology categories have been considered in the past and present for traction drive applications, including: brushed direct current (DC), PM (PM) brushless dc (BLDC), alternating current (AC) induction, switched reluctance and synchronous reluctance machines. Of these machine technologies, PM BLDC has consistently demonstrated an advantage in terms of power density and efficiency. As rare earth magnet cost has declined, total cost may also be reduced over the other technologies. Of the many different configurations of PM BLDC machines, those which incorporate power production utilizing both magnetic torque as well as reluctance torque appear to have the most promise for traction applications. There are many different PM BLDC machine configurations which employ both of these torque producing mechanisms; however, most would fall into one of two categories--some use weaker magnets and rely more heavily on reluctance torque (reluctance-dominant PM machines), others use strong PMs and supplement with reluctance torque (magnet-dominant PM machines). This report covers a trade study that was conducted in this phase I program to explore which type of machine best suits the FCVT requirements.

  19. Phase boundaries and deformation in high nitrogen duplex stainless steels; 1: Rolling texture development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdut, N. (Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Aachen (Germany). RWTH Aachen); Foct, J. (Univ. de Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Physique)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The texture development during cold rolling of two nitrogen alloyed duplex stainless steels with different nitrogen contents and different microstructures were investigated. The fcc phases of both duplex steels show an almost identical texture development in contrast to the ferritic phases. In single phase ferritic steels a typical fiber type texture develops to slip on [110], [112] and [123] planes. In contrast to this, the ferritic phase of duplex steel D1 deforms mainly by slip on [110] planes so that no typical fiber type texture can be observed. The texture development of the cast specimen D2 is characterized by its random character in the ferritic phase. This proves that besides the microstructure, nitrogen strongly influences the deformation mechanisms. Furthermore, it appears that for both phases the intensities of the cold rolling textures decrease. Induced by the phase boundaries, strong shear components appear as well as the activation of additional slip systems and the refinement of the microstructure.

  20. Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonika Jump to: navigation,Phase 3Phase

  1. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  2. Phase 3 Developments Investments LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonika Jump to: navigation,Phase 3

  3. Engineering Work Plan for the Development of Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) Phases 3 and 4 Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of tools and equipment pieces are required to facilitate planned test operations during Phases 3 and 4 of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). These items will be used in assessing residual canister sludge quantities on cleaned fuel assemblies, sorting coarse and fine scrap fuel pieces, assessing the size distribution of scrap pieces, loading scrap into a canister, and measuring the depth of the accumulated scrap in a canister. This work plan supercedes those previously issued for development of several of these test items. These items will be considered prototype equipment until testing has confirmed their suitability for use in K West Basin. The process described in AP-EN-6-032 will be used to qualify the equipment for facility use. These items are considered non-OCRWM for PSI Phase 3 applications. The safety classification of this equipment is General Service, with Quality Level 0 (for PSI Phase 3). Quality Control inspections shall be performed to verify basic dimensions and overall configurations of fabricated components, and any special quality control verifications specified in this work plan (Section 3.1.5). These inspections shall serve to approve the test equipment for use in K West Basin (Acceptance Tag). This equipment is for information gathering only during PSI Phases 3 and 4 activities, and will be discarded at the completion of PSI. For equipment needed to support actual production throughput, development/fabrication/testing activities would be more rigorously controlled.

  4. Biomass power for rural development: Phase 2. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase-1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and agreements necessary to demonstrate commercial willow production in Phase-2. The Phase-1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boilers, developing fuel supply plans for the project, obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase-2, obtaining construction and environmental permits, and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase-1 requirements the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and developed the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. This past summer 105 acres were prepared in advance for the spring planting in 1998. Having completed the above tasks, the Consortium is well positioned to begin Phase-2. In phase-2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase-2 is to transition the work performed under the Rural Energy for the Future project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.

  5. Development of Ground-testable Phase Fresnel Lenses in Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Krizmanic; Brian Morgan; Robert Streitmatter; Neil Gehrels; Keith Gendreau; Zaven Arzoumanian; Reza Ghodssi; Gerry Skinner

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffractive/refractive optics, such as Phase Fresnel Lenses (PFL's), offer the potential to achieve excellent imaging performance in the x-ray and gamma-ray photon regimes. In principle, the angular resolution obtained with these devices can be diffraction limited. Furthermore, improvements in signal sensitivity can be achieved as virtually the entire flux incident on a lens can be concentrated onto a small detector area. In order to verify experimentally the imaging performance, we have fabricated PFL's in silicon using gray-scale lithography to produce the required Fresnel profile. These devices are to be evaluated in the recently constructed 600-meter x-ray interferometry testbed at NASA/GSFC. Profile measurements of the Fresnel structures in fabricated PFL's have been performed and have been used to obtain initial characterization of the expected PFL imaging efficiencies.

  6. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  7. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, Phase 2, July 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boiler for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase 1 requirements, the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and has initiated development of the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. In Phase 2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow biomass will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase 2 is to transition the work performed under the Biomass Power for Rural Development project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.

  8. Conceptual Design Phase of Project on Design and Development of Airships for Transportation of Goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramu, Palaniappan

    Conceptual Design Phase of Project on Design and Development of Airships for Transportation Team 2 Literature Review 3 Requirements Capture 4 Discussions with Airship Manufacturers 5 Identification of Vendors and Resource Agencies 6 Regulations related to airship design, manufacture

  9. Development of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedev, Pavel

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics were developed, characterized, and evaluated as a potential matrix material for use in light water reactor inert matrix fuel intended for the disposition of plutonium and minor actinides. ...

  10. Development of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedev, Pavel

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics were developed, characterized, and evaluated as a potential matrix material for use in light water reactor inert matrix fuel intended for the disposition of plutonium and minor actinides. Ceramics were...

  11. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLARK,NANCY H.; EIDLER,PHILLIP

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents Phase 2 of a project to design, develop, and test a zinc/bromine battery technology for use in utility energy storage applications. The project was co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Power Technologies through Sandia National Laboratories. The viability of the zinc/bromine technology was demonstrated in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the technology developed during Phase 1 was scaled up to a size appropriate for the application. Batteries were increased in size from 8-cell, 1170-cm{sup 2} cell stacks (Phase 1) to 8- and then 60-cell, 2500-cm{sup 2} cell stacks in this phase. The 2500-cm{sup 2} series battery stacks were developed as the building block for large utility battery systems. Core technology research on electrolyte and separator materials and on manufacturing techniques, which began in Phase 1, continued to be investigated during Phase 2. Finally, the end product of this project was a 100-kWh prototype battery system to be installed and tested at an electric utility.

  12. Phase 1 Development Report for the SESSA Toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Melton, Brad J; Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Exploitation System for Situational Awareness ( SESSA ) tool kit , developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) , is a comprehensive de cision support system for crime scene data acquisition and Sensitive Site Exploitation (SSE). SESSA is an outgrowth of another SNL developed decision support system , the Building R estoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), a hardware/software solution for data acquisition, data management, and data analysis. SESSA was designed to meet forensic crime scene needs as defined by the DoD's Military Criminal Investigation Organiza tion (MCIO) . SESSA is a very comprehensive toolki t with a considerable amount of database information managed through a Microsoft SQL (Structured Query Language) database engine, a Geographical Information System (GIS) engine that provides comprehensive m apping capabilities, as well as a an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI) . An electronic sketch pad module is included. The system also has the ability to efficiently generate necessary forms for forensic crime scene investigations (e.g., evidence submittal, laboratory requests, and scene notes). SESSA allows the user to capture photos on site, and can read and generate ba rcode labels that limit transcription errors. SESSA runs on PC computers running Windows 7, but is optimized for touch - screen tablet computers running Windows for ease of use at crime scenes and on SSE deployments. A prototype system for 3 - dimensional (3 D) mapping and measur e ments was also developed to complement the SESSA software. The mapping system employs a visual/ depth sensor that captures data to create 3D visualizations of an interior space and to make distance measurements with centimeter - level a ccuracy. Output of this 3D Model Builder module provides a virtual 3D %22walk - through%22 of a crime scene. The 3D mapping system is much less expensive and easier to use than competitive systems. This document covers the basic installation and operation of th e SESSA tool kit in order to give the user enough information to start using the tool kit . SESSA is currently a prototype system and this documentation covers the initial release of the tool kit . Funding for SESSA was provided by the Department of Defense (D oD), Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E)) Rapid Fielding (RF) organization. The project was managed by the Defense Forensic Science Center (DFSC) , formerly known as the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory (USACIL) . ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors wish to acknowledge the funding support for the development of the Site Exploitation System for Situational Awareness (SESSA) toolkit from the Department of Defense (DoD), Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E)) Rapid Fielding (RF) organization. The project was managed by the Defense Forensic Science Center (DFSC) , formerly known as the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory (USACIL). Special thanks to Mr. Garold Warner, of DFSC, who served as the Project Manager. Individuals that worked on the design, functional attributes, algorithm development, system arc hitecture, and software programming include: Robert Knowlton, Brad Melton, Robert Anderson, and Wendy Amai.

  13. Granular-bed-filter development program, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillory, J.; Cooper, J.; Ferguson, J.; Goldbach, G.; Placer, F.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-temperature moving bed granular filter (GBF) program at Combustion Power Company (CPC) commenced in 1977. Its purpose was to investigate, for the Department of Energy, the filtration performance of the GBF for application to coal-fired PFBC turbine systems. The GBF test system was successfully operated on 1500/sup 0/F to 1600/sup 0/F gases produced from an atmospheric pressure coal-fired fluidized bed combustor. Overall collection efficiencies above 99% and submicron collection efficiencies above 96% were consistently demonstrated in over 1500 hours of high-temperature testing. Alkali content of the hot gases was also measured to evaluate aluminosilicate additives for controlling alkali emissions. Operational and performance stability under upset conditions (ten times normal inlet loading and 125% of design gas flowrate) was also demonstrated experimentally. A computer-based GBF performance model was developed. It predicts overall particle capture within +- 5%. Gas flow streamlines and isobars are computer generated from theoretical principles and particle capture is based on the most recent empirical models. The effects of elevated pressure on efficiency and filter pressure drop are included in the model. A modular approach was adopted for GBF scale-up to commercial size systems using elements of the same size tested in this program. Elements can be readily packaged into 30,000 acfm modules at a projected equipment cost of approximately $27 per acfm.

  14. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Zhuping; Tillery, Sue; King, Phillip J.; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    &M University Agricultural Research Center at El Paso; Raghavan Srinivasan, Spatial Sciences Laboratory, Texas A&M University; and Alfredo Granados Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Mexico Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A... University New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Texas A&M University Texas Agriculture Experiment Station Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez Centro de Información Geográfica Texas Water Resources Institute THE DEVELOPMENT...

  15. Development of a Dispatchable PV Peak Shainv System. PV: Bonus Program - Phase 1 Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Delmarva Power and Light and its subcontractors in Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy's PV:BONUS Program. The purpose of the program is to develop products and systems for buildings which utilize photovoltaic (N) technology. Beginning with a cooperative research effort with the University of Delaware's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research Delmarva Power developed and demonstrated the concept of Dispatchable PV Peak Shaving. This concept and the system which resulted horn the development work are unique from other grid-connected PV systems because it combines a PV, battery energy storage, power conversion and control technologies into an integrated package. Phase 1 began in July 1993 with the installation of a test and demonstration system at Delmarva's Northern Division General Office building near Newark, Delaware. Following initial testing throughout the summer and fall of 1993, significant modifications were made under an amendment to the DOE contract. Work on Phase 1 concluded in the early spring of 1995. Significant progress towards the goal of commercializing the system was made during Phase 1, and is summarized. Based on progress in Phase 1, a proposal to continue the work in Phase 2 was submitted to the US DOE in May 1995. A contract amendment and providing funds for the Phase 2 work is expected in July 1995.

  16. Focus Sensitive Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsey, Sarah McNearney

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the role of the Focus Sensitive Operators (FSOs) even and also when found inside of a coordination. Coordinations of this form are called Focus Sensitive Coordinations (FSC) and include or even, ...

  17. North Carolina State University | College of Engineering | Raleigh, NC | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu For More Information Contact: Betsy McCorkle, Economic Development Coordinator, NC Solar Center, 919-515-4382, betsy_mccorkle@ncsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Customized Dashboard Presentation Tools The NC Solar Center's Economic Development team offers a wide range Information Contact: Betsy McCorkle, Economic Development Coordinator, NC Solar Center, 919-515-4382, betsy the financial implications of implementing renewable energy projects. The NC Solar Center can assist your

  18. Collective coordinates for nuclear spectral densities in energy transfer and femtosecond spectroscopy of molecular aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Collective coordinates for nuclear spectral densities in energy transfer and femtosecond collective nuclear coordinates necessary to represent a given set of spectral densities is obtained coordinates phase space. The signatures of excitonic and nuclear motions in ultrafast fluorescence

  19. Career Map: Instrumentation Coordinator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Instrumentation Coordinator positions.

  20. Transverse emittance and phase space program developed for use at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Ruan, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab A0 Photoinjector is a 16 MeV high intensity, high brightness electron linac developed for advanced accelerator R&D. One of the key parameters for the electron beam is the transverse beam emittance. Here we report on a newly developed MATLAB based GUI program used for transverse emittance measurements using the multi-slit technique. This program combines the image acquisition and post-processing tools for determining the transverse phase space parameters with uncertainties. An integral part of accelerator research is a measurement of the beam phase space. Measurements of the transverse phase space can be accomplished by a variety of methods including multiple screens separated by drift spaces, or by sampling phase space via pepper pots or slits. In any case, the measurement of the phase space parameters, in particular the emittance, can be drastically simplified and sped up by automating the measurement in an intuitive fashion utilizing a graphical interface. At the A0 Photoinjector (A0PI), the control system is DOOCS, which originated at DESY. In addition, there is a library for interfacing to MATLAB, a graphically capable numerical analysis package sold by The Mathworks. It is this graphical package which was chosen as the basis for a graphical phase space measurement system due to its combination of analysis and display capabilities.

  1. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  2. Liquid Phase Methanol LaPorte Process Development Unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas phase and a slurry phase radioactive tracer study was performed on the 12 ton/day Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process Development Unit (PDU) in LaPorte, Texas. To study the gas phase mixing characteristics, a radioactive argon tracer was injected into the feed gas and residence time distribution was generated by measuring the response at the reactor outlet. Radioactive manganese oxide powder was independently injected into the reactor to measure the slurry phase mixing characteristics. A tanks-in-series model and an axial dispersion model were applied to the data to characterize the mixing in the reactor. From the axial dispersion model, a translation to the number of CSTR's (continuous stirred tank reactors) was made for comparison purposes with the first analysis. Dispersion correlations currently available in the literature were also compared. The tanks-in-series analysis is a simpler model whose results are easily interpreted. However, it does have a few drawbacks; among them, the lack of a reliable method for scaleup of a reactor and no direct correlation between mixing in the slurry and gas phases. The dispersion model allows the mixing in the gas and slurry phases to be characterized separately while including the effects of phase transfer. This analysis offers a means for combining the gas and slurry phase dispersion models into an effective dispersion coefficient, which, in turn, can be related to an equivalent number of tanks-in-series. The dispersion methods reported are recommended for scaleup of a reactor system. 24 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Design Development and Prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, E.; Kessler, B.; Mullens, M.; Rath, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  4. Ontological Semantics of Standards and PLM Repositories in the Product Development Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schröder, Lutz

    Ontological Semantics of Standards and PLM Repositories in the Product Development Phase Marco the large amounts of engineering information stored in contemporary PLM systems, the concept of knowledge based engineering (KBE) can be considered from a PLM perspective. By eventually combining product

  5. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Spring 2012 Solar Collector Research & Development Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Spring 2012 Solar Collector Research, low-maintenance solar collector that can output competitive efficiencies with respect to current solar & Development Phase II Overview Solar Dynamic is a small organization with the hopes of producing an affordable

  6. COORDINATORS Coordination Managers for First Responders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Thomas

    Guralnik Ryan VanRiper Honeywell Laboratories Tom.Wagner@honeywell.com Abstract COORDINATORs) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) under agree- ment number F30602-03-C-0010 and by Honeywell or Honeywell Interna- tional. Figure 1. A Single COORDINATOR Running on an Off-The-Shelf Wireless PDA helping

  7. Olefin Metatheses in Metal Coordination Spheres: Development of Gyroscope-like trans-Spanning Bis(pyridine) Complexes and Organometallic pi-Adducts of Conjugated Polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeits, Paul

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The olefin metathesis reaction has become one of the most powerful carbon-carbon bond forming reaction in synthetic chemistry. This work has expanded the utility of olefin metathesis in metal coordination spheres in three ...

  8. Hand Eye Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speckert, Glen

    This paper describes a simple method of converting visual coordinates to arm coordinates which does not require knowledge of the position of the camera(s). Comparisons are made to other methods and two camera, three ...

  9. Granular bed filter development program, Phase II. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moresco, L. L.; Ferguson, J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I included the development of a mathematical model, a cold flow parametric test series in a 0.746 Nm/sup 3//s GBF, and investigations of potential dust plugging problems at the inlet screen. Collection efficiencies of 99% and filter outlet loadings less than 0.0074 g/m/sup 3/ were demonstrated. The objectives of Phase II are to investigate the effects of elevated temperature and coal combustion particulate on GBF filtration performance; to update the analytical model developed in Phase I to reflect high temperature effects; to optimize filter internal configuration; to perform parametric and long duration tests to characterize the effects of filter design improvements on filtration efficiencies. Hot flow testing to date has confirmed that the GBF configured with inlet and outlet screens has exhibited a tendency for extensive and irreversible ash plugging. The potential advantages of a screenless configuration, having higher filtration efficiency, has been confirmed. This report describes the continuation of work pertinent to the development and design improvement of the GBF system, specifically addressing: (1) the development of governing equations derived for the 3-dimensional GBF mathematical model; (2) the initial results of subcontracted experiments to establish correlations of particulate capture mechanisms for use in the numerical 3-dimensional model; and (3) the design and physical modifications incorporated into the Model 4 GBF hot test setup for the final series of hot gas tests.

  10. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  11. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  12. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  13. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work done under Phase I, the moisture tolerance testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The following coals were used in the test program: Western Bituminous (Utah), Eastern Bituminous (Pennsylvania), North Dakota Lignite, Sub-Bituminous (Montana), and Eastern Bituminous coal mixed with 20-percent Limestone. The coals were initially tested at the as-received moisture level and subsequently tested after surface moisture was added by water spray. Test results and recommendations for future research and development work are presented.

  14. PHASE I MATERIALS PROPERTY DATABASE DEVELOPMENT FOR ASME CODES AND STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Lin, Lianshan [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes and Standard (BPVC) in modern information era, development of a web-based materials property database is initiated under the supervision of ASME Committee on Materials. To achieve efficiency, the project heavily draws upon experience from development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook and the Nuclear System Materials Handbook. The effort is divided into two phases. Phase I is planned to deliver a materials data file warehouse that offers a depository for various files containing raw data and background information, and Phase II will provide a relational digital database that provides advanced features facilitating digital data processing and management. Population of the database will start with materials property data for nuclear applications and expand to data covering the entire ASME Code and Standards including the piping codes as the database structure is continuously optimized. The ultimate goal of the effort is to establish a sound cyber infrastructure that support ASME Codes and Standards development and maintenance.

  15. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to design a pump for a trough solar power plant system, the intent is for the design to be extensible to a solar power tower application. This can be accomplished by adding pumping stages to increase the discharge pressure to the levels necessary for a solar power tower application. This report incorporates all available conceptual design information completed for this project in Phase I.

  16. Development and evaluation of a workpiece temperature analyzer (WPTA) for industrial furances (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is directed toward the research, development, and evaluation of a viable commercial product-a workpiece temperature measurement analyzer (WPTA) for fired furnaces based on unique radiation properties of surfaces. This WPTA will provide for more uniform, higher quality products and reduce product rejects as well as permit the optimum use of energy. The WPTA may also be utilized in control system applications including metal heat treating, forging furnaces, and ceramic firing furnaces. A large market also exists in the chemical process and refining industry. WPTA applications include the verification of product temperature/time cycles, and use as a front-end sensor for automatic feedback control systems. This report summarizes the work performed in Phase 1 of this three-phase project. The work Phase 1 included the application evaluation; the evaluation of present technologies and limitations; and the development of a preliminary conceptual WPTA design, including identification of technical and economic benefits. Recommendations based on the findings of this report include near-term enhancement of the capabilities of the Pyrolaser, and long-term development of an instrument based on Raman Spectroscopy. Development of the Pyrofiber, fiberoptics version of the Pyrolaser, will be a key to solving present problems involving specularity, measurement angle, and costs of multipoint measurement. Extending the instrument's measurement range to include temperatures below 600{degrees}C will make the product useful for a wider range of applications. The development of Raman Spectroscopy would result in an instrument that could easily be adapted to incorporate a wealth of additional nondestructive analytical capabilities, including stress/stain indication, crystallography, species concentrations, corrosion studies, and catalysis studies, in addition to temperature measurement. 9 refs., 20 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I, Final report, November 1, 1993--February 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase 1 activities were primarily aimed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emissions control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal.

  18. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the first half year (October 1, 2000-March 31, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

  19. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidler, Phillip

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zinc/Bromine Load-Leveling Battery Development contract (No. 40-8965) was partitioned at the outset into two phases of equal length. Phase 1 started in September 1990 and continued through December 1991. In Phase 1, zinc/bromine battery technology was to be advanced to the point that it would be clear that the technology was viable and would be an appropriate choice for electric utilities wishing to establish stationary energy-storage facilities. Criteria were established that addressed most of the concerns that had been observed in the previous development efforts. The performances of 8-cell and 100-cell laboratory batteries demonstrated that the criteria were met or exceeded. In Phase 2, 100-kWh batteries will be built and demonstrated, and a conceptual design for a load-leveling plant will be presented. At the same time, work will continue to identify improved assembly techniques and operating conditions. This report details the results of the efforts carried out in Phase 1. The highlights are: (1) Four 1-kWh stacks achieved over 100 cycles, One l-kWh stack achieved over 200 cycles, One 1-kWh stack achieved over 300 cycles; (2) Less than 10% degradation in performance occurred in the four stacks that achieved over 100 cycles; (3) The battery used for the zinc loading investigation exhibited virtually no loss in performance for loadings up to 130 mAh/cm{sup 2}; (4) Charge-current densities of 50 ma/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in minicells; (5) Fourteen consecutive no-strip cycles have been conducted on the stack with 300+ cycles; (6) A mass and energy balance spreadsheet that describes battery operation was completed; (7) Materials research has continued to provide improvements in the electrode, activation layer, and separator; and (8) A battery made of two 50-cell stacks (15 kWh) was produced and delivered to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for testing. The most critical development was the ability to assemble a battery stack that remained leak free. The task of sealing the battery stack using vibration welding has undergone significant improvement resulting in a viable production process. Through several design iterations, a solid technology base for larger battery stack designs was established. Internal stack stresses can now be modeled, in addition to fluid velocity and fluid pressure distribution, through the use of a finite element analysis computer program. Additionally, the Johnson Controls Battery Group, Inc. (JCBGI) proprietary FORTRAN model has been improved significantly, enabling accurate performance predictions. This modeling was used to improve the integrity and performance of the battery stacks, and should be instrumental in reducing the turnaround time from concept to assembly.

  20. Coordinators Help Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everything is done electronically using e-mail notification and simple web-based tools. As a Coordinator your principal activity will be to screen eprints submitted ...

  1. DOE SBIR Phase-1 Report on Hybrid CPU-GPU Parallel Development of the Eulerian-Lagrangian Barracuda Multiphase Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Dale M. Snider

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the result from the Phase-1 work on demonstrating greater than 10x speedup of the Barracuda computer program using parallel methods and GPU processors (General-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit or Graphics Processing Unit). Phase-1 demonstrated a 12x speedup on a typical Barracuda function using the GPU processor. The problem test case used about 5 million particles and 250,000 Eulerian grid cells. The relative speedup, compared to a single CPU, increases with increased number of particles giving greater than 12x speedup. Phase-1 work provided a path for reformatting data structure modifications to give good parallel performance while keeping a friendly environment for new physics development and code maintenance. The implementation of data structure changes will be in Phase-2. Phase-1 laid the ground work for the complete parallelization of Barracuda in Phase-2, with the caveat that implemented computer practices for parallel programming done in Phase-1 gives immediate speedup in the current Barracuda serial running code. The Phase-1 tasks were completed successfully laying the frame work for Phase-2. The detailed results of Phase-1 are within this document. In general, the speedup of one function would be expected to be higher than the speedup of the entire code because of I/O functions and communication between the algorithms. However, because one of the most difficult Barracuda algorithms was parallelized in Phase-1 and because advanced parallelization methods and proposed parallelization optimization techniques identified in Phase-1 will be used in Phase-2, an overall Barracuda code speedup (relative to a single CPU) is expected to be greater than 10x. This means that a job which takes 30 days to complete will be done in 3 days. Tasks completed in Phase-1 are: Task 1: Profile the entire Barracuda code and select which subroutines are to be parallelized (See Section Choosing a Function to Accelerate) Task 2: Select a GPU consultant company and jointly parallelize subroutines (CPFD chose the small business EMPhotonics for the Phase-1 the technical partner. See Section Technical Objective and Approach) Task 3: Integrate parallel subroutines into Barracuda (See Section Results from Phase-1 and its subsections) Task 4: Testing, refinement, and optimization of parallel methodology (See Section Results from Phase-1 and Section Result Comparison Program) Task 5: Integrate Phase-1 parallel subroutines into Barracuda and release (See Section Results from Phase-1 and its subsections) Task 6: Roadmap of Phase-2 (See Section Plan for Phase-2) With the completion of Phase 1 we have the base understanding to completely parallelize Barracuda. An overview of the work to move Barracuda to a parallelized code is given in Plan for Phase-2.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND CALIBRATION OF A TWO-DYE FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM FOR USE IN TWO-PHASE MICRO FLOW THERMOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    The increasing need for more effective cooling in electronic devices has led to research into the useDEVELOPMENT AND CALIBRATION OF A TWO-DYE FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM FOR USE IN TWO-PHASE MICRO FLOW and modeling of two- phase cooling strategies in micro-scale geometries. In order to verify these models

  3. Observed Synoptic-Scale Variability during the Developing Phase of an ISO over the Indian Ocean during MISMO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    Observed Synoptic-Scale Variability during the Developing Phase of an ISO over the Indian Ocean A case study of an intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) is investigated in the period leading up to its for a convectively active phase of the ISO. The prominent shallow heating during this period may explain the rather

  4. Development and validation of a two-phase, three-dimensional model for PEM fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To develop and validate a two-phase, three-dimensional transport modelfor simulating PEM fuel cell performance under a wide range of operating conditions; (2) To apply the validated PEM fuel cell model to improve fundamental understanding of key phenomena involved and to identify rate-limiting steps and develop recommendations for improvements so as to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell technology; (3) The validated PEMFC model can be employed to improve and optimize PEM fuel cell operation. Consequently, the project helps: (i) address the technical barriers on performance, cost, and durability; and (ii) achieve DOE's near-term technical targets on performance, cost, and durability in automotive and stationary applications.

