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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Incorporating UCD into the software development lifecycle: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study addresses how we applied user centered design (UCD) to the software development lifecycle for the new City of Austin Utilities Online Customer Care website. The case study focuses on the use of personas, prototypes, and user testing, ... Keywords: personas, prototypes, simulations, ucd, usability, user centered design, user experience

Andy Switzky

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

3

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lifecycle Assessment (LCA) is undergoing a period of rapid change as it strives to become more policy-relevant. Attributional LCA, the traditional LCA category, is beginning (more)

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Lifecycle of Bayesian Network Models Developed for Multi-Source Signature Assessment of Nuclear Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multi-Source Signatures for Nuclear Programs project, part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNL) Signature Discovery Initiative, seeks to computationally capture expert assessment of multi-type information such as text, sensor output, imagery, or audio/video files, to assess nuclear activities through a series of Bayesian network (BN) models. These models incorporate knowledge from a diverse range of information sources in order to help assess a countrys nuclear activities. The models span engineering topic areas, state-level indicators, and facility-specific characteristics. To illustrate the development, calibration, and use of BN models for multi-source assessment, we present a model that predicts a countrys likelihood to participate in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. We validate this model by examining the extent to which the model assists non-experts arrive at conclusions similar to those provided by nuclear proliferation experts. We also describe the PNNL-developed software used throughout the lifecycle of the Bayesian network model development.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sego, Landon H.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

5

Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses Jump to: navigation, search The National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs lifecycle and technoeconomic analyses to promote sustainable energy development. Conducting full life-cycle assessments for biomass products, including electricity, biodiesel, and ethanol, is important for determining environmental benefits. NREL analysts use a life-cycle inventory modeling package and supporting databases to conduct life-cycle assessments. These tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Integrated system analyses, technoeconomic analyses, life-cycle assessments (LCAs), and other analysis tools are essential to our research and development efforts. They provide an understanding of the economic,

6

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graboski analyzes lifecycle fossil energy use only. ) Notanalyzes lifecycle fossil energy use only. ) Analysis of2003). M. S. Graboski, Fossil Energy Use in the Manufacture

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be citedLIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may belifecycle analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

El Hanandeh, Ali, E-mail: alel5804@uni.sydney.edu.a [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); El-Zein, Abbas [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

10

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid wastes: Development of the WASTED model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of the Waste Analysis Software Tool for Environmental Decisions (WASTED) model. This model provides a comprehensive view of the environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management systems. The model consists of a number of separate submodels that describe a typical waste management process: waste collection, material recovery, composting, energy recovery from waste and landfilling. These submodels are combined to represent a complete waste management system. WASTED uses compensatory systems to account for the avoided environmental impacts derived from energy recovery and material recycling. The model is designed to provide solid waste decision-makers and environmental researchers with a tool to evaluate waste management plans and to improve the environmental performance of solid waste management strategies. The model is user-friendly and compares favourably with other earlier models.

Diaz, R. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Warith, M. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)]. E-mail: mwarith@ryerson.ca

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Balances for a Range of Biofuel Options, Project Number8. F UELCYCLE EMISSIONS FOR BIOFUEL VEHICLES IN DIFFERENTch. and LEM % ch. For a few biofuel lifecycles there can be

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Lifecycle building card: toward paperless and visual lifecycle management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel vision of paperless and visual lifecycle building management tools based on the coupling between Building Information Models (BIM) and Augmented Reality (AR) called Lifecycle Building Card. As the use of BIM increases within ... Keywords: augmented reality, building information model, building lifecycle, visual simulation

Holger Graf; Souheil Soubra; Guillaume Picinbono; Ian Keough; Alex Tessier; Azam Khan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis September 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new, free online tool developed by a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory allows users to customize and analyze the environmental impact of various fuels before they are used to create power. Information from the Excel™-based Upstream Dashboard - developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) - can be used with other data or models to build an emissions inventory of various feedstocks as part of a comprehensive lifecycle analysis of the fuels. Lifecycle analysis is a new and innovative way to analyze and compare different pathways for producing power and transportation fuels.

