National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for development oecd consists

  1. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Visualization of World Energy Supply Add Tool OECD Programs Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

  2. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and United States Mission OECD brings together the governments of...

  3. OECD-International Platform on Policy Coherence for Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area: Economic Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices, Technical report User Interface: Website Website:...

  4. Consistent Comparison of the Codes RELAP5/PARCS and TRAC-M/PARCS for the OECD MSLB Coupled Code Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlowski, Tomasz; Miller, R. Matthew; Downar, Thomas J.; Barber, Douglas A.; Joo, Han Gyu

    2004-04-15

    A generalized interface module was developed for coupling any thermal-hydraulic code to any spatial kinetic code. In the design used here the thermal-hydraulic and spatial kinetic codes function as independent processes and communicate using the Parallel Virtual Machine software. This approach helps maximize flexibility while minimizing modifications to the respective codes. Using this interface, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) three-dimensional neutron kinetic code, Purdue Advanced Reactor Core Simulator (PARCS), has been coupled to the NRC system analysis codes RELAP5 and Modernized Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-M). Consistent comparison of code results for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency main steam line break benchmark problem using RELAP5/PARCS and TRAC-M/PARCS was made to assess code performance.

  5. OECD | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  6. THE PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TEST HOW AND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-15

    The Product Consistency Test (PCT), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard C1285, is currently used world wide for testing glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for high level waste (HLW), low level waste (LLW), and hazardous wastes. Development of the PCT was initiated in 1986 because HLW glass waste forms required extensive characterization before actual production began and required continued characterization during production ({ge}25 years). Non-radioactive startup was in 1994 and radioactive startup was in 1996. The PCT underwent extensive development from 1986-1994 and became an ASTM consensus standard in 1994. During the extensive laboratory testing and inter- and intra-laboratory round robins using non-radioactive and radioactive glasses, the PCT was shown to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, to distinguish between glasses of different durability and homogeneity, and to easily be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. In 1997, the scope was broadened to include hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste glasses. In 2002, the scope was broadened to include glass-ceramic waste forms which are currently being recommended for second generation nuclear wastes yet to be generated in the nuclear renaissance. Since the PCT has proven useful for glass-ceramics with up to 75% ceramic component and has been used to evaluate Pu ceramic waste forms, the use of this test for other ceramic/mineral waste forms such as geopolymers, hydroceramics, and fluidized bed steam reformer mineralized product is under investigation.

  7. Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory Levels

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a short-term monthly forecasting model of West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) petroleum inventory levels.

  8. Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Presents world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries (including the current and former centrally planned economies).

  9. OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

  10. OECD-Fostering Innovation for Green Growth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fostering Innovation for Green Growth Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Fostering Innovation for Green Growth AgencyCompany Organization:...

  11. Energy use and carbon emissions: Non-OECD countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report surveys world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD countries. The non OECD is important not only because it currently makes up 84% of world population, but because its energy consumption, carbon emissions, population, and grow domestic product have all been growing faster than OECD`s. This presentation has seven major sections: (1) overview of key trends in non-OECD energy use and carbon emissions since 1970; (2) Comparison and contrasting energy use and carbon emissions for five major non OEDC regions (former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, Pacific Rim including China, Latin America, other Asia; Africa; 3-7) presentation of aggregate and sectoral energy use and carbon emissions data for countries within each of the 5 regions.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of OECD Benchmark Tests in BISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Gamble, Kyle; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on sensitivity analysis of a fuels performance benchmark problem. The benchmark problem was defined by the Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling working group of the Nuclear Science Committee, part of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD ). The benchmark problem involv ed steady - state behavior of a fuel pin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The problem was created in the BISON Fuels Performance code. Dakota was used to generate and analyze 300 samples of 17 input parameters defining core boundary conditions, manuf acturing tolerances , and fuel properties. There were 24 responses of interest, including fuel centerline temperatures at a variety of locations and burnup levels, fission gas released, axial elongation of the fuel pin, etc. Pearson and Spearman correlatio n coefficients and Sobol' variance - based indices were used to perform the sensitivity analysis. This report summarizes the process and presents results from this study.

  13. OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Agency...

  14. (OECD Expert Group meeting on reduction of capital costs of nuclear power plants, Paris, France, July 21--26, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R. II

    1989-08-09

    The OECD initiated a study of means to reduce the capital costs of nuclear power plants in the latter part of 1988. To accomplish the study, an Expert Group consisting of representatives of OECD member countries was formed. The initial meeting of the Expert Group was held in November 1988. A second meeting, documented in an ORNL trip report by this author, was held in May 1989. This meeting represents the third follow-on meeting with the primary goal of reviewing the draft report written by members of the Expert Group.

  15. RELAP5-3D results for phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2. (authors)

  16. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  17. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  18. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd325846553489.pdf Low...

  19. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results

  20. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D ring and block model results for phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 benchmark

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-12-02

    The PHISICS code system has been under development at INL since 2010. It consists of several modules providing improved coupled core simulation capability: INSTANT (3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and modules performing criticality searches, fuel shuffling and generalized perturbation. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D was finalized in 2013, and as part of the verification and validation effort the first phase of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark has now been completed. The theoretical basis and latest development status of the coupled PHISICS/RELAP5-3D tool are described in more detailmore » in a concurrent paper. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark and presents the results of Exercises 2 and 3 defined for Phase I. Exercise 2 required the modelling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution at End of Equilibrium Cycle for the Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR). The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 required a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D code suite was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of results obtained with the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach against a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity that can be obtained by this “block” model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the ring model leads to significantly lower fuel temperatures (up to 10%) when compared with the higher fidelity block model, and that the additional model development and run-time efforts are worth the gains obtained

  1. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D ring and block model results for phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-12-02

    The PHISICS code system has been under development at INL since 2010. It consists of several modules providing improved coupled core simulation capability: INSTANT (3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and modules performing criticality searches, fuel shuffling and generalized perturbation. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D was finalized in 2013, and as part of the verification and validation effort the first phase of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark has now been completed. The theoretical basis and latest development status of the coupled PHISICS/RELAP5-3D tool are described in more detail in a concurrent paper. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark and presents the results of Exercises 2 and 3 defined for Phase I. Exercise 2 required the modelling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution at End of Equilibrium Cycle for the Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR). The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 required a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D code suite was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of results obtained with the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach against a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity that can be obtained by this “block” model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the ring model leads to significantly lower fuel temperatures (up to 10%) when compared with the higher fidelity block model, and that the additional model development and run-time efforts are worth the gains obtained in the

  2. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  3. OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Green Growth Strategy for Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Organisation for...

  4. Development of a self-consistent thermodynamic- and transport-property correlation framework for the coal conversion industry. Phase I. Semiannual report, September 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starling, K.E.; Lee, L.L.; Kumar, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    During the first half year of this research program the following elements of research have been performed: (1) the development of an improved pure component data bank, including collection and processing of data which is 70% complete as to substance, (2) calculation of distillable coal fluid thermodynamic properties using a multiparameter corresponding states correlation, (3) application of the most general density-cubic equation of pure fluids and (4) initiation of research to extend the corresponding states correlation framework to polar fluids. Primary conclusions of the first phase of this research program are that the three parameter corresponding states correlation predicts lighter coal fluid properties to a reasonable level of accuracy, and that a cubic equation can predict pure fluid thermodynamic properties on par with non-cubic equations of state.

  5. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... U.S. Territories; for 1984 forward, Mexico; and, for 2000 forward, Chile, Estonia, and Israel. d The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of "OECD ...

  6. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark by the Coupled-Code System ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenbuch, S.; Schmidt, K.-D.; Velkov, K.

    2004-10-15

    The OECD/NRC boiling water reactor (BWR) turbine trip benchmark has been calculated by the coupled thermal-hydraulic neutronics system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX developed by Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit. The results obtained for all three exercises and for the additional four hypothetical cases are presented. The physical phenomena determining the BWR pressure transient are studied and explained. The sensitivity of results to variations of the initial steady-state conditions and of parameters of the two-phase flow model is discussed. A comparison is also performed for exercise 2 between the reactor core model with 33 thermal-hydraulic channels (THCs) as specified and a reactor core model with 764 THCs using a 1:1 mapping scheme.

  7. OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornet, S.M.; McCarthy, K.; Chauvin, N.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

  8. RELAP5/MOD2 assessment, OECD-LOFT small break experiment LP-SB-03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guntay, S. )

    1990-04-01

    An analysis of the experimental results and post-test calculations using RELAP5/MOD2 carried out for OECD-LOFT small break experiment LP-SB-3 are presented. Experiment LP-SB-3 was conducted on March 5, 1984 in Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The experiment simulated a small cold leg break, with concurrent loss of high pressure injection system, and cooldown and recovery by feed and bleed of the steam generator secondary side and accumulator injection, respectively. The analysis was under taken as a part of a program at EIR aimed at developing experience in using the latest generation of best estimate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis computer codes, and to improve understanding of Small Break LOCA transients and as well as a part of a program aimed at assessing the RELAP5/MOD2 code. The latest available version (Cycle 33 to 36.1) of the code was used. The particular test selected for the analysis included several phenomena potentially relevant to any PWR plant operation in Switzerland. This report documents a short post-test analysis of the experiment emphasizing the results of additional analysis performed during the course of this task. RELAP5/MOD2 input model and results of the post-test calculation are documented. Included in the report are the results of a sensitivity analysis which show the predicted thermal-hydraulic response to a different input model. 7 refs., 55 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    -dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory

  10. OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R.

    2012-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

  11. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) OECD The Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of the United States, much of Europe, and other advanced countries. At 53 percent of world oil consumption in 2010, these large economies consume more oil than the non-OECD countries, but have much lower oil consumption growth. Oil consumption in the OECD countries actually declined in the decade between 2000 and 2010, whereas non-OECD consumption rose 40 percent during the same period. In OECD

  12. Summary of important results and SCDAP/RELAP5 analysis for OECD LOFT experiment LP-FP-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coryell, E.W.

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes significant technical findings from the LP-FP-2 Experiment sponsored by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). It was the second, and final, fission product experiment conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel rod behavior, hydrogen generation, and fission product release, transport, and deposition during a V-sequence accident scenario that resulted in severe core damage. An 11 by 11 test bundle, comprised of 100 prepressurized fuel rods, 11 control rods, and 10 instrumented guide tubes, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a specially designed central fuel module, that was inserted into the LOFT reactor. The simulated transient was a V-sequence loss-of-coolant accident scenario featuring a pipe break in the low pressure injection system line attached to the hot leg of the LOFT broken loop piping. The transient was terminated by reflood of the reactor vessel when the outer wall shroud temperature reached 1517 K. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation and metal-water reactions, elevated temperatures resulted in zircaloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on line instrumentation, analysis of fission product data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented.

  13. Four new publications help advance renewable energy development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  14. Self-consistent klystron simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsten, B.E.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical analysis of large-signal klystron behavior based on general wave-particle interaction theory is presented. The computer code presented is tailored for the minimum amount of complexity needed in klystron simulation. The code includes self-consistent electron motion, space-charge fields, and intermediate and output fields. It also includes use of time periodicity to simplify the problem, accurate representation of the space-charge fields, accurate representation of the cavity standing-wave fields, and a sophisticated particle-pushing routine. In the paper, examples are given that show the effects of cavity detunings, of varying the magnetic field profile, of electron beam asymmetries from the gun, and of variations in external load impedance. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-02-25

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning.

  16. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-07-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates.

  17. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability

  18. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) OECD The Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of the United States, much of Europe, and other advanced countries. At 53 percent of world oil consumption in 2010, these large economies consume more oil than the non-OECD countries, but have much lower oil consumption growth. Oil consumption in the OECD countries actually declined in the decade between 2000 and 2010, whereas non-OECD consumption rose 40 percent during

  19. Summary of comparison and analysis of results from exercises 1 and 2 of the OECD PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkhabela, P.; Han, J.; Tyobeka, B.; Ivanov, K.; Reitsma, F.; Sartori, E.

    2006-07-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor 400 MW design (PBMR-400) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem as part of their official activities. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given library of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events through a set of multi-dimensional computational test problems. The benchmark includes three steady state exercises and six transient exercises. This paper describes the first two steady state exercises, their objectives and the international participation in terms of organization, country and computer code utilized. This description is followed by a comparison and analysis of the participants' results submitted for these two exercises. The comparison of results from different codes allows for an assessment of the sensitivity of a result to the method employed and can thus help to focus the development efforts on the most critical areas. The two first exercises also allow for removing of user-related modeling errors and prepare core neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the different codes for the rest of the exercises in the benchmark. (authors)

  20. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  1. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  2. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI workshop on transient thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, D.

    1997-07-01

    This is a report on the CSNI Workshop on Transient Thermal-Hydraulic and Neutronic Codes Requirements held at Annapolis, Maryland, USA November 5-8, 1996. This experts` meeting consisted of 140 participants from 21 countries; 65 invited papers were presented. The meeting was divided into five areas: (1) current and prospective plans of thermal hydraulic codes development; (2) current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes; (3) advances in modeling of thermal-hydraulic phenomena and associated additional experimental needs; (4) numerical methods in multi-phase flows; and (5) programming language, code architectures and user interfaces. The workshop consensus identified the following important action items to be addressed by the international community in order to maintain and improve the calculational capability: (a) preserve current code expertise and institutional memory, (b) preserve the ability to use the existing investment in plant transient analysis codes, (c) maintain essential experimental capabilities, (d) develop advanced measurement capabilities to support future code validation work, (e) integrate existing analytical capabilities so as to improve performance and reduce operating costs, (f) exploit the proven advances in code architecture, numerics, graphical user interfaces, and modularization in order to improve code performance and scrutibility, and (g) more effectively utilize user experience in modifying and improving the codes.

  3. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector ?0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  4. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle

    2015-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, parametric studies, and selection of system codes. The Cladding and Core Materials and Fuel Concepts task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment Task Force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (INL), while the Cladding Task Force will be chaired by a representative from France (Marie Moatti, Electricite de France [EdF]) and the Fuels Task Force will be chaired by a representative from Japan (Masaki Kurata, Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA]). This report provides an overview of the Systems Assessment Task Force charter and status of work accomplishment.

  5. Generalized arc consistency for global cardinality constraint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regin, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A global cardinality constraint (gcc) is specified in terms of a set of variables X = (x{sub 1},..., x{sub p}) which take their values in a subset of V = (v{sub 1},...,v{sub d}). It constrains the number of times a value v{sub i} {epsilon} V is assigned to a variable in X to be in an interval [l{sub i}, c{sub i}]. Cardinality constraints have proved very useful in many real-life problems, such as scheduling, timetabling, or resource allocation. A gcc is more general than a constraint of difference, which requires each interval to be. In this paper, we present an efficient way of implementing generalized arc consistency for a gcc. The algorithm we propose is based on a new theorem of flow theory. Its space complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}) and its time complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar}{sup 2} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}). We also show how this algorithm can efficiently be combined with other filtering techniques.

  6. On the grade consistent theories of micromorphic elastic solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iesan, D.

    2011-02-10

    For the investigation of specific nonlocal phenomena the second-order displacement gradient has been added to the independent constitutive variables used in the classical theories of elastic solids. In this paper we outline the hystorical development of the subject and present a nonlinear grade consistent theory of micromorphic elastic solids in which the independent constitutive variables are the deformation gradient, the second-order displacement gradient, microdeformation tensor, and microdeformation gradient. Then, we present the linearized theory and establish a uniqueness result with no definiteness assumption on the elastic coefficients. The theory is used to obtain the basic eqations of a grade consistent theory of microstretch elastic bodies. The field equations for an isotropic and homogeneous elastic body are presented. A counterpart of the Cauchy-Kowalevski-Somigliana solution of the classical elastodynamics is established.

  7. OECD MCCI project enhancing instrumentation for reactor materials experiments, Rev. 0 September 3, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    Reactor safety experiments for studying the reactions of a molten core (corium) with water and/or concrete involve materials at extremely high temperature. Such high temperature severely restricts the types of sensors that can be employed to measure characteristics of the corium itself. Yet there is great interest in improving instrumentation so that the state of the melt can be established with more precision. In particular, it would be beneficial to increase both the upper range limit and accuracy of temperature measurements. The poor durability of thermocouples at high temperature is also an important issue. For experiments involving a water-quenched melt, direct measurements of the growth rate of the crust separating the melt and water would be of great interest. This is a key element in determining the nature of heat transfer between the melt and coolant. Despite its importance, no one has been able to directly measure the crust thickness during such tests. This paper considers three specialized sensors that could be introduced to enhance melt characterization: (1) A commercially fabricated, single point infrared temperature measurement with the footprint of a thermowell. A lens assembly and fiber optic cable linked to a receiver and amplifier measures the temperature at the base of a tungsten thermowell. The upper range limit is 3000 C and accuracy is {+-}0.25% of the reading. (2) In-house development of an ultrasonic temperature sensor that would provide multipoint measurements at temperatures up to {approx}3000 C. The sensors are constructed from tungsten rods and have a high temperature durability that is superior to that of thermocouples. (3) In-house development of an ultrasonic probe to measure the growth rate of the corium crust. This ultrasonic sensor would include a tungsten waveguide that transmits ultrasonic pulses up through the corium melt towards the crust and detects reflections from the melt/crust interface. A measurement of the echo time

  8. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  9. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  10. Generalized contexts and consistent histories in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losada, Marcelo; Laura, Roberto

    2014-05-15

    We analyze a restriction of the theory of consistent histories by imposing that a valid description of a physical system must include quantum histories which satisfy the consistency conditions for all states. We prove that these conditions are equivalent to imposing the compatibility conditions of our formalism of generalized contexts. Moreover, we show that the theory of consistent histories with the consistency conditions for all states and the formalism of generalized context are equally useful representing expressions which involve properties at different times.

  11. A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model | Department of Energy Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model Rizzo Associates Presented at U.S. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21, 2014 A Probabilistic Approach to

  12. A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    flow with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient viscous flow with ...

  13. Efficient self-consistent quantum transport simulator for quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Efficient self-consistent quantum transport simulator for quantum ... DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  14. Self-consistent second-order Green's function perturbation theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Self-consistent second-order Green's function perturbation theory for periodic systems ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud ...

  15. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  16. BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" A finite set of results reported in consistent units * To track progress of individual projects on a consistent basis * To enable comparing projects in a transparent manner Potential BILIWG Figures of Merit Key BILI Distributed Reforming Targets * Cost ($/kg of H2): H2A analysis - Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 5000/6250 psi (and 10,000/12,000 psi) dispensing, 500 units/yr. * nth unit vs. 500 units/yr ? * production

  17. Self-consistency tests of large-scale dynamics parameterizations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In self-consistency tests based on radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE; i.e., no large-scale convergence), we find that simulations either weakly coupled or strongly coupled to ...

  18. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University Lviv Polytechnic, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  19. Exact solution of the self-consistent Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morawetz, K.