  5. Development and Analysis of a Block-Preconditioner for the Phase-Field Crystal Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Praetorius, Simon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a preconditioner for the linear system arising from a finite element discretization of the Phase Field Crystal (PFC) equation. The PFC model serves as an atomic description of crystalline materials on diffusive time scales and thus offers the opportunity to study long time behaviour of materials with atomic details. This requires adaptive time stepping and efficient time discretization schemes, for which we use an embedded Rosenbrock scheme. To resolve spatial scales of practical relevance, parallel algorithms are also required, which scale to large numbers of processors. The developed preconditioner provides such a tool. It is based on an approximate factorization of the system matrix and can be implemented efficiently. The preconditioner is analyzed in detail and shown to speed up the computation drastically.

  6. On-line chemical composition analyzer development. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Garrison, A.A.; Muly, E.C.; Moore, C.F.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumed in distillation processes in the United States represents nearly three percent of the total national energy consumption. If effective control of distillation columns can be accomplished, it has been estimated that it would result in a reduction in the national energy consumption of 0.3%. Real-time control based on mixture composition could achieve these savings. However, the major distillation processes represent diverse applications and at present there does not exist a proven on-line chemical composition sensor technology which can be used to control these diverse processes in real-time. This report presents a summary of the findings of the second phase of a three phase effort undertaken to develop an on-line real-time measurement and control system utilizing Raman spectroscopy. A prototype instrument system has been constructed utilizing a Perkin Elmer 1700 Spectrometer, a diode pumped YAG laser, two three axis positioning systems, a process sample cell land a personal computer. This system has been successfully tested using industrially supplied process samples to establish its performance. Also, continued application development was undertaken during this Phase of the program using both the spontaneous Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman modes of operation. The study was performed for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, whose mission is to conduct cost-shared R&D for new high-risk, high-payoff industrial energy conservation technologies. Although this document contains references to individual manufacturers and their products, the opinions expressed on the products reported do not necessarily reflect the position of the Department of Energy.

  7. Development of the Solid State X-band Radar and the Phased Array Radar System in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Development of the Solid State X-band Radar and the Phased Array Radar System in Japan By DR. TOMOO array radar system have been developed. Toshiba has developed the latest model of weather radar of precipitation and to achieve drastic reduction of its size and life cycle cost. It is now well known

  8. Track Co-ordinators Guide Track Co-ordinators Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Track Co-ordinators Guide CERN #12;Track Co-ordinators Guide by CERN #12;Table of Contents 1. Track Co-ordinators Guide ..................................................................................................................1 1.1. Track Co

  9. Session Co-ordinator's Session Co-ordinator's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session Co-ordinator's Guide CERN #12;Session Co-ordinator's Guide by CERN #12;Table of Contents 1. Session Co-ordinators Guide ................................................................................................................1 1.1. Session Co

  10. EIA and green procurement: Opportunities for strengthening their coordination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uttam, Kedar, E-mail: kedar@kth.se [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Faith-Ell, Charlotta, E-mail: charlotta.faith-ell@WSPGroup.se [WSP Sweden (Sweden); Balfors, Berit, E-mail: balfors@kth.se [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA plays an important role in enhancing the environmental performance of the construction sector. In recent years, the construction sector has been developing green procurement practices. Green procurement is a process that involves the incorporation of environmental requirements during the procurement of services and products. However, discussion on green procurement is rarely seen during the EIA phase. This paper addresses possible opportunities for improving the coordination between EIA and green procurement within the construction sector. The linking of EIA and green procurement has been postulated in the paper as an aid to strengthen the coordination between project planning and implementation. The paper is based on a literature review and is an outcome of an on-going research project concerning EIA and green procurement. This study indicated that it would be appropriate to introduce green procurement during the pre-decision phase of an EIA. In the present study, the opportunities for integrating green procurement at the stage of EIA are associated with the integration of project planning and EIA. Future research should investigate the mechanism through which the link can be established. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper identifies opportunities to link EIA and green procurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pre-decision phase of EIA could be appropriate for planning green procurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future research should investigate the mechanism for establishing the link.

  11. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  12. Development of ASME performance test code 12.5, single phase heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lestina, T. [MPR Associates, Alexandria, VA (United States); Scott, B. [Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Lusby, MD (United States). Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of heat exchanger performance is conducted to (1) confirm that the installed unit meets design specifications, (2) troubleshoot degradation, and (3) assess process improvements. Standard test methods are needed to ensure that highly accurate and reliable test results are obtained. These methods need to predict heat exchanger performance at design conditions based on test measurements at different conditions. ASME Performance Test Code 12.5, Single Phase Heat Exchangers, is under development to meet these needs. This paper summarizes the content of PTC 12.5 which is ready for industry review. The new PTC improves upon existing guidelines because methods to minimize and quantify uncertainty are provided. Overall uncertainty as low as 8% in heat transfer rate and overall heat transfer coefficient is possible for a well designed and properly instrumented thermal performance test.

  13. Water Use Optimization Toolset Project: Development and Demonstration Phase Draft Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasper, John R. [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Veselka, Thomas D. [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Mahalik, Matthew R. [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Hayse, John W. [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Saha, Samrat [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Wigmosta, Mark S. [PNNL] [PNNL; Voisin, Nathalie [PNNL] [PNNL; Rakowski, Cynthia [PNNL] [PNNL; Coleman, Andre [PNNL] [PNNL; Lowry, Thomas S. [SNL] [SNL

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the development and demonstration phase of the Water Use Optimization Toolset (WUOT) project. It identifies the objective and goals that guided the project, as well as demonstrating potential benefits that could be obtained by applying the WUOT in different geo-hydrologic systems across the United States. A major challenge facing conventional hydropower plants is to operate more efficiently while dealing with an increasingly uncertain water-constrained environment and complex electricity markets. The goal of this 3-year WUOT project, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is to improve water management, resulting in more energy, revenues, and grid services from available water, and to enhance environmental benefits from improved hydropower operations and planning while maintaining institutional water delivery requirements. The long-term goal is for the WUOT to be used by environmental analysts and deployed by hydropower schedulers and operators to assist in market, dispatch, and operational decisions.

  14. Development of viscometers for kraft black liquor. Summary report, Phase 2 and 2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, A.L.; Crisalle, O.D.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the on-line prototype viscometers for kraft black liquors carried out at the Pilot Plant facilities of the University of Florida. The original plan called for the evaluation of five prototype on-line viscometers along with laboratory bench versions. At a later stage in the project an additional experimental prototype under development at Southwest Research Institute was added. The viscometers are evaluated for accuracy and repeatability under varying process conditions, such as black liquor species, solids content, temperature, flow rate, and contaminants, as well as for maintenance and reliability. This document reports extensive results of the evaluations and recommendations for design modifications and for the installation of the instruments in industrial pulping mills for further field evaluations in Phase 3 of the project. The report also documents relevant details of the final design of the pilot flow loop used to support the experiments.

  15. Development and proof-testing of advanced absorption refrigeration cycle concepts. Report on Phases 1 and 1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modahl, R.J.; Hayes, F.C. [Trane Co., La Crosse, WI (United States). Applied Unitary/Refrigeration Systems Div.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate, develop, and proof-test advanced absorption refrigeration cycles that are applicable to residential and commercial heat pumps for space conditioning. The heat pump system is to be direct-fired with natural gas and is to use absorption working fluids whose properties are known. Target coefficients of performance (COPs) are 1.6 at 47{degrees}F and 1.2 at 17{degrees} in the heating mode, and 0.7 at 95{degree}F in the cooling mode, including the effect of flue losses. The project is divided into three phases. Phase I entailed the analytical evaluation of advanced cycles and included the selection of preferred concepts for further development. Phase II involves the development and testing of critical components and of a complete laboratory breadboard version of the selected system. Phase III calls for the development of a prototype unit and is contingent on the successful completion of Phase II. This report covers Phase I work on the project. In Phase 1, 24 advanced absorption cycle/fluid combinations were evaluated, and computer models were developed to predict system performance. COP, theoretical pump power, and internal heat exchange were calculated for each system, and these calculations were used as indicators of operating and installed costs in order to rank the relative promise of each system. The highest ranking systems involve the cycle concept of absorber/generator heat exchange, generator heat exchanger/absorber heat exchange, regeneration, and resorption/desorption, in combination with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary absorption fluid mixture or with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary solution. Based upon these conclusions, the recommendation was made to proceed to Phase II, the laboratory breadboard proof-of- concept.

  16. Research & Development of Materials/Processing Methods for Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Phase 2 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szweda, A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Initiative that begun in 1992 has led the way for Industry, Academia, and Government to carry out a 10 year R&D plan to develop CFCCs for these industrial applications. In Phase II of this program, Dow Corning has led a team of OEM's, composite fabricators, and Government Laboratories to develop polymer derived CFCC materials and processes for selected industrial applications. During this phase, Dow Corning carried extensive process development and representative component demonstration activities on gas turbine components, chemical pump components and heat treatment furnace components.

  17. Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Zogg

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering will be available in the U.S. is unclear. Third, these products are typically not designed for use in households having forced hot-air heating, which is the dominant heating system in the U.S. The U.S. market will also require a major manufacturer that has the reputation and brand recognition, low-cost manufacturing capability, distribution, sales, and service infrastructure, and marketing power to achieve significant market size with a previously unknown and unproven product. History has proven time and time again that small-to-medium-size manufacturers do not have the resources and capabilities to achieve significant markets with such products. During the Phase I effort, the Team developed a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system that addresses key DOE and U.S. market needs: (1) Provides emergency power adequate for critical household loads, with none of the key drawbacks associated with typical, low-cost emergency generators, such as liquid fuel storage, inability to power ''hard-wired'' loads, need to run temporary extension cords for plug loads, manual set up required, susceptibility to overload, and risk of failure due to lack of maintenance and infrequent operation; (2) Requires no special skills to install--plumbers, electricians and HVAC technicians will typically have all necessary skills; (3) Can be used with the major residential fuels in the U.S., including natural gas and propane, and can be easily adapted to fuel oil as well as emerging fuels as they become available; and (4) Significantly reduces household energy consumption and energy costs.

  18. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  19. Gridlock: A Policy Analysis of Siting and Coordination of Interstate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Siting and Coordination of Interstate Transmission Line Development in the Upper Midwest Authors Chet Bodin, Megan Hoye and Erik Sowers Organizations Great Plains...

  20. Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid Passenger-Vehicle Development Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat engine/electric hybrid vehicles offer the potential of greatly reduced petroleum consumption, compared to conventional vehicles, without the disadvantages of limited performance and operating range associated with purely electric vehicles. This report documents a hybrid-vehicle design approach which is aimed at the development of the technology required to achieve this potential - in such a way that it is transferable to the auto industry in the near term. The development of this design approach constituted Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid-Vehicle Program. The major tasks in this program were: (1) Mission Analysis and Performance Specification Studies; (2) Design Tradeoff Studies; and (3) Preliminary Design. Detailed reports covering each of these tasks are included as appendices to this report and issued under separate cover; a fourth task, Sensitivity Studies, is also included in the report on the Design Tradeoff Studies. Because of the detail with which these appendices cover methodology and both interim and final results, the body of this report was prepared as a brief executive summary of the program activities and results, with appropriate references to the detailed material in the appendices.

  1. Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State University. Prior to the current scale-up activity, considerable effort has gone in to adapting the MFIX code to incorporate the unique features of fuel coating reactors and also in validating the resulting simulation features with experimental observations. Much of this work is documented in previous AGR reports and publications (Pannala et al., 2004, Pannala et al., 2005, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005a, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005b and Finney et al., 2005). As a result of the previous work described above, the ORNL coater model now has the capability for simulating full spatio-temporal details of the gas-particle hydrodynamics and gas-particle heat and mass transfer in the TRISO coater. This capability provides a great deal of information about many of the processes believed to control quality, but the model is not yet sufficiently developed to fully predict coating quality for any given coater design and/or set of operating conditions because the detailed chemical reaction kinetics needed to make the model fully predictive are not yet available. Nevertheless, the model at its current stage of development already provides the most comprehensive and detailed quantitative information available about gas flows, solid flows, temperatures, and species inside the coater during operation. This level of information ought to be highly useful in expediting the scale-up process (e.g., in correlating observations and minimizing the number of pilot-scale tests required). However, previous work had not yet demonstrated that the typical design and/or operating changes known to affect product quality at the lab scale could be clearly discriminated by the existing model. The Modeling Scale-Up Phase I work was initiated to produce such a demonstration, and two detailed examples are discussed in this report.

  2. Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert Zauderer

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

  3. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

    2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a five-year (1997-2002) grant (Mohan and Shoham, DE-FG26-97BC15024, 1997) to The University of Tulsa, to develop compact multiphase separation components for 3-phase flow. The research activities of this project have been conducted through cost sharing by the member companies of the Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) research consortium and the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST). As part of this project, several individual compact separation components have been developed for onshore and offshore applications. These include gas-liquid cylindrical cyclones (GLCC{copyright}), liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclones (LLCC{copyright}), and the gas-liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclones (GLLCC{copyright}). A detailed study has also been completed for the liquid-liquid hydrocyclones (LLHC). Appropriate control strategies have been developed for proper operation of the GLCC{copyright} and LLCC{copyright}. Testing of GLCC{copyright} at high pressure and real crude conditions for field applications is also completed. Limited studies have been conducted on flow conditioning devices to be used upstream of the compact separators for performance improvement. This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the 5-year project period, October 1, 1997-March 31, 2003 (including the no-cost extended period of 6 months). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the 5-year budget periods. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section, followed by relevant references. The publications resulting from this study in the form of MS Theses, Ph.D. Dissertation, Journal Papers and Conference Presentations are provided at the end of this report.

  4. Rotation-Enabled 7-Degree of Freedom Seismometer for Geothermal Resource Development Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, Bob; Laughlin, Darren

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant, A-Tech Corporation d.b.a. Applied Technology Associates (ATA), seeks to develop a seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) seismic measurement tool for high-temperature geothermal applications. The Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer includes a conventional tri-axial accelerometer, a conventional pressure sensor or hydrophone, and a tri-axial rotational sensor. The rotational sensing capability is novel, based upon ATA?s innovative research in rotational sensing technologies. The geothermal industry requires tools for high-precision seismic monitoring of crack formation associated with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) stimulation activity. Currently, microseismic monitoring is conducted by deploying many seismic tools at different depth levels along a ?string? within drilled observation wells. Costs per string can be hundreds of thousands of dollars. Processing data from the spatial arrays of linear seismometers allows back-projection of seismic wave states. In contrast, a Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer would simultaneously measure p-wave velocity, s-wave velocity, and incident seismic wave direction all from a single point measurement. In addition, the Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer will, by its nature, separate p- and s-waves into different data streams, simplifying signal processing and facilitating analysis of seismic source signatures and geological characterization. By adding measurements of three additional degrees-of-freedom at each level and leveraging the information from this new seismic observable, it is likely that an equally accurate picture of subsurface seismic activity could be garnered with fewer levels per hole. The key cost savings would come from better siting of the well due to increased information content and a decrease in the number of confirmation wells drilled, also due to the increase in information per well. Improved seismic tools may also increase knowledge, understanding, and confidence, thus removing some current blocks to feasibility and significantly increasing access to potential geothermal sites. During the Phase 1 effort summarized in this final report, the ATA Team modeled and built two TRL 3 proof-of-concept test units for two competing rotational sensor technologies. The two competing technologies were based on ATA?s angular rate and angular displacement measurement technologies: ? Angular rate: ATA?s Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor (Seismic MHD) ? Angular displacement: ATA?s Low Frequency Improved Torsional Seismometer (LFITS) In order to down-select between these two technologies and formulate a go / no go decision, the ATA Team analyzed and traded scientific performance requirements and market constraints against sensor characteristics and components, acquiring field data where possible to validate the approach and publishing results from these studies of rotational technology capability. Based on the results of Phase 1, the ATA Team finds that the Seismic MHD (SMHD) technology is the best choice for enabling rotational seismometry and significant technical potential exists for micro-seismic monitoring using a downhole 7-DOF device based on the SMHD. Recent technical papers and field data confirm the potential of rotational sensing for seismic mapping, increasing confidence that cost-reduction benefits are achievable for EGS. However, the market for geothermal rotational sensing is small and undeveloped. As a result, this report recommends modifying the Phase 2 plan to focus on prototype development aimed at partnering with early adopters within the geothermal industry and the scientific research community. The highest public benefit will come from development and deployment of a science-grade SMHD rotational seismometer engineered for geothermal downhole conditions and an integrated test tool for downhole measurements at active geothermal test sites.

  5. Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 2, Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second volume of the Phase 1 report and discusses the 10 tasks performed in Phase 1. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for setting energy design targets to provide voluntary guidelines for the buildings industry. The whole-building energy targets project is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage the construction of energy-efficient buildings by informing designers and owners about cost-effective goals for energy use in new commercial buildings. The outcome of this research will be a flexible methodology for setting such targets. The tasks are listed and discussed in this report as follows: Task 1 - Develop Detailed Project Goals and Objectives; Task 2 - Establish Buildings-Industry Liaison; Task 3 - Develop Approaches to the Energy Targets Model, Building Operations, and Climate; Task 4 - Develop an Approach for Treating Economic Considerations; Task 5 - Develop an Approach for Treating Energy Sources; Task 6 - Collect Energy-Use Data; Task 7 - Survey Energy Expert Opinion; Task 8 - Evaluation Procedure Specification and Integration; Task 9 - Phase 1 Report Development; and Task 10 - Phase 1 Review Planning.

  6. Abstract Coordinate Transforms in Kinematic Changeable Sets and their Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ya. I. Grushka

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the fundamental postulates of the special relativity theory is existence of a single system of universal coordinate transforms for inertial reference frames, that is coordinate transforms, which are uniquely determined by space-time coordinates of a material point. In this paper the abstract mathematical theory of coordinate transforms in kinematic changeable sets is developed. In particular it is proved the formal possibility of existence of kinematics, which do not allow universal coordinate transforms. Such kinematics may be applied for simulation the evolution of physical systems under the condition of hypothesis on existence of particle-dependent velocity of light.

  7. Boosted object hardware trigger development and testing for the Phase I upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Giordon Holtsberg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Feature Extraction (gFEX) module is a Level 1 jet trigger system planned for installation in ATLAS during the Phase 1 upgrade in 2018. The gFEX selects large-radius jets for capturing Lorentz-boosted objects by means of wide-area jet algorithms refined by subjet information. The architecture of the gFEX permits event-by-event local pile-up suppression for these jets using the same subtraction techniques developed for offline analyses. The gFEX architecture is also suitable for other global event algorithms such as missing transverse energy (MET), centrality for heavy ion collisions, and "jets without jets". The gFEX will use 4 processor FPGAs to perform calculations on the incoming data and a Hybrid APU-FPGA for slow control of the module. The gFEX is unique in both design and implementation and substantially enhance the selectivity of the L1 trigger and increases sensitivity to key physics channels.

  8. Structural Composites Industries 4 kilowatt wind system development. Phase I: design and analysis, technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machine to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. The Phase I effort began in November, 1979 and was carried through the Final Design Review in February 1981. During this period extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating the following unique features: Composite Blades; Free-Standing Composite Tower; Torque-Actuated Blade Pitch Control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

  9. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO/sub 2/ tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study.

  10. Development of a near-bit MWD system. Phase 2 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, W.J. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Pittard, G.T. [Guided Boring Systems, Inc. (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program objective was to develop a Near-Bit Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) system which collects borehole directional data and formation parameters directly at the drill bit-rock interface and transmits this information electromagnetically to a distant receiver located some 50--100 feet above the bit. The system is to be designed to work with positive-displacement motors and stabilized bottomhole assemblies from all manufacturers and to pass its data message to third party steering tools and conventional MWD telemetry systems for subsequent transmission to the surface. The basic design of the Near-Bit MWD system is based upon commercially successful AccuNav{reg_sign} EM MWD guidance system. This system is widely employed in under-river utility crossings and environmental remediation activities. The system has been demonstrated to be accurate and extremely reliable in these applications. The Phase 2 objective was to incorporate a formation-measuring sensor and to assess the system performance and reliability in a series of field experiments. Based on the results of these tests, final design modifications were to be implemented in support of commercialization. The genesis for a Near-Bit MWD system which can be operated with commercial MWD or wireline steering tools and bottomhole directional assemblies responds to the need for enhanced information to support directional drilling operations in general, and horizontal drilling in particular.

  11. Coordinating and promoting effective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 I Coordinating and promoting effective protection and restoration of fish, wildlife Nation Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks National Marine Fisheries Service Nez Perce Tribe Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shoshone

  12. Block coordination copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  13. Block coordination copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G.; Matzger, Adam J.; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  14. Block coordination copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  15. Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development concept stage report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1985, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has managed the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Building Technologies (formerly the Office of Buildings and Community Systems). The primary focus of the Targets project is to develop a flexible methodology for buildings industry use in setting energy performance guidelines for commercial buildings and for determining compliance with those guidelines. The project is being conducted as a two-phase effort. In Phase 1, Planning, the project team determined the research that was necessary for developing the Targets methodology. In the concept stage of Phase 2, Development, the team sought to define the technical and software development concepts upon which the overall Targets methodology will be based. The concept stage work is documented in four volumes, of which this summary volume is the first. The three other volumes are Volume 2: Technical Concept Development Task Reports, Volume 3: Workshop Summaries, and Volume 4: Software Concept Development Task Reports. 8 refs., 14 figs.

  16. Demonology in Ancient Egypt History and Developments during the Later Phases of Pharaonic History and the Greco-Roman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Demonology in Ancient Egypt History and Developments during the Later Phases of Pharaonic History and the Greco-Roman Period. Rita Lucarelli In this paper the meaning and function of demons in ancient Egypt have been outlined and a few central issues concerning demonology of Pharaonic and Greco-Roman Egypt

  17. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume V. Component development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, C.; McBee, W.; Matthews, H.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental inventions which motivate this program are system concepts centered on a novel heat engine cycle and the use of downwell heat exchange. Here, the primary emphasis is on downwell hardware. The only surface equipment included is the surface portion of the instrumentation and control systems. Downwell instrumentation is reported. Downwell conduits and techniques for installing, connecting and sealing them are covered. The downwell turbine-pump unit (TPU) is a critical component since it is relatively inaccessible and operates in a hostile environment. Its development is reported. The TPU for the gravity-head system requires a different type of turbine because of the large flow-rate through it and the small pressure difference across it. The design study for a Francis turbine to meet these requirements is reported. A feature of these systems is use of a downwell heat exchanger. There were extensive studies of tube-bundle configuration, tube-sheet seals, structural integrity, and flow and heat transfer, as well as the research on welded connections and sliding elastomeric seals. Another innovative component in these systems is the enthalpy recovery unit (ERU). This direct-contact heat exchanger compensates for under-cooling in the condenser and superheat in the main turbine exhaust.

  18. Closure development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository; Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robitz, E.S. Jr.; McAninch, M.D. Jr.; Edmonds, D.P. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (USA). Nuclear Power Div.]|[Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (USA). Research and Development Div.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes Phase 1 activities for closure development of the high-level nuclear waste package task for the tuff repository. Work was conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract 9172105, administered through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), funded through the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The goal of this phase was to select five closure processes for further evaluation in later phases of the program. A decision tree methodology was utilized to perform an objective evaluation of 15 potential closure processes. Information was gathered via a literature survey, industrial contacts, and discussions with project team members, other experts in the field, and the LLNL waste package task staff. The five processes selected were friction welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and plasma arc welding. These are felt to represent the best combination of weldment material properties and process performance in a remote, radioactive environment. Conceptual designs have been generated for these processes to illustrate how they would be implemented in practice. Homopolar resistance welding was included in the Phase 1 analysis, and developments in this process will be monitored via literature in Phases 2 and 3. Work was conducted in accordance with the YMP Quality Assurance Program. 223 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Vertical Phasing as a Corporate Real Estate Strategy and Development Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guma, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential value of significant vertical phasing – that is, the addition of five or more stories to an existing building – as a valuable real option in real estate ...

  20. Development of Apple Workgroup Cluster and Parallel Computing for Phase Field Model of Magnetic Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yongxin

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    using MPI. The results show the cluster system can simultaneously support up to 32 processes for MPI program with high performance of interprocess communication. The parallel computations of phase field model of magnetic materials implemented by a MPI...

  1. Development and analysis of a flexible signal phasing strategy for diamond interchange control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Gregory David

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many signal timing strategies for diamond interchanges. Due to the different geometric and traffic conditions, however, none of the available strategies is always optimal. The two most widely used strategies, three-phase, and four...

  2. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

    1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

  3. Policy Network Approach to Coordinated Disaster Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwang Deok

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we explore the formation of network relationships among disaster relief agencies during the process of responding to an unexpected event. The relationship is investigated through variables derived from the policy network theory, and four cases from three developed countries such as (i) Hurricane Katrina in the US; (ii) Typhoon Maemi in South Korea; (iii) Kobe; and, (iv) Tohoku Earthquake in Japan that failed to cope with extreme events forms the basis for case study presented here. We argue that structural characteristics of multi-jurisdictional coordination may facilitate or impede in responding to a complex nature of recent disaster. We further highlight the promise of policy network approach in facilitating the development of multi-jurisdictional coordination process which may provide new avenue to improve the communication and coordination of hierarchical command control driven organizations with the local community. Our proposed novel approach in investigating the usefulness of network app...

  4. Student Leadership Program Coordinator Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Student Leadership Program Coordinator Application Summer 2012 ­ Spring 2013 Please direct all (Preferable Start Date 7/1) ____ Leadership Events and Training Program Coordinator (Preferable Start Date 7 leadership skills do you hope to strengthen from a Student Leadership Program Coordinator position? 2

  5. Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

    2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

  6. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  7. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  8. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an existing collaborative process through which new and existing technologies and management systems Committee (SRWQPC) promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adaptedSouthern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress

  9. Coordinating and Motivating open source contributors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Coordinating and Motivating open source contributors Workshop @ LinuxWorldAsia James Howison School Science at University of New South Wales 4th year of my PhD at Syracuse University Prof. Crowston Interviews, surveys and studies of development archives ApacheCon, O'Reilly OSCon, FOOCamp, OSDC

  10. Coordinated Management: Power, Performance, Energy, and Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keckler, Stephen W.