14

New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis September 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new, free online tool developed by a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory allows users to customize and analyze the environmental impact of various fuels before they are used to create power. Information from the Excel™-based Upstream Dashboard - developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) - can be used with other data or models to build an emissions inventory of various feedstocks as part of a comprehensive lifecycle analysis of the fuels. Lifecycle analysis is a new and innovative way to analyze and compare different pathways for producing power and transportation fuels.

15

Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (??target area?), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

J. Daniel Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

17

Quantifying Security in Secure Software Development Phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Secure software is crucial in todays software dependent world. However, most of the time, security is not addressed from the very beginning of a software development life cycle (SDLC), and it is only incorporated after the software has been developed. ...

Muhammad Umair Ahmed Khan; Mohammad Zulkernine

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

19

UMLtrust: towards developing trust-aware software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As users in software systems depend on each other for achieving goals, performing tasks, and utilizing resources, the trust relationships in the systems need to be considered to identify the opportunities and vulnerabilities these relationships bring. ... Keywords: software development life cycle (SDLC), trust scenario, unified modeling language (UML)

Mohammad Gias Uddin; Mohammad Zulkernine

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reflecting on ontologies: towards ontology-based agent-oriented software engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Ontology" in association with "software engineering" is becoming commonplace. This paper argues for the need to place ontologies at the centre of the software development lifecycle for multi agent systems to enhance reuse of software workproducts as ... Keywords: agents, multi agent systems (MAS), ontologies, services, software development lifecycle (SDLC)

Ghassan Beydoun; Brian Henderson-Sellers; Jun Shen; Graham Low

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Lifecycle Energy Balance The fossil "energy balance" of ethanol has been the subject of debate despite the fact that this metric is not as useful to policymakers as

23

Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on Linking Transformational Materials and Processing for Energy and ... LIFECYCLE ANALYSIS, GREEN HOUSE GASES, AND CLIMATE CHANGE...

24

DOE G 200  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

G 200.1-1A G 200.1-1A Department of Energy (DOE) Systems Engineering Methodology Version 3 The DOE Systems Development Lifecycle (SDLC) for Information Technology Investments September 2002 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Chief Information Officer Date: September 2002 Page Rev Date: i TITLE PAGE Document Name: Department of Energy Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM) The DOE Systems Development Lifecycle (SDLC) for Information Technology Investments Publication Date: Original March 1996; Revised November 1997 Version 2 March 1999 Version 3 September 2002 Approval: ___________________________________ Karen Evans, Chief Information Officer ___________________________________ Brenda Coblentz, Program Manager, Software Quality & Systems Engineering

25

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

26

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Roles and Lifecycle | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roles and Lifecycle Roles and Lifecycle Roles and Lifecycle Employee Property Responsibilities by Role Director, Office of Administration The Director, Office of Administration, has the following responsibilities: *Establish a personal property management program for DOE Headquarters, except for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC); *Appoint an Organizational Property Management Officer (OPMO) who is responsible for the Headquarters personal property management program; and *Approve, conditionally approve, or disapprove contractor property management systems for all DOE direct operations at Headquarters except for the FERC. Organizational Property Management Officer (OPMO) The OPMO has the following primary responsibilities: *Manage the control, management, and disposal of personal property in the

28

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

Modeling and visualization of lifecycle building performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lifecycle building performance assessment (LBPA) ensures that buildings perform and operate as intended during building lifecycle. Such assessment activities are typically multi-phase and multi-disciplinary, and generate large amounts of information ...

Ipek Gursel; Sevil Sariyildiz; mer Akin; Rudi Stouffs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Ficks second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Life-Cycle Analysis Process Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Example of a life-cycle inventory for an unspecified product...70 Nontoxic chemicals 2,000 Water effluents, mg COD 1,000 BOD 150 Acid, as H + 75 Nitrates 5 Metals 300 Ammonium ions 5 Chloride ions 120 Dissolved organics 20 Suspended solids 400 Oil 100 Hydrocarbons 100 Phenol 1 Dissolved solids 400 Phosphate 5 Other nitrogen 10 Sulfate ions 10 COD, chemical...

33

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle Net Energy Balance Designated a 'Hot' Article by Journal Photoelectrochemical hydrogen technology LCA analysis July...