    1997-03-01

    An analytical solution of the self-consistent Vlasov equation is presented. The time evolution is entirely determined by the initial distribution function. The largest Lyapunov exponent is calculated analytically. For special parameters of the potential a positive Lyapunov exponent is possible. This model may serve as a check for numerical codes solving self-consistent Vlasov equations. The here presented method is also applicable for any system with an analytical solution of the Hamilton equation for the form factor of the potential. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Consistent interaction vertices in arbitrary topological BF theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bizdadea, C.; Cioroianu, E. M.; Saliu, S. O.; Sararu, S. C.; Stanciu-Oprean, L.

    2013-11-13

    Here we extend the previous results from [12] to the computation of all consistent self-interactions for topological BF theories with maximal field spectra in D =5,6,7,8 and present some partial results on possible generalizations on a space-time of arbitrary dimension D. For convenience, the deformation of the solution to the master equation in the context of the BRST-antifield formalism is used as a general method of constructing consistent interacting gauge field theories together with most of the standard hypotheses on quantum field theories on Minkowski space-times.

  1. Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Zuber, Kai [Technical University Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-01

    We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited 0{sup +} state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass .

  2. Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2012-09-01

    In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: • Non-linear effects • Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections • Multi-isotope consistent assimilation • Consistency between differential and integral

  3. Non-trivial checks of novel consistency relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin; Wang, Junpu E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-06-01

    Single-field perturbations satisfy an infinite number of consistency relations constraining the squeezed limit of correlation functions at each order in the soft momentum. These can be understood as Ward identities for an infinite set of residual global symmetries, or equivalently as Slavnov-Taylor identities for spatial diffeomorphisms. In this paper, we perform a number of novel, non-trivial checks of the identities in the context of single field inflationary models with arbitrary sound speed. We focus for concreteness on identities involving 3-point functions with a soft external mode, and consider all possible scalar and tensor combinations for the hard-momentum modes. In all these cases, we check the consistency relations up to and including cubic order in the soft momentum. For this purpose, we compute for the first time the 3-point functions involving 2 scalars and 1 tensor, as well as 2 tensors and 1 scalar, for arbitrary sound speed.

  4. Full self-consistency versus quasiparticle self-consistency in diagrammatic approaches: Exactly solvable two-site Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutepov, A. L.

    2015-07-22

    Self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations (HE) for the two-site Hubbard model (HM) have been studied. They have been found for three-point vertices of increasing complexity (Γ = 1 (GW approximation), Γ₁ from the first-order perturbation theory, and the exact vertex ΓE). Comparison is made between the cases when an additional quasiparticle (QP) approximation for Green's functions is applied during the self-consistent iterative solving of HE and when QP approximation is not applied. Results obtained with the exact vertex are directly related to the present open question—which approximation is more advantageous for future implementations, GW + DMFT or QPGW + DMFT. It is shown that in a regime of strong correlations only the originally proposed GW + DMFT scheme is able to provide reliable results. Vertex corrections based on Perturbation Theory systematically improve the GW results when full self-consistency is applied. The application of QP self-consistency combined with PT vertex corrections shows similar problems to the case when the exact vertex is applied combined with QP sc. An analysis of Ward Identity violation is performed for all studied in this work's approximations and its relation to the general accuracy of the schemes used is provided.

  5. Full self-consistency versus quasiparticle self-consistency in diagrammatic approaches: Exactly solvable two-site Hubbard model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kutepov, A. L.

    2015-07-22

    Self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations (HE) for the two-site Hubbard model (HM) have been studied. They have been found for three-point vertices of increasing complexity (Γ = 1 (GW approximation), Γ₁ from the first-order perturbation theory, and the exact vertex ΓE). Comparison is made between the cases when an additional quasiparticle (QP) approximation for Green's functions is applied during the self-consistent iterative solving of HE and when QP approximation is not applied. Results obtained with the exact vertex are directly related to the present open question—which approximation is more advantageous for future implementations, GW + DMFT or QPGW + DMFT.more » It is shown that in a regime of strong correlations only the originally proposed GW + DMFT scheme is able to provide reliable results. Vertex corrections based on Perturbation Theory systematically improve the GW results when full self-consistency is applied. The application of QP self-consistency combined with PT vertex corrections shows similar problems to the case when the exact vertex is applied combined with QP sc. An analysis of Ward Identity violation is performed for all studied in this work's approximations and its relation to the general accuracy of the schemes used is provided.« less

  6. Diagnostic Mass-Consistent Wind Field Monte Carlo Dispersion Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-01-01

    MATHEW generates a diagnostic mass-consistent, three-dimensional wind field based on point measurements of wind speed and direction. It accounts for changes in topography within its calculational domain. The modeled wind field is used by the Langrangian ADPIC dispersion model. This code is designed to predict the atmospheric boundary layer transport and diffusion of neutrally bouyant, non-reactive species as well as first-order chemical reactions and radioactive decay (including daughter products).

  7. APPENDIX A: ENSURING CONSISTENCY WITH THE STANDARDS OF THE NATIONAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for 245 basin communities studied under the NFIP ... units of government (counties, cities, etc.) in developing ... the Unified National Program for Floodplain ...

  8. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  9. Measuring consistent masses for 25 Milky Way globular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmig, Brian; Seth, Anil; Ivans, Inese I.; Anderton, Tim; Gregersen, Dylan; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson

    2015-02-01

    We present central velocity dispersions, masses, mass-to-light ratios (M/Ls ), and rotation strengths for 25 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We derive radial velocities of 1951 stars in 12 GCs from single order spectra taken with Hectochelle on the MMT telescope. To this sample we add an analysis of available archival data of individual stars. For the full set of data we fit King models to derive consistent dynamical parameters for the clusters. We find good agreement between single-mass King models and the observed radial dispersion profiles. The large, uniform sample of dynamical masses we derive enables us to examine trends of M/L with cluster mass and metallicity. The overall values of M/L and the trends with mass and metallicity are consistent with existing measurements from a large sample of M31 clusters. This includes a clear trend of increasing M/L with cluster mass and lower than expected M/Ls for the metal-rich clusters. We find no clear trend of increasing rotation with increasing cluster metallicity suggested in previous work.

  10. On consistent kinetic and derivative interactions for gravitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noller, Johannes

    2015-04-17

    The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new candidate family of kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field — analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the ‘Jordan’ and ‘Einstein’ frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

  11. Simulation of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break Benchmark Exercise 3 Using the Coupled RELAP5/PANTHER Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneidesch, Christophe R.; Zhang Jinzhao

    2004-04-15

    The RELAP5 best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code has been coupled with the PANTHER three-dimensional neutron kinetics code via the TALINK dynamic data exchange control and processing tool. The coupled RELAP5/PANTHER code package has been qualified and will be used at Tractebel Engineering (TE) for analyzing asymmetric pressurized water reactor (PWR) accidents with strong core-system interactions. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission PWR main-steam-line-break benchmark problem was analyzed as part of the qualification efforts to demonstrate the capability of the coupled code package of simulating such transients. This paper reports the main results of TE's contribution to the benchmark Exercise 3.

  12. A consistent approach to falsifying ?CDM with rare galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Ian; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-07-01

    We consider methods with which to answer the question ''is any observed galaxy cluster too unusual for ?CDM?'' After emphasising that many previous attempts to answer this question will overestimate the confidence level at which ?CDM can be ruled out, we outline a consistent approach to these rare clusters, which allows the question to be answered. We define three statistical measures, each of which are sensitive to changes in cluster populations arising from different modifications to the cosmological model. We also use these properties to define the ''equivalent mass at redshift zero'' for a cluster the mass of an equally unusual cluster today. This quantity is independent of the observational survey in which the cluster was found, which makes it an ideal proxy for ranking the relative unusualness of clusters detected by different surveys. These methods are then used on a comprehensive sample of observed galaxy clusters and we confirm that all are less than 2? deviations from the ?CDM expectation. Whereas we have only applied our method to galaxy clusters, it is applicable to any isolated, collapsed, halo. As motivation for future surveys, we also calculate where in the mass redshift plane the rarest halo is most likely to be found, giving information as to which objects might be the most fruitful in the search for new physics.

  13. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Norea, Jorge; Simonovi?, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ?CDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast ? and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale ?. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  15. IMPROVING CONSISTENCY OF PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

    2009-01-20

    The low-level waste (LLW) performance assessment (PA) process has been traditionally focused on disposal facilities at a few United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites and commercial disposal facilities. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the scope of the use of PA-like modeling approaches, involving multiple activities, facilities, contractors and regulators. The scope now includes, for example: (1) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessments, (2) CERCLA disposal cells, (3) Waste Determinations and High-Level Waste (HLW) Closure activities, (4) Potential on-site disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste, and (5) In-situ decommissioning (including potential use of existing facilities for disposal). The dramatic increase in the variety of activities requiring more detailed modeling has resulted in a similar increase in the potential for inconsistency in approaches both at a site and complexwide scale. This paper includes a summary of USDOE Environmental Management (EM) sponsored initiatives and activities for improved consistency. New initiatives entitled the Performance Assessment Community of Practice and Performance Assessment Assistance Team are also introduced.

  16. ERUPTION OF A SOLAR FILAMENT CONSISTING OF TWO THREADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi Yi; Jiang Yunchun; Li Haidong; Hong Junchao; Zheng Ruisheng E-mail: jyc@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-10-10

    The trigger and driving mechanism for the eruption of a filament consisting of two dark threads was studied with unprecedented high cadence and resolution of He II 304 A observations made by the Atmospheric Imagining Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the observations made by the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) telescope on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A). The filament was located at the periphery of the active region NOAA 11228 and erupted on 2011 June 6. At the onset of the eruption, a turbulent filament thread was found to be heated and to elongate in stride over a second one. After it rose slowly, most interestingly, the elongating thread was driven to contact and interact with the second one, and it then erupted with its southern leg being wrapped by a newly formed thread produced by the magnetic reconnection between fields carried by the two threads. Combining the observations from STEREO-A/EUVI and SDO/AIA 304 A images, the three-dimensional shape of the axis of the filament was obtained and it was found that only the southern leg of the eruptive filament underwent rotation. We suggest that the eruption was triggered by the reconnection of the turbulent filament thread and the surrounding magnetic field, and that it was mainly driven by the kink instability of the southern leg of the eruptive filament that possessed a more twisted field introduced by the reconnection-produced thread.

  17. Statistical dynamics of classical systems: A self-consistent field approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzetic, Douglas J. Wickham, Robert A.; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-06-28

    We develop a self-consistent field theory for particle dynamics by extremizing the functional integral representation of a microscopic Langevin equation with respect to the collective fields. Although our approach is general, here we formulate it in the context of polymer dynamics to highlight satisfying formal analogies with equilibrium self-consistent field theory. An exact treatment of the dynamics of a single chain in a mean force field emerges naturally via a functional Smoluchowski equation, while the time-dependent monomer density and mean force field are determined self-consistently. As a simple initial demonstration of the theory, leaving an application to polymer dynamics for future work, we examine the dynamics of trapped interacting Brownian particles. For binary particle mixtures, we observe the kinetics of phase separation.

  18. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  19. Data consistency conditions for truncated fanbeam and parallel projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clackdoyle, Rolf; Desbat, Laurent

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In image reconstruction from projections, data consistency conditions (DCCs) are mathematical relationships that express the overlap of information between ideal projections. DCCs have been incorporated in image reconstruction procedures for positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, and x-ray computed tomography (CT). Building on published fanbeam DCCs for nontruncated projections along a line, the authors recently announced new DCCs that can be applied to truncated parallel projections in classical (two-dimensional) image reconstruction. These DCCs take the form of polynomial expressions for a weighted backprojection of the projections. The purpose of this work was to present the new DCCs for truncated parallel projections, to extend these conditions to truncated fanbeam projections on a circular trajectory, to verify the conditions with numerical examples, and to present a model of how DCCs could be applied with a toy problem in patient motion estimation with truncated projections. Methods: A mathematical derivation of the new parallel DCCs was performed by substituting the underlying imaging equation into the mathematical expression for the weighted backprojection and demonstrating the resulting polynomial form. This DCC result was extended to fanbeam projections by a substitution of parallel to fanbeam variables. Ideal fanbeam projections of a simple mathematical phantom were simulated and the DCCs for these projections were evaluated by fitting polynomials to the weighted backprojection. For the motion estimation problem, a parametrized motion was simulated using a dynamic version of the mathematical phantom, and both noiseless and noisy fanbeam projections were simulated for a full circular trajectory. The fanbeam DCCs were applied to extract the motion parameters, which allowed the motion contamination to be removed from the projections. A reconstruction was performed from the corrected projections. Results: The

  20. Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar Series Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Scott Yee March 19 th , 2014 1 Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance 2 MEEA is a collaborative network whose purpose is to advance energy efficiency to support sustainable economic development and environmental preservation. Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Midwest Energy Efficiency

  1. Self-Consistent Criteria for Evaluation of Neutron Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry H.F,Newlon C.E.,Knight J.R.

    2007-08-02

    New safe interaction criteria for containers of fissionable materials handled at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant have been developed on the basis of an interaction theory using the basic concepts of a safe solid angle subtended by interacting containers, and the multiplication factor as determined by two-group theory for an individually safe containers The calculated results agree satisfactorily with experimental data obtained with identical interacting units involving both cylinders and slabs containing highly enriched uranium, the core compositions of which were varied between H/U-235 atomic ratios of 44.3 and 337. The application of the derived interaction criteria to items containing material with low moderation or low U-235 assay, and to containers for which nuclear safety is dependent upon control of the U-235 mass or U-235 concentration is discussed.

  2. Integrated fusion simulation with self-consistent core-pedestal coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meneghini, O.; Snyder, P. B.; Smith, S. P.; Candy, J.; Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Lao, L. L.; Park, J. M.; Green, D. L.; Elwasif, W.; et al

    2016-04-20

    In this study, accurate prediction of fusion performance in present and future tokamaks requires taking into account the strong interplay between core transport, pedestal structure, current profile and plasma equilibrium. An integrated modeling workflow capable of calculating the steady-state self- consistent solution to this strongly-coupled problem has been developed. The workflow leverages state-of-the-art components for collisional and turbulent core transport, equilibrium and pedestal stability. Validation against DIII-D discharges shows that the workflow is capable of robustly pre- dicting the kinetic profiles (electron and ion temperature and electron density) from the axis to the separatrix in good agreement with the experiments.more » An example application is presented, showing self-consistent optimization for the fusion performance of the 15 MA D-T ITER baseline scenario as functions of the pedestal density and ion effective charge Zeff.« less

  3. Self-Consistent Multiscale Theory of Internal Wave, Mean-Flow Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holm, D.D.; Aceves, A.; Allen, J.S.; Alber, M.; Camassa, R.; Cendra, H.; Chen, S.; Duan, J.; Fabijonas, B.; Foias, C.; Fringer, O.; Gent, P.R.; Jordan, R.; Kouranbaeva, S.; Kovacic, G.; Levermore, C.D.; Lythe, G.; Lifschitz, A.; Marsden, J.E.; Margolin, L.; Newberger, P.; Olson, E.; Ratiu, T.; Shkoller, S.; Timofeyev, I.; Titi, E.S.; Wynn, S.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The research reported here produced new effective ways to solve multiscale problems in nonlinear fluid dynamics, such as turbulent flow and global ocean circulation. This was accomplished by first developing new methods for averaging over random or rapidly varying phases in nonlinear systems at multiple scales. We then used these methods to derive new equations for analyzing the mean behavior of fluctuation processes coupled self consistently to nonlinear fluid dynamics. This project extends a technology base relevant to a variety of multiscale problems in fluid dynamics of interest to the Laboratory and applies this technology to those problems. The project's theoretical and mathematical developments also help advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of complex behavior in fluid dynamical systems with strong spatial and temporal internal variability.

  4. Third Minima in Thorium and Uranium Isotopes in a Self-Consistent Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonnell, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Well-developed third minima, corresponding to strongly elongated and reflection-asymmetric shapes associated with dimolecular configurations, have been predicted in some non-self-consistent models to impact fission pathways of thorium and uranium isotopes. These predictions have guided the interpretation of resonances seen experimentally. On the other hand, self-consistent calculations consistently predict very shallow potential-energy surfaces in the third minimum region.

    Purpose: We investigate the interpretation of third-minimum configurations in terms of dimolecular (cluster) states. We study the isentropic potential-energy surfaces of selected even-even thorium and uranium isotopes at several excitation energies. In order to understand the driving effects behind the presence of third minima, we study the interplay between pairing and shell effects.

    Methods: We use the finite-temperature superfluid nuclear density functional theory. We consider two Skyrme energy density functionals: a traditional functional SkM and a recent functional UNEDF1 optimized for fission studies.

    Results: We predict very shallow or no third minima in the potential-energy surfaces of 232Th and 232U. In the lighter Th and U isotopes with N = 136 and 138, the third minima are better developed. We show that the reflection-asymmetric configurations around the third minimum can be associated with dimolecular states involving the spherical doubly magic 132Sn and a lighter deformed Zr or Mo fragment. The potential-energy surfaces for 228,232Th and 232U at several excitation energies are presented. We also study isotopic chains to demonstrate the evolution of the depth of the third minimum with neutron number.

    Conclusions: We show that the neutron shell effect that governs the existence of the dimolecular states around the third minimum is consistent with the spherical-to-deformed shape transition in the Zr andMo isotopes around N = 58.We demonstrate that the depth of

  5. Road Map for Studies to Produce Consistent and High Performance SRF Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; John F. OHanlon

    2007-06-20

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator structures made from high purity niobium are becoming the technological choice for a large number of future accelerators and energy recovery LINACs (ERL). Most of the presently planned accelerators and ERL requirements will be met with some effort by the current SRF technology where accelerating gradients of about 20 MV/m can be produced on a routine basis with an acceptable yield. However, the XFEL at DESY and the planned ILC require acceleration gradients more than 28 MV/m and 35 MV/m respectively. At the recent ILC meeting at Snowmass (2005) concern was expressed regarding the wide spread in the achieved accelerator gradients and the relatively low yields. For obtaining accelerating gradients of 35 MV/m in SRF accelerator structures consistently, a deeper understanding of the causes for the spread has to be gained and advances have to be made in many scientific and high technology fields, including materials, surface and vacuum sciences, application of reliable processes and procedures, which provide contamination free surfaces and avoid recontamination and cryogenics related technologies. In this contribution a road map for studies needed to produce consistent and high performance SRF accelerator structures from the needed materials development to clean and non-recontaminating processes and procedures will be presented.

  6. A Thermodynamically-Consistent Non-Ideal Stochastic Hard-Sphere Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2009-08-03

    A grid-free variant of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is proposed, named the Isotropic DSMC (I-DSMC) method, that is suitable for simulating collision-dominated dense fluid flows. The I-DSMC algorithm eliminates all grid artifacts from the traditional DSMC algorithm and is Galilean invariant and microscopically isotropic. The stochastic collision rules in I-DSMC are modified to introduce a non-ideal structure factor that gives consistent compressibility, as first proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101:075902 (2008)]. The resulting Stochastic Hard Sphere Dynamics (SHSD) fluid is empirically shown to be thermodynamically identical to a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with a linear core pair potential, well-described by the hypernetted chain (HNC) approximation. We develop a kinetic theory for the SHSD fluid to obtain estimates for the transport coefficients that are in excellent agreement with particle simulations over a wide range of densities and collision rates. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified by comparing its dynamic structure factor against theory based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations. We also study the Brownian motion of a nano-particle suspended in an SHSD fluid and find a long-time power-law tail in its velocity autocorrelation function consistent with hydrodynamic theory and molecular dynamics calculations.