    Coordinated Management: Power, Performance, Energy, and Temperature Heather Hanson Stephen W and energy lim- its" and enable a coherent set of management mechanisms to achieve the goal. The closed at Austin IBM Technical Contact : Rob Bell, Jr. Abstract We are developing a next-generation power manager

  11. February 2012 Facilities Coordinator's Group Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    on reliability and repair cost · FM ability to identify on-going funding (potentially $100k per year) · Value to develop next steps · Equipment input needed from Facility Coordinator's if the Environmental Room doesn · Replacement of equipment #12;3 FM Customer Service & Quality Initiative 10 Point Plan February 2012 - updated

  12. Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low-emissions natural gas-fueled school bus: Phase 2, prototype hardware development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubesh, J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work done on Phase 2, ``Prototype Hardware Development`` of Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project No. 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe, Ultra-Low-Emissions Alternative-Fueled School Bus``. A prototype school bus was designed and constructed. This bus incorporated many new technologies to increase the safety of the bus passengers as well as pedestrians boarding and leaving the bus. These technologies emphasized increased visibility between the bus driver and pedestrians or vehicles, and included the use of high intensity discharge lighting, pedestrian and vehicle detection systems, and remote-mounted cameras. Passenger safety was also stressed, with the application of seat belts and improved emergency exits and lighting. A natural gas-fueled engine was developed for powering the bus. The development process focused primarily on improvements to the lean operation of the engine and control system advancements. The control system development included investigations into alternative control algorithms for steady-state and transient operation, various fuel metering devices, as well as new methods for wastegate control, knock and misfire detection, and catalyst monitoring. Both the vehicle and engine systems represent state-of-the-art technologies. Integration of the vehicle and engine is planned for the next phase of the project, followed by a demonstration test of the overall vehicle system.

  13. Geometric phase for collinear conical intersections. I. Geometric phase angle and vector potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xuan [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Brue, Daniel A.; Blandon, Juan D.; Parker, Gregory A. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Kendrick, Brian K. [Theoretical Division (T-1, MS B268), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for properly treating collinear conical intersections in triatomic systems. The general vector potential (gauge theory) approach for including the geometric phase effects associated with collinear conical intersections in hyperspherical coordinates is presented. The current study develops an introductory method in the treatment of collinear conical intersections by using the phase angle method. The geometric phase angle, {eta}, in terms of purely internal coordinates is derived using the example of a spin-aligned quartet lithium triatomic system. A numerical fit and thus an analytical form for the associated vector potentials are explicitly derived for this triatomic A{sub 3} system. The application of this methodology to AB{sub 2} and ABC systems is also discussed.

  14. Status of the diagnostics development for the first operation phase of the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    König, R., E-mail: rlk@ipp.mpg.de; Biedermann, C.; Burhenn, R.; Endler, M.; Grulke, O.; Hathiramani, D.; Hirsch, M.; Jakubowski, M.; Kornejew, P.; Krychowiak, M.; Langenberg, A.; Laux, M.; Lorenz, A.; Otte, M.; Pasch, E.; Pedersen, T. S.; Schneider, W.; Thomsen, H.; Windisch, T.; Zhang, D. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the diagnostics which are essential for the first operational phase of Wendelstein 7-X and the set of diagnostics expected to be ready for operation at this time are presented. The ongoing investigations of how to cope with high levels of stray Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) radiation in the ultraviolet (UV)/visible/infrared (IR) optical diagnostics are described.

  15. Development of Micro-Encapsulated Phase Change Materials and W. Brownrigg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , thus creating a fluid of very high specific heat capacity over a narrow temperature range to demonstrate heat capacity of the LHS (eqtn 1). Here, a PCM is subject to heating from Tinitial to Tfinal temperature change to the TES. For practical purposes, the phase change between liquid and gas is not often

  16. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1: technical feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical progress made on the development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber.

  17. AIAA-2002-5410 COORDINATION SPECIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED OPTIMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    of the concurrency in the coordination is essential, in particular for large and non-hierarchic coordination architectures. This paper proposes to use concepts from communicating sequential processes (CSP) developed in concurrency theory. CSP allows the description of the MDO co- ordination as a number of parallel processes

  18. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  19. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon; Reina Calderon

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  20. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  1. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  2. Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zickefoose, C.R.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II report presents a description of the Enertech 15 kW prototype wind system hardware fabrication; results of component tests; and results of preliminary testing conducted at Norwich, VT and the RF Wind Energy Research Center. In addition, the assembly sequence is documented. During testing, the unit experienced several operational problems, but testing proved the design concept and demonstrated the system's ability to meet the contract design specifications for power output.

  3. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

  4. Coordinating Energy Efficiency with Other Disaster Resiliency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Coordinating Energy Efficiency with Other Disaster Resiliency Services Coordinating Energy Efficiency with Other Disaster Resiliency Services Better Buildings Residential Network...

  5. Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services Better Buildings Residential Network Program...

  6. Development of a dispatchable PV peak shaving system. Final report on PV:BONUS Phase 2 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, W.D. [Conectiv, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States); Nigro, R.M. [Applied Energy Group, Inc., Hauppauge, NY (United States)

    1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 1993, the Delmarva Power and Light Company (now Conectiv, Inc.) was awarded a contract for the development of a Dispatchable Photovoltaic Peak Shaving System under the US Department of Energy PV:BONUS Program. The rationale for the dispatchable PV peak shaving system is based on the coincidence between the solar resource and the electrical load in question. Where poor coincidence exists, a PV array by itself does little to offset peak demands. However, with the addition of a relatively small amount of energy storage, the energy from the PV array can be managed and the value of the PV system increases substantially. In Phase 2, Delmarva Power continued the refinement of the system deployed in Phase 1. Four additional dispatchable PV peak shaving systems were installed for extended testing and evaluation at sites in Delaware, Maryland, Wisconsin and North Carolina. A second type of system that can be used to provide back-up power as well as peak shaving was also developed in Phase 2. This PV-UPS system used a packaging approach nearly identical to the PV peak shaving system, although there were significant differences in the design of the power electronics and control systems. Conceptually, the PV-UPS system builds upon the idea of adding value to PV systems by increasing functionality. A prototype of the PV-UPS system was installed in Delaware for evaluation near the end of the contract period.

  7. Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Clipper Turbine Development Project; Clipper Windpower Technology, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Clipper Windpower Technology, Inc. to develop a new turbine design that incorporates advanced elements.

  8. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A. [Center for Sustainable Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  9. Coordinate transformations in quaternion spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quaternion spaces can be used to describe the property of electromagnetic field and gravitational field. In the quaternion space, some coordinate transformations can be deduced from the feature of quaternions, including Lorentz transformation and Galilean transformation etc., when the coordinate system is transformed into others. And some coordinate transformations with variable speed of light can be obtained in the electromagnetic field and gravitational field.

  10. Open cycle heat pump development: Phase II, District heating case study analysis: Progress report, October 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.; Becker, F.E.; Glick, J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A district heating system is proposed that uses low-level waste-energy sources, and a quasi open-cycle steam heat pump as a means of upgrading the energy in the form of hot water to use as a transport medium in the system. The use of a water-based, open-cycle heat pump appears to be extremely well suited in terms of its potential thermodynamic performance, cost, and environmental safety compared to more typical organic gased closed cycle systems. The Phase II case study provides a detailed analysis of a district heating system that utilizes the open cycle steam heat pump concept developed in Phase I. This quarterly report describes the energy audit performed on the heat source and heat sink.

  11. Continued development of a semianalytical solution for two-phase fluid and heat flow in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years the authors have developed a semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source, using a similarity variable {eta} = r/{radical}t. Although the similarity transformation approach requires a simplified geometry, all the complex physical mechanisms involved in coupled two-phase fluid and heat flow can be taken into account in a rigorous way, so that the solution may be applied to a variety of problems of current interest. The work was motivated by adverse to predict the thermohydrological response to the proposed geologic repository for heat-generating high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in a partially saturated, highly fractured volcanic formation. The paper describes thermal and hydrologic conditions near the heat source; new features of the model; vapor pressure lowering; and the effective-continuum representation of a fractured/porous medium.

  12. Coordinated development of leading biomass pretreatment technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    States c National Renewable Energy, Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, United States d Texas A&M University Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, and Texas A&M University. An Agri- cultural and Industrial%) and the world ($35%). Although production and consumption of most US energy sources (e.g., coal, natural gas

  13. Advanced turbine systems phase II - conceptual design and product development. Final report, August 1993--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The technical ATS requirements are based upon two workshops held in Greenville, SC that were sponsored by DOE and hosted by Clemson University. The objective of this 8-year program, managed jointly by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, and, Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy, is to develop natural-gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60%, lower heating value (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive. The program will include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  14. Analysis of the product development process for geographically distant teams in vehicle tophat design phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Valdez, Antonio del

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current global economic recession is putting pressure to increase model variation on the car makers, while at the same time leveraging highly efficient and proven platforms and product development assets globally is ...

  15. Predicting and managing system interactions at early phase of the product development process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Qi, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of designing and developing large, complex, discrete, physical, and engineered products faces the challenges in the physical product system, the organization of people, and the larger systems in which the ...

  16. Expanded High-Level Waste Glass Property Data Development: Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Lang, Jesse B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Raszewski, F. C.; Peeler, David K.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Best, D. R.; Reamer, Irene A.; Riley, W. T.; Simmons, P. T.; Workman, R. J.

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Two separate test matrices were developed as part if the EM-21 Glass Matrix Crucible Testing. The first matrix, developed using a single component-at-a-time design method and covering glasses of interest primarily to Hanford, is addressed in this data package. This data package includes methods and results from glass fabrication, chemical analysis of glass compositions, viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, canister centerline cooling, product consistency testing, and the toxicity characteristic leach procedure.

  17. Development of superior asphalt recycling agency: Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Lin, Moon-Sun; Chaffin, J.; Liu, Meng; Eckhardt, C.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About every 12 years, asphalt roads must be reworked, and this is usually done by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of failed material, resulting in considerable waste of material and use of new asphalt binder. A good recycling agent is needed, not only to reduce the viscosity of the aged material but also to restore compatibility. Objective is to establish the technical feasibility (Phase I) of determining the specifications and operating parameters for producing high quality recycling agents which will allow most/all the old asphalt-based road material to be recycled. It is expected that supercritical fractionation can be used. The advanced road aging simulation procedure will be used to study aging of blends of old asphalt and recycling agents.

  18. Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 2: Operation and Control of a Two-Inverter Microgrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illindala, M. S.; Piagi, P.; Zhang, H.; Venkataramanan, G.; Lasseter, R. H.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the second year of a three-year project to develop control software for microsource distributed generation systems. In this phase, a laboratory-scale microgrid was expanded to include: (1) Two emulated distributed resources; (2) Static switchgear to allow rapid disconnection and reconnection; (3) Electronic synchronizing circuitry to enable transient-free grid interconnection; (4) Control software for dynamically varying the frequency and voltage controller structures; and (5) Power measurement instrumentation for capturing transient waveforms at the interconnect during switching events.

  19. The second-phase development of the China JinPing underground Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jainmin Li; Xiangdong Ji; Wick Haxton; Joseph S. Y. Wang

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2013-2015 an expansion of the China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL) will be undertaken along a main branch of a bypass tunnel in the JinPing tunnel complex. This second phase of CJPL will increase laboratory space to approximately 96,000 m^3, which can be compared to the existing CJPL-I volume of 4,000 m^3. One design configuration has eight additional hall spaces, each over 60 m long and approximately 12 m in width, with overburdens of about 2.4 km of rock, oriented parallel to and away from the main water transport and auto traffic tunnels. Concurrent with the excavation activities, planning is underway for dark matter and other rare-event detectors, as well as for geophysics/engineering and other coupled multi-disciplinary sensors. In the town meeting on 8 September, 2013 at Asilomar, CA, associated with the 13th International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP), presentations and panel discussions addressed plans for one-ton expansions of the current CJPL germanium detector array of the China Darkmatter EXperiment (CDEX) collaboration and of the duel-phase xenon detector of the Panda-X collaboration, as well as possible new detector initiatives for dark matter studies, low-energy solar neutrino detection, neutrinoless double beta searches, and geoneutrinos. JinPing was also discussed as a site for a low-energy nuclear astrophysics accelerator. Geophysics/engineering opportunities include acoustic and micro-seismic monitoring of rock bursts during and after excavation, coupled-process in situ measurements, local, regional, and global monitoring of seismically induced radon emission, and electromagnetic signals.

  20. Randomized coordinate descent methods for big data optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takac, Martin

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of 5 chapters. We develop new serial (Chapter 2), parallel (Chapter 3), distributed (Chapter 4) and primal-dual (Chapter 5) stochastic (randomized) coordinate descent methods, analyze their complexity ...

  1. Intramolecular Strain Coordinates Kinesin Stepping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vale, Ronald D.

    Intramolecular Strain Coordinates Kinesin Stepping Behavior along Microtubules Ahmet Yildiz,1: vale@cmp.ucsf.edu DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2008.07.018 SUMMARY Kinesin advances 8 nm along a microtubule per ATP hydrolyzed, but the mechanism responsible for coordinating the enzymatic cycles of kinesin's two

  2. GEAR Tech-21 Geographic Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    and two others on the grid below: Important Terms #12;GEAR Tech-21 Geographic Coordinates How Far Are They on the grid below. You will need to label your grid. Using the data you collected, relate the points to one Coordinates Map Challenge Lincoln, Nebraska: Two cities with the same latitude: Two cities with the same

  3. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  4. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs for Phase 2 of the Secure Power Systems Professional project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of Phase 2 of the Secure Power Systems Professional project, a 3 phase project. DOE will post to their website upon release.

  5. Conceptual design report, TWRS Privatization Phase I, site development and roads, subproject W-505

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, G.

    1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the site development, construction of new roads and improvements at existing road intersections, habitat mitigation, roadway lighting, and construction power needed for the construction of two Private Contractor (PC) Facilities. Approximately 50 hectare (124 acres) land parcel, east of the Grout Facility, is planned for the PC facilities.

  6. Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase III. Biomass process development unit (PDU) construction and initial operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healey, J.J.; Hooverman, R.H.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and construction of the process development unit (PDU) are described in detail, examining each system and component in order. The following are covered: siting, the chip handling system, the reactor feed system, the reactor, the screw conveyor, the ash dump system, the PDU support equipment, control and information management, and shakedown runs. (MHR)

  7. Granular Bed Filter Development Program, Phase II. Monthly technical progress report for April 1-30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moresco, L.L.; Cooper, J.; Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring a multiphase program to investigate the filtration potential of the moving bed granular filter (GBF) for application in pressurized high temperature energy conversion systems. Phase I included the development of a mathematical model, a cold flow parametric test series in a 0.746 Nm/sup 3//s GBF, and investigations of potential dust plugging problems at the inlet screen. During the experimental program, collection efficiencies of 99% and filter outlet loadings less that 0.0074 g/m/sup 3/ were demonstrated. The objectives of Phase II are to investigate the effects of elevated temperature and coal combustion particulate on GBF filtration performance, to update the analytical model developed in Phase I to reflect high-temperature effects, to optimize filter internal configuration, to demonstrate long duration GBF performance relative to corrosion, deposition, erosion, filtration efficiency, reliability, controllability, and to design and construct a 0.879 Nm/sup 3//s, 660 kPa filter for delivery to DOE. Hot flow testing to date has confirmed that the GBF configured with inlet and outlet screens has exhibited a tendency for extensive and irreversible ash plugging. As an alternative, the potential advantages produced by a screenless configuration, having higher filtration efficiency, has been achieved during both cold flow and hot flow tests as previously reported. Feed and solid compositions from test P704, the 400-hour GBF test, are presented. A status report on the design of the high pressure GBF along with operation details for purging the GBF of corrosive gases upon shutdown and granular reserve sensing during its operation are detailed.

  8. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE MEASURE OF THE FUNCTIONALITY OF FRAME WALLS ENHANCED WITH PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Angela C.

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Frame walls enhanced with phase change materials (paraffin-based, hydrated salt-based, and eutectic) mixed in cellulose insulation were developed and tested. The frame walls were heated and allowed to cool in a dynamic wall simulator that replicated...

  10. Development of electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) phased arrays for SFR inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît [CEA LIST, Centre de Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-standing problem for Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) instrumentation is the development of efficient under-sodium visualization systems adapted to the hot and opaque sodium environment. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMAT) are potential candidates for a new generation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT) probes well-suited for SFR inspection that can overcome drawbacks of classical piezoelectric probes in sodium environment. Based on the use of new CIVA simulation tools, we have designed and optimized an advanced EMAT probe for under-sodium visualization. This has led to the development of a fully functional L-wave EMAT sensing system composed of 8 elements and a casing withstanding 200° C sodium inspection. Laboratory experiments demonstrated the probe's ability to sweep an ultrasonic beam to an angle of 15 degrees. Testing in a specialized sodium facility has shown that it was possible to obtain pulse-echo signals from a target under several different angles from a fixed position.

  11. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  12. Process Development for CIGS Based Thin Film Photovoltaics Modules, Phase II Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, J.; Wiedeman, S.; Albright, S.

    2000-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As a technology partner with NREL, Global Solar Energy (GSE) has initiated an extensive and systematic plan to accelerate the commercialization of thin-film photovoltaics (PV) based on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). The distinguishing feature of the GSE manufacturing process is the exclusive use of lightweight, flexible substrates. GSE has developed the technology to fabricate CIGS photovoltaics on both stainless-steel and polymer substrates. CIGS deposited on flexible substrates can be fabricated into either flexible or rigid modules. Low-cost, rigid PV panels for remote power, bulk/utility, telecommunication, and rooftop applications have been produced by affixing the flexible substrate to an inexpensive rigid panel by lamination or adhesive. Stainless-steel-based PV modules are fabricated by a novel interconnect method that avoids the use of wires or foils and soldered connections. In the case of polymer-based PV modules, the continuous roll is not sectioned into individual panels until the module buss and power leads are attached. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition has several advantages that translate directly to reduced capital costs, greater productivity, improved yield, greater reliability, lower maintenance, and a larger volume of PV material. In combination with roll-to-roll processing, GSE has developed evaporation deposition operations that enable low-cost and high-efficiency CIGS modules. The CIGS deposition process relies heavily on effusion source technology developed at GSE, and solving numerous problems was an integral part of the source development effort. Cell interconnection for thin-film CIGS modules on a polyimide substrate presents a considerable challenge.

  13. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J.; Chaffin, J.; Liu, M.; Madrid, R.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After an introduction and a literature survey in Chap. 1, Chap. 2 describes the tasks, together with objectives and important results obtained for each task throughout the entire project. Chaps. 3 thru 7 detail work in developing a qualitative and quantitative knowledge of asphalt oxidation, composition dependence of asphalt properties, and guidelines for producing superior asphalt binders through composition control. They also detail the development of a kinetic model for asphalt oxidative aging and present an understanding of the composition dependence of asphalt oxidation as well as other performance-related properties. Chaps. 8 and 9 compare the aging performance of recycled blends produced using commercial recycling agents and industrial supercritical fractions as rejuvenating agents. Oxidative aging of the recycled blends were evaluated along with the performance of the recycled blends in terms of the strategic highway research program performance grading procedure. Chap. 10 summarizes the work completed in the areas of processing schemes development, projection updates, and scale-up and commercialization plans.

  14. Report on Performance of Prototype Dynatronix Power Supplies Developed Under a Phase I DOE SBIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Merriman, Jason H.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prototype power supplies fabricated by Dynatronix, Inc. This project supports the advancement of electroforming capabilities to produce ultra-high purity copper. Ultra-high purity copper is an essential material used for a range of current and future fundamental nuclear physics programs such as the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The Mach 30 power supplies are a new design built to the specifications from the requirements of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with regard to timing, voltage, current output, and the required tolerances. The parameters used in these tests were developed empirically over a number of years based on a combination of thermodynamic and kinetics of the electroplating process. The power supplies were operated in a typical cleanroom environment for the production electroforming at PNNL. The units that were received by PNNL in July, 2010 have performed satisfactorily and have demonstrated short term durability.

  15. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt in a submerged arc furnace that is a large consumer of electric power. This facility is operated as a division of SDI under the name of Iron Dynamics (IDI). It is no secret that IDI has had and still has a great number of operational problems, including high cost for natural gas.

  16. LLP/ERASMUS Institutional Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    (BA/MA) Departmental Coordinator: Prof. Dr. Olga Pollatos olga.pollatos@uni-ulm.de Computer Science (481) Study Programs taught in German: Informatik (BA/MA) Medieninformatik (BA/MA) Software Engineering

  17. Suspect Counterfeit Coordinators, February 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ETTPEM Susan Kimmerly PQA Manager 865-574-8242 LOW@bechteljacobs.org Tom Warnick SCI SME 865-241-9516 7TO@bechteljacobs.org Fossil Energy HQFE Connie Lorenz HQ SCI Coordinator...

  18. Suspect Counterfeit Coordinators, April 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ETTPEM Susan Kimmerly PQA Manager 865-574-8242 LOW@bechteljacobs.org Tom Warnick SCI SME 865-241-9516 7TO@bechteljacobs.org Fossil Energy HQFE Connie Lorenz HQ SCI Coordinator...

  19. INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    space exploration infrastructure standards facilitating interoperability through an international with relevant existing international working groups/ organisations. · Preparation and Organization of a WS1 INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP WORKPLAN Update following 3rd ISECG Meeting

  20. Fabrication development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository; Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domian, H.A.; Holbrook, R.L.; LaCount, D.F. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (USA). Nuclear Power Div.]|[Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (USA). Research and Development Div.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report completes Phase 1 of an engineering study of potential manufacturing processes for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of nuclear waste. An extensive literature and industry review was conducted to identify and characterize various processes. A technical specification was prepared using the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code (ASME BPVC) to develop the requirements. A complex weighting and evaluation system was devised as a preliminary method to assess the processes. The system takes into account the likelihood and severity of each possible failure mechanism in service and the effects of various processes on the microstructural features. It is concluded that an integral, seamless lower unit of the container made by back extrusion has potential performance advantages but is also very high in cost. A welded construction offers lower cost and may be adequate for the application. Recommendations are made for the processes to be further evaluated in the next phase when mock-up trials will be conducted to address key concerns with various processes and materials before selecting a primary manufacturing process. 43 refs., 26 figs., 34 tabs.

  1. Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litka, A.F.; Breault, R.W.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.

  2. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  3. High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

  4. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  5. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) 1985-1999 (d), 2000 (n), 2001-6/2003 (d) Santo Tomas River Drain 1985-1990 (d) 1 d - daily data, m - monthly data, n ? no data C o n c e p t u a l M o d e l o f R i o G r a n d e P r o j e c... t F l o w 8 Site Available Data Since 1975 1 WW #25 (Santo Tomas Lateral) 1985-1999 (d), 2000 (n), 2001 (d) WW #26 (Upper Chamberino Lateral) 1979-1999 (d), 2000-5/2001(n), 6/2001-5/2005 (d) WW #18 (Eastside Canal) 1985-1999 (d), 2000 (n), 2001...

  6. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is recommended. 0 500 1000 1500 Jan-85 Jan-87 Jan-89 Jan-91 Jan-93 Jan-95 Jan-97 Jan-99 Month Flo w (AF ) j Historic Forecast FIGURE 5. Transfer Function Forecast for Garfield Drain 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Jan-85 Jan-87 Jan-89 Jan...-91 Jan-93 Jan-95 Jan-97 Jan-99 Month Flo w ( AF ) jk Historic Forecast FIGURE 6. Transfer Function Forecast for Hatch Drain C o n c e p t u a l M o d e l o f R i o G r a n d e P r o j e c t F l o w 14 0 400 800 1200...

  7. High-reliability gas-turbine combined-cycle development program: Phase II, Volume 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, K.G.; Sanderson, R.A.; Smith, M.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report presents the results of Phase II of the multiphase EPRI-sponsored High-Reliability Gas Turbine Combined-Cycle Development Program whose goal is to achieve a highly reliable gas turbine combined-cycle power plant, available by the mid-1980s, which would be an economically attractive baseload generation alternative for the electric utility industry. The Phase II program objective was to prepare the preliminary design of this power plant. The power plant was addressed in three areas: (1) the gas turbine, (2) the gas turbine ancillaries, and (3) the balance of plant including the steam turbine generator. To achieve the program goals, a gas turbine was incorporated which combined proven reliability characteristics with improved performance features. This gas turbine, designated the V84.3, is the result of a cooperative effort between Kraftwerk Union AG and United Technologies Corporation. Gas turbines of similar design operating in Europe under baseload conditions have demonstrated mean time between failures in excess of 40,000. The reliability characteristics of the gas turbine ancillaries and balance-of-plant equipment were improved through system simplification and component redundancy and by selection of component with inherent high reliability. A digital control system was included with logic, communications, sensor redundancy, and manual backup. An independent condition monitoring and diagnostic system was also included. Program results provide the preliminary design of a gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. This power plant has a predicted mean time between failure of nearly twice the 3000-h EPRI goal. The cost of added reliability features is offset by improved performance, which results in a comparable specific cost and an 8% lower cost of electricty compared to present market offerings.

  8. Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, economic development and production plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase 3 of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objective of this phase of the study was to establish the economic potential for the field by determining the optimum economic plan for development and production. The optimum economic plan used net cash flow analysis to evaluate future expected Department of Energy revenues less expenses and investments for proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable, possible and possible-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) reserves assigned in the Phase 2 study. The results of the Phase 2 study were used to define future production flowstreams. Additional production scheduling was carried out to evaluate accelerated depletion of proved developed reserves in the 29R, 31 C/D Shale and Northwest Stevens T Sand/N Shale Reservoirs. Production, cost and investment schedules were developed for the enhanced oil recovery projects identified in Phase 2. Price forecasts were provided by the Department of Energy. Operating costs and investment requirements were estimated by Bergeson. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  9. An approach to closed network signal coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutt, Amitabh K

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for traffic signal coordination in a closed signal system in order to improve the quality of flow. Three methods have been developed. The first one, the method of independent link analysis is based on the assumption that delay in a link depends solely... on the offset between the settir gs of the signal at each end of the link and independent of any other signal setting in the network. The second method is based on a set of time reference equations. This method is very useful in situations where the link...

  10. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  11. Coordinate measuring machine test standard apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, L.F.

    1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A coordinate measuring machine test standard apparatus and method are disclosed which includes a rotary spindle having an upper phase plate and an axis of rotation, a kinematic ball mount attached to the phase plate concentric with the axis of rotation of the phase plate, a groove mounted at the circumference of the phase plate, and an arm assembly which rests in the groove. The arm assembly has a small sphere at one end and a large sphere at the other end. The small sphere may be a coordinate measuring machine probe tip and may have variable diameters. The large sphere is secured in the kinematic ball mount and the arm is held in the groove. The kinematic ball mount includes at least three mounting spheres and the groove is an angular locating groove including at least two locking spheres. The arm may have a hollow inner core and an outer layer. The rotary spindle may be a ratio reducer. The device is used to evaluate the measuring performance of a coordinate measuring machine for periodic recertification, including 2 and 3 dimensional accuracy, squareness, straightness, and angular accuracy. 5 figs.