34

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.) How will future transportation energy production impact water resource availability in the US? b.)...

35

Vehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions of future transportation modes. These resultsVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycleVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

secure software providing independent testing, monitoring, and control of energy control system component operation Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection More Documents...

37

Life-Cycle Decision Making: Volume 1: Getting Started  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Decision Making (LCDM) 2.0 is a suite of integrated tools for making a wide range of decisions based on life-cycle costs and revenues. LCDM puts powerful methods and tools at the fingertips of employees, empowering them to quickly make better day-to-day business decisions based on the true costs and benefits to the company.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Metracker version 1.5: Life-cycle performance metricstracking  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage, nor even as measured during commissioning and maintenance operations. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. A key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended and actual performance of a building. This deficiency leads to several shortcomings in the life-cycle management of building information. Planners have no means of clearly specifying their expectations. Designers do not concisely document their design intent. Commissioning personnel have no standardized method for documenting the results of performance testing. Post-occupancy building performance cannot readily be compared to expectations in an attempt to evaluate and improve design and operation decisions. Lastly, without quantification of the magnitude of performance problems it is difficult to motivate building process participants to alter their current practice. This document describes an information management concept and a prototype tool based on this concept that has been developed to address this situation. The Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) has been designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. Metracker is a prototype implementation of BLISS based on the International Alliance for Interoperability's (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). The IFC is an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations (IAI, 2001). Metracker has been developed to demonstrate and explore the process of tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle.

Hitchcock, Robert J.

2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Comparing Life-Cycle Costs of ESPCs and Appropriations-Funded Energy Projects: An Update to the 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect

A study was sponsored by FEMP in 2001 - 2002 to develop methods to compare life-cycle costs of federal energy conservation projects carried out through energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and projects that are directly funded by appropriations. The study described in this report follows up on the original work, taking advantage of new pricing data on equipment and on $500 million worth of Super ESPC projects awarded since the end of FY 2001. The methods developed to compare life-cycle costs of ESPCs and directly funded energy projects are based on the following tasks: (1) Verify the parity of equipment prices in ESPC vs. directly funded projects; (2) Develop a representative energy conservation project; (3) Determine representative cycle times for both ESPCs and appropriations-funded projects; (4) Model the representative energy project implemented through an ESPC and through appropriations funding; and (5) Calculate the life-cycle costs for each project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT ENHANCED MISSION PLANNING THROUGH INNOVATIVE TOOLS LIFECYCLE COST MODELING AND AQUEOUS THERMODYNAMIC MODELING - 12134  

SciTech Connect

Two notable modeling efforts within the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) are currently underway to (1) increase the robustness of the underlying chemistry approximations through the development and implementation of an aqueous thermodynamic model, and (2) add enhanced planning capabilities to the HTWOS model through development and incorporation of the lifecycle cost model (LCM). Since even seemingly small changes in apparent waste composition or treatment parameters can result in large changes in quantities of high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass, mission duration or lifecycle cost, a solubility model that more accurately depicts the phases and concentrations of constituents in tank waste is required. The LCM enables evaluation of the interactions of proposed changes on lifecycle mission costs, which is critical for decision makers.

PIERSON KL; MEINERT FL

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Title Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Masanet, Eric R., Yuan Chang, Anand R. Gopal, Peter H. Larsen, William R. Morrow, Roger Sathre, Arman Shehabi, and Pei Zhai Journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources Volume 38 Date Published 2013 Keywords electricity, energy policy, environmental analysis, life-cycle impact, life-cycle inventory Abstract The application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to electric power (EP) technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts. While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use, LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life-cycle energy, GHG emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water use implications of EP technologies. With continued progress, LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically-thorough and environmentally-holistic manner for more robust deployment decisions. This article summarizes: (1) major challenges in applying LCA to EP technologies thus far, (2) LCA results to date on the various impacts of EP technologies, and (3) opportunities for improving LCAs as applied to EP technologies moving forward.

42

Economics of Lifecycle Analysis and Greenhouse Gas Regulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepak Rajagopal Date: May 28, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Unlike with conventional fossil fuels, lifecycle GHG emissions from energy sources such as biofuels, batteries, oil...