  7. Quantum Chemistry, and Eclectic Mix: From Silicon Carbide to Size Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamie Marie Rintelman

    2004-12-19

    Chemistry is a field of great breadth and variety. It is this diversity that makes for both an interesting and challenging field. My interests have spanned three major areas of theoretical chemistry: applications, method development, and method evaluation. The topics presented in this thesis are as follows: (1) a multi-reference study of the geometries and relative energies of four atom silicon carbide clusters in the gas phase; (2) the reaction of acetylene on the Si(100)-(2x1) surface; (3) an improvement to the Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) solvent model to enable the study of reactions in both aqueous and nonaqueous solution; and (4) an evaluation of the size consistency of Multireference Perturbation Theory (MRPT). In the following section, the author briefly discusses two topics central to, and present throughout, this thesis: Multi-reference methods and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) methods.

  8. Consistent generation and functionalization of one-dimensional cross sections for TRAC-BF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Verdu, G.; Pereira, C.; Escriva, A.; Rodenas, J. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering); Castrillo, F.; Serra, J. )

    1994-08-01

    A method of calculation of correct functionalized cross sections and diffusion coefficients for TRAC-BF1, based on the one-dimensional kinetic files of the tridimensional simulator SIMULATE-3, is developed. The method allows the user to obtain first the consistent one-dimensional cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and bucklings, which upon being inserted into TRAC-BF1 conserve the three-dimensional eigenvalues, the planar reaction rates, and the fast and thermal radially averaged fluxes at each axial node. This method also compensates for the differences between the thermal-hydraulic models of the three-dimensional simulator and the transient analysis code. The errors obtained with this method are very small.

  9. All-electron self-consistent G W in the Matsubara-time domain...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All-electron self-consistent G W in the Matsubara-time domain: Implementation and ... Title: All-electron self-consistent G W in the Matsubara-time domain: Implementation ...

  10. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  11. Average intragranular misorientation trends in polycrystalline materials predicted by a viscoplastic self-consistent approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Zecevic, Miroslav; Knezevic, Marko; McCabe, Rodney J.

    2015-12-15

    Here, this work presents estimations of average intragranular fluctuations of lattice rotation rates in polycrystalline materials, obtained by means of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model. These fluctuations give a tensorial measure of the trend of misorientation developing inside each single crystal grain representing a polycrystalline aggregate. We first report details of the algorithm implemented in the VPSC code to estimate these fluctuations, which are then validated by comparison with corresponding full-field calculations. Next, we present predictions of average intragranular fluctuations of lattice rotation rates for cubic aggregates, which are rationalized by comparison with experimental evidence on annealing textures of fcc and bcc polycrystals deformed in tension and compression, respectively, as well as with measured intragranular misorientation distributions in a Cu polycrystal deformed in tension. The orientation-dependent and micromechanically-based estimations of intragranular misorientations that can be derived from the present implementation are necessary to formulate sound sub-models for the prediction of quantitatively accurate deformation textures, grain fragmentation, and recrystallization textures using the VPSC approach.

  12. Average intragranular misorientation trends in polycrystalline materials predicted by a viscoplastic self-consistent approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Zecevic, Miroslav; Knezevic, Marko; McCabe, Rodney J.

    2015-12-15

    Here, this work presents estimations of average intragranular fluctuations of lattice rotation rates in polycrystalline materials, obtained by means of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model. These fluctuations give a tensorial measure of the trend of misorientation developing inside each single crystal grain representing a polycrystalline aggregate. We first report details of the algorithm implemented in the VPSC code to estimate these fluctuations, which are then validated by comparison with corresponding full-field calculations. Next, we present predictions of average intragranular fluctuations of lattice rotation rates for cubic aggregates, which are rationalized by comparison with experimental evidence on annealing textures of fccmore » and bcc polycrystals deformed in tension and compression, respectively, as well as with measured intragranular misorientation distributions in a Cu polycrystal deformed in tension. The orientation-dependent and micromechanically-based estimations of intragranular misorientations that can be derived from the present implementation are necessary to formulate sound sub-models for the prediction of quantitatively accurate deformation textures, grain fragmentation, and recrystallization textures using the VPSC approach.« less

  13. Consistent multi-internal-temperature models for vibrational and electronic nonequilibrium in hypersonic nitrogen plasma flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, Aurlien Bourdon, Anne Perrin, Marie-Yvonne

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a state-to-state vibrational and electronic collisional model is developed to investigate nonequilibrium phenomena behind a shock wave in an ionized nitrogen flow. In the ionization dynamics behind the shock wave, the electron energy budget is of key importance and it is found that the main depletion term corresponds to the electronic excitation of N atoms, and conversely the major creation terms are the electron-vibration term at the beginning, then replaced by the electron ions elastic exchange term. Based on these results, a macroscopic multi-internal-temperature model for the vibration of N{sub 2} and the electronic levels of N atoms is derived with several groups of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and electronic levels of N with their own internal temperatures to model the shape of the vibrational distribution of N{sub 2} and of the electronic excitation of N, respectively. In this model, energy and chemistry source terms are calculated self-consistently from the rate coefficients of the state-to-state database. For the shock wave condition studied, a good agreement is observed on the ionization dynamics as well as on the atomic bound-bound radiation between the state-to-state model and the macroscopic multi-internal temperature model with only one group of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and two groups of electronic levels of N.

  14. Third minima in thorium and uranium isotopes in a self-consistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Third minima in thorium and uranium isotopes in a self-consistent theory Title: Third ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud ...

  15. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics This content will become...

  16. Consistent satellite XCO2 retrievals from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT using the BESD algorithm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heymann, J.; Reuter, M.; Hilker, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.; Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-02-13

    Consistent and accurate long-term data sets of global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) are required for carbon cycle and climate related research. However, global data sets based on satellite observations may suffer from inconsistencies originating from the use of products derived from different satellites as needed to cover a long enough time period. One reason for inconsistencies can be the use of different retrieval algorithms. We address this potential issue by applying the same algorithm, the Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS (BESD) algorithm, to different satellite instruments, SCIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT (March 2002–April 2012) and TANSO-FTS on-board GOSAT (launched in Januarymore » 2009), to retrieve XCO2, the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of CO2. BESD has been initially developed for SCIAMACHY XCO2 retrievals. Here, we present the first detailed assessment of the new GOSAT BESD XCO2 product. GOSAT BESD XCO2 is a product generated and delivered to the MACC project for assimilation into ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). We describe the modifications of the BESD algorithm needed in order to retrieve XCO2 from GOSAT and present detailed comparisons with ground-based observations of XCO2 from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). We discuss detailed comparison results between all three XCO2 data sets (SCIAMACHY, GOSAT and TCCON). The comparison results demonstrate the good consistency between the SCIAMACHY and the GOSAT XCO2. For example, we found a mean difference for daily averages of −0.60 ± 1.56 ppm (mean difference ± standard deviation) for GOSAT-SCIAMACHY (linear correlation coefficient r = 0.82), −0.34 ± 1.37 ppm (r = 0.86) for GOSAT-TCCON and 0.10 ± 1.79 ppm (r = 0.75) for SCIAMACHY-TCCON. The remaining differences between GOSAT and SCIAMACHY are likely due to non-perfect collocation (±2 h, 10° × 10° around TCCON sites), i.e., the observed air masses are not exactly identical, but likely also

  17. Software Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

  18. Investigation of electron-atom/molecule scattering resonances: Two complex multiconfigurational self-consistent field approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, Kousik; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-01-22

    Resonances are temporarily bound states which lie in the continuum part of the Hamiltonian. If the electronic coordinates of the Hamiltonian are scaled (“dilated”) by a complex parameter, η = αe{sup iθ} (α, θ real), then its complex eigenvalues represent the scattering states (resonant and non-resonant) while the eigenvalues corresponding to the bound states and the ionization and the excitation thresholds remain real and unmodified. These make the study of these transient species amenable to the bound state methods. We developed a quadratically convergent multiconfigurational self-consistent field method (MCSCF), a well-established bound-state technique, combined with a dilated Hamiltonian to investigate resonances. This is made possible by the adoption of a second quantization algebra suitable for a set of “complex conjugate biorthonormal” spin orbitals and a modified step-length constraining algorithm to control the walk on the complex energy hypersurface while searching for the stationary point using a multidimensional Newton-Raphson scheme. We present our computational results for the {sup 2}PBe{sup −} shape resonances using two different computationally efficient methods that utilize complex scaled MCSCF (i.e., CMCSCF). These two methods are to straightforwardly use CMCSCF energy differences and to obtain energy differences using an approximation to the complex multiconfigurational electron propagator. It is found that, differing from previous computational studies by others, there are actually two {sup 2}PBe{sup −} shape resonances very close in energy. In addition, N{sub 2} resonances are examined using one of these methods.

  19. Self-consistent determination of low-[ital Z][sub [ital a

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahala, L.; Gerdin, G.; El Cashlan, A.G. ); Parks, P. )

    1992-10-01

    The ablation dynamics of LiT pellets are solved self-consistently over a modest range of parameters using a surface dissociation model. The self-consistently determined parameters are then used to modify the standard low-[ital Z] pellet penetration codes. Since LiT pellets have certain advantages over carbon [in particular, Li conditioning of the walls and T for refueling a D--T reaction], the penetration of LiT into fusion plasmas is considered.

  20. Using the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark to Study Current Numerical and Computational Issues of Coupled Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Todorova, Nadejda K.; Sartori, Enrico

    2003-05-15

    Incorporating full three-dimensional (3-D) models of the reactor core into system transient codes allows for a 'best-estimate' calculation of interactions between the core behavior and plant dynamics. Recent progress in computer technology has made the development of coupled thermal-hydraulic (T-H) and neutron kinetics code systems feasible. Considerable efforts have been made in various countries and organizations in this direction. Appropriate benchmarks need to be developed that will permit testing of two particular aspects. One is to verify the capability of the coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions. The second is to test fully the neutronics/T-H coupling. One such benchmark is the Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem. It was sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and The Pennsylvania State University. The benchmark problem uses a 3-D neutronics core model that is based on real plant design and operational data for the Three Mile Island Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The purpose of this benchmark is threefold: to verify the capability of system codes for analyzing complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions; to test fully the 3-D neutronics/T-H coupling; and to evaluate discrepancies among the predictions of coupled codes in best-estimate transient simulations. The purposes of the benchmark are met through the application of three exercises: a point kinetics plant simulation (exercise 1), a coupled 3-D neutronics/core T-H evaluation of core response (exercise 2), and a best-estimate coupled core-plant transient model (exercise 3).In this paper we present the three exercises of the MSLB benchmark, and we summarize the findings of the participants with regard to the current numerical and computational issues of coupled calculations. In addition, this paper reviews in some detail the sensitivity studies on

  1. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT B COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-01-19

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Therefore, the objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit B glass and perform additional testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and for additional performance testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The glass was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. The leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the

  2. Consistent satellite XCO2 retrievals from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT using the BESD algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heymann, J.; Reuter, M.; Hilker, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.; Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kawakami, S.; Kivi, R.; Morino, I.; Petri, C.; Roehl, C.; Schneider, M.; Sherlock, V.; Sussmann, R.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wunch, D.

    2015-02-13

    Consistent and accurate long-term data sets of global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) are required for carbon cycle and climate related research. However, global data sets based on satellite observations may suffer from inconsistencies originating from the use of products derived from different satellites as needed to cover a long enough time period. One reason for inconsistencies can be the use of different retrieval algorithms. We address this potential issue by applying the same algorithm, the Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS (BESD) algorithm, to different satellite instruments, SCIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT (March 2002April 2012) and TANSO-FTS on-board GOSAT (launched in January 2009), to retrieve XCO2, the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of CO2. BESD has been initially developed for SCIAMACHY XCO2 retrievals. Here, we present the first detailed assessment of the new GOSAT BESD XCO2 product. GOSAT BESD XCO2 is a product generated and delivered to the MACC project for assimilation into ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). We describe the modifications of the BESD algorithm needed in order to retrieve XCO2 from GOSAT and present detailed comparisons with ground-based observations of XCO2 from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). We discuss detailed comparison results between all three XCO2 data sets (SCIAMACHY, GOSAT and TCCON). The comparison results demonstrate the good consistency between the SCIAMACHY and the GOSAT XCO2. For example, we found a mean difference for daily averages of ?0.60 1.56 ppm (mean difference standard deviation) for GOSAT-SCIAMACHY (linear correlation coefficient r = 0.82), ?0.34 1.37 ppm (r = 0.86) for GOSAT-TCCON and 0.10 1.79 ppm (r = 0.75) for SCIAMACHY-TCCON. The remaining differences between GOSAT and SCIAMACHY are likely due to non

  3. Correlation consistent basis sets for actinides. I. The Th and U atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-02-21

    New correlation consistent basis sets based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) Hamiltonians have been developed from double- to quadruple-zeta quality for the actinide atoms thorium and uranium. Sets for valence electron correlation (5f6s6p6d), cc − pV nZ − PP and cc − pV nZ − DK3, as well as outer-core correlation (valence + 5s5p5d), cc − pwCV nZ − PP and cc − pwCV nZ − DK3, are reported (n = D, T, Q). The -PP sets are constructed in conjunction with small-core, 60-electron PPs, while the -DK3 sets utilized the 3rd-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess scalar relativistic Hamiltonian. Both series of basis sets show systematic convergence towards the complete basis set limit, both at the Hartree-Fock and correlated levels of theory, making them amenable to standard basis set extrapolation techniques. To assess the utility of the new basis sets, extensive coupled cluster composite thermochemistry calculations of ThF{sub n} (n = 2 − 4), ThO{sub 2}, and UF{sub n} (n = 4 − 6) have been carried out. After accurately accounting for valence and outer-core correlation, spin-orbit coupling, and even Lamb shift effects, the final 298 K atomization enthalpies of ThF{sub 4}, ThF{sub 3}, ThF{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2} are all within their experimental uncertainties. Bond dissociation energies of ThF{sub 4} and ThF{sub 3}, as well as UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 5}, were similarly accurate. The derived enthalpies of formation for these species also showed a very satisfactory agreement with experiment, demonstrating that the new basis sets allow for the use of accurate composite schemes just as in molecular systems composed only of lighter atoms. The differences between the PP and DK3 approaches were found to increase with the change in formal oxidation state on the actinide atom, approaching 5-6 kcal/mol for the atomization enthalpies of ThF{sub 4} and ThO{sub 2}. The DKH3 atomization energy of ThO{sub 2} was calculated to be smaller than the DKH2

  4. Doubly self-consistent field theory of grafted polymers under simple shear in steady state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-03-21

    We present a generalization of the numerical self-consistent mean-field theory of polymers to the case of grafted polymers under simple shear. The general theoretical framework is presented, and then applied to three different chain models: rods, Gaussian chains, and finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) chains. The approach is self-consistent at two levels. First, for any flow field, the polymer density profile and effective potential are calculated self-consistently in a manner similar to the usual self-consistent field theory of polymers, except that the calculation is inherently two-dimensional even for a laterally homogeneous system. Second, through the use of a modified Brinkman equation, the flow field and the polymer profile are made self-consistent with respect to each other. For all chain models, we find that reasonable levels of shear cause the chains to tilt, but it has very little effect on the overall thickness of the polymer layer, causing a small decrease for rods, and an increase of no more than a few percent for the Gaussian and FENE chains. Using the FENE model, we also probe the individual bond lengths, bond correlations, and bond angles along the chains, the effects of the shear on them, and the solvent and bonded stress profiles. We find that the approximations needed within the theory for the Brinkman equation affect the bonded stress, but none of the other quantities.

  5. Thermodynamic approach to the interpretation of self-consistent pressure profiles in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyabilin, K. S.; Razumova, K. A.

    2015-09-15

    The phenomenon of invariable pressure profiles in tokamaks is interpreted in the framework of the thermodynamic approach suggesting that invariable self-consistent states correspond to the minimum of free energy. Solutions qualitatively consistent with the experiment are obtained under the assumption that the mechanism for the formation of self-consistent profiles is directly related to equilibrium diamagnetic currents. The dynamics of the system and specific transport phenomena, such as energy and particle pinching and a decrease in the local density under auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating (density pump-out), are analyzed in the vicinity of an equilibrium state characterized by a stable pressure profile. The scaling for the energy confinement time deduced from the transport model agrees qualitatively with the ITER scaling based on the analysis of experimental data obtained in many tokamaks. The possibility of using generalized Tsallis statistics to analyze pressure profiles is considered.

  6. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. I. Optical response calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we implement and examine three excited state solvent models in time-dependent self-consistent field methods using a consistent formalism which unambiguously shows their relationship. These are the linear response, state specific, and vertical excitation solvent models. Their effects on energies calculated with the equivalent of COSMO/CIS/AM1 are given for a set of test molecules with varying excited state charge transfer character. The resulting solvent effects are explained qualitatively using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the fundamental differences between these solvent models are reflected by the character of the calculated excitations.

  7. A simple way to improve path consistency processing in interval algebra networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessiere, C.

    1996-12-31

    Reasoning about qualitative temporal information is essential in many artificial intelligence problems. In particular, many tasks can be solved using the interval-based temporal algebra introduced by Allen (A1183). In this framework, one of the main tasks is to compute the transitive closure of a network of relations between intervals (also called path consistency in a CSP-like terminology). Almost all previous path consistency algorithms proposed in the temporal reasoning literature were based on the constraint reasoning algorithms PC-1 and PC-2 (Mac77). In this paper, we first show that the most efficient of these algorithms is the one which stays the closest to PC-2. Afterwards, we propose a new algorithm, using the idea {open_quotes}one support is sufficient{close_quotes} (as AC-3 (Mac77) does for arc consistency in constraint networks). Actually, to apply this idea, we simply changed the way composition-intersection of relations was achieved during the path consistency process in previous algorithms.

  8. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Contracting companies supporting EM’s cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies.

  9. A proposal for a UPC memory consistency model, v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelick, Katherine; Bonachea, Dan; Wallace, Charles

    2004-05-05

    The memory consistency model in a language defines the order in which the results of write operations maybe observed through read operations. The behavior of a UPC program may depend on the timing of accesses to shared variables, so a program defines a set of possible executions, rather than a single execution. The memory consistency model constrains the set of possible executions for a given program; the user may then rely on properties that are true of all of those executions. The memory consistency model is defined in terms of the read and write operations issued by each thread in naive translation of the code, i.e., without any code transformations by the compiler, with each thread issuing operations as defined by the abstract machine defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3. A UPC compiler or run time system may perform various code transformations to improve performance, so long as they are not visible to the programmer - i.e., provided the set of externally-visible behaviors (the input/output dynamics and volatile behavior defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3) from any execution of the transformed program are identical to those of the original program executing on the abstract machine and adhering to the consistency model defined in this document.