  12. Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Wayne Surdoval, SECA Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy #12;Strategic Center for Natural GasFossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Wayne Surdoval, SECA Coordinator June 3, 2003 SECA Fuel Processing. & Desulf. *Berry *Shekhawat Gardner 1.) Develop Fuel Reforming Database & Report 2.) Develop Fuel

  13. PREFERENCE COORDINATION IN ENGINEERING DESIGN DECISION-MAKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    practice and determining how best to coordinate this with engineering. He contributed directly and Carl Lenker contributed to the cost and demand models developed in Chapter 7, in addition to providing of freedom and responsibility; developing my sense of the academic literature and community in engineering

  14. Tuning metal–carboxylate coordination in crystalline metal–organic frameworks through surfactant media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Junkuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); He, Mi [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Xiong, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wenfang; Lee, Zhi Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Tom [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Huo, Fengwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaogang [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that surfactants can efficiently control the size, shape and surface properties of micro/nanocrystals of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) due to the strong interactions between surfactants and crystal facets of MOFs, the use of surfactants as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals is unprecedented. In addition, compared with ionic liquids, surfactants are much cheaper and can have multifunctional properties such as acidic, basic, neutral, cationic, anionic, or even block. These factors strongly motivate us to develop a new synthetic strategy: growing crystalline MOFs in surfactants. In this report, eight new two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) MOFs have been successfully synthesized in an industrially-abundant and environmentally-friendly surfactant: polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Eight different coordination modes of carboxylates, ranging from monodentate ?{sup 1} mode to tetra-donor coordination µ{sub 3}-?{sup 1}:?{sup 2}:?{sup 1} mode, have been founded in our research. The magnetic properties of Co-based MOFs were investigated and MOF NTU-Z6b showed a phase transition with a Curie temperature (T{sub c}) at 5 K. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. - Graphical abstract: Surfactants have been used as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals for the first time. Eight new two-dimensional or three-dimensional MOFs were successfully synthesized in surfactant polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Coordination modes of carboxylates up to eight were founded. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal–organic frameworks. • Eight new 2-D or 3-D metal–organic frameworks. • Eight different metal–carboxylate coordination modes.

  15. Development of a method of measuring relative phase difference between sending and receiving voltage on a power line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rackley, Benton Tiburce

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Phase Angle Meter . . . 10 6. Schematic of a Standard Phase Angle Meter . 17 7. Schematic of Converted Phase Angle Meter . . 18 8. Meter As Normally Connected To Power Line . 20 9 . Laboratory Circuit 10. Laboratorv Set Up 21 22 11. 9raph... conditions on the important lines. The attendant could then know when given lines are approaching instability and precautions could be taken on loading. BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS 1. Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, Electrical Transmission...

  16. Panhandle Region Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panhandle Regional Transportation Advisory Group

    drivers; shared office staff with PCS Schedule for out of county trips Amarillo MWF Notes on Service Provided Medicaid to Amarillo M-F; school trips M-F; Hereford Satellite Center; some trips to Hereford Senior Center and nursing homes Table 2............................................................................................................................ 2-5 Health and Human Services Organizations ................................................................................. 2-9 History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation .................................................... 2...

  17. LAGRANGIAN COORDINATES AND MULTICLASS MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    LAGRANGIAN COORDINATES AND MULTICLASS MODELS The kinematic wave model, also known as the Lighthill. introduced a kinematic wave model with multiple user classes (7). They show qualitatively Formulation of Multiclass Kinematic Wave Model Femke van Wageningen-Kessels, Hans van Lint, Serge P

  18. Noncommutative electrodynamics with covariant coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Jochen [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chausse 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study noncommutative electrodynamics using the concept of covariant coordinates. We propose a scheme for interpreting the formalism and construct two basic examples, a constant field and a plane wave. Superposing these two, we find a modification of the dispersion relation. Our results differ from those obtained via the Seiberg-Witten map.

  19. Development of a Front Tracking Method for Two-Phase Micromixing of Incompressible Viscous Fluids with Interfacial Tension in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yijie [ORNL; Lim, Hyun-Kyung [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Navamita, Ray [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Wang, Shuqiang [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Glimm, James G [ORNL; Li, Xiao-lin [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Jiao, Xiangmin [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes the development of a front tracking method for the solution of the governing equations of motion for two-phase micromixing of incompressible, viscous, liquid-liquid solvent extraction processes. The ability to compute the detailed local interfacial structure of the mixture allows characterization of the statistical properties of the two-phase mixture in terms of droplets, filaments, and other structures which emerge as a dispersed phase embedded into a continuous phase. Such a statistical picture provides the information needed for building a consistent coarsened model applicable to the entire mixing device. Coarsening is an undertaking for a future mathematical development and is outside the scope of the present work. We present here a method for accurate simulation of the micromixing dynamics of an aqueous and an organic phase exposed to intense centrifugal force and shearing stress. The onset of mixing is the result of the combination of the classical Rayleigh- Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A mixing environment that emulates a sector of the annular mixing zone of a centrifugal contactor is used for the mathematical domain. The domain is small enough to allow for resolution of the individual interfacial structures and large enough to allow for an analysis of their statistical distribution of sizes and shapes. A set of accurate algorithms for this application requires an advanced front tracking approach constrained by the incompressibility condition. This research is aimed at designing and implementing these algorithms. We demonstrate verification and convergence results for one-phase and unmixed, two-phase flows. In addition we report on preliminary results for mixed, two-phase flow for realistic operating flow parameters.

  20. South Texas Planning Region Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Texas Development Council Economic Development Program

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    KFH GROUP, INC. SOUTH TEXAS PLANNING REGION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for the: SOUTH TEXAS DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM By: KFH Group, Incorporated December... that will permit increased levels of service; and 3. To further the state?s efforts to reduce air pollution? (HB3588, Article 13, Chapter 461, Section 461.001). In 2005, the TxDOT Draft Strategic Plan called for the development of regional public transportation...

  1. Polymer Development for Enhanced Delivery of Phenol in a Solid-Liquid Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Bioreactor George P. Prpich and Andrew J. Daugulis* Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactors (TPPBs) have traditionally been used concentration. In an effort to overcome these limitations the Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor (TPPB) concept

  2. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  3. Coordination and sharing at the interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Vivian I-Wen, 1972-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines properties of a type of coordinate structure that involves shared material (i.e., elements above the point coordination that c-command all of the conjuncts), what is referred to as a sharing structure. ...

  4. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and Phase III. Quarter progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is presented on the development of a coal-fired high performance power generation system by the year 2000. This report describes the design of the air heater, duct heater, system controls, slag viscosity, and design of a quench zone.

  5. Research, development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the Phase I effort was to demonstrate feasibility of the fuel cell/battery system for powering a small bus (under 30 ft or 9 m) on an urban bus route. A brassboard powerplant was specified, designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate feasibility in the laboratory. The proof-of-concept bus, with a powerplant scaled up from the brassboard, will be demonstrated under Phase II.

  6. Optimization Online - Efficient parallel coordinate descent algorithm ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ion Necoara

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 2, 2012 ... Efficient parallel coordinate descent algorithm for convex optimization problems with separable constraints: application to distributed MPC.

  7. Alamo Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alamo Area Council of Governments

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    for the technology, through New Freedom or FTA?s Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) initiatives. Coordination Task No. 2 ? Coordinating Services between ART and VIA This task calls for direct connections between ART and VIA at a variety of transfer... for the technology, through New Freedom or FTA?s Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) initiatives. Coordination Task No. 2 ? Coordinating Services between ART and VIA This task calls for direct connections between ART and VIA at a variety of transfer...

  8. Clean Cities Coordinator Awards (Fact sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Clean Cities publication regarding the Clean Cities Coordinator Award winners announced at the 2004 Clean Cities Conference.

  9. Novel selective surface flow (SSF{trademark}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogen from waste gas streams. Phase 2: Technology development, final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, M.; Ludwig, K.A.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Phase II of the Selective Surface Flow Membrane program was Technology Development. Issues addressed were: (i) to develop detailed performance characteristics on a 1 ft{sup 2} multi- tube module and develop design data, (ii) to build a field test rig and complete field evaluation with the 1 ft{sup 2} area membrane system, (iii) to implement membrane preparation technology and demonstrate membrane performance in 3.5 ft long tube, (iv) to complete detailed process design and economic analysis.

  10. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    houses located adjacent to the cooling towers, the block walls that separated the transformers, and the containment dike that surrounded the empty sulfuric acid tank). Phase I...

  11. Phase 1 -- 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "Replace Std Task 2-1","DO RFP Development - On Site Consultation","FEMP Services will provide technical consultation...

  12. Communication and Coordination John H. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication and Coordination John H. Miller Scott Moser February 25, 2003 Abstract Remarkable coordinate are not well understood. Here we examine the role of communication in achieving coordination this question we employ an adaptive model of strategically communicating agents (Miller et al. [7]) playing

  13. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  14. Development of a coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Phase 3 final report, November 1992--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A three phase research and development program has resulted in the development and commercialization of a Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}), capable of being fueled by pulverized coal, natural gas, and other solid, gaseous, or liquid fuels, for the vitrification of industrial wastes. The Phase 3 research effort focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added glass products from the vitrification of boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase 3 project was to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential for successful commercialization. The demonstration test consisted of one test run with a duration of 105 hours, approximately one-half (46 hours) performed with coal as the primary fuel source (70% to 100%), the other half with natural gas. Approximately 50 hours of melting operation were performed vitrifying approximately 50,000 lbs of coal-fired utility boiler flyash/dolomite mixture, producing a fully-reacted vitrified product.

  15. Development of an equivalent homogenous fluid model for pseudo-two-phase (air plus water) flow through fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, J.; Indraratna, B. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Civil Engineering

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture flow of two-phase mixtures is particularly applicable to the coal mining and coal bed methane projects in Australia. A one-dimensional steady-state pseudo-two-phase flow model is proposed for fractured rock. The model considers free flow of a compressible mixture of air and water in an inclined planar fracture and is based upon the conservation of momentum and the 'cubic' law. The flow model is coupled to changes in the stress environment through the fracture normal stiffness, which is related to changes in fracture aperture. The model represents the individual air and water phases as a single equivalent homogenous fluid. Laboratory testing was performed using the two-phase high-pressure triaxial apparatus on 54 mm diameter (approximately 2: 1 height: diameter) borehole cores intersected by induced near-axial fractures. The samples were of Triassic arenaceous fine-medium grained sandstone (known as the Eckersley Formation) that is found locally in the Southern Coalfield of New South Wales. The sample fracture roughness was assessed using a technique based upon Fourier series analysis to objectively attribute a joint roughness coefficient. The proposed two-phase flow model was verified using the recorded laboratory data obtained over a range of triaxial confining pressures (i.e., fracture normal stresses).

  16. Coordination polymers and building blocks based on ditopic heteroscorpionate ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santillan, Guillermo A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Silver (I) Coordination Polymers formed through hydrogenBlocks for Coordination Polymers” Inorg. Chem. *One of theof Silver(I) Coordination Polymers Formed through Hydrogen

  17. Regional Transportation Coordination Plan for the Capital Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capital Area Regional Transit Coordination Committee

    3588 is to ensure that the benefits of the State?s public transportation resources are maximized through development #24; Regional Transportation Coordination Plan for the Capital Area and implementation of regional public transportation services... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-24 Appendix C ? Public Transportation Providers and Resources in the Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 Public Transit Providers...

  18. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordination Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Program Coordination The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  19. Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract--In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract-- In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed GaInN/GaN quantum well material suitable for 500 ­ 580 nm light emitting diodes at longer wavelengths. Index Terms-- a-plane GaN, GaInN, Green light emitting diode, m-plane GaN I

  20. The use of Enterobacter cloacae ATCC 43560 in the development of a two-phase partitioning bioreactor for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    bioreactor for the destruction of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-s-triazine (RDX) Ian B. Pudge a , Andrew J-triazine (RDX) by Enterobacter cloacae ATCC 43560 was investigated, and a two-phase partitioning bioreactor-based substrate delivery, and high bioreactor productivity. Through consideration of the critical log P of E

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Integrating Vermicomposting into AMS SUB Operations -Phase 3 -Compiled presentations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermicomposting into AMS SUB Operations - Phase 3 - Compiled presentations GRS 497B November 04, 2014 634 1679 TO CHANGE THE WORLD social equity ecological health economic prosperity #12;#12;OBJECTIVE Explore material, production of humus ACTS AS: nutrient recycler, soil conditioner RESULTS IN: IMPROVED SOIL

  2. Development of a neural network model for the prediction of liquid holdup in two-phase horizontal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shippen, Mack Edward

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -phase effects. Because the correlation is simple, it is still used in certain applications and the Lockhart-Martinelli dimensionless correlating parameter (Eq. I) appears in several modern correlations. sr;Pops. I Pr sii (dPldy). . [vrv p, po J p. v, 'o...

  3. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler system. Phase II subsystem test design and plan - an addendum to the Phase II RD & T Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly after the year 2000 it is expected that new generating plants will be needed to meet the growing demand for electricity and to replace the aging plants that are nearing the end of their useful service life. The plants of the future will need to be extremely clean, highly efficient and economical. Continuing concerns over acid rain, air toxics, global climate changes, ozone depletion and solid waste disposal are expected to further then regulations. In the late 1980`s it was commonly believed that coal-fired power plants of the future would incorporate either some form of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) or first generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBS) technologies. However, recent advances In emission control techniques at reduced costs and auxiliary power requirements coupled with significant improvements In steam turbine and cycle design have clearly indicated that pulverized coal technology can continue to be competitive In both cost and performance. In recognition of the competitive potential for advanced pulverized coal-fired systems with other emerging advanced coal-fired technologies, DOE`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) began a research and development initiative In late 1990 named, Combustion 2000, with the intention of preserving and expanding coal as a principal fuel In the Generation of electrical power. The project was designed for two stages of commercialization, the nearer-term Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) program, and for the future, the High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. B&W is participating In the LEBS program.

  4. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: TRANSMITTAL OF Dl CONSTRUCTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR PHASES I AND II OF THE REMOVAL OF THE X-760 CHEMICAL...

  5. Learning Quantitative Knowledge for Multiagent Coordination David Jensen, Michael Atighetchi, R'egis Vincent, Victor Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    of these interrelation­ ships can help coordinate agents --- preventing con­ flicts and exploiting beneficial of such non­local effects in TAEMS, a well­developed framework for multiagent coordination. The surprising knowledge. Introduction A major challenge of designing effective multiagent sys­ tems is managing non

  6. A Passivity-Based Controller for coordination of converters in a Fuel Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and hybrid vehicles has increased since 2009. In this context, the development of a fuel cell (FC) system, , A Passivity-Based Controller for coordination of converters in a Fuel Cell System M. Hilaireta-mail: mickael.hilairet@lgep.supelec.fr Abstract The problem of converters coordination of a fuel cell system

  7. Coordinated Control and Communication for Enhanced Safety of Highway Vehicle Platoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongwei

    Coordinated Control and Communication for Enhanced Safety of Highway Vehicle Platoons Lijian Xu as a promising framework in developing intelligent transportation systems. By autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle control and inter-vehicle coordination, an appropriately managed platoon can potentially offer

  8. A Continuous ` \\Gamma oe Vertical Coordinate for a Baroclinic Model of the Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, John B.

    meteorolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support a continuous isentropic­ oe vertical coordinate and boundary layer approximations were addressed by the introduction of a hybrid (patched) model [15]. By use analysis [14, 8]. The effects of heating on the circulation are most clearly seen with the isentropic

  9. adamantine-dicarboxylate coordination complexes: Topics by E...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiagent systems, Coordination, Planning, Resource Kropf, Peter 25 Optical Design of Reflectionless Complex Media by Finite Embedded Coordinate Transformations...

  10. DOE Coordination Meeting CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the International Standards Organization's standards for hydrogen refueling and storage, by 2006; · Complete. Provide technical resources to harmonize the development of international standards among IEC, ISO negotiations with critical Standard Development Organizations and develop draft generic licensing agreement

  11. Phase I-B development of kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, September 1983-December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.E.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-ton, and a COP (heating) of 1.8 and COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1989. In this phase, an HVAC systems manufacturer (Borg-Warner) is working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, a piston-type open-shaft refrigeration compressor was selected as the best match for the engine. Both the engine and compressor have been tested and characterized by performance maps, and the experimental heat-pump systems designed, built, and preliminary testing performed. Close agreement with computer model output has been achieved. SPS has continued to focus on improving the Stirling-engine performance and reliability for the gas-heat-pump application.

  12. Phase 1-supplemental development of a kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, January 1989-June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10 tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for the mid-1990's. In previous phases, an HVAC-systems manufacturer (York International) had been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Under the program, a number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described. The adaptation and operation of a computer optimization code was accomplished under the program and is reported herein.

  13. East Texas Regional Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    East Texas Council of Governments

    transportation resources are utilized as efficiently as possible, the Texas Legislature passed HB 3588 in 2003, which amended the Texas Transportation Code to add Chapter 461 ? Statewide Coordination of Public Transportation. Its overall purpose is to maximize... transportation resources by coordinating services. The intent of coordination is to eliminate waste, generate increased efficiencies, and further the state?s efforts to reduce air pollution (Texas Statutes Transportation Code, 2006). The Texas Transportation...

  14. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Locations

  15. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen 1 of 5 This office coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional and state classified personnel. Customized training and orga- nizational development consulting services

  16. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  17. Athletic Training Coordinator Hometown: Colorado Springs, CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    WHO WE ARE Gaby Bell Athletic Training Coordinator Hometown: Colorado Springs, CO Certifications Athletic Training Graduate Assistant Jonathan Hodapp Student Athletic Trainer Mike Carlson Student Athletic

  18. Optimization Online - Efficient Serial and Parallel Coordinate ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Richtarik

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 2, 2011 ... Efficient Serial and Parallel Coordinate Descent Methods for Huge-Scale Truss Topology Design. Peter Richtarik(peter.richtarik ***at*** ...

  19. Energy Agency Coordinators for Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agency coordinators serve as primary Federal agency points of contact for Energy Action Month. Contact them if you have questions about implementing an Energy Action Month campaign.

  20. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  1. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  2. Open cycle heat pump development for local resource use Phase II district heating case study analysis: Progress report, 1 January 1989--30 March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.; Becker, F.E.; Glick, J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A district heating system is proposed that uses low-level waste- energy sources, and a quasi open-cycle steam heat pump as a means of upgrading the energy in the form of hot water to use as a transport medium in the system. the use of a water-based, open-cycle heat pump appears to be extremely well suited in terms of its potential thermodynamic performance, cost, and environmental safety compared to more typical organic gased closed cycle systems. The Phase II case study provides a detailed analysis of a district heating system that utilizes the open cycle steam heat pump concept developed in Phase I. This quarterly report describes the energy audit performed on the heat source and heat sink.

  3. The "extended phase space" approach to quantum geometrodynamics: what can it give for the development of quantum gravity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Shestakova

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The talk is devoted to the "extended phase space" approach to Quantum Geometrodynamics. The premises that have led to the formulation of this approach are briefly reviewed, namely, non-trivial topology of the Universe which implies the absence of asymptotic states, in contrast to situations one usually deals in ordinary quantum field theory; parametrization noninvariance in the Wheeler - DeWitt theory; the problem of time and the absence of dynamical evolution. Then we discuss the main features of the approach: Hamiltonian dynamics in extended phase space, gauge-dependent Schrodinger equation for the wave function of the Universe, the description of quantum Universe from the viewpoint of observers in a wide enough class of reference frames. After all, we analyse problems arising in this approach: the structure of Hilbert space in Quantum Geometrodynamics, the relations between solutions for the wave function of the Universe corresponding to various reference frames, properties of a medium to be necessary to fix a reference frame, the transition to classical limit.

  4. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VI. FBC-Data Base-Management-System (FBC-DBMS) development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base, (FBCDB), situated in MIT's Energy laboratory, is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. It is anticipated that the FBCDB would play an active and a direct role in the development of FBC technology as well as in the FBC commercial application. After some in-house experience and after a careful and extensive review of commercially available database systems, it was determined that the Model 204 DBMS by Computer Corporation of America was the most suitable to our needs. The setup of a prototype in-house database also allowed us to investigate and understand fully the particular problems involved in coordinating FBC development with a DBMS. Various difficult aspects were encountered and solutions had been sought. For instance, we found that it was necessary to rename the variables to avoid repetition as well as to increase usefulness of our database and, hence, we had designed a classification system for which variables were classified under category to achieve standardization of variable names. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the database from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results.

  5. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, México

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    de Ju?rez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, M?xico By Dr. Alfredo Granados Olivas Coordinador del Centro de Informaci?n Geogr?fica The Universidad Aut?noma de Ciudad Ju?rez (UACJ) in collaboration... Centro de Informaci?n Geogr?fica The Universidad Aut?noma de Ciudad Ju?rez (UACJ) in collaboration with Zhuping Sheng, Texas A& M University System J. Phillip King, New Mexico State University Bobby Creel, New Mexico Water Resources Research...

  6. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, México 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Informe Estad?stico 1. SEMARNAT. M?xico, D.F. Julio de 2003. Iba?ez, Oscar, 2003. ?Transferencias de agua en la regi?n Paso del Norte: Antecedentes, marco legal, experiencias y oportunidades en el Municipio de Ju ?rez?. Reporte de Investigaci...

  7. Phase A: Initial Development of an Advanced Diagnostic Procedure for Air-Side Retrofits in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Kissock, J. K.; Katipamula, S.; Claridge, D. E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop a diagnostic approach that involves analyzing monitored whole-building cooling and heating energy use in large commercial buildings in order to determine the effectiveness of air-side energy retrofits...

  8. Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes background research for preparation of a plan for development of whole-building energy targets for new commercial buildings. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued.

  9. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  10. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary-power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-hp range. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 373 kW (500 hp) to 2237 kW (3000 hp) range was completed. The tasks in Phase I include conceptual designs of large Stirling cycle stationary engines and program plan for implementing Phases II through V. Four different heater head designs and five different machine designs were prepared in sufficient detail to select a design recommended for development in the near future. A second order analysis was developed for examining the various loss mechanisms in the Stirling engine and for predicting the thermodynamic performance of these engines. The predicted engine thermal brake efficiency excluding combustion efficiency is approximately 42% which exceeds the design objective of 40%. The combustion system designs were prepared for both a clean fuel combustion system and a two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system. The calculated combustion efficiency of the former is 90% and of the latter is 80%. Heat transport systems, i.e., a heat exchanger for the clean fuel combustion system and a sodium heat pipe system for coal and other nonclean fuel combustion systems were selected. The cost analysis showed that for clean fuels combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is $478,242 or $214/kW ($159/hp) which is approximately 1.86 times the cost of a comparable size diesel engine. For solid coal combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is approximately $2,246,242 which corresponds to a cost to power capacity ratio of $1004/kW ($749/hp). The two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system represents 81% of the total cost; the engine represents 14% depending on the future price differential between coal and conventional clean fuels, a short payback period of the proposed Stirling cycle engine/FBC system may justify the initial cost. (LCL)

  11. Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); Hall, J.D. (Deringer Group, Riva, MD (USA)); Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., New York, NY (USA)); McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA)); Alley, P.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary focus of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project is to develop a flexible methodology for setting target guidelines with which to assess energy efficiency in commercial building design. The proposed methodology has several innovative features. In this report, the authors document their work to define the software development concepts upon which the overall Targets methodology will be based. Three task reports are included here. Development of the user interface--that critical connection through which the human end-user (architect, engineer, planner, owner) will apply the methodology--is described in Section 2. In Section 3, the use of the software engineering process in Targets model development efforts is described. Section 4 provides details on the data and system integration task, in which interactions between and among all the major components, termed modules, of the Targets model were examined to determine how to put them together to create a methodology that is effective and easy to use. 4 refs., 26 figs.

  12. Fuse and breaker coordination on the Harlingen distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foelker, Henry Edward

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment, these relays can be coordinated effectively in many cases by using either a 17 greater pickup tap or high time lever setting or both. In setting the relays it is mandatory that the longest time that a fault may rema1n on a circu1t at any... and Breakers 380 377 3082 356 Wlsn Rd Rec THREE PHASE FAULTS Cj~nerut u n Ivl cAkl mum fYl in I nu. rn A 1 7 p & t) p t Ckpci. el 2670 4300 1590 2065 2410 3690 1490. 1940 2220 3230 1430 1830 1380 1660 1020 1190 1920 2510 1310 1570 LINE TO LINE...

  13. Investigation of strategies for more effective coordination of simulations and experiments in engineering design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitriou, Aristos Orpheas

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to lay the foundation for developing effective strategies for coordinated use of computational simulation and experiments in engineering design. The primary research objectives are to explore ...

  14. RECYCLING COORDINATOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP University of Nebraska--Lincoln Landscape Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    RECYCLING COORDINATOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP University of Nebraska--Lincoln Landscape Services, implementing and maintaining recycling on campus. Assist in annual recycler's survey; tracking of recycling drop- off program; assist in market research for selected recycled materials; assist in developing

  15. Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 1--Single Inverter in Island Mode Operation: Base Year Report, December 2000 -- November 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataramanan, G.; Illindala, M. S.; Houle, C.; Lasseter, R. H.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the first year of a three-year project to develop control software for micro-source distributed generation systems. The focus of this phase was on internal energy storage requirements, the modification of an off-the-shelf motor drive system inverter to supply utility-grade ac power, and a single inverter system operating in island mode. The report provides a methodology for determining battery energy storage requirements, a method for converting a motor drive inverter into a utility-grade inverter, and typical characteristics and test results of using such an inverter in a complex load environment.

  16. Chapter 20. Work Breakdown and Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 20. Work Breakdown and Coordination Revised March 1994 The leadership responsibility to level 4 of the work breakdown is shown below. The work breakdown was done by the ten technical teams. We breakdown for commissioning with beam. -- 404 -- #12; Work Breakdown and Coordination 405 #12; 406 Work

  17. Universal coordinates for Schwarzschild black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W G Unruh

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of historical coordinates in which the Schwarzschild metric is regular over the whole of the extended spacetime are compared and the hypersurfaces of constant coordinate are graphically presented. While the Kruscal form (one of the later forms) is probably the simplest, each of the others has some interesting features.

  18. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

  19. Representation of noncommutative phase space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang Li; Jianhua Wang; Chiyi Chen

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The representations of the algebra of coordinates and momenta of noncommutative phase space are given. We study, as an example, the harmonic oscillator in noncommutative space of any dimension. Finally the map of Sch$\\ddot{o}$dinger equation from noncommutative space to commutative space is obtained.

  20. Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA)); Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Hall, J.D. (Deringer Group, Riva, MD (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents eight tasks performed as part of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project, in which detailed conceptual approaches were produced for each element of the proposed Targets model. The eight task reports together describe the important modules proposed for inclusion in the Targets model: input module, energy module, characteristic development moduel, building cost module, analysis control module, energy cost module, search routines module, and economic analysis module. 16 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Definition of Systematic, Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates (SASMIC) for macromolecular simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Echenique; J. L. Alonso

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of rules is defined to systematically number the groups and the atoms of organic molecules and, particularly, of polypeptides in a modular manner. Supported by this numeration, a set of internal coordinates is defined. These coordinates (termed Systematic, Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates, SASMIC) are straightforwardly written in Z-matrix form and may be directly implemented in typical Quantum Chemistry packages. A number of Perl scripts that automatically generate the Z-matrix files for polypeptides are provided as supplementary material. The main difference with other Z-matrix-like coordinates normally used in the literature is that normal dihedral angles (``principal dihedrals'' in this work) are only used to fix the orientation of whole groups and a somewhat non-standard type of dihedrals, termed ``phase dihedrals'', are used to describe the covalent structure inside the groups. This physical approach allows to approximately separate soft and hard movements of the molecule using only topological information and to directly implement constraints. As an application, we use the coordinates defined and ab initio quantum mechanical calculations to assess the commonly assumed approximation of the free energy, obtained from ``integrating out'' the side chain degree of freedom chi, by the Potential Energy Surface (PES) in the protected dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH2. We also present a sub-box of the Hessian matrix in two different sets of coordinates to illustrate the approximate separation of soft and hard movements when the coordinates defined in this work are used.