43

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Anita...

44

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Program on Technology Innovation: An Optimization Approach for Life-Cycle Management Applied to Large Power Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results and insights from a study of the life-cycle management (LCM) of main transformers at Constellation Energy Nuclear Group's (CENG's) five nuclear power plants. The study used two asset management (AM) tools developed by Electricit de France (EDF).

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

The principles of life-cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Decisionmakers representing government agencies must balance competing objectives when deciding on the purchase and sale of assets. The goal in all cases should be to make prudent or financially {open_quotes}cost-effective{close_quotes} decisions. That is, the revenues from the purchase or sale of assets should exceed any out-of-pocket costs to obtain the revenues. However, effects external to these financial considerations such as promoting environmental quality, creating or maintaining jobs, and abiding by existing regulations should also be considered in the decisionmaking process. In this paper, we outline the principles of life-cycle analysis (LCA), a framework that allows decisionmakers to make informed, balanced choices over the period of time affected by the decision, taking into account important external effects. Specifically, LCA contains three levels of analysis for any option: (1) direct financial benefits (revenues) and out-of-pocket costs for a course of action; (2) environmental and health consequences of a decision; and (3) other economic and socio-institutional effects. Because some of the components of LCA are difficult to value in monetary terms, the outcome of the LCA process is not generally a yes-no answer. However, the framework allows the decisionmaker to at least qualitatively consider all relevant factors in analyzing options, promoting sound decisionmaking in the process.

Hill, L.J.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Curlee, T.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Life-cycle of Operons  

SciTech Connect

Operons are a major feature of all prokaryotic genomes, but how and why operon structures vary is not well understood. To elucidate the life-cycle of operons, we compared gene order between Escherichia coli K12 and its relatives and identified the recently formed and destroyed operons in E. coli. This allowed us to determine how operons form, how they become closely spaced, and how they die. Our findings suggest that operon evolution is driven by selection on gene expression patterns. First, both operon creation and operon destruction lead to large changes in gene expression patterns. For example, the removal of lysA and ruvA from ancestral operons that contained essential genes allowed their expression to respond to lysine levels and DNA damage, respectively. Second, some operons have undergone accelerated evolution, with multiple new genes being added during a brief period. Third, although most operons are closely spaced because of a neutral bias towards deletion and because of selection against large overlaps, highly expressed operons tend to be widely spaced because of regulatory fine-tuning by intervening sequences. Although operon evolution seems to be adaptive, it need not be optimal: new operons often comprise functionally unrelated genes that were already in proximity before the operon formed.

Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

48

Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

Gaines, L.

1998-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmenta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and...

51

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

52

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

54

Information Resources: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL alternatives. The reports for Parts 1 and 2 were published in February 2012 and June 2012, respectively, providing a literature review and life-cycle assessment (LCA) for lamps utilizing these three light source technologies. Presenters Jason Tuenge of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Brad Hollomon of Compa Industries focused on findings from Part 3, which augments the LCA results with chemical analysis of a variety of lamps using standard testing procedures from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of California. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different lamps, were tested to ascertain whether potentially toxic elements are present in concentrations that exceed regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste.

55

Totally green: evaluating and designing servers for lifecycle environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental impact of servers and datacenters is an important future challenge. System architects have traditionally focused on operational energy as a proxy for designing green servers, but this ignores important environmental implications from ... Keywords: datacenter design, dematerialization, disaggregation, environmental sustainability, exergy, green computing, lifecycle impact, server architecture

Jichuan Chang; Justin Meza; Parthasarathy Ranganathan; Amip Shah; Rocky Shih; Cullen Bash

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovcs; S. Kopcsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Life-cycle cost analysis project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to demonstrate the impact of life-cycle costing in Ohio's residential building sector. Typical single-family, townhouse, and multifamily housing units were modeled using sophisticated computer programs to predict annual energy comsumption. Energy conservation techniques were applied to the typical units and the resulting utility savings were computed. Installed costs were estimated for each energy conservation technique.