  10. Self-consistency tests of large-scale dynamics parameterizations for single-column modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edman, Jacob P.; Romps, David M.

    2015-03-18

    Large-scale dynamics parameterizations are tested numerically in cloud-resolving simulations, including a new version of the weak-pressure-gradient approximation (WPG) introduced by Edman and Romps (2014), the weak-temperature-gradient approximation (WTG), and a prior implementation of WPG. We perform a series of self-consistency tests with each large-scale dynamics parameterization, in which we compare the result of a cloud-resolving simulation coupled to WTG or WPG with an otherwise identical simulation with prescribed large-scale convergence. In self-consistency tests based on radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE; i.e., no large-scale convergence), we find that simulations either weakly coupled or strongly coupled to either WPG or WTG are self-consistent, but WPG-coupled simulations exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior as the strength of the coupling to WPG is varied. We also perform self-consistency tests based on observed forcings from two observational campaigns: the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Summer 1995 IOP. In these tests, we show that the new version of WPG improves upon prior versions of WPG by eliminating a potentially troublesome gravity-wave resonance.

  11. Self-consistency tests of large-scale dynamics parameterizations for single-column modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edman, Jacob P.; Romps, David M.

    2015-03-18

    Large-scale dynamics parameterizations are tested numerically in cloud-resolving simulations, including a new version of the weak-pressure-gradient approximation (WPG) introduced by Edman and Romps (2014), the weak-temperature-gradient approximation (WTG), and a prior implementation of WPG. We perform a series of self-consistency tests with each large-scale dynamics parameterization, in which we compare the result of a cloud-resolving simulation coupled to WTG or WPG with an otherwise identical simulation with prescribed large-scale convergence. In self-consistency tests based on radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE; i.e., no large-scale convergence), we find that simulations either weakly coupled or strongly coupled to either WPG or WTG are self-consistent, butmore » WPG-coupled simulations exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior as the strength of the coupling to WPG is varied. We also perform self-consistency tests based on observed forcings from two observational campaigns: the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Summer 1995 IOP. In these tests, we show that the new version of WPG improves upon prior versions of WPG by eliminating a potentially troublesome gravity-wave resonance.« less

  12. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richters, Dorothee; Khne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  13. The consistency condition for the three-point function in dissipative single-clock inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nacir, Diana López; Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: rporto@ias.edu

    2012-09-01

    We generalize the consistency condition for the three-point function in single field inflation to the case of dissipative, multi-field, single-clock models. We use the recently introduced extension of the effective field theory of inflation that accounts for dissipative effects, to provide an explicit proof to leading (non-trivial) order in the generalized slow roll parameters and mixing with gravity scales. Our results illustrate the conditions necessary for the validity of the consistency relation in situations with many degrees of freedom relevant during inflation, namely that there is a preferred clock. Departures from this condition in forthcoming experiments would rule out not only single field but also a large class of multi-field models.

  14. Introduction to Webinar: Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance? Moderator: Cheryn Metzger - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Panelists: Scott Yee - Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Christine Liaukus - NJIT's Center for Building Knowledge Janet McIlvaine - Florida Solar Energy Center March 19, 2014 Some Housekeeping Items Two Options for Audio (select audio mode): 1. Listen through your computer. Please select the "mic and speakers" radio button on the right

  15. Negative running of the spectral index, hemispherical asymmetry and the consistency of Planck with large r

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    Planck favours a negative running of the spectral index, with the likelihood being dominated by low multipoles l?<50 and no preference for running at higher l. A negative spectral index is also necessary for the 2- Planck upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be consistent with values significantly larger than 0.1. Planck has also observed a hemispherical asymmetry of the CMB power spectrum, again mostly at low multipoles. Here we consider whether the physics responsible for the hemispherical asymmetry could also account for the negative running of the spectral index and the consistency of Planck with a large value of r. A negative running of the spectral index can be generated if the hemispherical asymmetry is due to a scale- and space-dependent modulation which suppresses the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles. We show that the observed hemispherical asymmetry at low l can be generated while satisfying constraints on the asymmetry at higher l and generating a negative spectral index of the right magnitude to account for the Planck observation and to allow Planck to be consistent with a large value of r.

  16. Examining the consistency relations describing the three-point functions involving tensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreenath, V.; Sriramkumar, L. E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} characterizing the scalar bi-spectrum can be expressed in terms of the scalar spectral index in the squeezed limit, a property that is referred to as the consistency relation. In contrast to the scalar bi-spectrum, the three-point cross-correlations involving scalars and tensors and the tensor bi-spectrum have not received adequate attention, which can be largely attributed to the fact that the tensors had remained undetected at the level of the power spectrum until very recently. The detection of the imprints of the primordial tensor perturbations by BICEP2 and its indication of a rather high tensor-to-scalar ratio, if confirmed, can open up a new window for understanding the tensor perturbations, not only at the level of the power spectrum, but also in the realm of non-Gaussianities. In this work, we consider the consistency relations associated with the three-point cross-correlations involving scalars and tensors as well as the tensor bi-spectrum in inflationary models driven by a single, canonical, scalar field. Characterizing the cross-correlations in terms of the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameters C{sub NL}{sup R} and C{sub NL}{sup γ} that we had introduced earlier, we express the consistency relations governing the cross-correlations as relations between these non-Gaussianity parameters and the scalar or tensor spectral indices, in a fashion similar to that of the purely scalar case. We also discuss the corresponding relation for the non-Gaussianity parameter h{sub NL} used to describe the tensor bi-spectrum. We analytically establish these consistency relations explicitly in the following two situations: a simple example involving a specific case of power law inflation and a non-trivial scenario in the so-called Starobinsky model that is governed by a linear potential with a sharp change in its slope. We also numerically verify the consistency relations in three types of inflationary

  17. Instantaneous spatially local projective measurements are consistent in a relativistic quantum field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shih-Yuin

    2012-12-15

    Suppose the postulate of measurement in quantum mechanics can be extended to quantum field theory; then a local projective measurement at some moment on an object locally coupled with a relativistic quantum field will result in a projection or collapse of the wavefunctional of the combined system defined on the whole time-slice associated with the very moment of the measurement, if the relevant degrees of freedom have nonzero correlations. This implies that the wavefunctionals in the same Hamiltonian system but defined in different reference frames would collapse on different time-slices passing through the same local event where the measurement was done. Are these post-measurement states consistent with each other? We illustrate that the quantum states of the Raine-Sciama-Grove detector-field system started with the same initial Gaussian state defined on the same initial time-slice, then collapsed by the measurements on the pointlike detectors on different time-slices in different frames, will evolve to the same state of the combined system up to a coordinate transformation when compared on the same final time-slice. Such consistency is guaranteed by the spatial locality of interactions and the general covariance in a relativistic system, together with the spatial locality of measurements and the linearity of quantum dynamics in its quantum theory. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially local quantum measurements in detector-field models are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local quantum measurement collapses the wavefunctional on the whole time-slice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In different frames wavefunctionals of a field would collapse on different time-slices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer States collapsed by the same measurement will be consistent on the same final slice.

  18. Alfven-wave particle interaction in finite-dimensional self-consistent field model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padhye, N.; Horton, W.

    1998-10-09

    A low-dimensional Hamiltonian model is derived for the acceleration of ions in finite amplitude Alfven waves in a finite pressure plasma sheet. The reduced low-dimensional wave-particle Hamiltonian is useful for describing the reaction of the accelerated ions on the wave amplitudes and phases through the self-consistent fields within the envelope approximation. As an example, the authors show for a single Alfven wave in the central plasma sheet of the Earth`s geotail, modeled by the linear pinch geometry called the Harris sheet, the time variation of the wave amplitude during the acceleration of fast protons.

  19. Some exploitations of the self-consistent QRPA approach with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peru, S.; Martini, M.; Dupuis, M.

    2012-10-20

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations have been performed with the D1S Gogny force. Giant resonances in exotic nuclei as well as in deformed Mg and Si isotopes have been studied. Dipole responses have been calculated in Ne isotopes and N=16 isotones to study the existence of soft dipole modes in exotic nuclei. The same formalism has been used to describe multipole responses up to octupole in the deformed and heavy nucleus {sup 238}U. Low energy spectroscopy of nickel isotopes has been studied, revealing 0{sup +} states which display a particular structure.

  20. Complete active space self-consistent field calculations of the vibrational band strengths for C3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, U.G.; Almlof, J.; Siegbahn, P.E.M.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis; Stockholm Universitet )

    1989-08-01

    Complete active space self-consistent calculations of the energy and dipole moment functions were carried out for C3 in its electronic ground state. The absorption coefficient between 0.7 and 75 microns is calculated on the basis of the vibrational band strength of transitions between the 800 lowest states with v less than or equal to (4, 39, 3). In cool carbon stars with a high C/O ratio, C3 is found to be the most prevalent of the known opacity sources. 49 refs.

  1. Properties of hadronic systems according to the non-extensive self-consistent thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppman, A.

    2014-11-11

    The non-extensive self-consistent theory describing the thermodynamics of hadronic systems at high temperatures is used to derive some thermodynamical quantities, as pressure, entropy, speed of sound and trace-anomaly. The calculations are free of fitting parameters, and the results are compared to lattice QCD calculations, showing a good agreement between theory and data up to temperatures around 175 MeV. Above this temperature the effects of a singularity in the partition function at T{sub o} = 192 MeV results in a divergent behaviour in respect with the lattice calculation.

  2. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang, E-mail: qiangweibeihua@163.com [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Xie, Cheng-jun [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Liu, Hong-jun [School of Information Engineering, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China); Li, Yan-hui [The Library, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Significantly Shorter Fe-S Bond in Cytochrome P450-I is Consistent with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Greater Reactivity Relative to Chloroperoxidase | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Significantly Shorter Fe-S Bond in Cytochrome P450-I is Consistent with Greater Reactivity Relative to Chloroperoxidase Monday, August 31, 2015 C-H bond activation is often considered the "holy grail" of inorganic chemists, as the ability to specifically activate C-H bonds would be one of the most used transformations in all of chemistry. Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are thiolate ligated heme

  4. Multiple Fano interferences in a plasmonic metamolecule consisting of asymmetric metallic nanodimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, Khai Q.; Alù, Andrea; Bai, Jing

    2015-01-14

    We theoretically explore signatures of plasmonic Fano interferences in a subwavelength plasmonic metamolecule consisting of closely packed asymmetric gold nanodimers, which lead to the possibility of generating multiple Fano resonances in the scattering spectrum. This spectral feature is attributed to the interference between bright and dark plasmonic modes sustained by the constituent nanodimers. The excited Fano dips are highly sensitive in both wavelength and amplitude to geometry and background dielectric medium. The tunability of induced Fano resonances associated with enhanced electric fields from the visible to infrared region provides promising applications, particularly in refractive index sensing, light-trapping, and photon up-converting.

  5. Using electronic templates and a centralized document production network to reduce cost and improve consistence between technical reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrnes, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    In an effort to reduce the cost and improve the accuracy and consistency between technical reports being written by large companies or large Federal installations, SAIC has recently developed the Centralized Document Production Network (CDPN) Software. The CDPN Software is loaded with standardized electronic document templates along with standardized site-specific background text, tables, and figures. While users across the network are able to retrieve electronic templates and site-specific background text to support their report writing activities, modifications to the network text can only be made by designated experts which are assigned individual passwords. At this time, the CDPN software is being Beta Tested by Kaiser-Hill and Rocky Mountain Remediation Services at the US Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant, in addition to multiple private sector corporations.

  6. SU-E-J-227: Breathing Pattern Consistency and Reproducibility: Comparative Analysis for Supine and Prone Body Positioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laugeman, E; Weiss, E; Chen, S; Hugo, G; Rosu, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate and compare the cycle-to-cycle consistency of breathing patterns and their reproducibility over the course of treatment, for supine and prone positioning. Methods: Respiratory traces from 25 patients were recorded for sequential supine/prone 4DCT scans acquired prior to treatment, and during the course of the treatment (weekly or bi-weekly). For each breathing cycle, the average(AVE), end-of-exhale(EoE) and end-of-inhale( EoI) locations were identified using in-house developed software. In addition, the mean values and variations for the above quantities were computed for each breathing trace. F-tests were used to compare the cycle-to-cycle consistency of all pairs of sequential supine and prone scans. Analysis of variances was also performed using population means for AVE, EoE and EoI to quantify differences between the reproducibility of prone and supine respiration traces over the treatment course. Results: Consistency: Cycle-to-cycle variations are less in prone than supine in the pre-treatment and during-treatment scans for AVE, EoE and EoI points, for the majority of patients (differences significant at p<0.05). The few cases where the respiratory pattern had more variability in prone appeared to be random events. Reproducibility: The reproducibility of breathing patterns (supine and prone) improved as treatment progressed, perhaps due to patients becoming more comfortable with the procedure. However, variability in supine position continued to remain significantly larger than in prone (p<0.05), as indicated by the variance analysis of population means for the pretreatment and subsequent during-treatment scans. Conclusions: Prone positioning stabilizes breathing patterns in most subjects investigated in this study. Importantly, a parallel analysis of the same group of patients revealed a tendency towards increasing motion amplitude of tumor targets in prone position regardless of their size or location; thus, the choice for body positioning

  7. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Colas, Laurent Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Kubič, Martin; Milanesio, Daniele; Heuraux, Stéphane

    2014-06-15

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.

  8. Status and Opportunities for Improving the Consistency of Technical Reference Manuals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, Tina; Velonis, Aquila; Haeri, Hossein; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2012-05-01

    Across the United States, energy-efficiency program administrators rely on Technical Reference Manuals (TRMs) as sources for calculations and deemed savings values for specific, well-defined efficiency measures. TRMs play an important part in energy efficiency program planning by providing a common and consistent source for calculation of ex ante and often ex post savings. They thus help reduce energy-efficiency resource acquisition costs by obviating the need for extensive measurement and verification and lower performance risk for program administrators and implementation contractors. This paper considers the benefits of establishing region-wide or national TRMs and considers the challenges of such undertaking due to the difficulties in comparing energy savings across jurisdictions. We argue that greater consistency across TRMs in the approaches used to determine deemed savings values, with more transparency about assumptions, would allow better comparisons in savings estimates across jurisdictions as well as improve confidence in reported efficiency measure savings. To support this thesis, we review approaches for the calculation of savings for select measures in TRMs currently in use in 17 jurisdictions. The review reveals differences in the saving methodologies, technical assumptions, and input variables used for estimating deemed savings values. These differences are described and their implications are summarized, using four, common energy-efficiency measures as examples. Recommendations are then offered for establishing a uniform approach for determining deemed savings values.

  9. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Golubev, Nikolay; Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Steinmann, Stephan N.

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  10. Self-consistent theory of nanodomain formation on non-polar surfaces of ferroelectrics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Obukhovskii, Vyacheslav; Fomichov, Evhen; Varenyk, O. V.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Eliseev, E. A.

    2016-04-28

    We propose a self-consistent theoretical approach capable of describing the features of the anisotropic nanodomain formation induced by a strongly inhomogeneous electric field of a charged scanning probe microscopy tip on nonpolar cuts of ferroelectrics. We obtained that a threshold field, previously regarded as an isotropic parameter, is an anisotropic function that is specified from the polar properties and lattice pinning anisotropy of a given ferroelectric in a self-consistent way. The proposed method for the calculation of the anisotropic threshold field is not material specific, thus the field should be anisotropic in all ferroelectrics with the spontaneous polarization anisotropy alongmore » the main crystallographic directions. The most evident examples are uniaxial ferroelectrics, layered ferroelectric perovskites, and low-symmetry incommensurate ferroelectrics. Obtained results quantitatively describe the differences at several times in the nanodomain length experimentally observed on X and Y cuts of LiNbO3 and can give insight into the anisotropic dynamics of nanoscale polarization reversal in strongly inhomogeneous electric fields.« less

  11. Fractional charge and spin errors in self-consistent Greens function theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jordan J. Kananenka, Alexei A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-05-21

    We examine fractional charge and spin errors in self-consistent Greens function theory within a second-order approximation (GF2). For GF2, it is known that the summation of diagrams resulting from the self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation removes the divergences pathological to second-order Mller-Plesset (MP2) theory for strong correlations. In the language often used in density functional theory contexts, this means GF2 has a greatly reduced fractional spin error relative to MP2. The natural question then is what effect, if any, does the Dyson summation have on the fractional charge error in GF2? To this end, we generalize our previous implementation of GF2 to open-shell systems and analyze its fractional spin and charge errors. We find that like MP2, GF2 possesses only a very small fractional charge error, and consequently minimal many electron self-interaction error. This shows that GF2 improves on the critical failings of MP2, but without altering the positive features that make it desirable. Furthermore, we find that GF2 has both less fractional charge and fractional spin errors than typical hybrid density functionals as well as random phase approximation with exchange.

  12. Neutrinos and dark energy after Planck and BICEP2: data consistency tests and cosmological parameter constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jing-Fei; Geng, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Xin E-mail: gengjiajia163@163.com

    2014-10-01

    The detection of the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the BICEP2 experiment implies that the tensor-to-scalar ratio r should be involved in the base standard cosmology. In this paper, we extend the ΛCDM r+neutrino/dark radiation models by replacing the cosmological constant with the dynamical dark energy with constant w. Four neutrino plus dark energy models are considered, i.e., the wCDM r ∑ m{sub ν}, wCDM r N{sub eff}, wCDM r ∑ m{sub ν} N{sub eff}, and wCDM r N{sub eff} m{sub ν,sterile}{sup eff} models. The current observational data considered in this paper include the Planck temperature data, the WMAP 9-year polarization data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the Hubble constant direct measurement data, the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts data, the Planck CMB lensing data, the cosmic shear data, and the BICEP2 polarization data. We test the data consistency in the four cosmological models, and then combine the consistent data sets to perform joint constraints on the models. We focus on the constraints on the parameters w, ∑ m{sub ν}, N{sub eff}, and m{sub ν,sterile}{sup eff}.

  13. Toward fully self-consistent simulation of the interaction of E-Clouds and beams with WARP-POSINST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLNL; Furman, M.A.; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Sonnad, K.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2012-04-09

    To predict the evolution of electron clouds and their effect on the beam, the high energy physics community has relied so far on the complementary use of 'buildup' and 'single/multi-bunch instability' reduced descriptions. The former describes the evolution of electron clouds at a given location in the ring, or 'station', under the influence of prescribed beams and external fields [1], while the latter (sometimes also referred as the 'quasi-static' approximation [2]) follows the interaction between the beams and the electron clouds around the accelerator with prescribed initial distributions of electrons, assumed to be concentrated at a number of discrete 'stations' around the ring. Examples of single bunch instability codes include HEADTAIL [3], QuickPIC [4, 5], and PEHTS [6]. By contrast, a fully self-consistent approach, in which both the electron cloud and beam distributions evolve simultaneously under their mutual influence without any restriction on their relative motion, is required for modeling the interaction of high-intensity beams with electron clouds for heavy-ion beam-driven fusion and warm-dense matter science. This community has relied on the use of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods through the development and use of the WARP-POSINST code suite [1, 7, 8]. The development of novel numerical techniques (including adaptive mesh refinement, and a new 'drift-Lorentz' particle mover for tracking charged particles in magnetic fields using large time steps) has enabled the first application of WARP-POSINST to the fully self-consistent modeling of beams and electron clouds in high energy accelerators [9], albeit for only a few betatron oscillations. It was recently observed [10] that there exists a preferred frame of reference which minimizes the number of computer operations needed to simulate the interaction of relativistic objects. This opens the possibility of reducing the cost of fully self-consistent simulations for the interaction of ultrarelativistic

  14. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2015-07-28

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the chemical master equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete chemical master equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the chemical Langevin equation or low noise approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the chemical master equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the chemical master equation.