  2. Houston-Galveston Region Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston-Galveston Area Council

    2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    18 E. Summary of Related Planning Activities 19 Houston?Galveston Area Council (H-GAC) as Lead Agency Many organizations and transportation service providers are grappling with declining resources to meet the growing number of citizens... comprehensive transportation coordination study led to the development of a pilot project streamlining the delivery of transportation services to qualifying persons unable to rely on a personal car for critical trip-making. However, a regional assessment...

  3. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 1 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final of Bishop's University. The role of the Sustainable Development Summer Intern (SDSI) is to coordinate and organize sustainable development information and activities during the summer months. Ensuring

  4. Conversion of Hanford site well locations to Washington coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, R.A.; Tzemos, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dietz, L.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past construction and survey practices have resulted in the use of multiple local coordinate systems for measuring and reporting the horizontal position of wells and other facilities and locations on the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of a coordinate transformation process and algorithm and its application to the conversion of the horizontal coordinates of Hanford site wells from the various local coordinate systems and datums to a single standard coordinate system, the Washington Coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S). The coordinate transformation algorithm, implemented as a computer program called CTRANS, uses standard two-dimensional translation, rotation, and scaling transformation equations and can be applied to any set of horizontal point locations. For each point to be transformed, the coefficients of the transformation equations are calculated locally, using the coordinates of the three nearest registration points (points with known locations in both coordinate systems). The report contains a discussion of efforts to verify and validate both the software and the well location data, a description of the methods used to estimate transformation and registration point accuracy, instructions for using the computer program, and a summary of the Hanford well conversion results for each local coordinate system and datum. Also included are the results of using recent U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey data to obtain estimated measures of location errors in wells for which the local coordinate data source is undocumented, unverified, and therefore of unknown accuracy.

  5. Advanced emissions control development program: Phase 2 final report, February 29, 1996--August 31, 1997. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.; Holmes, M.J.; Redinger, K.E.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the advanced emissions control development program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals [antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, nickel, and selenium], fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP`s and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals; (2) mercury goes through particulate control devices almost entirely uncontrolled; (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride; and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however additional work is needed to understand the relationship between the wet scrubber`s operating conditions and mercury capture.

  6. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  7. Coordinating Garbage Collection for Arrays of Solid-state Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Junghee [ORNL] [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL] [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although solid-state drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDDs) for a number of workloads, they can exhibit substantial variance in request latency and throughput as a result of garbage collection (GC). When GC conflicts with an I/O stream, the stream can make no forward progress until the GC cycle completes. GC cycles are scheduled by logic internal to the SSD based on several factors such as the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests. When SSDs are used in a RAID with currently available technology, the lack of coordination of the SSD-local GC cycles amplifies this performance variance. We propose a global garbage collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID of SSDs. We include a high-level design of SSD-aware RAID controller and GGC-capable SSD devices and algorithms to coordinate the GGC cycles. We develop reactive and proactive GC coordination algorithms and evaluate their I/O performance and block erase counts for various workloads. Our simulations show that GC coordination by a reactive scheme improves average response time and reduces performance variability for a wide variety of enterprise workloads. For bursty, write-dominated workloads, response time was improved by 69% and performance variability was reduced by 71%. We show that a proactive GC coordination algorithm can further improve the I/O response times by up to 9% and the performance variability by up to 15%. We also observe that it could increase the lifetimes of SSDs with some workloads (e.g. Financial) by reducing the number of block erase counts by up to 79% relative to a reactive algorithm for write-dominant enterprise workloads.

  8. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities that are focused on meeting the President's Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the Federal Energy Resource Modernization (FERM) Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from April 1, 1992, through September 30, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for federal energy managers to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems revitalization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities. Lighting systems and air conditioning projects at federal facilities, especially military bases are updated.

  9. Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring Tool Development: CO2 Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kieki

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary project goal is to develop and test tools for optimization of ECBM recovery and geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds, in addition to tools for monitoring CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbeds to support risk assessment. Three critical topics identified are (1) the integrity of coal bed methane geologic and engineered systems, (2) the optimization of the coal bed storage process, and (3) reliable monitoring and verification systems appropriate to the special conditions of CO{sub 2} storage and flow in coals.

  10. Second-generation PFBC systems research and development: Phase 2, Best efficiency approach in light of current data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Burkhard, F.; Carli, G. [and others

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-Btu gas is produced in the carbonizer by pyrolysis/mild devolatilization of coal in a fluidized bed reactor. Because this unit operates at temperatures much lower than gasifiers currently under development, it also produces char residue. Left untreated, the fuel gas will contain hydrogen sulfide and sulfur-containing tar/light oil vapors; therefore, lime-based sorbents are injected into the carbonizer to catalytically enhance tar cracking and to capture sulfur as calcium sulfide. Sulfur is captured in situ, and the raw fuel gas is fired hot. Thus expensive, complex, fuel gas heat exchangers and chemical or sulfur-capturing bed cleanup systems that are part of the coal gasification combined-cycle plants now being developed are eliminated. The char and calcium sulfide produced in the carbonizer and contained in the fuel gas as elutriated particles are captured by high-temperature filters, rendering the fuel gas essentially particulate-free and able to meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The captured material, with carbonizer bed drains, is collected in a central hopper and injected into the CPFBC through a nitrogen-aerated non-mechanical valve. The high excess air in the combustor transforms the calcium sulfide to sulfate, allowing its disposal with the normal CPFBC spent sorbent. In the CPFBC, the burning char heats the high-excess-air flue gas to 1600{degree}F; any surplus heat is transferred to the FBHE by the recirculation of solids (sorbent and coal fly ash) between the two units. Controlled recirculation is accomplished with cyclone separators and non-mechanical valves. The FBHE contains tube surfaces that cool the circulating solids. Because of the low fluidizing velocity in the FBHE ({le} 1/2 ft/s), the risk of tube erosion is virtually eliminated.

  11. Diversification, Coordination Costs and Organizational Rigidity: Evidence from Microdata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    1 Diversification, Coordination Costs and Organizational Rigidity: Evidence from Microdata First: Diversification, coordination costs, organizational rigidity, productivity #12;2 Diversification, Coordination Costs and Organizational Rigidity: Evidence from Microdata Abstract: This paper examines the impact

  12. Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning, M. I. (2013, August 19). Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials.1037/a0034098 #12;Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials: A Study

  13. Coordination of General Accounting Office Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The order provides policies, procedures, and responsibilities for the coordination of General Accounting Office activities and actions required when GAO reports contain recommendations pertaining to the DOE. Cancels DOE O 2340.1B.

  14. Clause chaining, switch reference and coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonato, Rafael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I ponder over a constellation of phenomena that revolve around switch reference and coordination, drawing mainly on their instantiation in Kisedje (Je, Brazil). I start by investigating Klsedje's case system. ...

  15. SPACECRAFT COORDINATION CONTROL USING PID+ BACKSTEPPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    SPACECRAFT COORDINATION CONTROL USING PID+ BACKSTEPPING Raymond Kristiansen Thomas R. Krogstad a PID+ solution to the problem of relative translational and rotational tracking, using the concept are presented to show the controller performance. Keywords: Spacecraft formation, integrator backstepping, PID

  16. Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator Awards 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator awards winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The recipients will receive their awards at the Clean Cities Conference in Palm Springs, CA.

  17. Loss of coordination in competitive supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Koon Soon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The loss of coordination in supply chains quantifies the inefficiency (i.e. the loss of total profit) due to the presence of competition in the supply chain. In this thesis, we discuss four models: one model with multiple ...

  18. Map-likelihood phasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A map-likelihood function is described that can yield phase probabilities with very low model bias. The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2F{sub o} ? F{sub c} or ?{sub A}-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density.

  19. Development of a new feed channel spacer for reverse osmosis elements. Phase 2 final report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milstead, C.E.; Riley, R.L.

    1998-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phase 1, computer modeling techniques were used as the prime instrument of evaluation of designs for a new feed channel spacer to replace the 30 mil thick standard mesh (Vexar) spacer currently used in ROWPU [Reverse Osmosis Water Processing Unit] spiral-wound elements. A hemispherical peg model, based on a Bed of Nails concept developed in Phase 1, was selected for prototype production of spiral-wound elements for field testing. Evaluation in the See-Thru test cell to observe pressure drops through the spacer, feed mixing patterns and ease of cleaning fouled membrane samples showed considerable benefit over Vexar. This design would be suitable for production by roll embossing (or rotary punching) methods instead of expensive injection molding techniques. A 10{1/2} inch die set was fabricated to prove this concept using a 12 ton press brake. Due to a number of factors, however, the equipment did not work as anticipated and numerous modifications are currently in progress. This work will continue at no cost to the government until completed. A seawater test system has been constructed for field testing of various commercially available feed channel spacers for comparison with the Vexar spacer.

  20. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

  1. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohnsorg, R.W.; Hollar, W.E. Jr.; Lau, S.K. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.; Ko, F.K.; Schatz, K. [Advanced Product Development, Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As reinforcements for composites, VLS SiC fibrils have attractive mechanical properties including high-strength, high modulus, and excellent creep resistance. To make use of their excellent mechanical properties in a composite, a significant volume fraction (>10%) of aligned, long fibrils (>2 mm) needs to be consolidated in the ceramic matrix. The fibrils must be processed into an assembly that will allow for composite fabrication while maintaining fibril alignment and length. With Advanced Product Development (APD) as the yam fabrication subcontractor, Carborundum investigated several approaches to achieve this goaL including traditional yam-forming processes such as carding and air-vortex spinning and nontraditional processes such as tape forming and wet casting. Carborundum additionally performed an economic analysis for producing 500 and 10,000 pounds of SiC fibrils annually using both conservative and more aggressive processing parameters. With the aggressive approach, the projected costs for SiC fibril production for 500 and 10,000 pounds per year are $1,340/pound and $340/pound, respectively.

  2. Beyond the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination Sphere on Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation. Beyond the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination...

  3. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit Evaluation Team Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit Evaluation...

  4. Coordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: An Interorganizational Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spear, Suzanne Evelyn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substance abuse treatment under the Affordable Care Act.Coordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: AnCoordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: An

  5. Energy Saver Heroes: Clean Cities Coordinators | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Saver Heroes: Clean Cities Coordinators Energy Saver Heroes: Clean Cities Coordinators April 2, 2009 - 3:32pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean...

  6. Innovation and Coordination at the Callifornia Fuel Cell Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation and Coordination at the Callifornia Fuel Cell Partnership Innovation and Coordination at the Callifornia Fuel Cell Partnership Presented at Refueling Infrastructure for...

  7. DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers February...

  8. ACADEMIC SUPPORT COORDINATOR POSITION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    to a maximum of $350.00 will be available per candidate for interviews. Please contact the Chair of the Search to develop an Academic Plan: Short- and Long-Term Proactive outreach and tracking Attention to data success indicators of cohorts of entering majors; continually measure progress of individual students

  9. Development of a self-consistent thermodynamic- and transport-property correlation framework for the coal conversion industry. Phase I. Semiannual report, September 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starling, K.E.; Lee, L.L.; Kumar, K.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first half year of this research program the following elements of research have been performed: (1) the development of an improved pure component data bank, including collection and processing of data which is 70% complete as to substance, (2) calculation of distillable coal fluid thermodynamic properties using a multiparameter corresponding states correlation, (3) application of the most general density-cubic equation of pure fluids and (4) initiation of research to extend the corresponding states correlation framework to polar fluids. Primary conclusions of the first phase of this research program are that the three parameter corresponding states correlation predicts lighter coal fluid properties to a reasonable level of accuracy, and that a cubic equation can predict pure fluid thermodynamic properties on par with non-cubic equations of state.

  10. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R. [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Yeates, Todd O., E-mail: yeates@mbi.ucla.edu [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of California, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing.

  11. Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority is a public body, established for the purposes of facilitating, coordinating, and supporting the development, either by the Authority or by other...

  12. Generalized harmonic spatial coordinates and hyperbolic shift conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Alcubierre; Alejandro Corichi; José A. González; Darío Núñez; Bernd Reimann; Marcelo Salgado

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a generalization of the condition for harmonic spatial coordinates analogous to the generalization of the harmonic time slices introduced by Bona et al., and closely related to dynamic shift conditions recently proposed by Lindblom and Scheel, and Bona and Palenzuela. These generalized harmonic spatial coordinates imply a condition for the shift vector that has the form of an evolution equation for the shift components. We find that in order to decouple the slicing condition from the evolution equation for the shift it is necessary to use a rescaled shift vector. The initial form of the generalized harmonic shift condition is not spatially covariant, but we propose a simple way to make it fully covariant so that it can be used in coordinate systems other than Cartesian. We also analyze the effect of the shift condition proposed here on the hyperbolicity of the evolution equations of general relativity in 1+1 dimensions and 3+1 spherical symmetry, and study the possible development of blow-ups. Finally, we perform a series of numerical experiments to illustrate the behavior of this shift condition.

  13. Low cation coordination in oxide melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Lawrie [State University of New York, Stony Brook] [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Du, Jincheng [University of North Texas] [University of North Texas; Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL] [ORNL; Tumber, Sonia [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL] [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Parise, John B [Stony Brook University (SUNY)] [Stony Brook University (SUNY)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  14. Coordination and Efficiency in Decentralized Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Daniel M; Kleinberg, Jon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environments for decentralized on-line collaboration are now widespread on the Web, underpinning open-source efforts, knowledge creation sites including Wikipedia, and other experiments in joint production. When a distributed group works together in such a setting, the mechanisms they use for coordination can play an important role in the effectiveness of the group's performance. Here we consider the trade-offs inherent in coordination in these on-line settings, balancing the benefits to collaboration with the cost in effort that could be spent in other ways. We consider two diverse domains that each contain a wide range of collaborations taking place simultaneously -- Wikipedia and GitHub -- allowing us to study how coordination varies across different projects. We analyze trade-offs in coordination along two main dimensions, finding similar effects in both our domains of study: first we show that, in aggregate, high-status projects on these sites manage the coordination trade-off at a different level than t...

  15. The Development and Optimization of Techniques for Monitoring Water Quality on-Board Spacecraft Using Colorimetric Solid-Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    April Hill

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main focus of this dissertation is the design, development, and ground and microgravity validation of methods for monitoring drinking water quality on-board NASA spacecraft using clorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE). The Introduction will overview the need for in-flight water quality analysis and will detail some of the challenges associated with operations in the absence of gravity. The ability of C-SPE methods to meet these challenges will then be discussed, followed by a literature review on existing applications of C-SPE and similar techniques. Finally, a brief discussion of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy theory, which provides a means for analyte identification and quantification in C-SPE analyses, is presented. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 reports the results from microgravity testing of existing C-SPE methods and procedures aboard NASA's C-9 microgravity simulator. Chapter 2 discusses the development of a C-SPE method for determining the total concentration of biocidal silver (i.e., in both dissolved and colloidal forms) in water samples. Chapter 3 presents the first application of the C-SPE technique to the determination of an organic analyte (i.e., formaldehyde). Chapter 4, which is a departure from the main focus of the thesis, details the results of an investigation into the effect of substrate rotation on the kinetics involved in the antigen and labeling steps in sandwich immunoassays. These research chapters are followed by general conclusions and a prospectus section.

  16. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase III, Industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, Windsor, CT (United States). U.S. Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Massachusetts Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the fourteenth quarter (January `95 through March `95) of the program. The ABB project team met with cognizant DOE-PETC and Penn State personnel on February 15, 1995 at Penn State to discuss our ideas for a new burner (RSFC-based) to replace the HEACC burner prior to the long term ({approximately}1000 hrs) demonstration phase of this project. The main reasons for the proposed new burner were to improve combustion efficiencies and NO{sub x} reduction. Recent, experience at MIT with 5 million Btu/hr coal firing experiments on RSFC burner have shown remarkable performance. Results indicate that RSFC-based burner has the potential to produce lower NO{sub x} and higher carbon conversion efficiencies than the HEACC burner. M.I.T. developed the RSFC burner and obtained a patent for the concept. A decision was made to go with the new, RSFC-based burner during 1000 hr demonstration. ABB-CE will fund the costs ({approximately}$50K) for design/fabrication of the proposed new burner. Penn State plans to improve coal handling by installation of a gravimetric feeder and redesign/installation of a mass flow bottom on the surge bin.

  17. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.

  18. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems, Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Kramer, W.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report also analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.

  19. FAULT & COORDINATION STUDY FOR T PLANT COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD, G.P.; BOYD-BODIAU, E.A.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short circuit study is performed to determine the maximum fault current that the system protective devices, transformers, and interconnections would he subject to in event of a three phase, phase-to-phase, or phase-to-ground fault. Generally, the short circuit study provides the worst case fault current levels at each bus or connection point of the system.

  20. Development and initial evaluation of a dynamic species-resolved model for gas phase chemistry and size-resolved gas//particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    condensed products of gas phase oxidation, the present model can be viewed as the most detailed SOA of the semivolatile or nonvolatile products of VOC oxidation between the gas and particle phases. Chem- ical analysis of the SOA identifies many products that condense, thereby allowing formulation of gas phase path- ways

  1. DOE-TSPP-06; Coordination of DOE Technical Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 2.1.6 Coordination of Technical Qualification Standards and Information Architecture Standards......

  2. THE MC AND A COUNCIL AT SSC RF - IPPE AS A COORDINATING BODY FOR SYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISHBONE,L.VALENTE,J.HANLEY,T.HIRSCHI,E.J.RUSS,P.SCHERER-KATZ,C.

    2004-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation--Institute of Physics and Power Engineering's (SSC RF-IPPE) practice of nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) has undergone significant changes during the period of cooperation with U.S. national laboratories from 1995 to the present. These changes corresponded with general changes of the Russian system of state control and accounting of nuclear materials resulting from the new Concept of the System for State Regulating and Control of Nuclear Materials (1996) and further regulatory documents, which were developed and implemented to take into account international experience in the MC&A [1]. During the upgrades phase of Russian-U.S. cooperation, an MC&A laboratory was specially created within the SSC RF IPPE for the purpose of guiding the creation of the upgraded MC&A system, coordinating the activities of all units involved in the creation of this system, and implementing a unified technical policy during the transition period. After five years of operation of the MC&A laboratory and the implementation of new components for the upgraded MC&A system, it was decided that a greater degree of attention must be paid to the MC&A system's operation in addition to the coordination activities carried out by the MC&A laboratory. To meet this need, an organization for operation of the nuclear material (NM) control and accounting system was created as part of the Division of NM Transportation and Storage. It was also recognized that a new mechanism was required for effective coordination of MC&A activities in IPPE, including the implementation of a unified MC&A policy in methodological, technical and practical areas. This mechanism should allow the IPPE management to gain an objective evaluation of the MC&A system status and provide leading specialists with objective recommendations on maintenance of MC&A system and on basic directions for further improvements. Preliminary discussions indicated that such a mechanism could be created through the establishment of an MC&A Council at SSC RF-IPPE. The MC&A Council has been created in SSC RF-IPPE as an advisory body without administrative functions. However it is stated in the Council Regulations that if the IPPE Director General or his Deputy responsible for NM control and accounting approves Council recommendations, the recommendations become obligatory. In this paper, the experience of the Council and its initial activities are presented and discussed in, as are possible activities and roles the Council could play in the future.

  3. Phase transitions and equation of state of CsI under high pressure and the development of a focusing system for x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yan.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase transitions and equation of state of ionic solid cesium iodide were studied under high pressure and room temperature in a diamond anvil cell. The studies were carried out using both energy dispersive and angular dispersive diffraction methods on synchrotron radiation sources over the pressure range from atmospheric pressure to over 300 gigapascals (3 million atmospheres). CsI undergoes a distinct phase transition at about 40 GPa, a pressure that is much lower than the reported insulator-metal transition at 110 GPa, from the atmospheric pressure B2(CsCl) structure to an orthorhombic structure. At higher pressures, a continuous distortion in the structure was observed with a final structure similar to a hcp lattice under ultra high pressure. No volume discontinuity was observed at the insulator-metal transition. The newly found transition sequence is different from the result of previous static compression studies. The current structure has a smaller unit cell volume than the previous assignment. This has resolved a long existing controversy among the previous static compression studies, the dynamic compression studies, and the theoretical studies. The current results also explain the apparent discrepancy between the present study and the previous static studies. We also present the development of a focusing system for high energy x-rays (> 12 keV) that is particularly suited for high pressure diffraction studies. This system uses a pair of multilayer coated spherical mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry. A focused beam size less than 10 micron in diameter can be readily achieved with sufficient intensity to perform diffraction studies. 93 refs., 46 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Twenty-second automotive technology development contractors' coordination meeting: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-four papers and reviews are arranged under the following session headings: alcohol fuels; liquid hydrocarbon and gaseous fuels; Stirling technology (two sessions); industry perspectives; heavy duty transport technology (two sessions); gas turbine technology; and ceramic technology (two sessions). (DLC)

  5. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartmentCAIRSPlanningLaboratory, JuneOMERDepartment23

  7. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartmentCAIRSPlanningLaboratory,

  8. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

  9. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals-Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond Hobbs

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP)--conversion of coal to methane--is being developed through NETL with a DOE Grant and has successfully completed its first phase of development. The results so far are encouraging and have led to commitment by DOE/NETL to begin a second phase--bench scale reactor vessel testing, expanded engineering analysis and economic perspective review. During the next decade new means of generating electricity, and other forms of energy, will be introduced. The members of the AHP Team envision a need for expanded sources of natural gas or substitutes for natural gas, to fuel power generating plants. The initial work the team has completed on a process to use hydrogen to convert coal to methane (pipeline ready gas) shows promising potential. The Team has intentionally slanted its efforts toward the needs of US electric utilities, particularly on fuels that can be used near urban centers where the greatest need for new electric generation is found. The process, as it has evolved, would produce methane from coal by adding hydrogen. The process appears to be efficient using western coals for conversion to a highly sought after fuel with significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. Utilities have a natural interest in the preservation of their industry, which will require a dramatic reduction in stack emissions and an increase in sustainable technologies. Utilities tend to rank long-term stable supplies of fuel higher than most industries and are willing to trade some ratio of cost for stability. The need for sustainability, stability and environmentally compatible production are key drivers in the formation and progression of the AHP development. In Phase II, the team will add a focus on water conservation to determine how the basic gasification process can be best integrated with all the plant components to minimize water consumption during SNG production. The process allows for several CO{sub 2} reduction options including consumption of the CO{sub 2} in the original process as converted to methane. The process could under another option avoid emissions following the conversion to SNG through an adjunct algae conversion process. The algae would then be converted to fuels or other products. An additional application of the algae process at the end use natural gas fired plant could further reduce emissions. The APS team fully recognizes the competition facing the process from natural gas and imported liquid natural gas. While we expect those resources to set the price for methane in the near-term, the team's work to date indicates that the AHP process can be commercially competitive, with the added benefit of assuring long-term energy supplies from North American resources. Conversion of coal to a more readily transportable fuel that can be employed near load centers with an overall reduction of greenhouses gases is edging closer to reality.

  10. Effect of Ligand Structural Isomerism in Formation of Calcium Coordination Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plonka A. M.; Parise J.; Banerjee, D.

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using different structural isomers (2,5-; 2,4-; 2;6-; 3,4-; 3,5-) of pyridinedicarboxylic acid, nine calcium-based coordination networks were synthesized under hydro-/solvothermal conditions and/or were produced via solvent recrystallization of previously synthesized compounds. The coordination networks reported were characterized using single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermal methods. They show diverse structural topologies, depending on the ligand geometry and coordinated solvent molecules, with inorganic connectivity motifs ranging from isolated octahedra to infinite chains, layer and a three-dimensional dense framework. The as-synthesized and desolvated networks further show structural transformation to hydrated phases through dissolution/reformation pathways. The process is likely driven by the high hydration energy of the calcium metal center.

  11. The Thirteenth Annual Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Report for Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. (DJE 2005)

  12. Switched System Models for Coordinated Cyber-Physical Attack Construction and Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    Switched System Models for Coordinated Cyber-Physical Attack Construction and Simulation Shan Liu the need to develop intelligent models of cyber-physical attacks that produce salient disruptions. In this paper, we present a foundation for the development of a class of intelligent cyber-physical attacks

  13. Thermodynamics, Optical Properties and Coordination Modes of Np(V) with Dipicolinic Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Guoxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics, Optical Properties and Coordination Modes ofacid, complexation, thermodynamics, coordination mode 1.

  14. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

  15. Residence Coordinator Agreement Concerning University Provided Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    Residence Coordinator Agreement Concerning University Provided Housing I understand-campus apartments and provides such housing. My acceptance of employment also constitutes my agreement to the following terms related to housing provided to me by the University: 1. I agree to make no substantial

  16. Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling Rodion M. Podorozhny , Barbara Staudt describes experience in applying a resource man- agement system to problems in two areas of agent and activity coordi- nation. In the paper we argue that precise speci cation of resources is important

  17. Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling Rodion M. Podorozhny , Barbara Staudt describes experience in applying a resource man­ agement system to problems in two areas of agent and activity coordi­ nation. In the paper we argue that precise specification of resources is important

  18. Quantum mechanics with coordinate dependent noncommutativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupriyanov, V. G. [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)] [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Noncommutative quantum mechanics can be considered as a first step in the construction of quantum field theory on noncommutative spaces of generic form, when the commutator between coordinates is a function of these coordinates. In this paper we discuss the mathematical framework of such a theory. The noncommutativity is treated as an external antisymmetric field satisfying the Jacobi identity. First, we propose a symplectic realization of a given Poisson manifold and construct the Darboux coordinates on the obtained symplectic manifold. Then we define the star product on a Poisson manifold and obtain the expression for the trace functional. The above ingredients are used to formulate a nonrelativistic quantum mechanics on noncommutative spaces of general form. All considered constructions are obtained as a formal series in the parameter of noncommutativity. In particular, the complete algebra of commutation relations between coordinates and conjugated momenta is a deformation of the standard Heisenberg algebra. As examples we consider a free particle and an isotropic harmonic oscillator on the rotational invariant noncommutative space.

  19. Training and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Training and Development Administration Assistant Vice Chancellor Lori Castro VC Business Senior Manager Conflict Resolution Nancy Heischman Training Coordinator Vacant Principal Technical Training Consultant Frank Widman Health Care Facilitator / Interim Benefits Manager Frank Trueba Disability

  20. Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleck, R.