Davies, G.R.; Temming, S.J.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interest group lifecycles and recreational fishing: an exploratory study in the evolution of two sport fishing groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is a comparative, exploratory case study of the evolution of the Sport Fishing Institute and the Coastal Conservation Association. The study details the life histories of these two recreational fishing interest groups in order that it may be seen how interest groups change and why they do so. Initial propositions suggest there are three developmental stages in the lifecycle of an interest group. Additionally, there are eight variables of change that are characteristic of each stage. These variables may be used to classify the interest group according to its developmental stage. Finally, it is suggested that these changes are part of a general and predictable pattern in the interest group's lifecycle. Data for the study was obtained over a two year period through document search and extensive interviews with key informants, both inside and outside the organizations. Findings of the study indicate that there are three stages of development in these interest group's lifecycles. The stages are; nascent, developing, and mature. Data indicates that the Sport Fishing Institute has evolved to the mature stage, while the Coastal Conservation Association is in the developing stage. Characteristics of each stage are defined, as are the circumstances necessary for movement from one stage to another and the common problems faced by most interest groups.

Faulkner, Kelly Patrice

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Performance metrics and life-cycle information management for building performance assurance  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for over $85 billion per year in energy costs, which is far more energy than technically necessary. One of the primary reasons buildings do not perform as well as intended is that critical information is lost, through ineffective documentation and communication, leading to building systems that are often improperly installed and operated. A life-cycle perspective on the management of building information provides a framework for improving commercial building energy performance. This paper describes a project to develop strategies and techniques to provide decision-makers with information needed to assure the desired building performance across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element in this effort is the development of explicit performance metrics that quantitatively represent performance objectives of interest to various building stakeholders. The paper begins with a discussion of key problems identified in current building industry practice, and ongoing work to address these problems. The paper then focuses on the concept of performance metrics and their use in improving building performance during design, commissioning, and on-going operations. The design of a Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) is presented. BLISS is intended to provide an information infrastructure capable of integrating a variety of building information technologies that support performance assurance. The use of performance metrics in case study building projects is explored to illustrate current best practice. The application of integrated information technology for improving current practice is discussed.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An approach to developing user interfaces for space systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inherent weakness in the traditional waterfall model of software development has led to the definition of the spiral model. The spiral model software development lifecycle model

Keith Shackelford; Karen McKinney

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Velocity of Money in a Life-Cycle Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determinants of the velocity of money have been examined based on life-cycle hypothesis. The velocity of money can be expressed by reciprocal of the average value of holding time which is defined as interval between participating exchanges for one unit of money. This expression indicates that the velocity is governed by behavior patterns of economic agents and open a way to constructing micro-foundation of it. It is found that time pattern of income and expense for a representative individual can be obtained from a simple version of life-cycle model, and average holding time of money resulted from the individual's optimal choice depends on the expected length of relevant planning periods.

Wang, Y; Wang, Yougui; Qiu, Hanqing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Eric Masanet, 1 Yuan Chang, 1 Anand R. Gopal, 2 Peter Larsen, 2,3 William R. Morrow III, 2 Roger Sathre, 2 Arman Shehabi, 2 and Pei Zhai 2 1 McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; email: eric.masanet@northwestern.edu, yuan.chang@northwestern.edu 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720; email: argopal@lbl.gov, wrmorrow@lbl.gov, rsathre@lbl.gov, ashehabi@lbl.gov, pzhai@lbl.gov 3 Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: phlarsen@lbl.gov Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2013. 38:107-36 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 7, 2013 The Annual Review of Environment and Resources is online at http://environ.annualreviews.org

67

Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implicaitons of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Simulated with the GREET Model  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implications of Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implications of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Simulated with the GREET Model Michael Wang*, May Wu, Hong Huo and Jiahong Liu Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. *Contact author: Tel: +1 (630) 252 2819 Fax: +1 (630) 252 3443 Email: mqwang@anl.gov In International Sugar Journal 2008, Vol. 110, No. 1317 ABSTRACT By using data available in the open literature, we expanded the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne National Laboratory to include Brazilian-grown sugarcane ethanol. With the expanded GREET model, we examined the well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and

68

MARVEL: A PC-based interactive software package for life-cycle evaluations of hybrid/electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

As a life-cycle analysis tool, MARVEL has been developed for the evaluation of hybrid/electric vehicle systems. It can identify the optimal combination of battery and heat engine characteristics for different vehicle types and performance requirements, on the basis of either life-cycle cost or fuel efficiency. Battery models that allow trade-offs between specific power and specific energy, between cycle life and depth of discharge, between peak power and depth of discharge, and between other parameters, are included in the software. A parallel hybrid configuration, using an internal combustion engine and a battery as the power sources, can be simulated with a user-specified energy management strategy. The PC-based software package can also be used for cost or fuel efficiency comparisons among conventional, electric, and hybrid vehicles.