  15. Non-perturbative and self-consistent models of neutron stars in R-squared gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Staykov, Kalin V. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de E-mail: kalin.v.staikov@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper we investigate non-perturbatively and self-consistently the structure of neutron stars in R-squared gravity by simultaneously solving the interior and exterior problem. The mass-radius relations are obtained for several equations of state and for wide range of the R-squared gravity parameter a. Even though the deviation from general relativity for nonzero values of a can be large, they are still comparable with the variations due to different modern realistic equations of state. That is why the current observations of the neutron star masses and radii alone can not put constraints on the value of the parameter a. We also compare our results with those obtained within the perturbative method and we discuss the differences between them.

  16. SELF-CONSISTENT LANGEVIN SIMULATION OF COULOMB COLLISIONS IN CHARGED-PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. QIANG; R. RYNE; S. HABIB

    2000-05-01

    In many plasma physics and charged-particle beam dynamics problems, Coulomb collisions are modeled by a Fokker-Planck equation. In order to incorporate these collisions, we present a three-dimensional parallel Langevin simulation method using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach implemented on high-performance parallel computers. We perform, for the first time, a fully self-consistent simulation, in which the friction and diffusion coefficients are computed from first principles. We employ a two-dimensional domain decomposition approach within a message passing programming paradigm along with dynamic load balancing. Object oriented programming is used to encapsulate details of the communication syntax as well as to enhance reusability and extensibility. Performance tests on the SGI Origin 2000 and the Cray T3E-900 have demonstrated good scalability. Work is in progress to apply our technique to intrabeam scattering in accelerators.

  17. Improved master equation approach to quantum transport: From Born to self-consistent Born approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jinshuang; Li, Jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Xin-Qi; Yan, YiJing

    2014-06-28

    Beyond the second-order Born approximation, we propose an improved master equation approach to quantum transport under self-consistent Born approximation. The basic idea is to replace the free Green's function in the tunneling self-energy diagram by an effective reduced propagator under the Born approximation. This simple modification has remarkable consequences. It not only recovers the exact results for quantum transport through noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltages, but also predicts the challenging nonequilibrium Kondo effect. Compared to the nonequilibrium Green's function technique that formulates the calculation of specific correlation functions, the master equation approach contains richer dynamical information to allow more efficient studies for such as the shot noise and full counting statistics.

  18. Self-consistent simulation of CdTe solar cells with active defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, Daniel; Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Ringhofer, Christian; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a self-consistent numerical scheme for simulating an electronic device which contains active defects. As a specific case, we consider copper defects in cadmium telluride solar cells. The presence of copper has been shown experimentally to play a crucial role in predicting device performance. The primary source of this copper is migration away from the back contact during annealing, which likely occurs predominantly along grain boundaries. We introduce a mathematical scheme for simulating this effect in 2D and explain the numerical implementation of the system. Lastly, we will give numerical results comparing our results to known 1D simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the solver and then show results unique to the 2D case.

  19. Self-consistent simulation of CdTe solar cells with active defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, Daniel; Ringhofer, Christian; Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Vasileska, Dragica; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a self-consistent numerical scheme for simulating an electronic device which contains active defects. As a specific case, we consider copper defects in cadmium telluride solar cells. The presence of copper has been shown experimentally to play a crucial role in predicting device performance. The primary source of this copper is migration away from the back contact during annealing, which likely occurs predominantly along grain boundaries. We introduce a mathematical scheme for simulating this effect in 2D and explain the numerical implementation of the system. Finally, we will give numerical results comparing our results to known 1D simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the solver and then show results unique to the 2D case.

  20. A consistency relation for the CMB B-mode polarization in the squeezed limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehagias, A.; Dizgah, A. Moradinezhad; Norea, J.; Perrier, H.; Riotto, A. E-mail: Azadeh.Moradinezhad@unige.ch E-mail: Hideki.Perrier@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    A large-scale temperature perturbation has a non-zero correlation with the power spectrum of B-modes of cosmological origin on short scales while the corresponding correlation is expected to be zero for B-modes sourced by galactic foregrounds. We thus compute the squeezed limit of a three-point function in which one correlates the temperature fluctuations at large scales with two polarization modes at small scales. In the particular case of the B-mode polarization we obtain a relation that connects the squeezed limit of the TBB three-point function with the cosmological B-mode power spectrum, which can be used as a consistency relation. This could in principle help to distinguish a primordial signal from that induced by inter-stellar dust.

  1. Dynamically consistent method for mixed quantum-classical simulations: A semiclassical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antipov, Sergey V.; Ye, Ziyu; Ananth, Nandini

    2015-05-14

    We introduce a new semiclassical (SC) framework, the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR), that can be tuned to reproduce existing quantum-limit and classical-limit SC approximations to quantum real-time correlation functions. Applying a modified Filinov transformation to a quantum-limit SC formulation leads to the association of a Filinov parameter with each degree of freedom in the system; varying this parameter from zero to infinity controls the extent of quantization of the corresponding mode. The resulting MQC-IVR expression provides a consistent dynamic framework for mixed quantum-classical simulations and we demonstrate its numerical accuracy in the calculation of real-time correlation functions for a model 1D system and a model 2D system over the full range of quantum- to classical-limit behaviors.

  2. Self-consistent inclusion of classical large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasma Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E. Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2015-10-15

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions allow for the exchange of a significant proportion of the energy of a particle in a single collision, but are not included in models of plasmas based on fluids, the Vlasov–Fokker–Planck equation, or currently available plasma Monte Carlo techniques. Their unique effects include the creation of fast ‘knock-on’ ions, which may be more likely to undergo certain reactions, and distortions to ion distribution functions relative to what is predicted by small-angle collision only theories. We present a computational method which uses Monte Carlo techniques to include the effects of large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas and which self-consistently evolves distribution functions according to the creation of knock-on ions of any generation. The method is used to demonstrate ion distribution function distortions in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) relevant scenario of the slowing of fusion products.

  3. Self-consistent simulation of CdTe solar cells with active defects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brinkman, Daniel; Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Ringhofer, Christian; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a self-consistent numerical scheme for simulating an electronic device which contains active defects. As a specific case, we consider copper defects in cadmium telluride solar cells. The presence of copper has been shown experimentally to play a crucial role in predicting device performance. The primary source of this copper is migration away from the back contact during annealing, which likely occurs predominantly along grain boundaries. We introduce a mathematical scheme for simulating this effect in 2D and explain the numerical implementation of the system. Lastly, we will give numerical results comparing our results to known 1D simulations tomore » demonstrate the accuracy of the solver and then show results unique to the 2D case.« less

  4. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B.; Barhen, Jacob; Oblow, Edward M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  5. Physically consistent simulation of mesoscale chemical kinetics: The non-negative FIS-{alpha} method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana, Saswati, E-mail: saswatid@rishi.serc.iisc.ernet.in [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Raha, Soumyendu, E-mail: raha@serc.iisc.ernet.in [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2011-10-01

    Biochemical pathways involving chemical kinetics in medium concentrations (i.e., at mesoscale) of the reacting molecules can be approximated as chemical Langevin equations (CLE) systems. We address the physically consistent non-negative simulation of the CLE sample paths as well as the issue of non-Lipschitz diffusion coefficients when a species approaches depletion and any stiffness due to faster reactions. The non-negative Fully Implicit Stochastic {alpha} (FIS {alpha}) method in which stopped reaction channels due to depleted reactants are deleted until a reactant concentration rises again, for non-negativity preservation and in which a positive definite Jacobian is maintained to deal with possible stiffness, is proposed and analysed. The method is illustrated with the computation of active Protein Kinase C response in the Protein Kinase C pathway.

  6. Methods for consistent forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2006-11-21

    This invention teaches further method improvements to forewarn of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves conversion of time-serial data into equiprobable symbols. A second improvement is a method to maximize the channel-consistent total-true rate of forewarning from a plurality of data channels over multiple data sets from the same patient or process. This total-true rate requires resolution of the forewarning indications into true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. A third improvement is the use of various objective functions, as derived from the phase-space dissimilarity measures, to give the best forewarning indication. A fourth improvement uses various search strategies over the phase-space analysis parameters to maximize said objective functions. A fifth improvement shows the usefulness of the method for various biomedical and machine applications.

  7. Self-consistent electrodynamics of large-area high-frequency capacitive plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Zhigang; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2010-10-15

    Capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) generated using high frequency (3-30 MHz) and very high frequency (30-300 MHz) radio-frequency (rf) sources are used for many plasma processing applications including thin film etching and deposition. When chamber dimensions become commensurate with the effective rf wavelength in the plasma, electromagnetic wave effects impose a significant influence on plasma behavior. Because the effective rf wavelength in plasma depends upon both rf and plasma process conditions (e.g., rf power and gas pressure), a self-consistent model including both the rf power delivery system and the plasma discharge is highly desirable to capture a more complete physical picture of the plasma behavior. A three-dimensional model for self-consistently studying both electrodynamic and plasma dynamic behavior of large-area (Gen 10, >8 m{sup 2}) CCP is described in this paper. This model includes Maxwell's equations and transport equations for charged and neutral species, which are coupled and solved in the time domain. The complete rf plasma discharge chamber including the rf power delivery subsystem, rf feed, electrodes, and the plasma domain is modeled as an integrated system. Based on this full-wave solution model, important limitations for processing uniformity imposed by electromagnetic wave propagation effects in a large-area CCP (3.05x2.85 m{sup 2} electrode size) are studied. The behavior of H{sub 2} plasmas in such a reactor is examined from 13.56 to 200 MHz. It is shown that various rectangular harmonics of electromagnetic fields can be excited in a large-area rectangular reactor as the rf or power is increased. The rectangular harmonics can create not only center-high plasma distribution but also high plasma density at the corners and along the edges of the reactor.

  8. A self-consistent two-fluid model of a magnetized plasma-wall transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2015-09-15

    A self-consistent one-dimensional two-fluid model of the magnetized plasma-wall transition is presented. The model includes magnetic field, elastic collisions between ions and electrons, and creation/annihilation of charged particles. Two systems of differential equations are derived. The first system describes the whole magnetized plasma-wall transition region, which consists of the pre-sheath, the magnetized pre-sheath (Chodura layer), and the sheath, which is not neutral, but contains a positive space charge. The second system of equations describes only the neutral part of the plasma-wall transition region—this means only the pre-sheath and the Chodura layer, but not also the sheath. Both systems are solved numerically. The first system of equations has two singularities. The first occurs when ion velocity in the direction perpendicularly to the wall drops below the ion thermal velocity. The second occurs when the electron velocity in the direction perpendicularly to the wall exceeds the electron thermal velocity. The second system of differential equations only has one singularity, which has also been derived analytically. For finite electron to ion mass ratio, the integration of the second system always breaks down before the Bohm criterion is fulfilled. Some properties of the first system of equations are examined. It is shown that the increased collision frequency demagnetizes the plasma. On the other hand, if the magnetic field is so strong that the ion Larmor radius and the Debye length are comparable, the electron velocity in the direction perpendicularly to the wall reaches the electron thermal velocity before the ion velocity in the direction perpendicularly to the wall reaches the ion sound velocity. In this case, the integration of the model equations breaks down before the Bohm criterion is fulfilled and the sheath is formed.

  9. Development Shop | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development Shop The Ames Laboratory operates a complete machine shop. Our shop consists of the modern equipment needed to fabricate almost any conceivable device required for...

  10. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    according to a new OECD report. Thu, 24 Sep 2015 17:36:00 GMT CLIMATE CHANGE: Support to fossil fuels remains high Government support to fossil fuel consumption and production in...

  11. Impact of Lack of Consistent Free Release Standards on Decommissioning Projects and Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J. S.

    2002-02-26

    While the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has had specific and dose-based standards for the release of liquids and gases for a long time, there are no regulatory mechanisms in place for the release of solid bulk materials from a nuclear power plant. Even though free releases of small quantities of solid materials continue under existing guidelines from the operating plants, the regulatory void creates major difficulties for the bulk materials that result from the decommissioning of a nuclear site. Decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant generates large quantities of solid bulk materials such as concrete, metal, and demolition debris. Disposition of such materials has a large impact on the overall decommissioning cost. Yet, there are no clear and cost-effective alternatives for the disposal of these materials from a regulatory perspective. This paper discusses the methodologies for clearance of solid materials1, their applicability to the disposition of bulk materials, and the impact of lack of consistent free release standards on the decommissioning projects and costs.

  12. SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C. E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-20

    We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

  13. Combined uranous nitrate production consisting of undivided electrolytic cell and divided electrolytic cell (Electrolysis ? Electrolytic cell)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Hui; Xian, Liang

    2013-07-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, mild way to make uranous ions. Undivided electrolyzers whose maintenance is less but their conversion ratio and current efficiency are low, have been chosen. However, at the beginning of undivided electrolysis, high current efficiency can also be maintained. Divided electrolyzers' conversion ratio and current efficiency is much higher because the re-oxidation of uranous on anode is avoided, but their maintenance costs are more, because in radioactive environment the membrane has to be changed after several operations. In this paper, a combined method of uranous production is proposed which consists of 2 stages: undivided electrolysis (early stage) and divided electrolysis (late stage) to benefit from the advantages of both electrolysis modes. The performance of the combined method was tested. The results show that in combined mode, after 200 min long electrolysis (80 min undivided electrolysis and 120 min divided electrolysis), U(IV) yield can achieve 92.3% (500 ml feed, U 199 g/l, 72 cm{sup 2} cathode, 120 mA/cm{sup 2}). Compared with divided mode, about 1/3 working time in divided electrolyzer is reduced to achieve the same U(IV) yield. If 120 min long undivided electrolysis was taken, more than 1/2 working time can be reduced in divided electrolyzer, which means that about half of the maintenance cost can also be reduced. (authors)

  14. The physical squeezed limit: consistency relations at order q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Perko, Ashley; Senatore, Leonardo; Simonovi?, Marko; Trevisan, Gabriele E-mail: perko@stanford.edu E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it

    2013-11-01

    In single-field models of inflation the effect of a long mode with momentum q reduces to a diffeomorphism at zeroth and first order in q. This gives the well-known consistency relations for the n-point functions. At order q{sup 2} the long mode has a physical effect on the short ones, since it induces curvature, and we expect that this effect is the same as being in a curved FRW universe. In this paper we verify this intuition in various examples of the three-point function, whose behaviour at order q{sup 2} can be written in terms of the power spectrum in a curved universe. This gives a simple alternative understanding of the level of non-Gaussianity in single-field models. Non-Gaussianity is always parametrically enhanced when modes freeze at a physical scale k{sub ph,f} shorter than H: f{sub NL} ? (k{sub ph,f}/H){sup 2}.

  15. On the consistency of QCBED structure factor measurements for TiO2 (Rutile)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Jian -Min; Friis, Jesper; Spence, John C. H.

    2003-09-16

    The same Bragg reflection in TiO2 from twelve different CBED patterns (from different crystals, orientations and thicknesses) are analysed quantitatively in order to evaluate the consistency of the QCBED method for bond-charge mapping. The standard deviation in the resulting distribution of derived X-ray structure factors is found to be an order of magnitude smaller than that in conventional X-ray work, and the standard error (0.026% for FX(110)) is slightly better than obtained by the X-ray Pendellosung method applied to silicon. This is sufficiently accuracy to distinguish between atomic, covalent and ionic models of bonding. We describe the importance of extractingmore » experimental parameters from CCD camera characterization, and of surface oxidation and crystal shape. Thus, the current experiments show that the QCBED method is now a robust and powerful tool for low order structure factor measurement, which does not suffer from the large extinction (multiple scattering) errors which occur in inorganic X-ray crystallography, and may be applied to nanocrystals. Our results will be used to understand the role of d electrons in the chemical bonding of TiO2.« less

  16. Consistent use of type Ia supernovae highly magnified by galaxy clusters to constrain the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Redlich, Matthias [Universitt Heidelberg, Zentrum fr Astronomie, Institut fr Theoretische Astrophysik, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    We discuss how Type Ia supernovae (SNe) strongly magnified by foreground galaxy clusters should be self-consistently treated when used in samples fitted for the cosmological parameters. While the cluster lens magnification of a SN can be well constrained from sets of multiple images of various background galaxies with measured redshifts, its value is typically dependent on the fiducial set of cosmological parameters used to construct the mass model. In such cases, one should not naively demagnify the observed SN luminosity by the model magnification into the expected Hubble diagram, which would create a bias, but instead take into account the cosmological parameters a priori chosen to construct the mass model. We quantify the effect and find that a systematic error of typically a few percent, up to a few dozen percent per magnified SN may be propagated onto a cosmological parameter fit unless the cosmology assumed for the mass model is taken into account (the bias can be even larger if the SN is lying very near the critical curves). We also simulate how such a bias propagates onto the cosmological parameter fit using the Union2.1 sample supplemented with strongly magnified SNe. The resulting bias on the deduced cosmological parameters is generally at the few percent level, if only few biased SNe are included, and increases with the number of lensed SNe and their redshift. Samples containing magnified Type Ia SNe, e.g., from ongoing cluster surveys, should readily account for this possible bias.

  17. A self-consistent model of the lateral behavior of a twin-stripe injection laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, T.; Ormondroyd, R.F.; Rozzi, T.E.

    1986-10-01

    A fully self-consistent computer model of the steady-state behavior of the zero-order lateral optical field of a GaAs twin-stripe injection laser is presented which takes into account current spreading in the p-type confining layer, the effect of lateral diffusion of carriers in the active layer, and bimolecular and stimulated radiative recombination. The results predict the lateral movement of the near field of the optical signal under asymmetric drive conditions, as observed in practice. Also calculated are the corresponding carrier and current density distributions. It is shown that the near-field zero order lateral optical field can be beam steered across the facet by only 2 ..mu..m, typically. However, the initial position of the beam can be controlled by the two-stripe currents and also the geometry of the device. For the case where I/sub s1/ approx. = I/sub s2/ the beam movement is seen to be proportional to either I/sub s1/ or I/sub s2/. The results show that beam steering is not accompanied by a negative slope to the I-L characteristics. The effect of geometry and diffusion coefficient on the value of maximum current allowed before modal instability occurs is also given.