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

  1. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  2. The project PPPserve (Network based GNSS Phase Biases to enhance PPP Applications A new Service Level of GNSS Reference Station Provider) aims at the development and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Harald

    PPPserve The project PPPserve (Network based GNSS Phase Biases to enhance PPP Applications Standard (RTCM 3.2, State Space Representation = SSR) which supports PPP. New receiver hard and software are the missing link at user side to allow for PPP based phase ambiguity resolution. Applying relevant satellite

  3. NMR with generalized dynamics of spin and spatial coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chang Jae

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is concerned with theoretical and experimental aspects of the generalized dynamics of nuclear spin and spatial coordinates under magnetic-field pulses and mechanical motions. The main text begins with an introduction to the concept of ''fictitious'' interactions. A systematic method for constructing fictitious spin-1/2 operators is given. The interaction of spins with a quantized-field is described. The concept of the fictitious interactions under the irradiation of multiple pulses is utilized to design sequences for selectively averaging linear and bilinear operators. Relations between the low-field sequences and high-field iterative schemes are clarified. These relations and the transformation properties of the spin operators are exploited to develop schemes for heteronuclear decoupling of multi-level systems. The resulting schemes are evaluated for heteronuclear decoupling of a dilute spin-1/2 from a spin-1 in liquid crystal samples and from a homonuclear spin-1/2 pair in liquids. A relation between the spin and the spatial variables is discussed. The transformation properties of the spin operators are applied to spatial coordinates and utilized to develop methods for removing the orientational dependence responsible for line broadening in a powder sample. Elimination of the second order quadrupole effects, as well as the first order anisotropies is discussed. It is shown that various sources of line broadening can effectively be eliminated by spinning and/or hopping the sample about judiciously chosen axes along with appropriate radio-frequency pulse sequences.

  4. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  5. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3, Industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 13, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Massachusetts Univ. (United States)

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. During this reporting period, activities included completing the ``Task 3 Topical Report.`` The report is being reviewed internally by the ABB CE project team. Overall, all the program goals were met except carbon conversion efficiency. Based on all the results obtained to date the ABB CE/Penn State team believes that conducting the 1000 hr demonstration (Task 5) is warranted. Since, Penn State has planned to conduct long term combustion tests on micronized coal and coal-water fuels for other DOE-funded Projects during the first quarter of 1995, the demonstration phase (Task 5) of the subject program is tentatively scheduled to begin in June 1995, pending DOE approval. Work continued under Task 4.0 to complete the ``Commercialization Plan`` with ABB CE`s cognizant Business Unit. To address the lower combustion efficiency than the original project goal (95% vs 98%) during Task 3, the data were evaluated in-detail to understand which of the key parameters might be adjusted to achieve the desired burnout. To identify reasons for this lower combustion efficiency, and to evaluate which of the key parameters (i.e, coal fineness, residence time, coal reactivities etc.) are important for maximizing the combustion efficiency, ABB CE`s proprietary mathematical model known as the Lower Furnace Program-Slice Kinetic Model (LFP-SKM) was used for simulating the combustion process in the Penn State boiler (at full load firing rate). Fuel kinetic information for this study was selected on a surrogate basis from ABB CE`s extensive in-house data base.

  6. Weitzenböck's Torsion, Fermi Coordinates and Adapted Frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Bahram Mashhoon

    2015-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Weitzenb\\"ock's torsion and discuss its properties. Specifically, we calculate the measured components of Weitzenb\\"ock's torsion tensor for a frame field adapted to static observers in a Fermi normal coordinate system that we establish along the world line of an arbitrary accelerated observer in general relativity. A similar calculation is carried out in the standard Schwarzschild-like coordinates for static observers in the exterior Kerr spacetime; we then compare our results with the corresponding curvature components. Our work supports the contention that in the extended general relativistic framework involving both the Levi-Civita and Weitzenb\\"ock connections, curvature and torsion provide complementary representations of the gravitational field.

  7. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, S. R., E-mail: shudson@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Suzuki, Y. [National Institute for Natural Sciences, National Institute for Fusion Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become “straight” and islands become “square.”.

  8. Noncommutative theories and general coordinate transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fosco, C.D. [Centro Atomico de Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Torroba, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the class of noncommutative theories in d dimensions whose spatial coordinates (x{sub i}){sub i=1}{sup d} can be obtained by performing a smooth change of variables on (y{sub i}){sub i=1}{sup d}, the coordinates of a standard noncommutative theory, which satisfy the relation [y{sub i},y{sub j}]=i{theta}{sub ij}, with a constant {theta}{sub ij} tensor. The x{sub i} variables verify a commutation relation which is, in general, space dependent. We study the main properties of this special kind of noncommutative theory and show explicitly that, in two dimensions, any theory with a space-dependent commutation relation can be mapped to another where that {theta}{sub ij} is constant.

  9. HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities – that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

  10. Localization and Coordination in Decentralized Multi-Robot Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    Localization and Coordination in Decentralized Multi-Robot Systems Patricia Kristine Sheridan Supervisor: Professor B. Benhabib Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering University of Toronto March, 2009 #12;Localization and Coordination in Decentralized Multi-Robot Systems ABSTRACT

  11. Fiscal policy coordination in times of economic and financial crises 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rommerskirchen, Charlotte Sophie

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines fiscal policy coordination in the EU during the Great Recession (2008-2010). For the first time since the Maastricht Treaty heralded the coordination of macroeconomic policies among EU Member States, ...

  12. Acquaintanceship, familiarity, and coordinated laughter in writing tutorials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thonus, Terese

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sequenced, simultaneous, and extended laughter. Familiarity, viewed as a continuum,was also investigated with reference to coordinated laughter. Results showed that coordinated laughter was indeed more frequent in acquainted-pair interactions, and in those...

  13. automated optimal coordination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Pathwise coordinate optimization CiteSeer Summary: We consider one-at-a-time coordinate-wise descent algorithms...

  14. areas joint coordinating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resolution; support of analytical modelling; and description of the organizational environment. Keywords : coordination; group decision support; collaborative office processes;...

  15. Coordinating Pediatric Medical Care during an Influenza Pandemic - Hospital Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workbook is intended to assist hospitals with coordinating medical care for pediatric influenza-like illness across their community.

  16. Outreach Letter Template for Clean Cities Coordinators Promoting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Letter Template for Clean Cities Coordinators Promoting the Workplace Charging Challenge ccoutreachlettertemplate-final.docx More Documents & Publications Outreach Letter...

  17. ENVS 404: Internship Syllabus Contact Information: Internship Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ENVS 404: Internship Syllabus Contact Information: Internship Coordinator Peg Boulay Environmental Leadership Program Co-Director, Internship Coordinator and Academic Adviser 242 Columbia Hall 541-346-5945 boulay@uoregon.edu Note: The Internship Coordinator position may also be filled by a Graduate Teaching

  18. 2008-2009 Graduate Coordinators Program Contact Person Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    & Design Ms. Patricia Mink , Coordinator 5739 MINK@etsu.edu 70708 Biological Sciences: Microbiology Dr. Bert Lampson, Coordinator 4572 LAMPSON@etsu.edu 70673 Biological Sciences: Biology Dr. Mike Zavada, Chair & Coordinator 6919 ZAVADAM@etsu.edu 70703 Biological Sciences: Paleontology Dr. Blaine Schubert

  19. SME dependence and coordination in innovation networks RESEARCH PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SME dependence and coordination in innovation networks RESEARCH PAPER Elodie Gardet elodie and characterize the coordination systems used by SME hub firms that are in a situation of dependence with respect of the adequate coordination mechanims is central for a SME hub firm and the success of the innovation project

  20. General Methodology for developing UML models from UI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Ch Ram Mohan; Srinivasa, K G; Kumar, T V Suresh; Kanth, K Rajani

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent past every discipline and every industry have their own methods of developing products. It may be software development, mechanics, construction, psychology and so on. These demarcations work fine as long as the requirements are within one discipline. However, if the project extends over several disciplines, interfaces have to be created and coordinated between the methods of these disciplines. Performance is an important quality aspect of Web Services because of their distributed nature. Predicting the performance of web services during early stages of software development is significant. In Industry, Prototype of these applications is developed during analysis phase of Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). However, Performance models are generated from UML models. Methodologies for predicting the performance from UML models is available. Hence, In this paper, a methodology for developing Use Case model and Activity model from User Interface is presented. The methodology is illustrated with a case...

  1. Tucson's Solar Experience: Developing PV with RFPs and PPAs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tucson's Solar Experience: Developing PV with RFPs and PPAs Bruce Plenk Solar Coordinator City of Tucson Office of Conservation and Sustainable Development DOE EERE- January 15,...

  2. Nucleon-nucleon potentials in phase-space representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Feldmeier; T. Neff; D. Weber

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase-space representation of nuclear interactions, which depends on the distance $\\vec{r}$ and relative momentum $\\vec{p}$ of the nucleons, is presented. A method is developed that permits to extract the interaction $V(\\vec{r},\\vec{p})$ from antisymmetrized matrix elements given in a spherical basis with angular momentum quantum numbers, either in momentum or coordinate space representation. This representation visualizes in an intuitive way the non-local behavior introduced by cutoffs in momentum space or renormalization procedures that are used to adapt the interaction to low momentum many-body Hilbert spaces, as done in the unitary correlation operator method or with the similarity renormalization group. It allows to develop intuition about the various interactions and illustrates how the softened interactions reduce the short-range repulsion in favor of non-locality or momentum dependence while keeping the scattering phase shifts invariant. It also reveals that these effective interactions can have undesired complicated momentum dependencies at momenta around and above the Fermi momentum. Properties, similarities and differences of the phase-space representations of the Argonne and the N3LO chiral potential, and their UCOM and SRG derivatives are discussed.

  3. Opening Remarks by George W. Arnold, National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Opening Remarks by George W. Arnold, National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability Conference on Smart Grid Interoperability Standards January 31, 2011 Introduction Chairman Wellinghoff the opportunity to escribe NIST's and our partners efforts to develop standards for an interoperable d smart grid

  4. Multiple Coordinated Views for Network Attack Graphs Steven Noel Michael Jacobs Pramod Kalapa Sushil Jajodia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Steven

    Multiple Coordinated Views for Network Attack Graphs Steven Noel Michael Jacobs Pramod Kalapa graph-based representations have been developed for modeling combinations of low-level network attacks, relatively little attention has been paid to effective techniques for visualizing such attack graphs

  5. User's Guide to MBC3: Multi-Blade Coordinate Transformation Code for 3-Bladed Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, G. S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide explains how to use MBC3, a MATLAB-based script NREL developed to perform multi-blade coordinate transformation of system matrices for three-bladed wind turbines. In its current form, MBC3 can be applied to system matrices generated by FAST.2.

  6. The coordinate coherent states approach revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, Yan-Gang, E-mail: miaoyg@nankai.edu.cn; Zhang, Shao-Jun, E-mail: sjzhang@mail.nankai.edu.cn

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the coordinate coherent states approach through two different quantization procedures in the quantum field theory on the noncommutative Minkowski plane. The first procedure, which is based on the normal commutation relation between an annihilation and creation operators, deduces that a point mass can be described by a Gaussian function instead of the usual Dirac delta function. However, we argue this specific quantization by adopting the canonical one (based on the canonical commutation relation between a field and its conjugate momentum) and show that a point mass should still be described by the Dirac delta function, which implies that the concept of point particles is still valid when we deal with the noncommutativity by following the coordinate coherent states approach. In order to investigate the dependence on quantization procedures, we apply the two quantization procedures to the Unruh effect and Hawking radiation and find that they give rise to significantly different results. Under the first quantization procedure, the Unruh temperature and Unruh spectrum are not deformed by noncommutativity, but the Hawking temperature is deformed by noncommutativity while the radiation specturm is untack. However, under the second quantization procedure, the Unruh temperature and Hawking temperature are untack but the both spectra are modified by an effective greybody (deformed) factor. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggest a canonical quantization in the coordinate coherent states approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prove the validity of the concept of point particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apply the canonical quantization to the Unruh effect and Hawking radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Find no deformations in the Unruh temperature and Hawking temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provide the modified spectra of the Unruh effect and Hawking radiation.

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

  8. Widget:CoordinatesHelper | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to:Westwood RenewablesBoundingCoordinatesHelpergenerates

  9. Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department of Energy Coordinating Energy

  10. A robust coordinated control scheme for HVDC transmission with parallel AC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    To, K.W.V.; David, A.K. (Hong Kong Polytechnic (Hong Kong). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Hammad, A.E. (N.E. Swiss Power Co., Baden (Switzerland))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a practical control philosophy for HVDC transmission in parallel operation to an AC system with particular emphasis on coordination of both transient and dynamic stability. Systematic development of the control scheme on the basis of on-line identification, optimal control and rule-based bang-optimal coordination principles is presented. Verification tests of the scheme on a physical HVDC/AC system simulator show that the simple control computer algorithm is practical and robust. The controller can successfully distinguish between different system fault severities and adapts its output signals to provide maximum synchronizing torque and ensure optimal damping of power oscillations.

  11. Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in a model Ti-Mo-Al alloy studied by direct coupling of transmission Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta...

  12. Controlling the Emission of Electromagnetic Sources by Coordinate transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Luo; Jingjing Zhang; Lixin Ran; Hongsheng Chen; Jin Au Kong

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordinate transformation on the space that contains electromagnetic sources is studied. We find that, not only the permittivity and permeability tensors of the media, but also the sources inside the media will take another form in order to behave equivalently as the original case. It is demonstrated that, a source of arbitrary shape and position in the free space can be replaced by an appropriately designed metamaterial coating with current distributed on the inner surface and would not be detected by outer observers, because the emission of the source can be controlled at will in this way. As examples, we show how to design conformal antennas by covering the sources with transformation media. The method proposed in this letter provides a completely new approach to develop novel active EM devices.

  13. Abstract Two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) comprise an aqueous phase containing all non-carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Abstract Two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) comprise an aqueous phase containing all non developed to address this issue is two-phase par- titioning bioreactor (TPPB) technology which involves

  14. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  15. Emission coordinates for the navigation in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tartaglia

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A general approach to the problem of positioning by means of pulsars or other pulsating sources located at infinity is described. The counting of the pulses for a set of different sources whose positions in the sky and periods are assumed to be known, is used to provide null emission, or light, coordinates for the receiver. The measurement of the proper time intervals between successive arrivals of the signals from the various sources is used to give the final localization of the receiver, within an accuracy controlled by the precision of the onboard clock. The deviation from the flat case is discussed, separately considering the different possible causes: local gravitational potential, finiteness of the distance of the source, proper motion of the source, period decay, proper acceleration due to non-gravitational forces. Calculations turn out to be simple and the result is highly positive. The method can also be applied to a constellation of satellites orbiting the Earth.

  16. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

  17. Compact-range coordinate system established using a laser tracker.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, Floyd H.; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishing a Cartesian coordinate reference system for an existing Compact Antenna Range using the parabolic reflector is presented. A SMX (Spatial Metrix Corporation) M/N 4000 laser-based coordinate measuring system established absolute coordinates for the facility. Electric field characteristics with positional movement correction are evaluated. Feed Horn relocation for alignment with the reflector axis is also described. Reference points are established for follow-on non-laser alignments utilizing a theodolite.

  18. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Annual Report for Fiscal Year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. Table 1 lists significant events in the history of use of geothermal energy in the U.S., starting in1884. That is useful for tracking which Federal departments and agencies managed aspects of this work over time. Table 2 gives a complete accounting for all Federal outlays for geothermal energy development for FY 1979 - 1989, including non-DOE outlays. Table 3 shows the status of the U.S. Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program at end of FY 1989: of the $500 million authorized, $285 million was committed to eight projects, and about $40 million had been paid out on project defaults. An additional $101 million had been repaid by the borrowers. (DJE 2005)

  19. The appearance of coordinate shocks in hyperbolic formalisms of General Realtivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Alcubierre

    1997-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the appearance of shocks in hyperbolic formalisms of General Relativity. I study the particular case of the Bona-Masso formalism with zero shift vector and show how shocks associated with two families of characteristic fields can develop. These shocks do not represent discontinuities in the geometry of spacetime, but rather regions where the coordinate system becomes pathological. For this reason I call them coordinate shocks. I show how one family of shocks can be eliminated by restricting the Bona-Masso slicing condition to a special case. The other family of shocks, however, can not be eliminated even in the case of harmonic slicing. I also show the results of numerical simulations in the special cases of a flat two-dimensional spacetime, a flat four-dimensional spacetime with a spherically symmetric slicing, and a spherically symmetric black hole spacetime. In all three cases coordinate shocks readily develop, confirming the predictions of the mathematical analysis. Although here I concentrate in the Bona-Masso formalism, the phenomena of coordinate shocks should arise in any other hyperbolic formalism. In particular, since the appearance of the shocks is determined by the choice of gauge, the results presented here imply that in any formalism the use of a harmonic slicing can generate shocks.

  20. Efficient random coordinate descent algorithms for large-scale ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    (will be inserted by the editor). Efficient random coordinate descent algorithms for large-scale structured nonconvex optimization. Andrei Patrascu · Ion Necoara.

  1. Efficient Block-coordinate Descent Algorithms for the Group Lasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiwei (Tony) Qin

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 10, 2010 ... First, we propose a general version of the Block Coordinate Descent (BCD) algorithm for the Group Lasso that employs an efficient approach ...

  2. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown...

  3. The Announcement Layer: Beacon Coordination for the Sensornet Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunkels, Adam

    consumption. #12;MAC / Link layers ... ... Multiple, uncoordinated beacons Collect Trickle Deluge Collect Trickle Deluge Coordinated beacons Announcement layer MAC / Link layers Fig. 1. The announcement layer

  4. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Response: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Coordination of Energy Efficiency and...

  5. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

  6. Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Free Energy Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using...

  7. Workplace Charging Challenge: Press Release template for Clean Cities coordinators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An editable press release that Clean Cities coordinators can use to announce local Partners' participation in the EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge

  8. Role of Metal Coordination Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalyt...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalytic Activity of Ternary Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Role of Metal Coordination Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalytic...

  9. Optimization Online - Stochastic Quasi-Fejér Block-Coordinate Fixed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick L. Combettes

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 29, 2014 ... Stochastic Quasi-Fejér Block-Coordinate Fixed Point Iterations with Random Sweeping. Patrick L. Combettes (plc ***at*** math.jussieu.fr)

  10. Interagency Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council's WSRA...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Instructions: Interagency Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council's WSRA Section 7(a) FlowchartsPermitting...

  11. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  12. Phases I-C, I-D and I-E development of Kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat pump system. Final report, January 1986-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.E.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas-heat-pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine under development for over a decade. The engine was converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1990. In these phases, an HVAC systems manufacturer (York International) has been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Data are presented for environmental laboratory testing of both prototype gas heat pumps as well as durability, reliability, performance, and emission testing of the V160 Stirling engine. A number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described.

  13. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  14. An experimental method for investigating phase transformations in the heat affected zone of welds using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Froba, M.; Waide, P.A.; Larson, E.M.

    1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Although welding is an established technology used in many industrial settings, it is least understand terms of the phases that actually exist, the variation of their spatial disposition with time, and the rate of transformation from one phase to another at various thermal coordinates in the vicinity of the weld. With the availability of high flux and, more recently, high brightness synchrotron x-radiation sources, a number of diffraction and spectroscopic methods have been developed for structural characterization with improved spatial and temporal resolutions to enable in-situ measurements of phases under extreme temperature, pressure and other processing conditions not readily accessible with conventional sources. This paper describes the application of spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) for in-situ investigations of phase transformations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of fusion welds. Results are presented for gas tungsten (GTA) welds in commercially pure titanium that show the existence of the high temperature bcc {beta}-phase in a 3.3 {plus_minus} 0.3 mm wide HA band adjacent to the liquid weld pool. Phase concentration profiles derived from the SRXRD data further show the co-existence of both the low temperature hcp ({alpha}-phase and the {beta}-phase in the partially, transformed region of the HA. These results represent the first direct observations of solid state phase transformations and mapping of phase boundaries in fusion welds. SRXRD experiments of this type are needed as experimental input for modeling of kinetics of phase transformations and microstructural evolution under the highly non-isothermal conditions produced during welding.

  15. The freezing tendency towards 4-coordinated amorphous network causes increase in heat capacity of supercooled Stillinger-Weber silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankaj A. Apte; Nandlal Pingua; Arvind Kumar Gautam; Uday Kumar; Soohaeng Yoo Willow; Xiao Cheng Zeng; B. D. Kulkarni

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercooled liquid silicon, modeled by Stillinger-Weber potential, shows anomalous increase in heat capacity $C_p$, with a maximum $C_p$ value close to 1060 K at zero pressure. We study equilibration and relaxation of the supercooled SW Si, in the temperature range of 1060 K--1070 K at zero pressure. We find that as the relaxation of the metastable supercooled liquid phase initiates, a straight line region (SLR) is formed in cumulative potential energy distributions. The configurational temperature corresponding to the SLR is close to 1060 K, which was earlier identified as the freezing temperature of 4-coordinated amorphous network. The SLR is found to be tangential to the distribution of the metastable liquid phase and thus influences the broadness of the distribution. As the bath temperature is reduced from 1070 K to 1060 K, the effective temperature approaches the bath temperature which results in broadening of the metastable phase distribution. This, in turn, causes an increase in overall fluctuations of potential energy and hence an increase of heat capacity. We also find that during initial stages of relaxation, 4-coordinated atoms form 6-membered rings with a chair--like structure and other structural units that indicate crystallization. Simultaneously a strong correlation is established between the number of chair-shaped 6-membered rings and the number of 4-coordinated atoms in the system. This shows that all properties related to 4-coordinated particles are highly correlated as the SLR is formed in potential energy distributions and this can be interpreted as a consequence of `freezing' of amorphous network formed by 4-coordinated particles.

  16. Developing a Fire Danger Rating System for the UK: FireBeaters Phase I final report. Report to the Scottish Wildfire Forum. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legg, Colin J; Davies, Gwilym Matthew; Kitchen, Karl; Marno, Penny

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction and objectives The objective of this research is to develop a predictive tool for the management of wildfire in the UK and for facilitating good practice by those who work with fire in semi-natural vegetation. ...

  17. Phase-Change Frame Walls (PCFWs) for On-Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Residential Buildings: Development, Construction and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, M.; Medina, M. A.; King, J. B.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this work was to develop a thermally enhanced frame wall that would reduce peak load air conditioning demand, shift a portion of the thermal load, and conserve energy in residential buildings. A frame wall containing...

  18. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council fifth annual report. Final draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, Fred H.

    1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy is the natural heat of the earth, and can be tapped as a clean, safe, economical alternative source of energy. Much of the geothermal energy resource is recoverable with current or near-current technology and could make a significant contribution both to increasing domestic energy supplies and to reducing the US dependence on imported oil. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural process applications. This report describes the progress for fiscal year 1980 (FY80) of the Federal Geothermal Program. It also summarizes the goals, strategy, and plans which form the basis for the FY81 and FY82 program activities and reflects the recent change in national policy affecting Federal research, development and demonstration programs. The Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC) believes that substantial progress can and will be made in the development of geothermal energy. The IGCC goals are: (1) reduce the institutional barriers so that geothermal projects can be on-line in one-half the current time; (2) make moderate temperature resources an economically competitive source of electricity; (3) remove the backlog of noncompetitive lease applications; (4) competitive lease all KGRA lands; and (5) cut the cost of hydrothermal technology by 25%.

  19. Coordinating a Constrained Channel with Linear Wholesale Price Contracts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsitsiklis, John

    Coordinating a Constrained Channel with Linear Wholesale Price Contracts. Navid Sabbaghi, Yossi, there is a set of linear wholesale price contracts that coordinates the channel while allowing the supplier-supplier/one-newsvendor channel configuration (with each supplier selling a unique product). We analyze how this set of wholesale

  20. Barycentric coordinates for Lagrange interpolation over lattices on a simplex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krajnc, Marjeta

    Barycentric coordinates for Lagrange interpolation over lattices on a simplex Gasper Jaklic (gasper on a simplex in Rd is studied. The lattice points are explicitly given in barycentric coordinates. This enables the construction and the efficient evaluation of the Lagrange interpolating polynomial over a lattice on a simplex

  1. The coordinates of isolated accumulations are exactly computable real numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, Jérôme

    The coordinates of isolated accumulations are exactly computable real numbers J´er^ome Durand and Smale. The key is that accumulations can be de- vised to accelerate the computation and provide an exact for coordinates and speeds, the collections of positions of accumulations in both space and time are exactly

  2. Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Coordinated Study Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Studies 3 UNIV 7200 Liberal Studies Seminar 3 UNIV 7996 Special Project 3 Coordinated Study ­ Courses a contract for a specific course of study leading to the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies; the Graduate must be approved by the Graduate Coordinator prior to certification for graduation. Student signature

  3. Article 003S02 Eye-hand coordination 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriques, Denise Y. P.

    Article 003S02 Eye-hand coordination 1 Correspondence and reprint requests to: J. Douglas Crawford by a Human Frontier Science Program Fellowship. Abstract Eye-hand coordination is complicated by the fact that the eyes are constantly in motion relative to the head.This poses problems in interpreting the spatial

  4. Coordinating Tectons: Bipyridyl Terminated Allenylidene Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Lengkeek, Nigel A.; Petrie, Simon; Sanford, Vanessa; Schauer, Phil A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Stranger, Robert; White, Allan H. (UWA); (ANU)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of complexes with {pi}-conjugated carbon chains terminated by bipyridyl moieties has been prepared. These allenylidene complexes were derived from 9-hydroxy-9-ethynyl-4,5-diazafluorene, the preparation of which is reported; the new allenylidene complexes are highly colored with the cumulated carbon chain terminating in a bipyridyl unit providing a site for further coordination. The synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structure determination of trans-[MCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]PF{sub 6} (M = Ru, P{intersection}P = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm), 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe), 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe); M = Os, P{intersection}P = dppm) are described. The effect of the variation in metal and ligand on electronic and electrochemical characteristics of these complexes has been investigated by using UV-vis, solution electrochemistry, and a combination of these techniques in spectroelectrochemical experiments. DFT calculations have been performed on trans-[RuCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]{sup q} (P{intersection}P = dppm, bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (dmpm); q = -1, 0, +1, +2) and subsequently solvent-corrected calculations with use of COSMO were also undertaken to examine the nature of electronic transitions in various oxidation states.

  5. Emission vs Fermi coordinates: applications to relativistic positioning systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Matteo Luca Ruggiero; Angelo Tartaglia

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-dimensional relativistic positioning system for a general spacetime is constructed by using the so called "emission coordinates". The results apply in a small region around the world line of an accelerated observer carrying a Fermi triad, as described by the Fermi metric. In the case of a Schwarzschild spacetime modeling the gravitational field around the Earth and an observer at rest at a fixed spacetime point, these coordinates realize a relativistic positioning system alternative to the current GPS system. The latter is indeed essentially conceived as Newtonian, so that it necessarily needs taking into account at least the most important relativistic effects through Post-Newtonian corrections to work properly. Previous results concerning emission coordinates in flat spacetime are thus extended to this more general situation. Furthermore, the mapping between spacetime coordinates and emission coordinates is completely determined by means of the world function, which in the case of a Fermi metric can be explicitly obtained.