Marr, W.W.; He, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Food and Agriculture - Biofuels: Prospects, risks andand D. Zilberman. Are Biofuels the Culprit: OPEC, Food, andmodel. In Symposium on Biofuels in Developing Countries:

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Product lifecycle management (PLM) to support product development processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today manufacturing companies are more and more characterized by a growing product and processes complexity. Projects needs the participation of a pool of companies that have to collaborate in a multidisciplinary and integrated way following a defined ...

Marco Alemanni; Danilo Cannoletta; Pierpaolo Gambini; Mauro Macci; Davide Pinna

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Title Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Publication Type...

73

Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle Analysis Electric Vehicles and the Environment...

74

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P.C. Sernia and G.R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P, vehicle driving range, battery pack lifetime, and potential reductions in system lifecycle cost costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle operation

Walker, Geoff

75

TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.  

SciTech Connect

Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Heroux, Michael Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Characterization of EGS Fracture Network Lifecycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is relatively clean, and is an important non-hydrocarbon source of energy. It can potentially reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and contribute to reduction in carbon emissions. High-temperature geothermal areas can be used for electricity generation if they contain permeable reservoirs of hot water or steam that can be extracted. The biggest challenge to achieving the full potential of the nations resources of this kind is maintaining and creating the fracture networks required for the circulation, heating, and extraction of hot fluids. The fundamental objective of the present research was to understand how fracture networks are created in hydraulic borehole injection experiments, and how they subsequently evolve. When high-pressure fluids are injected into boreholes in geothermal areas, they flow into hot rock at depth inducing thermal cracking and activating critically stressed pre-existing faults. This causes earthquake activity which, if monitored, can provide information on the locations of the cracks formed, their time-development and the type of cracking underway, e.g., whether shear movement on faults occurred or whether cracks opened up. Ultimately it may be possible to monitor the critical earthquake parameters in near-real-time so the information can be used to guide the hydraulic injection while it is in progress, e.g., how to adjust factors such as injectate pressure, volume and temperature. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to mature analysis techniques and software that were, at the start of this project, in an embryonic developmental state. Task 1 of the present project was to develop state-of-the-art techniques and software for calculating highly accurate earthquake locations, earthquake source mechanisms (moment tensors) and temporal changes in reservoir structure. Task 2 was to apply the new techniques to hydrofracturing (Enhanced Geothermal Systems, or EGS) experiments performed at the Coso geothermal field, in order to enhance productivity there. Task 3 was to interpret the results jointly with other geological information in order to provide a consistent physical model. All of the original goals of the project have been achieved. An existing program for calculating accurate relative earthquake locations has been enhanced by a technique to improve the accuracy of earthquake arrival-time measurements using waveform cross-correlation. Error analysis has been added to pre-existing moment tensor software. New seismic tomography software has been written to calculate changes in structure that could be due, for example, to reservoir depletion. Data processing procedures have been streamlined and web tools developed for rapid dissemination of the results, e.g., to on-site operations staff. Application of the new analysis tools to the Coso geothermal field has demonstrated the effective use of the techniques and provided important case histories to guide the style of future applications. Changes in reservoir structure with time are imaged throughout the upper 3 km, identifying the areas where large volumes of fluid are being extracted. EGS hydrofracturing experiments in two wells stimulated a nearby fault to the south that ruptured from south to north. The position of this fault could be precisely mapped and its existence was confirmed by surface mapping and data from a borehole televiewer log. No earthquakes occurred far north of the injection wells, suggesting that the wells lie near the northern boundary of the region of critically stressed faults. Minor en-echelon faults were also activated. Significant across-strike fluid flow occurred. The faults activated had significant crack-opening components, indicating that the hydraulic fracturing created open cavities at depth. The fluid injection changed the local stress field orientation and thus the mode of failure was different from the normal background. Initial indications are that the injections modulated stress release, seismicity and natural fracture system evolution for periods of up to months. The research demon