  18. The framework convention on climate change a convention for sustainable energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassing, P.; Mendis, M.S.; Menezes, L.M.; Gowen, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In 1992, over 165 countries signed the United Nation`s Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). These countries have implicitly agreed to alter their `anthropogenic activities` that increase the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere and deplete the natural sinks for these same greenhouse gases. The energy sector is the major source of the primary anthropogenic GHGs, notably carbon dioxide and methane. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries presently account for the major share of GHG emissions from the energy sector. However, the developing countries are also rapidly increasing their contribution to global GHG emissions as a result of their growing consumption of fossil-based energy. Implementation of this global climate change convention, if seriously undertaken by the signatory countries, will necessitate changes in the energy mix and production processes in both the OECD and developing countries. International actions also will be needed to put the world on a sustainable energy path. By adoption of the FCCC, representatives of the world`s populations have indicated their desire to move toward such a path. The Conference of Parties to the Convention has just concluded its second meeting, at which the Parties endorsed a U.S. proposal that legally binding and enforceable emissions targets be adopted. It is clearly evident that the FCCC, as presently operating, cannot achieve the objective of stabilizing GHG concentrations in the atmosphere unless it adopts a major protocol to significantly reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. As demonstrated here, a good starting point in determining the steps the Parties to the FCCC should take in designing a protocol is to remember that the primary source of anthropogenic GHG emissions is the consumption of fossil fuels and the future growth of GHG emissions will derive primarily from the ever-increasing demand for and consumption of these fuels.

  19. Self-consistent modeling of electrochemical strain microscopy of solid electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tselev, Alexander; Morozovska, Anna N.; Udod, Alexei; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-10-10

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) employs a strong electromechanical coupling in solid ionic conductors to map ionic transport and electrochemical processes with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. To elucidate the mechanisms of the ESM image formation, we performed self-consistent numerical modeling of the electromechanical response in solid electrolytes under the probe tip in a linear, small-signal regime using the Boltzmann–Planck–Nernst–Einstein theory and Vegard's law while taking account of the electromigration and diffusion. We identified the characteristic time scales involved in the formation of the ESM response and found that the dynamics of the charge carriers in the tip-electrolyte system with blocking interfaces canmore » be described as charging of the diffuse layer at the tip-electrolyte interface through the tip contact spreading resistance. At the high frequencies used in the detection regime, the distribution of the charge carriers under the tip is governed by evanescent concentration waves generated at the tip-electrolyte interface. The ion drift length in the electric field produced by the tip determines the ESM response at high frequencies, which follows a 1/f asymptotic law. The electronic conductivity, as well as the electron transport through the electrode-electrolyte interface, do not have a significant effect on the ESM signal in the detection regime. The results indicate, however, that for typical solid electrolytes at room temperature, the ESM response originates at and contains information about the very surface layer of a sample, and the properties of the one-unit-cell-thick surface layer may significantly contribute to the ESM response, implying a high surface sensitivity and a high lateral resolution of the technique. On the other hand, it follows that a rigorous analysis of the ESM signals requires techniques that account for the discrete nature of a solid.« less

  20. Plasma Biomarker Profiles Differ Depending on Breast Cancer Subtype but RANTES is Consistently Increased

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Daly, Don S.; Tan, Ruimin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-07-01

    Background: Current biomarkers for breast cancer have little potential for detection. We determined if breast cancer subtypes influence circulating protein biomarkers. Methods: A sandwich-ELISA microarray platform was used to evaluate 23 candidate biomarkers in plasma samples that were obtained from subjects with either benign breast disease or invasive breast cancer. All plasma samples were collected at the time of biopsy, after a referral due to a suspicious screen (e.g., mammography). Cancer samples were evaluated based on breast cancer subtypes, as defined by the HER2 and estrogen receptor statuses. Results: Ten proteins were statistically altered in at least one breast cancer subtype, including four epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, two matrix metalloproteases, two cytokines, and two angiogenic factors. Only one cytokine, RANTES, was significantly increased (P<0.01 for each analysis) in all four subtypes, with areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) that ranged from 0.76 to 0.82, depending on cancer subtype. The best AUC values were observed for analyses that combined data from multiple biomarkers, with values ranging from 0.70 to 0.99, depending on the cancer subtype. Although the results for RANTES are consistent with previous publications, the multi-assay results need to be validated in independent sample sets. Conclusions: Different breast cancer subtypes produce distinct biomarker profiles, and circulating protein biomarkers have potential to differentiate between true and false positive screens for breast cancer. Impact: Subtype-specific biomarker panels may be useful for detecting breast cancer or as an adjunct assay to improve the accuracy of current screening methods.

  1. Consistency check for trends in surface temperature and upper-level circulation: 1950-1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Den Dool, H.M.; O'Lenic, E.A. ); Klein, W.H. )

    1993-12-01

    A time series of 43 years of observed monthly mean air temperature at 109 sites in the 48 contiguous US is compared to monthly mean air temperature specified from hemispheric gridded 700-mb heights. Because both upper-air and surface data have problems that may limit their use in climate change studies, this comparison could be considered a mutual consistency check. Cooling (by about 0.5[degrees]C) from 1951 to about 1970 and subsequent warming (also by 0.5[degrees]C) that continues through the present are found in both datasets, indicating that these interdecadal changes are probably real. In the last several years the specified temperatures were often colder than those observed. This prompted an investigation of whether the [open quotes]residual[close quotes] (specified minus observed) has recently been large (and negative) compared to the earlier part of the record. It was found that for the same 700-mb height field, surface temperatures were almost a degree Celsius warmer in the last few years than they were in the early 1950s, but considering the variability of the residuals over the 1950-92 period, the recent cold residuals may not yet be strikingly unusual. By comparing the full set of 109 stations to a [open quotes]clean[close quotes] subset of 24, the impact of common problems in surface data (station relocation, urbanization, etc.) was found to be quite small. The rather favorable comparison of observed surface temperatures and specified temperatures (which suffer from upper-air analysis/observation changes over the years) indicates that their respective data problems do not appear to validate their use in studies of interdecadal temperature change. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Self-consistent modeling of radio-frequency plasma generation in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, V. E. Stadnik, Yu. S.; Lysoivan, A. I.; Korovin, V. B.

    2013-11-15

    A self-consistent model of radio-frequency (RF) plasma generation in stellarators in the ion cyclotron frequency range is described. The model includes equations for the particle and energy balance and boundary conditions for Maxwells equations. The equation of charged particle balance takes into account the influx of particles due to ionization and their loss via diffusion and convection. The equation of electron energy balance takes into account the RF heating power source, as well as energy losses due to the excitation and electron-impact ionization of gas atoms, energy exchange via Coulomb collisions, and plasma heat conduction. The deposited RF power is calculated by solving the boundary problem for Maxwells equations. When describing the dissipation of the energy of the RF field, collisional absorption and Landau damping are taken into account. At each time step, Maxwells equations are solved for the current profiles of the plasma density and plasma temperature. The calculations are performed for a cylindrical plasma. The plasma is assumed to be axisymmetric and homogeneous along the plasma column. The system of balance equations is solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Maxwells equations are solved in a one-dimensional approximation by using the Fourier transformation along the azimuthal and longitudinal coordinates. Results of simulations of RF plasma generation in the Uragan-2M stellarator by using a frame antenna operating at frequencies lower than the ion cyclotron frequency are presented. The calculations show that the slow wave generated by the antenna is efficiently absorbed at the periphery of the plasma column, due to which only a small fraction of the input power reaches the confinement region. As a result, the temperature on the axis of the plasma column remains low, whereas at the periphery it is substantially higher. This leads to strong absorption of the RF field at the periphery via the Landau mechanism.

  3. Engineering Evaluation of X/Q Values Consistent with Regulatory Guide 1.145

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2010-02-01

    A goal for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) is to demonstrate compliance with regulatory dose limits bases on an exclusion area boundary and emergency planning zones boundaries set nominally to 400 meters. This paper presents the development of the atmospheric dispersion (X/Q) estimates for use in calculating doses at this distance and evaluating the resultant X/Q for an 800 meter receptor against X/Q values submitted to the NRC for review as part of Design Control Documentation (DCD) in support of future combined licensing (COL) Applications.

  4. An efficient and stable hybrid extended Lagrangian/self-consistent field scheme for solving classical mutual induction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albaugh, Alex; Demerdash, Omar; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-11-07

    We have adapted a hybrid extended Lagrangian self-consistent field (EL/SCF) approach, developed for time reversible Born Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for quantum electronic degrees of freedom, to the problem of classical polarization. In this context, the initial guess for the mutual induction calculation is treated by auxiliary induced dipole variables evolved via a time-reversible velocity Verlet scheme. However, we find numerical instability, which is manifested as an accumulation in the auxiliary velocity variables, that in turn results in an unacceptable increase in the number of SCF cycles to meet even loose convergence tolerances for the real induced dipoles over the course of a 1 ns trajectory of the AMOEBA14 water model. By diagnosing the numerical instability as a problem of resonances that corrupt the dynamics, we introduce a simple thermostating scheme, illustrated using Berendsen weak coupling and Nose-Hoover chain thermostats, applied to the auxiliary dipole velocities. We find that the inertial EL/SCF (iEL/SCF) method provides superior energy conservation with less stringent convergence thresholds and a correspondingly small number of SCF cycles, to reproduce all properties of the polarization model in the NVT and NVE ensembles accurately. Our iEL/SCF approach is a clear improvement over standard SCF approaches to classical mutual induction calculations and would be worth investigating for application to ab initio molecular dynamics as well.

  5. Consistency in the Sum Frequency Generation Intensity and Phase Vibrational Spectra of the Air/Neat Water Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Ranran; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Rong; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2011-06-16

    Tremendous progresses have been made in quantitative understanding and interpretation of the hydrogen bonding and ordering structure at the air/water interface since the first sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) measurement on the neat air/water interface by Q. Du et al. in 1993 (PRL, 70, 2312-2316, 1993.). However, there are still disagreements and controversies on the consistency between the different experiment measurements and the theoretical computational results. One critical problem lies in the inconsistency between the SFG-VS intensity measurements and the recently developed SFG-VS phase spectra measurements of the neat air/water interface, which has inspired various theoretical efforts trying to understand them. In this report, the reliability of the SFG-VS intensity spectra of the neat air/water interface is to be quantitatively examined, and the sources of possible inaccuracies in the SFG-VS phase spectral measurement is to be discussed based on the non-resonant SHG phase measurement results. The conclusion is that the SFG-VS intensity spectra data from different laboratories are now quantitatively converging and in agreement with each other, and the possible inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the SFG-VS phase spectra measurements need to be carefully examined against the properly corrected phase standard.

  6. DISPERSION ELEMENT CONSISTING OF CHROMIUM COATED UO$sup 2$ PARTICLES UNIFORMLY DISTRIBUTED IN A ZIRCALOY MATRIX

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cain, F.M. Jr.; Eck, J.E.

    1963-05-01

    A nuclear fuel element consisting of metal coated UO/sub 2/ particles dispersed in a matrix of Zircalloy and having a cladding of Zircalloy is presented. (AEC)

  7. A thermodynamically consistent, damage-dependent, interface debonding model for composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.N.; Clements, B.E.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ability to design composite materials and analyze processing procedures relies on the availability of constitutive models that describe their dynamic response accurately. The strength, damage evolution, and failure of interfaces within composites often dominate their macroscopic performance but are not well characterized. The design of such composites for particular applications requires adequate knowledge of interfacial characteristics. Given the large number of potential loading scenarios that an engineering composite can be subjected to, it is obviously beneficial to have reliable and accurate theoretical methods for their quantitative treatment in numerical calculation. This project addresses the fundamental aspects of interfacial debonding in composites, and examines the basic behavior in practical situations.

  8. Retrofit Audits and Cost Estimates. A Look at Quality and Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, L.; Shapiro, C.; Fleischer, W.

    2012-10-01

    Retrofit NYC Block by Block is an outreach program targeting owners of one- to four-family homes, the most common building type in New York City, with more than 600,000 structures citywide. Administered by the Pratt Center for Community Development and implemented by four nonprofit, community-based organizations, Block by Block connects residents, businesses, and religious and civic organizations in predominantly low-and moderate-income neighborhoods with one or more of a half-dozen public and private financial incentive programs that facilitate energy-efficiency retrofits. This research project sought to evaluate the approach, effectiveness, and the energy use reductions accomplished by the Retrofit NYC: Block by Block program.

  9. Retrofit Audits and Cost Estimates: A Look at Quality and Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, L.; Shapiro, C.; Fleischer, W.

    2012-10-01

    Retrofit NYC Block by Block is an outreach program targeting owners of one- to four-family homes, the most common building type in New York City, with more than 600,000 structures citywide. Administered by the Pratt Center for Community Development and implemented by four nonprofit, community based organizations, Block by Block connects residents, businesses, and religious and civic organizations in predominantly low- and moderate-income neighborhoods with one or more of a half-dozen public and private financial incentive programs that facilitate energy-efficiency retrofits. This research project sought to evaluate the approach, effectiveness, and the energy use reductions accomplished by the Retrofit NYC: Block by Block program.

  10. Consistent evaluation of GOSAT, SCIAMACHY, carbontracker, and MACC through comparisons to TCCON

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kulawik, S. S.; Wunch, D.; O'Dell, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Reuter, M.; Oda, T.; Chevallier, F.; Sherlock, V.; Buchwitz, M.; Osterman, G.; et al

    2015-06-22

    Consistent validation of satellite CO2 estimates is a prerequisite for using multiple satellite CO2 measurements for joint flux inversion, and for establishing an accurate long-term atmospheric CO2 data record. We focus on validating model and satellite observation attributes that impact flux estimates and CO2 assimilation, including accurate error estimates, correlated and random errors, overall biases, biases by season and latitude, the impact of coincidence criteria, validation of seasonal cycle phase and amplitude, yearly growth, and daily variability. We evaluate dry air mole fraction (XCO2) for GOSAT (ACOS b3.5) and SCIAMACHY (BESD v2.00.08) as well as the CarbonTracker (CT2013b) simulated CO2more » mole fraction fields and the MACC CO2 inversion system (v13.1) and compare these to TCCON observations (GGG2014). We find standard deviations of 0.9 ppm, 0.9, 1.7, and 2.1 ppm versus TCCON for CT2013b, MACC, GOSAT, and SCIAMACHY, respectively, with the single target errors 1.9 and 0.9 times the predicted errors for GOSAT and SCIAMACHY, respectively. When satellite data are averaged and interpreted according to error2 = a2+ b2 /n (where n are the number of observations averaged, a are the systematic (correlated) errors, and b are the random (uncorrelated) errors), we find that the correlated error term a = 0.6 ppm and the uncorrelated error term b = 1.7 ppm for GOSAT and a = 1.0 ppm, b = 1.4 ppm for SCIAMACHY regional averages. Biases at individual stations have year-to-year variability of ~ 0.3 ppm, with biases larger than the TCCON predicted bias uncertainty of 0.4 ppm at many stations. Using fitting software, we find that GOSAT underpredicts the seasonal cycle amplitude in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) between 46–53° N. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH), CT2013b underestimates the seasonal cycle amplitude. Biases are calculated for 3-month intervals and indicate the months that contribute to the observed amplitude differences. The seasonal cycle phase

  11. Consistent evaluation of GOSAT, SCIAMACHY, carbontracker, and MACC through comparisons to TCCON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulawik, S. S.; Wunch, D.; O'Dell, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Reuter, M.; Oda, T.; Chevallier, F.; Sherlock, V.; Buchwitz, M.; Osterman, G.; Miller, C.; Wennberg, P.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Morino, I.; Dubey, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Notholt, J.; Hase, F.; Warneke, T.; Sussmann, R.; Robinson, J.; Strong, K.; Schneider, M.; Wolf, J.

    2015-06-22

    Consistent validation of satellite CO2 estimates is a prerequisite for using multiple satellite CO2 measurements for joint flux inversion, and for establishing an accurate long-term atmospheric CO2 data record. We focus on validating model and satellite observation attributes that impact flux estimates and CO2 assimilation, including accurate error estimates, correlated and random errors, overall biases, biases by season and latitude, the impact of coincidence criteria, validation of seasonal cycle phase and amplitude, yearly growth, and daily variability. We evaluate dry air mole fraction (XCO2) for GOSAT (ACOS b3.5) and SCIAMACHY (BESD v2.00.08) as well as the CarbonTracker (CT2013b) simulated CO2 mole fraction fields and the MACC CO2 inversion system (v13.1) and compare these to TCCON observations (GGG2014). We find standard deviations of 0.9 ppm, 0.9, 1.7, and 2.1 ppm versus TCCON for CT2013b, MACC, GOSAT, and SCIAMACHY, respectively, with the single target errors 1.9 and 0.9 times the predicted errors for GOSAT and SCIAMACHY, respectively. When satellite data are averaged and interpreted according to error2 = a2+ b2 /n (where n are the number of observations averaged, a are the systematic (correlated) errors, and b are the random (uncorrelated) errors), we find that the correlated error term a = 0.6 ppm and the uncorrelated error term b = 1.7 ppm for GOSAT and a = 1.0 ppm, b = 1.4 ppm for SCIAMACHY regional averages. Biases at individual stations have year-to-year variability of ~ 0.3 ppm, with biases larger than the TCCON predicted bias uncertainty of 0.4 ppm at many stations. Using fitting software, we find that GOSAT underpredicts the seasonal cycle amplitude in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) between 46–53° N. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH), CT2013b underestimates the

  12. Making the market right for environmentally sound energy-efficient technologies: US buildings sector successes that might work in developing countries and Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-12-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, when energy prices were high, all Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries improved their E/GNP by about 2.5% annually. Increased energy efficiency accounted for 2/3rds of this improvement; the remaining portion was due to structural changes in the economy. In the US, analytic and policy tools that have successfully promoted energy efficiency include integrated resource planning, energy use labels, energy use standards, ``Golden Carrot`` incentive programs, and revenue-neutral ``feebates.`` In addition, a number of low cost, environmentally sound, energy-efficient technologies, such as electronic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows, have recently been developed. We discuss how many of these policies and technologies are probably exportable to developing countries and Eastern Europe, giving examples of successful starts in India, the ASEAN countries, and Brazil.

  13. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  14. Analysis of international efforts in energy research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaiyan, A.J.; Gill, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    Research and experimental development comprise innovative and creative work undertaken systematically to increase the stock of knowledge of science, engineering, and society. This knowledge reserve is used to improve living conditions and standards, including economic growth. Research and development (R&D) expenditures are useful measures of the scale and direction of technological innovation within a country, industry, or scientific field. Administrators concerned with economic growth and performance rely on R&D statistics as one possible type of indicator of technological change. R&D statistics are an essential tool in many government programs and evaluations (OECD 1993). The objective of the analysis was to identify and evaluate R&D funding sources, levels, and trends in the energy sectors of selected industrialized countries (Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) and the European Union (EU). Fossil fuel technologies, particularly fuel cells and advanced gas turbines, were the focus of the analysis, whose results are presented in this report.

  15. Energetically consistent collisional gyrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burby, J. W.; Brizard, A. J.; Qin, H.