  6. Thin-film photovoltaic partnership -- Apollo{reg{underscore}sign} thin film process development: Phase 1 Technical Report, May 1998--April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, D.W.; Skinner, D.E.

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Phase 1 subcontract was to establish an efficient production plating system capable of depositing thin-film CdTe and CdS on substrates up to 0.55 m{sup 2}. This baseline would then be used to build on and extend deposition areas to 0.94 m{sup 2} in the next two phases. The following achievements have been demonstrated: {sm{underscore}bullet} Chemical-bath deposition of CdS and electrochemical deposition of CdTe was demonstrated on 0.55 m{sup 2} substrates. The films were characterized using optical and electrical techniques, to increase the understanding of the materials and aid in loss analysis. {sm{underscore}bullet} A stand-alone, prototype CdTe reaction tank was built and commissioned, allowing the BP Solar team to perform full-scale trials as part of this subcontract. {sm{underscore}bullet} BP Solar installed two outdoor systems for reliability and performance testing. {sm{underscore}bullet} The 2-kW, ground-mounted, grid-connected system contains seventy-two 0.43-m{sup 2} Apollo{reg{underscore}sign} module interconnects. {sm{underscore}bullet} Two modules have been supplied to NREL for evaluation on their Performance and Energy Rating Test bed (PERT) for kWh evaluation. {sm{underscore}bullet} BP Solar further characterized the process waste stream with the aim to close-loop the system. Currently, various pieces of equipment are being investigated for suitability of particle and total organic compound removal.

  7. Act as NARSTO Management Coordinator and Conduct Research In Support of NARSTO Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennell, William T.

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant funded the position of NARSTO Management Coordinator. NARSTO was a public-private partnership with members from government, utilities, industry, and academe in Canada, the United States and Mexico. NARSTO planed and coordinated independently sponsored projects and tasks designed to identify and resolve policy-relevant science questions related to a) Anthropogenic and biogenic air-pollution sources and emissions, b) The complex physical and chemical processes affecting the accumulation of pollutants in the troposphere (including greenhouse gases and aerosols), c) The potential of certain pollutants to react and generate oxidants and fine particles in the troposphere, d) The development, intercomparison, and application of atmospheric models, e) The development of monitoring studies and methodologies needed to assess emission control effectiveness for selected greenhouse gases and aerosols, air pollutants and their precursors, and f) The attainment of the national air-quality and climate-stabilization goals and standards established by each member Nation

  8. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  9. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  10. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  11. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  12. COORDINATING HUMAN AND MATERIAL RESOURCES Construction project management is the art of directing and coordinating human and material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    COORDINATING HUMAN AND MATERIAL RESOURCES Construction project management is the art of directing and coordinating human and material resources throughout the life of a project by using modern management. Today's construction engineers and managers are faced with unprecedented challenges in planning

  13. Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

  14. Optimization of control parameters for isolated and coordinated actuated signal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koothrappally, Joseph

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and additions to existing traffic control techniques. A new simulation model, called TEXSIM, which takes full advantage of the latest programming standards and techniques, was developed during this effort. The new model is used to identify patterns.... It is obvious that if the advantages of actuation and coordination could be combined, then such systems would be both efficient and responsive. However, complications introduced by the probabilistic response of actuated controllers to variations in traffic...

  15. Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a safe, cost-effective, and high energy density technology for large scale energy storage. However, the development of magnesium battery has been hindered by the limited...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Joint Development and Coordination of Emissions Control Data and Models (CLEERS Analysis and Coordination)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the joint...

  17. Research Centre for Sustainable Development (RCSD), Chinese Academy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Centre for Sustainable Development (RCSD), Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) Place: China Coordinates: 35.86166, 104.195397 Loading map......

  18. Testing and Evaluation of Photoelectrochemical Membranes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, T.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research work will be undertaken in close coordination with Synkera Technologies and in concurrence with the overall objectives of the Synkera DOE SBIR Phase II project. The subcontract is conditional on Synkera receiving the DOE Phase II SBIR award.

  19. Second generation pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) research and development, Phase 2 --- Task 4, carbonizer testing. Volume 2, Data reconciliation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froehlich, R.; Robertson, A.; Vanhook, J.; Goyal, A.; Rehmat, A.; Newby, R.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period beginning November 1991 and ending September 1992, a series of tests were conducted at Foster Wheeler Development Corporation in a fluidized-bed coal carbonizer to determine its performance characteristics. The carbonizer was operated for 533 hours in a jetting fluidized-bed configuration during which 36 set points (steady-state periods) were achieved. Extensive data were collected on the feed and product stream compositions, heating values, temperatures, and flow rates. With these data, elemental and energy balances were computed to evaluate and confirm accuracy of the data. The carbonizer data were not as self-consistent as could be desired (balance closure imperfection). A software package developed by Science Ventures, Inc., of California, called BALAID, was used to reconcile the carbonizer data; the details of the reconciliation have been given in Volume 1 of this report. The reconciled data for the carbonizer were rigorously analyzed, correlations were developed, and the model was updated accordingly. The model was then used in simulating each of the 36 steady-state periods achieved in the pilot plant. The details are given in this Volume one. This Volume 2 provides details of the carbonizer data reconciliation.

  20. Harmonic coordinates in the string and membrane equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Lei He; Shou-Jun Huang

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note, we first show that the solutions to Cauchy problems for two versions of relativistic string and membrane equations are diffeomorphic. Then we investigate the coordinates transformation presented in Ref. [9] (see (2.20) in Ref. [9]) which plays an important role in the study on the dynamics of the motion of string in Minkowski space. This kind of transformed coordinates are harmonic coordinates, and the nonlinear relativistic string equations can be straightforwardly simplified into linear wave equations under this transformation.

  1. Transactive Control and Coordination of Distributed Assets for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Somani, Abhishek; Pratt, Robert G.; Widergren, Steven E.; Chassin, David P.

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to diversify energy supplies, the need to mitigate energy-related environmental impact, and the entry of electric vehicles in large numbers present challenges and opportunities to power system professionals. Wind and solar power provide many benefits, and to reap the benefits the resulting increased variability—forecasted as well as unforecasted—should be addressed. Demand resources are receiving increasing attention as one means of providing the grid balancing services. Control and coordination of a large number (~millions) of distributed smart grid assets requires innovative approaches. One such is transactive control and coordination (TC2)—a distributed, agent-based incentive and control system. The TC2 paradigm is to create a market system with the following characteristics: • Participation should be entirely voluntary. • The participant decides at what price s/he is willing to participate. • The bids and responses are automated. Such an approach has been developed and demonstrated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for energy markets. It is the purpose of this project to develop a similar approach for ancillary services. In this report, the following ancillary services are considered: • spinning reserve • ramping • regulation. These services are to be provided by the following devices: • refrigerators • water heaters • clothes dryers • variable speed drives. The important results are summarized below: The regulation signal can be divided into an energy-neutral high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency component is particularly well suited for demand resources. The low frequency component, which carries energy non-neutrality, can be handled by a combination of generators and demand resources. An explicit method for such a separation is obtained from an exponentially weighted moving average filter. Causal filters (i.e., filters that process only present and past values of a signal) introduce delays that can be issues in some signal processing applications that treat the high frequency part as a noise to be eliminated. For regulation, the high frequency component is an essential part of the signal. The delay in the low frequency component is not a problem. A stochastic self-dispatch algorithm determines the response of the devices to the regulation signal. • In an ensemble of devices under normal operation, some devices turn on and some turn off in any time interval. Demand response necessitates turning off devices that would normally be on, or turning on devices that would normally be off. Over time, some of these would have turned off on their own. A formalism to determine expectation values under a combination of natural and forced attrition has been developed. This formalism provides a mechanism for accomplishing a desired power profile within a bid period. In particular, a method to minimize regulation requirement can be developed. The formulation provides valuable insights into control. • Some ancillary services—ramping to absorb unforecasted increase in renewable generation, and regulation down—require the demand resources to increase their energy use. Some resources such as HVAC systems can do this readily, whereas some others require enabling technology. Even without such technology, it is possible to arrange refrigerators and water heaters to have an energy debt and be ready to increase their energy use. A transactive bid mechanism of revolving debt can be developed for this purpose. Dramatic changes in control systems, architecture and markets are expected in the electrical grid. The technical capabilities of a large number of devices interacting with the grid are changing. While it is too early to describe complete solutions, TC2 has attractive features suitable for adapting to the changes. The analyses in this report and the activities planned for FY 14 and beyond are designed to facilitate this transition.

  2. Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Data Catalog, 1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fisheries, Olympia, WA); Allen, Stan; Reece, Doug (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River Coordinated Information system (CIS) Project started in 1989 to address regional data sharing. Coordinated exchange and dissemination of any data must begin with dissemination of information about those data, such as: what is available; where the data are stored; what form they exist in; who to contact for further information or access to these data. In Phase II of this Project (1991), a Data Catalog describing the contents of regional datasets and less formal data collections useful for system monitoring and evaluation projects was built to improve awareness of their existence. Formal datasets are described in a `Dataset Directory,` while collections of data are Used to those that collect such information in the `Data Item Directory.` The Data Catalog will serve regional workers as a useful reference which centralizes the institutional knowledge of many data contacts into a single source. Recommendations for improvement of the Catalog during Phase III of this Project include addressing gaps in coverage, establishing an annual maintenance schedule, and loading the contents into a PC-based electronic database for easier searching and cross-referencing.

  3. Canonical quantization of classical mechanics in curvilinear coordinates. Invariant quantization procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B?aszak, Maciej, E-mail: blaszakm@amu.edu.pl; Doma?ski, Ziemowit, E-mail: ziemowit@amu.edu.pl

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper is presented an invariant quantization procedure of classical mechanics on the phase space over flat configuration space. Then, the passage to an operator representation of quantum mechanics in a Hilbert space over configuration space is derived. An explicit form of position and momentum operators as well as their appropriate ordering in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates is demonstrated. Finally, the extension of presented formalism onto non-flat case and related ambiguities of the process of quantization are discussed. -- Highlights: •An invariant quantization procedure of classical mechanics on the phase space over flat configuration space is presented. •The passage to an operator representation of quantum mechanics in a Hilbert space over configuration space is derived. •Explicit form of position and momentum operators and their appropriate ordering in curvilinear coordinates is shown. •The invariant form of Hamiltonian operators quadratic and cubic in momenta is derived. •The extension of presented formalism onto non-flat case and related ambiguities of the quantization process are discussed.

  4. Development of a Training Program for Commercial Building Technicians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinholm, Rod

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on developing and deploying a comprehensive program of 22 training modules, including certification requirements, and accreditation standards for commercial building technicians, to help achieve the full savings potential of energy efficient buildings, equipment, and systems. This curriculum extended the currently available commercial building technician programs -- training a labor force in a growing market area focused on energy efficiency. The program helps to remove a major market impediment to low energy/zero energy commercial building system acceptance, namely a lack of operating personnel capable of handling more complex high efficiency systems. The project developed a training curriculum for commercial building technicians, with particular focus on high-efficiency building technology, and systems. In Phase 1, the project team worked collaboratively in developing a draft training syllabus to address project objectives. The team identified energy efficiency knowledge gaps in existing programs and plans and plans to address the gaps with either modified or new curricula. In Phase 2, appropriate training materials were developed to meet project objectives. This material was developed for alternative modes of delivery, including classroom lecture materials, e-learning elements, video segments, exercises, and hands-on training elements. A Certification and Accreditation Plan and a Commercialization and Sustainability Plan were also investigated and developed. The Project Management Plan was updated quarterly and provided direction on the management approaches used to accomplish the expected project objectives. GTI project management practices tightly coordinate project activities using management controls to deliver optimal customer value. The project management practices include clear scope definition, schedule/budget tracking, risk/issue resolution and team coordination.

  5. Coordinated part delivery using distributed planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, Adrienne (Adrienne M.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we develop a distributed mobile robot platform to deliver parts around a model construction site. The platform's robots, specialized into delivery robots and assembly robots, use a distributed coverage ...

  6. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    has for years used “New York Energy $mart” as the umbrellaevent days. The New York State Energy Research & DevelopmentEnergy Challenge”). The New York State Energy Research and

  7. Liquid-phase methanol process development unit: installation, operation, and support studies. Technical progress report No. 1, 28 September 1981-31 December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period the Work Breakdown Structure Dictionary was established. Task 1 was completed with submittal of the Project Work Plan and the Quality Assurance Manual. CSI produced basic process design information and a preliminary flowsheet for the LaPorte LPMeOH PDU. APCI developed the flowsheet further and set up the process on APCI's process simulator. The flowsheet development revealed a number of major changes necessary in the existing LPM pilot plant; this has led to pursuit of a unified design concept. Approval was requested for the unified design concept as well as advanced schedule for relocation of the LPM unit and advanced procurement of long delivery equipment items. A number of preliminary heat and material balances were calculated for the LPMeOH PDU and preliminary process specifications were prepared for the equipment items. The final design basis was established. The design pressure was set at 1000 psig. Eight design operating cases were defined for the following range of reactor operating conditions: Pressure - 500 to 900 psig, Temperature - 220 to 270/sup 0/C, Liquid-Fluidized Space Velocity - 1000 to 4000 l/hr-kg catalyst, Liquid-Entrained Space Velocity - 2000 to 10,000 l/hr-kg catalyst, and Liquid-Entrained Catalyst Loading - 0.1 to 0.4 kg catalyst/l oil. The methanol production rate for these cases ranges from 0.2 to 9.7 short tons per day. Preliminary equipment arrangement and site layout drawings were prepared for the PDU. In the laboratories, CSI began autoclave testing of in-situ catalyst reduction procedures. The specification and evaluation of equipment for the CSI laboratory PDU progressed. CSI prepared and issued a Topical Report covering liquid-entrained LPMeOH lab development work accomplished under advance funding. APCI's laboratories progressed with the design of the bench scale slurry reactor.

  8. Development of New Low-Cost, High-Performance, PV Module Encapsulant/Packaging Materials: Annual Technical Progress Report, Phase 1, 22 October 2002-30 September 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agro, S. C.; Tucker, R. T.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objectives of this subcontract are for Specialized Technology Resources, Inc., to work with U.S.-based PV module manufacturers representing crystalline silicon, polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide (CIS), and other state-of-the-art thin-film technologies to develop formulations, production processes, prototype and qualify new low-cost, high-performance photovoltaic module encapsulants/packaging materials. The manufacturers will assist in identifying each materials' deficiencies while undergoing development, and then ultimately in qualifying the final optimized materials designed to specifically meet their requirements. Upon completion of this program, new low-cost, high-performance, PV module encapsulant/packaging materials will be qualified, by one or more end-users, for their specific application. Information gathering on topics related to thin-film module technology, including device performance/failure analysis, glass stability, and de vice encapsulation, has been completed. This information has provided concepts and considerations for module failure analysis, accelerated testing design, and encapsulation formulation strategy for thin-film modules.

  9. Influence of Biomechanical Constraints on Endpoint Control, Interlimb Coordination and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Tiffany M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on intralimb coordination, interlimb coordination, and learning. Experiment 1 sought to determine if principles of the Leading Joint Hypothesis, when applied to a multijoint bimanual coordination task, could provide insight into the contribution of intralimb...

  10. Renewable success : development of good architecture in the case of Arriyadh Development Authority, Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkhabbaz, Mohammed H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ArRiyadh Development Authority (ADA) is an unusual city development authority within the Saudi Arabian government hierarchy. Part of its responsibilities is coordinating and overseeing the design and building of buildings ...

  11. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

  12. Coordinating diamond interchange and arterial street signal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelbrecht, Roelof Johannes

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that under some conditions, notably particular cycle lengths, the coordination of diamond interchange and arterial signal control could be beneficial. This will be the case when the optimal cycle lengths of the arterial and interchange systems are similar...

  13. Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Wayne Surdoval, SECA Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Simulation Power Electronics Controls & Diagnostics Manufacturing Materials Core Technology Program Fuel CellFossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Wayne Surdoval, SECA Coordinator June 3, 2003 National Energy & Simulation Materials Controls & Diagnostics Fuel Processing Fuel Processing Manufacturing Modeling

  14. Distributed Regulation Allocation with Aggregator Coordinated Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Ben

    Distributed Regulation Allocation with Aggregator Coordinated Electric Vehicles Sun Sun, Min Dong, and Ben Liang Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada Dept. of Electrical, Computer and Software Engineering, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada Email

  15. Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Automated Coordinator Synthesis for Mission Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles S vehicles. The approach is aided by tools that allow graphical design, iterative redesign, and code autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) programs to meet evolving requirements and capabilities. The hierarchical

  16. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  17. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lim

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  18. Coordination of supply chain inventory systems with private information 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Chi-Leung

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation considers the problems of coordinating different supply chain inventory systems with private information under deterministic settings. These systems studied are characterized by the following properties: (a) each facility...

  19. BMW ALGEBRA, QUANTIZED COORDINATE ALGEBRA AND TYPE C SCHURWEYL DUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sydney, University of

    BMW ALGEBRA, QUANTIZED COORDINATE ALGEBRA AND TYPE C SCHUR­WEYL DUALITY JUN HU Abstract. We prove enveloping algebra of type C 6 3. BMW algebras and a generalized FRT construction 9 4. A comparison of two

  20. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngendakumana, Ancille, E-mail: nancille@yahoo.fr; Todjihoundé, Leonard, E-mail: leonardt@imsp.uac.org [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin)] [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim, E-mail: kimpaye@kie.ac.rw [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)] [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  1. Application of 'Six Sigma{sup TM}' and 'Design of Experiment' for Cementation - Recipe Development for Evaporator Concentrate for NPP Ling AO, Phase II (China) - 12555

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH (Germany); Perdue, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Company (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cementation of radioactive waste is a common technology. The waste is mixed with cement and water and forms a stable, solid block. The physical properties like compression strength or low leach ability depends strongly on the cement recipe. Due to the fact that this waste cement mixture has to fulfill special requirements, a recipe development is necessary. The Six Sigma{sup TM}' DMAIC methodology, together with the Design of experiment (DoE) approach, was employed to optimize the process of a recipe development for cementation at the Ling Ao nuclear power plant (NPP) in China. The DMAIC offers a structured, systematical and traceable process to derive test parameters. The DoE test plans and statistical analysis is efficient regarding the amount of test runs and the benefit gain by getting a transfer function. A transfer function enables simulation which is useful to optimize the later process and being responsive to changes. The DoE method was successfully applied for developing a cementation recipe for both evaporator concentrate and resin waste in the plant. The key input parameters were determined, evaluated and the control of these parameters were included into the design. The applied Six Sigma{sup TM} tools can help to organize the thinking during the engineering process. Data are organized and clearly presented. Various variables can be limited to the most important ones. The Six Sigma{sup TM} tools help to make the thinking and decision process trace able. The tools can help to make data driven decisions (e.g. C and E Matrix). But the tools are not the only golden way. Results from scoring tools like the C and E Matrix need close review before using them. The DoE is an effective tool for generating test plans. DoE can be used with a small number of tests runs, but gives a valuable result from an engineering perspective in terms of a transfer function. The DoE prediction results, however, are only valid in the tested area. So a careful selection of input parameter and their limits for setting up a DoE is very important. An extrapolation of results is not recommended because the results are not reliable out of the tested area. (authors)

  2. MAXWELL-LORENTZ EQUATIONS IN GENERAL FRENET-SERRET COORDINATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabel, A

    2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the trajectory of a charged particle in an arbitrary external magnetic field. A local orthogonal coordinate system is given by the tangential, curvature, and torsion vectors. We write down Maxwell's equations in this coordinate system. The resulting partial differential equations for the magnetic fields fix conditions among its local multipole components, which can be viewed as a generalization of the usual multipole expansion of the fields of magnetic elements.

  3. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung [Nuclear Data Section, NAPC Division, International Atomic Energy Agency P. O. Box 100, Vienna International Centre, AT-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  4. The Eighth Annual Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Report, Fiscal Year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. Table 5 here shows competitive leasing of federal lands for geothermal uses, by state, for 1974-1976, and annually for 1977 through 1983. By the end of FY 1983, 972,492 acres were under competitive lease. Bonus bids collected from these sales totaled more than $77 million. (DJE 2005)

  5. Canby Cascaded Geothermal Project Phase 1 Feasibility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of 50-kW in a community that will use warm discharge water for an existing district heating system, greenhouse operations and aquaculture development. - Timeline * Phase 1...

  6. Ferrofluid nucleus phase transitions in an external uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Tanygin; S. I. Shulyma; V. F. Kovalenko; M. V. Petrychuk

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase transition between massive dense phase and diluted superparamagnetic phase is studied by means of direct molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrium structures of ferrofluid aggregate nucleus are obtained for different values of temperature and external magnetic field magnitude. For the ferrofluid phase diagram (coordinates "field-temperature"): approximate match of experiment and simulation is shown. Obtained phase coexistence curve has opposite trend compare to some of known theoretical results. This contradiction is related to postulating and comparing of the free energy of only simplest ferrofluid structures: diluted superparamagnetic phase, linear chains of the particles, and dense globes. The present results provide more fine structure of transition from "linear chains" to "dense globes" phase, e.g. through the ring assembly structure.

  7. Coordinating Partners www.nwocenter.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for people of all ages 241Math-372-2718 Fax: 419-372-2738 To join NWO and receive updates on NWO activities Visit: www.nwocenter.org www.nwocenter.org Teacher/Pre-service and Higher Education Faculty Professional Development NWO Inquiry Series in STEM

  8. EIS-0075: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Phase III Development, Texoma and Seaway Group Salt Domes (West Hackberry and Bryan Mound Expansion, Big Hill Development) Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and Brazoria and Jefferson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Also see EIS-0021 and EIS-0029. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Office developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of expanding the existing SPR storage capacity from 538 million to 750 million barrels of storage and increasing the drawdown capability from 3.5 million to 4.5 million barrels per day. This EIS incorperates two previously issued EISs: DOE/EIS-0021, Seaway Group of Salt Domes, and DOE/EIS-0029, Texoma Group of Salt Domes.

  9. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator`s story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon ({Upsilon}) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the {Upsilon} in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the {mu}{mu}II phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of {mu}{mu}II and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note.

  10. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase 2 and 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: >47% thermal efficiency (HHV); NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {ge} 10% NSPS; coal {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity 90% of present plant. The HIPPS generating plant integrates a combustion gas turbine/HRSG combined cycle arrangement with an advanced coal-fired boiler. The unique feature of the HIPPS plant is the partial heating of gas turbine (GT) compressor outlet air using energy released by firing coal in the high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The compressed air is additionally heated prior to entering the GT expander section by burning natural gas. Energy available, in the gas turbine exhaust and in the HITAF flue gas are used in a steam cycle to maximize energy production. The HIPPS plant arrangement is thus a combination of existing technologies (gas turbine, heat recovery boilers, conventional steam cycle) and new technologies (the HITAF design especially the heater located in the radiant section). Work reported herein is from Task 1.3, HIPPS Commercial Design and Task 2.2, HITAF Air Heaters.

  11. Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litka, A.F.; Breault, R.W.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.

  12. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor, Phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G.; McGowan, J.G.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit a burner capable of firing microfine coal to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the fifteenth quarter (April `95 through June `95) of the program. The overall program has consisted of five major tasks: (1.0) A review of current state-of-the-art coal firing system components. (2.0) Design and experimental testing of a prototype HEACC (High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor) burner. (3.0) Installation and testing of a prototype HEACC system in a commercial retrofit application. (4.0) Economics evaluation of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications. (5.0) Long term demonstration under commercial user demand conditions. Task 1 through Task 4 were previously completed. Based on all the results obtained to date the ABB/Penn State team and DOE/PETC have decided to conduct a 1000 hr demonstration test (Task 5). Importantly, a decision was made to employ a new burner for the demonstration. The new burner is based on the concept called {open_quotes}Radially Stratified Flame Core (RSFC){close_quotes}, developed by MIT and licensed by ABB. Work under Task 5 of this program was started during this reporting period.

  13. Research and development of a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Progress report for Quarter 4 of the Phase II report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This 4th quarter report summarizes activity from July 1, 1995 through October 1, 1995; the report is organized as usual into sections describing background information and work performed under the main WBS categories: The Fuel Processor (WBS 1.0) team activity during this quarter focused on the continued design/development of the full scale fuel processing hardware. The combustor test stand has been completed allowing more detailed testing of the various parts of the combustor subsystem; this subsystem is currently being evaluated using the dual fuel (methanol/hydrogen) option to gain a better understanding of the control issues. The Fuel Cell Stack (WBS 2.0) team activity focused on material analysis and testing to determine the appropriate approach for the first GM stack. Five hundred hours of durability was achieved on a single cell fixture using coated titanium plates (anode and cathode) with no appreciable voltage degradation of the SEL (Stack Engineering Lab) produced MEA. Additionally, the voltage level drop across each of the plates remained low (<5mv) over the full test period; The system integration and control team focused on the initial layout and configuration of the system; and the Reference powertrain and commercialization studies are currently under review.

  14. Development of 230-kV high-pressure, gas-filled, pipe-type cable system: Model test program phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, D.A. (Pirelli Cable Corp., Florham Park, NJ (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was the development of a 230 kV high-pressure gas-filled (HPGF) pipe-type cable employing paper or laminate of paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) insulation pressurized with N{sub 2} gas or a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas. Heretofore, HPGF pipe-type cables have been restricted to 138 kV ratings due to technical difficulties in achieving higher voltage ratings. In view of the high cost of manufacturing and testing a large number of full size cables, cable models with 2 mm (80 mils) and 2.5 mm (100 mils) wall thicknesses of insulation enclosed in a test fixture capable of withstanding a test pressure of 2070 kPa (300 psig) and high electrical stresses were employed for dissipation factor versus voltage measurements and for ac and impulse breakdown tests at rated and emergency operating temperatures. In addition, a 36 cm (14 in) full wall cable model enclosed in a pressure vessel was utilized for transient pressure response tests. The results of this investigation attest tot he technical feasibility of the design and manufacture of a 230 kV HPGF pipe-type cable employing paper or PPP insulation pressurized with 100% N{sub 2} gas or a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas for operation under normal and 100 hour emergency conditions at conductor temperatures of 85{degree} and 105{degree}C, respectively. The manufacture of a full size PPP insulated cable pressurized with a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas employing pre-impregnated PPP insulating tapes and an annular conductor based on the design stresses defined in this report is recommended for laboratory evaluation and extended life tests. 11 refs., 45 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Phase Space Navigator: Towards Automating Control Synthesis in Phase Spaces for Nonlinear Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Feng

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a novel autonomous control synthesis strategy called Phase Space Navigator for the automatic synthesis of nonlinear control systems. The Phase Space Navigator generates global control laws by synthesizing ...

  17. Special Relativity in Quantum Phase Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniela Dragoman

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase space treatment of special relativity of quantum systems is developed. In this approach a quantum particle remains localized if subject to inertial transformations, the localization occurring in a finite phase space area. Unlike non-relativistic transformations, relativistic transformations generally distort the phase space distribution function, being equivalent to aberrations in optics.

  18. Geometric phases in quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Sjöqvist

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of quantum information science has opened up a new venue for applications of the geometric phase (GP), as well as triggered new insights into its physical, mathematical, and conceptual nature. Here, we review this development by focusing on three main themes: the use of GPs to perform robust quantum computation, the development of GP concepts for mixed quantum states, and the discovery of a new type of topological phases for entangled quantum systems. We delineate the theoretical development as well as describe recent experiments related to GPs in the context of quantum information.

  19. Property:Coordinates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project developer,is

  20. From Noncommutative Phase Space to Hilbert Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, B. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan nagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Hamiltonian formulation, classical mechanics employs the commutative algebra of functions that are defined on phase space a point of which could be represented using Dirac delta distributions. In the absence of such a concrete existence of the notion of point in the quantum domain, we show how the quantum mechanical formalism emerges by replacing the commutative algebra by a noncommutative algebra of functions and introducing the quantum condition. The noncommutativity is achieved by deforming the product of two functions and by introducing the Moyal brackets, the basic Moyal brackets between two spatial coordinates and between position and momentum coordinates being noncommutative. The only other input we make use of is the quantum condition which is motivated from its classical analogue--the square of Dirac delta distributions.

  1. Incorporating Peptides in the Outer Coordination Sphere of Bio-inspired Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Avijita; Lense, Sheri; Linehan, John C.; Raugei, Simone; Cho, Herman M.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four new cyclic 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands have been prepared and used to synthesize [Ni(PPh2NR2)2]2+ complexes in which R is a mono- or dipeptide. These complexes represent a first step in developing an outer coordination sphere for this class of complexes that can mimic the outer coordination sphere of the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. Importantly, these complexes retain the electrocatalytic activity of the parent [Ni(PPh2NPh2)2]2+ complex in acetonitrile solution with turnover frequencies (TOF) for hydrogen production ranging from 14 to 25 s-1 in the presence of p-cyanoanilinium trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and 135-1000 s-1 in the presence of triflic acid salt of protonated dimethylformamide, with moderately low overpotentials, ~0.3 V. The addition of small amounts of water result in rate increases of 5-7 times. Unlike the parent complex, these complexes demonstrate dynamic structural transformations in solution whereby the dipeptide tail interacts with the nickel center. These results establish a building block from which larger peptide scaffolding can be added to allow the [Ni(PR2NR’2)2]2+ molecular catalytic core to begin to mimic the multifunctional outer coordination sphere of enzymes. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. The definition of reaction coordinates for reaction-path dynamics Gregory A. Natanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    The definition of reaction coordinates for reaction-path dynamics Gregory A. Natanson Computer only small-amplitude deviations from a minimum-energy path (MEP) through nuclear coordinate space. Thus. In choosing the coordinate system, the critical issue is the definition of the reaction coordinate. Along

  3. Development of Eu{sup 3+} activated monoclinic, perovskite, and garnet compounds in the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase diagram as efficient red-emitting phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jinkai [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China); Li, Ji-Guang, E-mail: LI.Jiguang@nims.go.jp [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China); Advanced Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Li, Jing [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China); Advanced Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Liu, Shaohong; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Xudong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China); Sakka, Yoshio [Advanced Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eu{sup 3+} doped Gd{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (GdAM), GdAlO{sub 3} (GdAP), and Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (GdAG, containing 10 at% of Lu{sup 3+} for lattice stabilization) have been developed in this work as efficient red-emitting phosphors. With coprecipitated carbonate precursors, phase evolution studies found minimum processing temperatures of ?1000, 1100, and 1300 °C for the three phosphors to crystallize as pure phases, respectively. Compared with their yttrium aluminate counterparts, the gadolinium-based phosphors exhibit red-shifted O{sup 2?}–Eu{sup 3+} charge transfer excitation band (CTB) centers due to the lower electronegativity of Gd{sup 3+} and appreciably higher quantum yields of photoluminescence owing to the occurrence of efficient Gd{sup 3+}?Eu{sup 3+}energy transfer. The optimal Eu{sup 3+} contents were determined to be ?7.5 at% for GdAM and 5.0 at% for both GdAP and GdAG, and concentration quenching of luminescence was suggested to be due to exchange interactions. Fluorescence decay analysis found a shorter lifetime for the phosphor powder processed at a higher temperature or with a higher Eu{sup 3+} content, and the underlying mechanism was discussed. Fluorescence lifetimes were also compared between the yttrium and gadolinium phosphor systems for the dominant emissions. - Graphical abstract: Eu{sup 3+} doped Gd{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (GdAM), GdAlO{sub 3} (GdAP), and Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (GdAG, containing 10 at% of Lu{sup 3+} for lattice stabilization) have been developed as efficient red-emitting phosphors. Owing to the Gd{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} energy transfer, improved luminescence is observed for the compounds than their yttrium-based counterparts. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Eu{sup 3+} doped Gd{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9}, GdAlO{sub 3} and (Gd{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} developed as red phosphors. • Improved red-emissions than their yttrium-based counterparts confirmed. • Efficient Gd{sup 3+}?Eu{sup 3+}energy transfer observed. • Applications in various lighting, display, and scintillation areas expected.

  4. Multi-phasing CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics for multiphase flows is an emerging field. Due to the complexity and divergence of multiphase thermal and hydraulic problems, further development of multiphase flow modelling, closure laws and numerical methods is needed in order to achieve the general purpose and optimised CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methods, which will be applicable to the wide variety of multiphase flow problems. In the paper, an original approach to the various aspects of multiphase CFD modelling is presented. It is based on the multi-fluid modelling approach, development of necessary closure laws and derivation of appropriate numerical methods for efficient governing equations solution. Velocity and pressure fields are solved with the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) type pressure-corrector method developed for the multiphase flow conditions. For the solution of scalar parameters transport equations both implicit and explicit methods are presented. The implicit method is suitable for steady state, slow transients and problems without the sharp fronts propagation. Explicit method is developed in order to predict scalar parameters fronts propagation, as well as phase interface tracking problems. The challenge towards the multiphase flow solution on both the macro and micro level is presented in order to perform multiphase CFD simulations and analyses of multiphase flows in complex geometry of nuclear power plant components, such as nuclear fuel rod bundles thermal-hydraulics. Presented methodology and obtained CFD results comprise micro-scale phenomena of phases' separation, interface tracking, heated surfaces dry-out and critical heat flux occurrence, as well as macro-scale transport and distributions of phase volumes. (authors)

  5. New Coordinate Systems for Axisymmetric Black Hole Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Anninos; S. R. Brandt; P. Walker

    1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a grid generation procedure designed to construct new classes of orthogonal coordinate systems for binary black hole spacetimes. The computed coordinates offer an alternative approach to current methods, in addition to providing a framework for potentially more stable and accurate evolutions of colliding black holes. As a particular example, we apply our procedure to generate appropriate numerical grids to evolve Misner's axisymmetric initial data set representing two equal mass black holes colliding head-on. These new results are compared with previously published calculations, and we find generally good agreement in both the waveform profiles and total radiated energies over the allowable range of separation parameters. Furthermore, because no specialized treatment of the coordinate singularities is required, these new grids are more easily extendible to unequal mass and spinning black hole collisions.

  6. Energy and Development Gordon Mackenzie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and Development Gordon Mackenzie Energy Programme Coordinator UNEP Risø Centre #12;Energy · Nordic Arctic energy network #12;African Rural Energy Enterprise Development - AREED ENDA MFC KITE TaTEDO CEEEZ E+Co Africa E+Co NJ UNEP Paris URC UN Foundation Sida Others Demonstrating that needed energy

  7. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  8. Solid-phase extraction preconcentration and radiometric determination of strontium radionuclides in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malofeeva, G.I.; Danilova, T.V.; Petrukhin, O.M.; Spivakov, B.Ya. [Vernadskii Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of strontium radionuclides in environmental samples often require preconcentration. In many cases, it is necessary to preconcentrate from large volumes of sample solutions containing predominant amounts of alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and the enrichment factors in the procedure must be high. Problems of this kind can be efficiently solved by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE). Until recently, coordinatively saturated metal chelates were the only compounds employed in the SPE method. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the possibility of using cationic metal complexes for metal preconcentration in the form of ion associates, taking the system strontium-dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6)-ion-pairing reagent as an example. The metal distribution ratio depends on many parameters, and the prescribed adsorption conditions must be strictly met to achieve complete recovery. A procedure for {sup 90} Sr preconcentration is developed and is applicable to analysis of environmental samples and certain foodstuffs.

  9. On deriving nonreflecting boundary conditions in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Sescu

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, nonreflecting boundary conditions in generalized three-dimensional curvilinear coordinates are derived, relying on the original analysis that was done in Cartesian two-dimensional coordinates by Giles (AIAA Journal, 28.12, 2050-2058, 1990). A thorough Fourier analysis of the linearized Euler equation is performed to determine the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors that are then used to derive the appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The analysis lacks rigorous proof of the well-posedness in the general case, which is open to investigation (a weak assumption is introduced here to complete the boundary conditions). The boundary conditions derived here are not tested on specific applications.

  10. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee, fiscal year 1997. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1997 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  11. Yttrium-succinates coordination polymers: Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amghouz, Zakariae; Roces, Laura; Garcia-Granda, Santiago [Departamentos de Quimica Fisica y Analitica y Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.e [Departamentos de Quimica Fisica y Analitica y Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Souhail, Badredine [Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, 93002 Tetouan, Maroc (Morocco); Mafra, Luis; Shi, Fa-nian; Rocha, Joao [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New polymeric yttrium-succinates, Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O and Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, have been synthesized, and their structures (solved by single crystal XRD) are compared with that of Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O. Three compounds were obtained as single phases, and their thermal behaviour is described. - Graphical abstract: In the field of coordination polymers or MOF's, few studies report on the polymorphs of Ln(III)-succinic acid. Here, we describe the hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of two novel yttrium-succinates coordination polymers, respectively 2D and 3D, Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O and Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}.

  12. Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Information Needs, 1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Kinney, William J. (Washington Department of Fishereis, Olympia, WA); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful application of adaptive management to rebuilding the Columbia Basin`s anadromous fish resources requires that available information and experience be organized and shared between numerous organizations and individuals. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin`s collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases and recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognize these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project is now completing the process of scoping and identification of information needs. Construction of prototype systems will begin in 1992. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information on System scoping and needs identification phase.

  13. A new coordinated control strategy for boiler-turbine system of coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Y.; Liu, H.B.; Cai, W.J.; Soh, Y.C.; Xie, L.H. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the new development of the boiler-turbine coordinated control strategy using fuzzy reasoning and autotuning techniques. The boiler-turbine system is a very complex process that is a multivariable, nonlinear, slowly time-varying plant with large settling time and a lot of uncertainties. As there exist strong couplings between the main steam pressure control loop and the power output control loop in the boiler-turbine unit with large time-delay and uncertainties, automatic coordinated control of the two loops is a very challenging problem. This paper presents a new coordinated control strategy (CCS) which is organized into two levels: a basic control level and a high supervision level. Proportional-integral derivative (PID) type controllers are used in the basic level to perform basic control functions while the decoupling between two control loops can be realized in the high level. A special subclass of fuzzy inference systems, called the Gaussian partition with evenly (GPE) spaced midpoints systems, is used to self-tune the main steam pressure PID controller's parameters online based on the error signal and its first difference, aimed at overcoming the uncertainties due to changing fuel calorific value, machine wear, contamination of the boiler heating surfaces and plant modeling errors. For the large variation of operating condition, a supervisory control level has been developed by autotuning technique. The developed CCS has been implemented in a power plant in China, and satisfactory industrial operation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy has enhanced the adaptability and robustness of the process. Indeed, better control performance and economic benefit have been achieved.

  14. Second order symmetry-preserving conservative Lagrangian scheme for compressible Euler equations in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Juan, E-mail: cheng_juan@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Shu, Chi-Wang, E-mail: shu@dam.brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In applications such as astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion, there are many three-dimensional cylindrical-symmetric multi-material problems which are usually simulated by Lagrangian schemes in the two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. For this type of simulation, a critical issue for the schemes is to keep spherical symmetry in the cylindrical coordinate system if the original physical problem has this symmetry. In the past decades, several Lagrangian schemes with such symmetry property have been developed, but all of them are only first order accurate. In this paper, we develop a second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving compressible Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates, based on the control volume discretizations, which is designed to have uniformly second order accuracy and capability to preserve one-dimensional spherical symmetry in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry when computed on an equal-angle-zoned initial grid. The scheme maintains several good properties such as conservation for mass, momentum and total energy, and the geometric conservation law. Several two-dimensional numerical examples in cylindrical coordinates are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the scheme in terms of accuracy, symmetry, non-oscillation and robustness. The advantage of higher order accuracy is demonstrated in these examples.

  15. Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web

  16. GEA Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm Inc JumpGADReporting Terms and

  17. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (JulyAugust 2013) Developing Secure Power Systems...

  18. Job Description of Inventory QA-QC coordinator, ASICO LLC General Job Description: Great opportunity with a established Medical instrument company. Applicant must be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    for specials. 9. Coordinate ISO 13485 and FDA/CE follow up. 10. Create purchase order for all vendors based evaluations- as per new forms(ISO) 6. Developing and evaluation of alternate vendors.(ISO) 7. Developing new and Delivery analysis.(ISO) 16. QA/QC for 2 or 3 items weekly comparing with manufacturing drawing. 17. Review

  19. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  20. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  1. Coordination and Lock-In: Competition with Switching Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Coordination and Lock-In: Competition with Switching Costs and Network E ects Part II of IV Switching Costs Section December 2004 the latest version of this paper, and related material, will be at www Switching Costs and Competition 2.1 Introduction A consumer faces a switching cost between sellers when

  2. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty & Staff, KOKUA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE New Notice TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty, 2011 to August 15, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ACCESSIBLE of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

  3. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty & Staff, KOKUA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty & Staff: CC Engineering & Construction, Ltd. SCOPE OF WORK: The project in general shall consist of selective to October 2, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION 7:30 AM to 3:30 PM Monday through Friday ACCESSIBLE ROUTES

  4. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty & Staff, KOKUA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty & Staff OF PROJECT: Early morning on November 18, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: The Contractor is allowed to work from persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades

  5. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty & Staff, KOKUA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE New Notice TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Building Coordinators, Faculty, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: Parking of area. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all

  6. Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan: Heart of Texas Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heart of Texas Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan Heart of Texas Region Bosque, Falls, Freestone, Hill, Limestone & McLennan Counties December 1, 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements... of Texas Council of Governments (HOTCOG) and the McLennan County Youth Collaboration (MCYC) ---21 Central Texas Senior Ministries (CTSM), Hill County Transit (HCT) and Scott and White (S&W) Medical Facilities...

  7. Bimanual coordination as task-dependent linear control policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    Bimanual coordination as task-dependent linear control policies Jörn Diedrichsen *, Noreen Dowling Feedback control Modelling Bimanual a b s t r a c t When we perform actions with two hands in everyday life have previously shown that feedback control, the struc- ture of noise, and adaptation change between

  8. AgentBased Digital Libraries: Decentralization and Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durfee, Edmund H.

    1 Agent­Based Digital Libraries: Decentralization and Coordination Peter C. Weinstein, William P describes agent­based systems and explains why digital libraries should be built with this type describe the approach taken by the University of Michigan Digital Library project. #12; 2 1 Introduction

  9. Ohio State ADA Coordinator to Provide Assistance in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Ohio State ADA Coordinator to Provide Assistance in Indonesia L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State in Indonesia on disability policy and practice. The trip, from September 15 ­ October 2, 2013, is sponsored, and university professors and students, the U.S. Embassy, along with Helen Keller International Indonesia [a U

  10. Coordinated Multilateral Trades for Electric Power Networks: Theory and Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    Felix F. Wu and Pravin Varaiya June 1995 This paper is part of the working papers series of the Program earlier, the constraint equations are usually derived with built-in safety margins, they are soft;Coordinated Multilateral Trades for Electric Power Networks: Theory and Implementation 50 of 51

  11. Magnetic Coordinates for Systems with Imperfect Magnetic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewar, Robert L.

    Magnetic Coordinates for Systems with Imperfect Magnetic Surfaces R. L. Dewar and S. R. Hudson & Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 0200, Australia e-mail: robert-orbits, and the surfaces are formed from a continuous one-parameter family of such orbits. Magnetic field-line flow

  12. Blue Moon sampling, vectorial reaction coordinates, and unbiased constrained dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    Blue Moon sampling, vectorial reaction coordinates, and unbiased constrained dynamics Giovanni force in terms of a conditional expectation which can be computed by Blue Moon sampling Introduction Fifteen years ago the Blue Moon ensemble method was introduced to sample rare events that occur

  13. Sequential Linear Programming Coordination Strategy for Deterministic and Probabilistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    electric fuel cell vehicle design model, including enterprise, powertrain, fuel cell and battery models using an L norm to measure deviations between targets and responses. A subproblem suspension strategy on trust region and target value step size. A global convergence proof of the SLP-based coordination

  14. Coordinate Bethe Ansatz for Spin s XXX Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Crampé; Eric Ragoucy; Ludovic Alonzi

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the periodic integrable spin s XXX model using the coordinate Bethe ansatz. To do so, we compute explicitly the Hamiltonian of the model. These results generalize what has been obtained for spin 1/2 and spin 1 chains.

  15. Building and Facility Codes Code Building Location Bldg # Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Building and Facility Codes Code Building Location Bldg # Coordinates APM Applied Physics & Mathematics Building Muir 249 F7 ASANT Asante Hall Eleanor Roosevelt 446 F5 BIO Biology Building Muir 259 F7 BIRCH Birch Aquarium SIO 2300 S-D7 BONN Bonner Hall Revelle 131 G8 BSB Biomedical Sciences Building

  16. Alpha-beta coordination method for collective search

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Steven Y. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention comprises a decentralized coordination strategy called alpha-beta coordination. The alpha-beta coordination strategy is a family of collective search methods that allow teams of communicating agents to implicitly coordinate their search activities through a division of labor based on self-selected roles and self-determined status. An agent can play one of two complementary roles. An agent in the alpha role is motivated to improve its status by exploring new regions of the search space. An agent in the beta role is also motivated to improve its status, but is conservative and tends to remain aggregated with other agents until alpha agents have clearly identified and communicated better regions of the search space. An agent can select its role dynamically based on its current status value relative to the status values of neighboring team members. Status can be determined by a function of the agent's sensor readings, and can generally be a measurement of source intensity at the agent's current location. An agent's decision cycle can comprise three sequential decision rules: (1) selection of a current role based on the evaluation of the current status data, (2) selection of a specific subset of the current data, and (3) determination of the next heading using the selected data. Variations of the decision rules produce different versions of alpha and beta behaviors that lead to different collective behavior properties.

  17. Coordination Breakdowns: Why Groupware is so Difficult to Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easterbrook, Steve

    Coordination Breakdowns: Why Groupware is so Difficult to Design Steve Easterbrook School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QH, UK. in the requirements for software support tools. Many existing software systems rely on the adaptability of human users

  18. Generator Coordinate Method framework for Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Bobyk; Wies?aw A. Kami?ski

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a consistent prescription for the derivation of the particle number and angular momentum projected QRPA (PQRPA) equation in the Generator Coordinate Method (GCM) framework for calculation of NME's of double-beta decay of axially deformed nuclei. We derive closed formulae for the calculation of excitation energies and wave functions of the intermediate nucleus.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization- related genes and play for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer 2011 Abstract To examine the roles of FGF and ERK MAPK signaling in an ERK MAPK-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that FGF2 upregulates Ank, Enpp1, Mgp, Slc

  20. Coordinated Control and Range Imaging for Mobile Manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Alonzo

    Coordinated Control and Range Imaging for Mobile Manipulation Dean Anderson, Thomas M. Howard manipulators currently deployed for explosive ordinance disposal are typically controlled via crude forms interface. The manipulator arms are controlled in #12;2 Anderson, et al. the joint-velocity space

  1. Numerical Relativity in Spherical Polar Coordinates: Off-center Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte; Pedro J. Montero; Ewald Müller

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently presented a new approach for numerical relativity simulations in spherical polar coordinates, both for vacuum and for relativistic hydrodynamics. Our approach is based on a reference-metric formulation of the BSSN equations, a factoring of all tensor components, as well as a partially implicit Runge-Kutta method, and does not rely on a regularization of the equations, nor does it make any assumptions about the symmetry across the origin. In order to demonstrate this feature we present here several off-centered simulations, including simulations of single black holes and neutron stars whose center is placed away from the origin of the coordinate system, as well as the asymmetric head-on collision of two black holes. We also revisit our implementation of relativistic hydrodynamics and demonstrate that a reference-metric formulation of hydrodynamics together with a factoring of all tensor components avoids problems related to the coordinate singularities at the origin and on the axes. As a particularly demanding test we present results for a shock wave propagating through the origin of the spherical polar coordinate system.

  2. A Multi-Vehicle Testbed for Underwater Motion Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Collective Unmanned Underwater Labora- tory (SCUUL) testbed is a multi-vehicle testbed that is used. SCUUL is a multi-vehicle testbed consisting of six propellor-driven unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVsA Multi-Vehicle Testbed for Underwater Motion Coordination Nitin Sydney Department of Aerospace

  3. International Peer Group (IPG) Mentor / Mentor Coordinator Job Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    International Peer Group (IPG) Mentor / Mentor Coordinator Job Description International Peer Group (IPG) Mentors are current UCI undergraduates who have lived or studied abroad and/or are knowledgeable about the issues faced by international students. Mentors build strong relationships with mentees

  4. Networked Innovation: Using Roadmapping to Facilitate Coordination, Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Networked Innovation: Using Roadmapping to Facilitate Coordination, Collaboration and Cooperation, as are the resulting uncertainties. Roadmapping is a method that at its core is used to buy down uncertainty (linking activity to value creation across an ecosystem or platform). Ultimately, the way that roadmapping

  5. Coordinated Dynamic Voltage Stabilization based on Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    is very important for power system operations. This paper presents an approach for optimal coordination and operation [1], [2]. The deregulation of power industry has created an economical incentive to operate power devices, generator reactive power control, transformer tap changer control and load shedding. As shown

  6. From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

    From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse Rebecca E. Grinter Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA grinter@parc.xerox.com http://www.parc by making it possible to share code. However, software reuse in practice has proved much harder. This paper

  7. VirtualPower: Coordinated Power Management in Virtualized Enterprise Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    VirtualPower: Coordinated Power Management in Virtualized Enterprise Systems Ripal Nathuji CERCS Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30032 schwan@cc.gatech.edu ABSTRACT Power management has become. This paper explores how to inte- grate power management mechanisms and policies with the virtualization

  8. Coordinated Renewable Energy Support Schemes Stine Grenaa Jensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinated Renewable Energy Support Schemes Stine Grenaa Jensen1 , and Poul Erik Morthorst2 Risø for renewable energy are regionalised. Two theoretical examples are used to explain interactive effects on, e-ordination of support schemes for renewable energy technologies plays a prominent role at the European agenda (EC, 2005

  9. Designing pricing strategies for coordination of networked distributed energy resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Designing pricing strategies for coordination of networked distributed energy resources Bahman, by a group of distributed energy resources (DERs). The aggregator interacts with the wholesale electricity. The objective is for the aggregator to design a pricing strategy for incentivizing DERs to modify their active

  10. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator Committee Membership Dr. Jerry Johnson - committee chair Dr. Paul Raymer Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University

  11. Securing Internet Coordinate Embedding Systems Mohamed Ali Kaafar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turletti, Thierry

    Securing Internet Coordinate Embedding Systems Mohamed Ali Kaafar INRIA Sophia Antipolis, FR mkaafar@sophia.inria.fr Laurent Mathy Lancaster University, UK laurent@comp.lancs.ac.uk Chadi Barakat INRIA Sophia Antipolis, FR barakat@sophia.inria.fr Kave Salamatian LIP6, FR and EPFL, CH kave

  12. Virtual Networks under Attack: Disrupting Internet Coordinate Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turletti, Thierry

    Sophia Antipolis, FR mkaafar@sophia.inria.fr Laurent Mathy Lancaster University, UK and LAAS-CNRS, FR laurent@comp.lancs.ac.uk Thierry Turletti INRIA Sophia Antipolis, FR turletti@sophia.inria.fr Walid Dabbous INRIA Sophia Antipolis, FR dabbous@sophia.inria.fr ABSTRACT Internet coordinate-based systems

  13. Strategies for improved arterial coordination using actuated control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nageswara, Ramanan Venkat

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for optimal performance at higher volume levels for a g' en cycle length. At low volumes, any reasonable signal timing strategy works well as long as the detectors work and the traffic signals are coordinated. NETSIM simulation results for pretimed control...

  14. Collaborative Construction of Task Activity: Coordinating Multiple Resources in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Collaborative Construction of Task Activity: Coordinating Multiple Resources in a High School of the moment-to- moment construction of task, this study draws attention to complex yet taken-for- granted connections, knowing how to collaboratively construct a task. This article documents the collaborative

  15. Bowling Green State University Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Bowling Green State University Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries The University Libraries (UL) at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) invites applications and nominations and the University of Toledo, is managed by the University Libraries. Established in 1910, BGSU has received

  16. Blood Drive Coordinator Packet Massachusetts General Hospital pg.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    1 Blood Drive Coordinator Packet Massachusetts General Hospital pg.2 The MGH Bloodmobile pg.3 Facts about Blood Donation pg.4 Spreading the Word pg.5 Frequently Asked Questions and Tips pg.7 Schedule a Blood Drive pg.10 Eligibility Guidelines pg.11 #12;2 Massachusetts General Hospital

  17. Scientific Coordination Prof. dr. ir. Michel De Paepe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    govern- ments) in order to reduce CO2 emissions and the use of fossil fuels. Ten years later we seeScientific Coordination Prof. dr. ir. Michel De Paepe Department of Flow, heat and combustion that fuel prices have doubled and energy saving has reached a point of economic importance in the whole span

  18. UNCORRECTED 2 Coordination in irrigation systems: An analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Coordination in irrigation systems: An analysis 3 of the Lansing­Kremer model;UNCORRECTED PROOF 25 argued that a central control was inevitable for larger irrigation systems and hypoth- 26, there are various examples of complex irrigation systems and drainage systems 28 that have evolved without central

  19. Coordination of Cloud Computing and Smart Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Coordination of Cloud Computing and Smart Power Grids Amir-Hamed Mohsenian-Rad and Alberto Leon.mohsenian.rad, alberto.leongarcia}@utoronto.ca Abstract--The emergence of cloud computing has established a trend towards increasing the load at locations where they are built. However, data centers and cloud computing also provide

  20. A grid model for the design, coordination and dimensional optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A grid model for the design, coordination and dimensional optimization in architecture D.Léonard1 54000 Nancy, France INTRODUCTION Our article treats layout grids in architecture and their use. It initially proposes to define an architectural grid model as well as a set of operations to construct them