    2015-10-01

    We present a formulation of collisional gyrokinetic theory with exact conservation laws for energy and canonical toroidal momentum. Collisions are accounted for by a nonlinear gyrokinetic Landau operator. Gyroaveraging and linearization do not destroy the operator's conservation properties. Just as in ordinary kinetic theory, the conservation laws for collisional gyrokinetic theory are selected by the limiting collisionless gyrokinetic theory. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  16. Self-consistent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dams | Department of Energy Self-charging Tracking Device Monitors Fish Migration through Hydroelectric Dams Self-charging Tracking Device Monitors Fish Migration through Hydroelectric Dams August 18, 2016 - 9:45am Addthis A rainbow trout, one of several species of fish being tracked using PNNL's new injectable, self-charging acoustic fish tags. These devices allow scientists to research how fish migrate through waterways when encountering hydrokinetic dams. | Photo courtesy of PNNL A

  17. BRANCH?BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF?CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neradilek, Moni Blazej; Polissar, Nayak; Einstein, Daniel R.; Glenny, Robb W.; Minard, Kevin R.; Carson, James P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Postlewait, Ed; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-06-01

    We examine a previously published branch-based approach to modeling airway diameters that is predicated on the assumption of self-consistency across all levels of the tree. We mathematically formulate this assumption, propose a method to test it and develop a more general model to be used when the assumption is violated. We discuss the effect of measurement error on the estimated models and propose methods that account for it. The methods are illustrated on data from MRI and CT images of silicone casts of two rats, two normal monkeys and one ozone-exposed monkey. Our results showed substantial departures from self-consistency in all five subjects. When departures from selfconsistency exist we do not recommend using the self-consistency model, even as an approximation, as we have shown that it may likely lead to an incorrect representation of the diameter geometry. Measurement error has an important impact on the estimated morphometry models and needs to be accounted for in the analysis.

  18. Self-Consistent Full-Wave/Fokker-Planck Calculations for Ion Cyclotron Heating in Non-Maxwellian Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; D'Azevedo, E.; Harvey, R.W.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Dumont, R.J.; Smithe, D.N.; Bonoli, P.T.; Wright, J.C.

    2005-09-26

    Self-consistent solutions for the wave electric field and particle distribution function are calculated for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas. The all-orders wave solver AORSA is generalized to treat non-thermal velocity distributions arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave driven diffusion in velocity space. Quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the wave electric fields and used to calculate velocity distribution functions with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. Self-consistent results are obtained by iterating the full-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.

  19. Gradient Theory simulations of pure fluid interfaces using a generalized expression for influence parameters and a Helmholtz energy equation of state for fundamentally consistent two-phase calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahms, Rainer N.

    2014-12-31

    The fidelity of Gradient Theory simulations depends on the accuracy of saturation properties and influence parameters, and require equations of state (EoS) which exhibit a fundamentally consistent behavior in the two-phase regime. Widely applied multi-parameter EoS, however, are generally invalid inside this region. Hence, they may not be fully suitable for application in concert with Gradient Theory despite their ability to accurately predict saturation properties. The commonly assumed temperature-dependence of pure component influence parameters usually restricts their validity to subcritical temperature regimes. This may distort predictions for general multi-component interfaces where temperatures often exceed the critical temperature of vapor phase components. Then, the calculation of influence parameters is not well defined. In this paper, one of the first studies is presented in which Gradient Theory is combined with a next-generation Helmholtz energy EoS which facilitates fundamentally consistent calculations over the entire two-phase regime. Illustrated on pentafluoroethane as an example, reference simulations using this method are performed. They demonstrate the significance of such high-accuracy and fundamentally consistent calculations for the computation of interfacial properties. These reference simulations are compared to corresponding results from cubic PR EoS, widely-applied in combination with Gradient Theory, and mBWR EoS. The analysis reveals that neither of those two methods succeeds to consistently capture the qualitative distribution of obtained key thermodynamic properties in Gradient Theory. Furthermore, a generalized expression of the pure component influence parameter is presented. This development is informed by its fundamental definition based on the direct correlation function of the homogeneous fluid and by presented high-fidelity simulations of interfacial density profiles. As a result, the new model preserves the accuracy of previous

  20. Gradient Theory simulations of pure fluid interfaces using a generalized expression for influence parameters and a Helmholtz energy equation of state for fundamentally consistent two-phase calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dahms, Rainer N.

    2014-12-31

    The fidelity of Gradient Theory simulations depends on the accuracy of saturation properties and influence parameters, and require equations of state (EoS) which exhibit a fundamentally consistent behavior in the two-phase regime. Widely applied multi-parameter EoS, however, are generally invalid inside this region. Hence, they may not be fully suitable for application in concert with Gradient Theory despite their ability to accurately predict saturation properties. The commonly assumed temperature-dependence of pure component influence parameters usually restricts their validity to subcritical temperature regimes. This may distort predictions for general multi-component interfaces where temperatures often exceed the critical temperature of vapor phasemore » components. Then, the calculation of influence parameters is not well defined. In this paper, one of the first studies is presented in which Gradient Theory is combined with a next-generation Helmholtz energy EoS which facilitates fundamentally consistent calculations over the entire two-phase regime. Illustrated on pentafluoroethane as an example, reference simulations using this method are performed. They demonstrate the significance of such high-accuracy and fundamentally consistent calculations for the computation of interfacial properties. These reference simulations are compared to corresponding results from cubic PR EoS, widely-applied in combination with Gradient Theory, and mBWR EoS. The analysis reveals that neither of those two methods succeeds to consistently capture the qualitative distribution of obtained key thermodynamic properties in Gradient Theory. Furthermore, a generalized expression of the pure component influence parameter is presented. This development is informed by its fundamental definition based on the direct correlation function of the homogeneous fluid and by presented high-fidelity simulations of interfacial density profiles. As a result, the new model preserves the accuracy of

  1. Description of the yrast states in {sup 24}Mg by the self-consistent 3D-cranking model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oi, Makito

    2005-11-01

    With the self-consistent 3D-cranking model, the ground-state rotational band in {sup 24}Mg is analyzed. The role of triaxial deformation is discussed, in particular in a description of the observed two I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} states.

  2. GEA Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. These updates are a...

  3. CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... A survey cf the area of the "L' Building was performed and consisted of gamma-ray ... - Statement of Certification Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant East Pittsburgh ...

  4. The different varieties of the Suyama-Yamaguchi consistency relation and its violation as a signal of statistical inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez, Yeinzon; Almeida, Juan P. Beltrn; Valenzuela-Toledo, Csar A. E-mail: juanpbeltran@uan.edu.co

    2013-04-01

    We present the different consistency relations that can be seen as variations of the well known Suyama-Yamaguchi (SY) consistency relation ?{sub NL}?((6/5)f{sub NL}){sup 2}, the latter involving the levels of non-gaussianity f{sub NL} and ?{sub NL} in the primordial curvature perturbation ?. It has been (implicitly) claimed that the following variation: ?{sub NL}(k{sub 1},k{sub 3})?((6/5)){sup 2}f{sub NL}(k{sub 1})f{sub NL}(k{sub 3}), which we call ''the fourth variety'', in the collapsed (for ?{sub NL}) and squeezed (for f{sub NL}) limits is always satisfied independently of any physics; however, the proof depends sensitively on the assumption of scale-invariance (expressing this way the fourth variety of the SY consistency relation as ?{sub NL}?((6/5)f{sub NL}){sup 2}) which only applies for cosmological models involving Lorentz-invariant scalar fields (at least at tree level), leaving room for a strong violation of this variety of the consistency relation when non-trivial degrees of freedom, for instance vector fields, are in charge of the generation of the primordial curvature perturbation. With this in mind as a motivation, we explicitly state, in the first part of this work, under which conditions the SY consistency relation has been claimed to hold in its different varieties (implicitly) presented in the literature since its inception back in 2008; as a result, we show for the first time that the variety ?{sub NL}(k{sub 1},k{sub 1})?((6/5)f{sub NL}(k{sub 1})){sup 2}, which we call ''the fifth variety'', is always satisfied even when there is strong scale-dependence and high levels of statistical anisotropy as long as statistical homogeneity holds: thus, an observed violation of this specific variety would prevent the comparison between theory and observation, shaking this way the foundations of cosmology as a science. In the second part, we concern about the existence of non-trivial degrees of freedom, concretely vector fields for which the levels of non

  5. Neutrinoless double {beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements within the SRQRPA with self-consistent short range correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benes, Petr [IEAP, Czech Technical University (Czech Republic); Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-09

    The nuclear matrix elements M{sup 0v} of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0v{beta}{beta}-decay) are systematically evaluated using the self-consistent renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (SRQRPA). The residual interaction and the two-nucleon short-range correlations are derived from the charge-dependent Bonn (CD-Bonn) potential. The importance of further progress in the calculation of the 0v{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is stressed.

  6. Self-Consistant Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J-L.; Furman, M.A.; Secondo, R.; Venturini, M.; Fox, J.D.; Rivetta, C.H,

    2010-09-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the growth rate and frequency patterns in space-time of the electron cloud driven transverse instability for a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Comparisons to selected experimental data are also given. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons. Comparisons to experimental data are also given.

  7. Study of Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides Kozlovskiy V.I., Filatov V. V., Shchepunov (UNIRIB, O.R.A.U. Oak Ridge, TN, USA) V. A., Brusov V. S., Pikhtelev A. R., Zelenov V. V. Introduction The primary objective of this work concerns linear quadrupole ion traps, which are commonly used to interface a continuous ion beam from an external source with a mass analyzer, requiring bunched or pulsed beams. We assume that the ions prepared for mass

  8. International Petroleum Statistics Report, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993. Data for the United States are developed by the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Office of Oil and Gas. Data for other countries are derived largely from published sources, including International Energy Agency publications, the EIA International Energy Annual, and the trade press. (See sources after each section.) All data are reviewed by the International Statistics Branch of EIA. All data have been converted to units of measurement familiar to the American public. Definitions of oil production and consumption are consistent with other EIA publications.

  9. Vapor-liquid Equilibria and Polarization Behavior of the GCP Water Model: Gaussian Charge-on-spring versus Dipole Self-consistent Field approaches to induced polarization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Moucka, Filip; Vlcek, Lukas; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    We implemented the Gaussian charge-on-spring (GCOS) version of the original self-consistent field implementation of the Gaussian Charge Polarizable water model and test its accuracy to represent the polarization behavior of the original model involving smeared charges and induced dipole moments. For that purpose we adapted the recently developed multiple-particle-move (MPM) within the Gibbs and isochoric-isothermal ensembles Monte Carlo methods for the efficient simulation of polarizable fluids. We assessed the accuracy of the GCOS representation by a direct comparison of the resulting vapor-liquid phase envelope, microstructure, and relevant microscopic descriptors of water polarization along the orthobaric curve against the corresponding quantitiesmore » from the actual GCP water model.« less

  10. Vapor–Liquid Equilibrium and Polarization Behavior of the GCP Water Model: Gaussian Charge-on-Spring versus Dipole Self-Consistent Field Approaches to Induced Polarization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Moucka, Filip; Vlcek, Lukas; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2015-03-24

    Here we implemented the Gaussian charge-on-spring (GCOS) version of the original self-consistent field implementation of the Gaussian Charge Polarizable water model and test its accuracy to represent the polarization behavior of the original model involving smeared charges and induced dipole moments. Moreover, for that purpose we adapted the recently developed multiple-particle-move (MPM) within the Gibbs and isochoric-isothermal ensembles Monte Carlo methods for the efficient simulation of polarizable fluids. We also assessed the accuracy of the GCOS representation by a direct comparison of the resulting vapor-liquid phase envelope, microstructure, and relevant microscopic descriptors of water polarization along the orthobaric curve againstmore » the corresponding quantities from the actual GCP water model.« less

  11. Facile fabrication of rutile monolayer films consisting of well crystalline nanorods by following an IL-assisted hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Peng; Liu Xiaodi; Sun, Chuansheng; Ma Jianmin; Zheng Wenjun

    2009-05-15

    In this study, rutile films consisting of rectangular nanorods were facilely deposited on glass substrates from strongly acid solution of TiCl{sub 4}. The highly ordered array of nanorods was realized in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br by following a hydrothermal process. In this process, Degussa P25 nanoparticles served as seeds that were pre-deposited on the substrates to facilitate the array of rutile nanorods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectrum were used to characterize the obtained nanorod films. The measurements showed that the nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, and grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate. The presence of IL was found vital for the formation of rutile nanorods, and the suitable molar ratio of [Bmim]Br to TiCl{sub 4} ranged from 500:1 to 1500:1. The excessive [Bmim]Br may hinder the precipitation of rutile particles. - Graphical abstract: The rutile film consisting of rectangular nanorods is successfully deposited on glass substrate in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br. The nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, which grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate.

  12. Communication: Smoothing out excited-state dynamics: Analytical gradients for dynamically weighted complete active space self-consistent field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, W. J.

    2014-11-07

    State averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) is a workhorse for determining the excited-state electronic structure of molecules, particularly for states with multireference character; however, the method suffers from known issues that have prevented its wider adoption. One issue is the presence of discontinuities in potential energy surfaces when a state that is not included in the state averaging crosses with one that is. In this communication I introduce a new dynamical weight with spline (DWS) scheme that mimics SA-CASSCF while removing energy discontinuities due to unweighted state crossings. In addition, analytical gradients for DWS-CASSCF (and other dynamically weighted schemes) are derived for the first time, enabling energy-conserving excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics in instances where SA-CASSCF fails.

  13. On the full exploitation of symmetry in periodic (as well as molecular) self-consistent-field ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlando, Roberto Erba, Alessandro; Dovesi, Roberto; De La Pierre, Marco; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M.

    2014-09-14

    Use of symmetry can dramatically reduce the computational cost (running time and memory allocation) of self-consistent-field ab initio calculations for molecular and crystalline systems. Crucial for running time is symmetry exploitation in the evaluation of one- and two-electron integrals, diagonalization of the Fock matrix at selected points in reciprocal space, reconstruction of the density matrix. As regards memory allocation, full square matrices (overlap, Fock, and density) in the Atomic Orbital (AO) basis are avoided and a direct transformation from the packed AO to the symmetry adapted crystalline orbital basis is performed, so that the largest matrix to be handled has the size of the largest sub-block in the latter basis. Quantitative examples, referring to the implementation in the CRYSTAL code, are given for high symmetry families of compounds such as carbon fullerenes and nanotubes.

  14. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  15. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, and scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.

  16. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. II. Variational formulations and analytical gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-08-06

    This study describes variational energy expressions and analytical excited state energy gradients for time-dependent self-consistent field methods with polarizable solvent effects. Linear response, vertical excitation, and state-specific solventmodels are examined. Enforcing a variational ground stateenergy expression in the state-specific model is found to reduce it to the vertical excitation model. Variational excited state energy expressions are then provided for the linear response and vertical excitation models and analytical gradients are formulated. Using semiempiricalmodel chemistry, the variational expressions are verified by numerical and analytical differentiation with respect to a static external electric field. Lastly, analytical gradients are further tested by performing microcanonical excited state molecular dynamics with p-nitroaniline.

  17. Analytical gradients of the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method with density fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delcey, Mickaël G.; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland

    2015-07-28

    An efficient implementation of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) gradients employing density fitting (DF) is presented. The DF allows a reduction both in scaling and prefactors of the different steps involved. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on a set of molecules ranging up to an iron-Heme b complex which with its 79 atoms and 811 basis functions is to our knowledge the largest SA-CASSCF gradient computed. For smaller systems where the conventional code could still be used as a reference, both the linear response calculation and the gradient formation showed a clear timing reduction and the overall cost of a geometry optimization is typically reduced by more than one order of magnitude while the accuracy loss is negligible.

  18. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. II. Variational formulations and analytical gradients

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-08-06

    This study describes variational energy expressions and analytical excited state energy gradients for time-dependent self-consistent field methods with polarizable solvent effects. Linear response, vertical excitation, and state-specific solventmodels are examined. Enforcing a variational ground stateenergy expression in the state-specific model is found to reduce it to the vertical excitation model. Variational excited state energy expressions are then provided for the linear response and vertical excitation models and analytical gradients are formulated. Using semiempiricalmodel chemistry, the variational expressions are verified by numerical and analytical differentiation with respect to a static external electric field. Lastly, analytical gradients are further tested by performingmore » microcanonical excited state molecular dynamics with p-nitroaniline.« less

  19. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, andmore » scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.« less

  20. Three-Nucleon Low-Energy Constants From The Consistency Of Interactions And Currents In Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazit, D; Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2008-12-18

    The chiral low-energy constants cD and cE are constrained by means of accurate ab initio calculations of the A = 3 binding energies and, for the first time, of the triton {beta} decay. We demonstrate that these low-energy observables allow a robust determination of the two undetermined constants. The consistency of the interactions and currents in chiral effective field theory is key to this remarkable result. The two- plus three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory defined by properties of the A = 2 system and the present determination of c{sub D} and c{sub E} are successful in predicting properties of the A = 3, and 4 systems.

  1. SU-E-E-05: Improving Contouring Precision and Consistency for Physicians-In-Training with Simple Lab Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, L; Larson, D A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Target contouring for high-dose treatments such as radiosurgery of brain metastases is highly critical in eliminating marginal failure and reducing complications as shown by recent clinical studies. In order to improve contouring accuracy and practice consistency for the procedure, we introduced a self-assessed physics lab practice for the physicians-in-training. Methods: A set of commercially acquired high-precision PMMA plastic spheres were randomly embedded in a Styrofoam block and then scanned with the CT/MR via the clinical procedural imaging protocol. A group of first-year physicians-in-training (n=6) from either neurosurgery or radiation oncology department were asked to contour the scanned objects (diameter ranged from 0.4 cm to 3.8 cm). These user-defined contours were then compared with the ideal contour sets of object shape for self assessments to determine the maximum areas of the observed discrepancies and method of improvements. Results: The largest discrepancies from initial practice were consistently found to be located near the extreme longitudinal portions of the target for all the residents. Discrepancy was especially prominent when contouring small objects < 1.0 cm in diameters. For example, the mean volumes rendered from the initial contour data set differed from the ideal data set by 7.7%±6.6% for the participants (p> 0.23 suggesting agreement cannot be established). However, when incorporating a secondary imaging scan such as reconstructed coronal or sagittal images in a repeat practice, the agreement was dramatically improved yielding p<0.02 in agreement with the reference data set for all the participants. Conclusion: A simple physics lab revealed a common pitfall in contouring small metastatic brain tumors for radiosurgical procedures and provided a systematic tool for physicians-in-training in improving their clinical contouring skills. Dr Ma is current a board member of international stereotactic radiosurgical society.

  2. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean {+-} standard deviation of 32 {+-} 9 vs. 23 {+-} 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 {+-} 3 vs. 21 {+-} 5 min (p = .003), 39 {+-} 12 vs. 30 {+-} 5 min (p = .055), and 29 {+-} 5 vs. 20 {+-} 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target

  3. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  4. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  5. Justice Department review of federal coal and oil leasing: serving the consistent goals of competition and energy independence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    As the nation moves into the 1980s, development of our domestic energy resources must surely be the number one priority of energy policy. Important natural resources are owned by the Federal government and must be dedicated to development in the public interest. This includes a government leasing program which fosters competitive and efficient development of these resources by private companies. Through its antitrust review of individual leases and its general advocacy of competition in the leasing program, the Department of Justice seeks to bring the prospect of a sound national energy policy closer to reality. Examples of how this review functions are drawn from the Outer Continental Shelf Land Acts Amendments of 1978 and the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1975. 32 references.

  6. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasegawa, Hiroki Ishiguro, Seiji

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  7. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: Consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-16

    In this study, several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends onmore » several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.« less

  8. Self-consistent fluid modeling and simulation on a pulsed microwave atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Yin, Zhixiang Chen, Minggong; Hong, Lingli; Hu, Yelin; Huang, Yourui; Xia, Guangqing; Liu, Minghai; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2014-10-21

    In present study, a pulsed lower-power microwave-driven atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet has been introduced with the type of coaxial transmission line resonator. The plasma jet plume is with room air temperature, even can be directly touched by human body without any hot harm. In order to study ionization process of the proposed plasma jet, a self-consistent hybrid fluid model is constructed in which Maxwell's equations are solved numerically by finite-difference time-domain method and a fluid model is used to study the characteristics of argon plasma evolution. With a Guass type input power function, the spatio-temporal distributions of the electron density, the electron temperature, the electric field, and the absorbed power density have been simulated, respectively. The simulation results suggest that the peak values of the electron temperature and the electric field are synchronous with the input pulsed microwave power but the maximum quantities of the electron density and the absorbed power density are lagged to the microwave power excitation. In addition, the pulsed plasma jet excited by the local enhanced electric field of surface plasmon polaritons should be the discharge mechanism of the proposed plasma jet.

  9. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: Consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-16

    In this study, several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.

  10. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) Non-OECD Oil consumption in developing countries that are not part of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has risen sharply in recent years. While oil consumption in the OECD countries declined between 2000 and 2010, non-OECD oil consumption increased more than 40 percent. China, India, and Saudi Arabia had the largest growth in oil consumption among the countries in the non-OECD during this period. Economic growth has a strong impact on oil

  11. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Non-OECD Oil consumption in developing countries that are not part of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has risen sharply in recent years. While oil consumption in the OECD countries declined between 2000 and 2010, non-OECD oil consumption increased more than 40 percent. China, India, and Saudi Arabia had the largest growth in oil consumption among the countries in the non-OECD during this period. Economic growth has

  12. A consistent positive association between landscape simplification and insecticide use across the Midwestern US from 1997 through 2012

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meehan, Timothy D.; Gratton, Claudio

    2015-10-27

    During 2007, counties across the Midwestern US with relatively high levels of landscape simplification (i.e., widespread replacement of seminatural habitats with cultivated crops) had relatively high crop-pest abundances which, in turn, were associated with relatively high insecticide application. These results suggested a positive relationship between landscape simplification and insecticide use, mediated by landscape effects on crop pests or their natural enemies. A follow-up study, in the same region but using different statistical methods, explored the relationship between landscape simplification and insecticide use between 1987 and 2007, and concluded that the relationship varied substantially in sign and strength across years. Here,more » we explore this relationship from 1997 through 2012, using a single dataset and two different analytical approaches. We demonstrate that, when using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, the relationship between landscape simplification and insecticide use is, indeed, quite variable over time. However, the residuals from OLS models show strong spatial autocorrelation, indicating spatial structure in the data not accounted for by explanatory variables, and violating a standard assumption of OLS. When modeled using spatial regression techniques, relationships between landscape simplification and insecticide use were consistently positive between 1997 and 2012, and model fits were dramatically improved. We argue that spatial regression methods are more appropriate for these data, and conclude that there remains compelling correlative support for a link between landscape simplification and insecticide use in the Midwestern US. We discuss the limitations of inference from this and related studies, and suggest improved data collection campaigns for better understanding links between landscape structure, crop-pest pressure, and pest-management practices.« less

  13. A consistent positive association between landscape simplification and insecticide use across the Midwestern US from 1997 through 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meehan, Timothy D.; Gratton, Claudio

    2015-10-27

    During 2007, counties across the Midwestern US with relatively high levels of landscape simplification (i.e., widespread replacement of seminatural habitats with cultivated crops) had relatively high crop-pest abundances which, in turn, were associated with relatively high insecticide application. These results suggested a positive relationship between landscape simplification and insecticide use, mediated by landscape effects on crop pests or their natural enemies. A follow-up study, in the same region but using different statistical methods, explored the relationship between landscape simplification and insecticide use between 1987 and 2007, and concluded that the relationship varied substantially in sign and strength across years. Here, we explore this relationship from 1997 through 2012, using a single dataset and two different analytical approaches. We demonstrate that, when using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, the relationship between landscape simplification and insecticide use is, indeed, quite variable over time. However, the residuals from OLS models show strong spatial autocorrelation, indicating spatial structure in the data not accounted for by explanatory variables, and violating a standard assumption of OLS. When modeled using spatial regression techniques, relationships between landscape simplification and insecticide use were consistently positive between 1997 and 2012, and model fits were dramatically improved. We argue that spatial regression methods are more appropriate for these data, and conclude that there remains compelling correlative support for a link between landscape simplification and insecticide use in the Midwestern US. We discuss the limitations of inference from this and related studies, and suggest improved data collection campaigns for better understanding links between landscape structure, crop-pest pressure, and pest-management practices.

  14. TU-A-12A-01: Consistency of Lung Expansion and Contraction During Respiration: Implications for Quantitative Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, T; Du, K; Bayouth, J; Christensen, G; Reinhardt, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can be used to evaluate longitudinal changes in pulmonary function. The sensitivity of such measurements to identify function change may be improved with reproducible breathing patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine if inhale was more consistent than exhale, i.e., lung expansion during inhalation compared to lung contraction during exhalation. Methods: Repeat 4DCT image data acquired within a short time interval from 8 patients. Using a tissue volume preserving deformable image registration algorithm, Jacobian ventilation maps in two scanning sessions were computed and compared on the same coordinate for reproducibility analysis. Equivalent lung volumes (ELV) were used for 5 subjects and equivalent title volumes (ETV) for the 3 subjects who experienced a baseline shift between scans. In addition, gamma pass rate was calculated from a modified gamma index evaluation between two ventilation maps, using acceptance criterions of 2mm distance-to-agreement and 5% ventilation difference. The gamma pass rates were then compared using paired t-test to determine if there was a significant difference. Results: Inhalation was more reproducible than exhalation. In the 5 ELV subjects 78.5% of the lung voxels met the gamma criteria for expansion during inhalation when comparing the two scans, while significantly fewer (70.9% of the lung voxels) met the gamma criteria for contraction during exhalation (p = .027). In the 8 total subjects analyzed the average gamma pass rate for expansion during inhalation was 75.2% while for contraction during exhalation it was 70.3%; which trended towards significant (p = .064). Conclusion: This work implies inhalation is more reproducible than exhalation, when equivalent respiratory volumes are considered. The reason for this difference is unknown. Longitudinal investigation of pulmonary function change based on inhalation images appears appropriate for Jacobian-based measure of

  15. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temkin, Richard

    2014-12-24

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  16. SELF-CONSISTENT MODEL OF THE INTERSTELLAR PICKUP PROTONS, ALFVENIC TURBULENCE, AND CORE SOLAR WIND IN THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamayunov, Konstantin V.; Zhang Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2012-09-20

    A self-consistent model of the interstellar pickup protons, the slab component of the Alfvenic turbulence, and core solar wind (SW) protons is presented for r {>=} 1 along with the initial results of and comparison with the Voyager 2 (V2) observations. Two kinetic equations are used for the pickup proton distribution and Alfvenic power spectral density, and a third equation governs SW temperature including source due to the Alfven wave energy dissipation. A fraction of the pickup proton free energy, f{sub D} , which is actually released in the waveform during isotropization, is taken from the quasi-linear consideration without preexisting turbulence, whereas we use observations to specify the strength of the large-scale driving, C{sub sh}, for turbulence. The main conclusions of our study can be summarized as follows. (1) For C{sub sh} Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5 and f{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 0.7-1, the model slab component agrees well with the V2 observations of the total transverse magnetic fluctuations starting from {approx}8 AU. This indicates that the slab component at low-latitudes makes up a majority of the transverse magnetic fluctuations beyond 8-10 AU. (2) The model core SW temperature agrees well with the V2 observations for r {approx}> 20 AU if f{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 0.7-1. (3) A combined effect of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin attenuation, large-scale driving, and pickup proton generated waves results in the energy sink in the region r {approx}< 10 AU, while wave energy is pumped in the turbulence beyond 10 AU. Without energy pumping, the nonlinear energy cascade is suppressed for r {approx}< 10 AU, supplying only a small energy fraction into the k-region of dissipation by the core SW protons. A similar situation takes place for the two-dimensional turbulence. (4) The energy source due to the resonant Alfven wave damping by the core SW protons is small at heliocentric distances r {approx}< 10 AU for both the slab and the two-dimensional turbulent components

  17. Consistent quantification of climate impacts due to biogenic carbon storage across a range of bio-product systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guest, Geoffrey Bright, Ryan M. Cherubini, Francesco Strmman, Anders H.

    2013-11-15

    resource and carbon storage options considered indicates that more accurate accounting will require case-specific factors derived following the methodological guidelines provided in this and recent manuscripts. -- Highlights: Climate impacts of stored biogenic carbon (bio-C) are consistently quantified. Temporary storage of bio-C does not always equate to a climate cooling impact. 1 unit of bio-C stored over a time horizon does not always equate to ? 1 unit CO{sub 2}eq. Discrepancies of climate change impact quantification in literature are clarified.

  18. sustainable development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sustainable development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Hydrogen Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells ...

  19. Combined heat and power systems that consist of biomass fired fluidised bed combustors and modern steam engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, S.D.; Errey, S.; Thomas, M.; Kruger, P.

    1996-12-31

    Biomass energy is widely used in many processing industries in the ASEAN region. The residue produced by agricultural and wood processing plant is either inefficiently combusted in simple furnaces or in the open, or disposed of in land fill sites or in rivers. Many of these industries are paying high prices for electricity in rural areas and/or supply is unreliable. An ASEAN/Australian cooperation program has been under way for the last ten years to introduce clean burning biomass fired heat and/or combined heat and power equipment. It aims to transfer Australian know how in the design and manufacture of fluidised bed CHP technology to the ASEAN region. The main participants involved in the program include SIRIM and UKM in Malaysia, PCIERD, FPRI and Asia Ratan in the Philippines, King Monkutt Institute of Technology (KMITT) in Thailand, LIPI and ITB in Indonesia, and the University of Singapore. In this paper an outline of the program will be given including results of market research and development undertaken into fluidised bed combustion, the proposed plant design and costings, and research and development undertaken into modem steam engine technology. It will be shown that all of the projects to be undertaken are financially viable. In particular the use of simple low cost high efficient steam engines ensures that the smaller CHP plant (50-100 kWe) can be viable.

  20. OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    714271111,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India,...

  1. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  2. Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Development Economic Development Los Alamos is committed to investing and partnering in economic development initiatives and programs that have a positive impact to stimulate business growth that creates jobs and strengthens communities in Northern New Mexico. September 20, 2013 R&M Construction from Santa Clara Pueblo is a 2015 Native American Venture Acceleration Fund recipient. R&M Construction from Santa Clara Pueblo is a 2015 Native American Venture Acceleration Fund

  3. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profilesmore » by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.« less

  4. Technology Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Developing advanced materials such as novel coatings and composites. Defining and validating control strategies for wave energy converters (WECs) to improve power performance. ...

  5. Development of an ACP facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gil-Sung You; Won-Myung Choung; Jeong-Hoe Ku; il-Je Cho; Dong-Hak Kook; Kie-Chan Kwon; Eun-Pyo Lee; Ji-Sup Yoon; Seong-Won Park; Won-Kyung Lee

    2007-07-01

    KAERI has been developing an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP). The ACP facility for a process demonstration consists of two air-sealed type hot cells. The safety analysis results showed that the facility was designed safely. The relevant integrated performance tests were also carried out successfully. (authors)

  6. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  7. Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource...

  8. Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike; Daniska, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

  9. EOS Interpolation and Thermodynamic Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammel, J. Tinka

    2015-11-16

    As discussed in LA-UR-08-05451, the current interpolator used by Grizzly, OpenSesame, EOSPAC, and similar routines is the rational function interpolator from Kerley. While the rational function interpolator is well-suited for interpolation on sparse grids with logarithmic spacing and it preserves monotonicity in 1-d, it has some known problems.

  10. Leadership Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Leadership & Development Programs are designed to strengthen the participant’s capacity to lead by deepening their understanding of the DOE’s core values and key leadership characteristics and behaviors, which is the foundation of our model for success.

  11. Instrument Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for the ARM Central Facility: Multiple Remote Sensor Techniques Development K. Sassen Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt lake City, UT 84112 overcome the poor data-handling capabilities that handi- capped multiple-channellidar studies in the past. The true diversity of transmitted and received polarization states of our system is illustrated at the bottom of Table 1. Note that the first full POL field tests will be made at the upcoming 1991

  12. Systematic study of electric dipole excitations with fully self-consistent Skyrme HF plus RPA calculation from light to medium-mass deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inakura, Tsunenori; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2009-05-04

    We undertake a systematic calculation on electric dipole responses of even-even nuclei for a wide mass region employing a fully self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus RPA approach. For an easy implementation of the fully self-consistent calculation, the finite amplitude method which we have proposed recently is employed. We calculated dipole responses in Cartesian mesh representation, which can deal with deformed nuclei but does not include pairing correlation. The calculated results show reasonable agreement for heavy nuclei while the average excitation energy are underestimated for light nuclei. The systematic calculation have reached Nickel isotopes. We show a compilation of calculated peak energies of giant dipole resonances.

  13. Drum inspection robots: Application development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, F.B.; Warner, R.D.

    1996-02-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE), drums containing mixed and low level stored waste are inspected, as mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and other regulations. The inspections are intended to prevent leaks by finding corrosion long before the drums are breached. The DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) has sponsored efforts towards the development of robotic drum inspectors. This emerging application for mobile and remote sensing has broad applicability for DOE and commercial waste storage areas. Three full scale robot prototypes have been under development, and another project has prototyped a novel technique to analyze robotically collected drum images. In general, the robots consist of a mobile, self-navigating base vehicle, outfitted with sensor packages so that rust and other corrosion cues can be automatically identified. They promise the potential to lower radiation dose and operator effort required, while improving diligence, consistency, and documentation.

  14. United Nations Economic Commission for Africa | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Ministerial Consultation known as "The Big Table" . Started in 2000, a small group of African Ministers of Finance gather with...

  15. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in DOE technology and contains selected scientific and technical software from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). ...

  16. Paris, France: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Agency (IEA) Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21) Registered Energy...

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Development (WPISD). Partners include the OECD International Energy Agency (IEA), UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), Eurostat, and the European...

  18. Word Pro - S11

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    April 2015 April 2016 Note: OECD is the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthlyinternational. Source: Table ...

  19. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  20. Mixed oxide fuel development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, R.D.; Omberg, R.P.

    1987-05-08

    This paper describes the success of the ongoing mixed-oxide fuel development program in the United States aimed at qualifying an economical fuel system for liquid metal cooled reactors. This development has been the cornerstone of the US program for the past 20 years and has proceeded in a deliberate and highly disciplined fashion with high emphasis on fuel reliability and operational safety as major features of an economical fuel system. The program progresses from feature testing in EBR-II to qualifying full size components in FFTF under fully prototypic conditions to establish a basis for extending allowable lifetimes. The development program started with the one year (300 EFPD) core, which is the FFTF driver fuel, continued with the demonstration of a two year (600 EFPD) core and is presently evaluating a three year (900 EFPD) fuel system. All three of these systems, consistent with other LMR fuel programs around the world, use fuel pellets gas bonded to a cladding tube that is assembled into a bundle and fitted into a wrapper tube or duct for ease of insertion into a core. The materials of construction progressed from austenitic CW 316 SS to lower swelling austenitic D9 to non swelling ferritic/martensitic HT9. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  2. Nozzle development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Energy & Financial Markets - Petprod - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) Consumption Countries outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) drove increases in global demand for petroleum products in recent years. In aggregate, non-OECD countries consumed more petroleum products than OECD countries for the first time in 2014. Global distillate consumption tends to rise as developing countries show robust economic growth because their economies tend to be driven by industry and manufacturing rather than services.

  4. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models: Results for the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. B.; Riley, W. T.; Best, D. R.

    2015-09-03

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  5. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. B.; Best, D. R.

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  6. The breaks and the hidden components in the power-law spectra of synchrotron radiation of the self-consistent current structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocharovsky, V. V.; Kocharovsky, VI. V.; Tarasov, S. V.; Martyanov, V. Ju.

    2015-08-15

    Widespread use of a broken-power-law description of the spectra of synchrotron emission of various plasma objects requires an analysis of origin and a proper interpretation of spectral components. We show that, for a self-consistent magnetic configuration in a collisionless plasma, these components may be angle-dependent according to an anisotropic particle momentum distribution and may have no counterparts in a particle energy distribution. That has never been studied analytically and is in contrast to a usual model of synchrotron radiation, assuming an external magnetic field and a particle ensemble with isotropic momentum distribution. We demonstrate that for the wide intervals of observation angle the power-law spectra and, in particular, the positions and number of spectral breaks may be essentially different for the cases of the self-consistent and not-self-consistent magnetic fields in current structures responsible for the synchrotron radiation of the ensembles of relativistic particles with the multi-power-law energy distributions.

  7. The distribution of the major economies’ effort in the Durban platform scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; Jewell, Jessica; Kober, Tom; Lucas, Paul; Luderer, Gunnar; McCollum, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of achieving climate stabilization consistent with the objective of 2C is heavily influenced by how the effort in terms of mitigation and economic resources will be distributed among the major economies. This paper provides a multi-model quantifications of the mitigation commitment in ten major regions of the world for a diversity of allocation schemes. Our results indicate that a stylized policy with uniform carbon pricing and no transfer payments would yield an uneven distribution of policy costs, which would be lower, higher and significantly higher than the average for the OECD, developing economies and energy exporters respectively. We show that resource sharing burden sharing schemes would not resolve the issue of cost distribution. An effort sharing scheme which equalizes policy costs would yield an allocation of allowances in line with the aspirational targets of the OECD countries, and which would peak before 2030 for China. In all cases, a large international carbon market would emerge.

  8. International petroleum statistics report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992: and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  9. International petroleum statistics report, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  10. Program development fund: FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    It is the objective of the Fund to encourage innovative research to maintain the Laboratory's position at the forefront of science. Funds are used to explore new ideas and concepts that may potentially develop into new directions of research for the Laboratory and that are consistent with the major needs, overall goals, and mission of the Laboratory and the DOE. The types of projects eligible for support from PDF include: work in forefront areas of science and technology for the primary purpose of enriching Laboratory research and development capabilities; advanced study of new hypotheses, new experimental concepts, or innovative approaches to energy problems; experiments directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of a new concept; and conception, design analyses, and development of experimental devices, instruments, or components. This report is a review of these research programs.