Gillian R. Foulger

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Implementing data security in student lifecycle management system at the university of Prishtina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper is presented a novel approach for fulfilling the data security criteria in a Student Lifecycle Management System at the University of Prishtina. The four main criteria of data security such as: privacy, authentication, integrity and non-repudiation ... Keywords: X.509 certificate, authentication, digital signature, non-repudiation, privacy, security, smart cards, student lifecycle management

Blerim Rexha; Haxhi Lajqi; Myzafere Limani

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Experiences with early life-cycle performance modeling for architecture assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our preliminary experiences of a performance modeling "Blending" approach for early life-cycle architecture assessment and risk mitigation in a large enterprise integration project. The goal was to use performance modeling to ... Keywords: blended performance modeling, early life-cycle risk mitigation

Paul C. Brebner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Year 2006 UCD-ITS-RR-06-08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Year 2006 UCD-ITS-RR-06-08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be cited as draft://its.ucdavis.edu/ #12;DRAFT WORKING MANUSCRIPT LIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may be cited as draft analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has three major parts: I. An analysis of greenhouse

Delucchi, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

82

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Water Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of Administration Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings and substantial

84

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the lifecycle of gasoline: crude oil recovery, petroleummaterials are input to the crude-oil recovery process, whichresults in an output of crude oil. This crude oil output is

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the lifecycle of gasoline: crude oil recovery, petroleummaterials are input to the crude-oil recovery process, whichresults in an output of crude oil. This crude oil output is

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Overhead Transmission Lines (LCCA) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LCCA software is a tool to assist transmission line designers in selecting the optimized design for an overhead line by comparing the life-cycle cost of various design options. Windows2000, XP, and Vista Excel 2003 and 2007

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

144 Figure 63: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Life-Cycle157 Figure 64: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Water68 Table 14: Hydroelectricity-Related FWSE (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

89

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alternative 2. Federal Life-Cycle Cost Criteria (a) Discount rate (b) DOE energy price escalation rates (c) Use of constant dollars (d) Study period (e) Presumption of cost...

90

Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative...

91

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S....

92

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing life-cycle cost analyses of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects in federal facilities.

93

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D....

95

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 (Rev. 510) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special...

96

Literature Review and Sensitivity Analysis of Biopower Life-Cycle Assessments and Greenhouse Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolios for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopowers life-cycle GHG emissions has been published.Phase A of this project performed an exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielding 117 references that ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Survey of life-cycle measures and metrics for concurrent product and process design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concurrent Engineering needs a series of measures (or measurement criteria) that are distinct to each process, and a set of metrics to check (and validate) the outcome when two or more of the life-cycle processes are overlapped or required to be executed ... Keywords: Concurrent Engineering, Knowledge-based Systems, Life-cycle Measures and Metrics, Rule-based Optimization, Rule-based Simulation

Biren Prasad

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

State of the Science of Biopower Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolio for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower's life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has been published. An exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielded 117 references that passed quality and relevance screening criteria. ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Market disruption, cascading effects, and economic recovery:a life-cycle hypothesis model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper builds upon previous work [Sprigg and Ehlen, 2004] by introducing a bond market into a model of production and employment. The previous paper described an economy in which households choose whether to enter the labor and product markets based on wages and prices. Firms experiment with prices and employment levels to maximize their profits. We developed agent-based simulations using Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate that multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment, but also suffer from market noise stemming from consumer churn. In this paper we introduce a bond market as a mechanism for household savings. We simulate an economy of continuous overlapping generations in which each household grows older in the course of the simulation and continually revises its target level of savings according to a life-cycle hypothesis. Households can seek employment, earn income, purchase goods, and contribute to savings until they reach the mandatory retirement age; upon retirement households must draw from savings in order to purchase goods. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous convergence of product, labor, and savings markets to their calculated equilibria, and simulates how a disruption to a productive sector will create cascading effects in all markets. Subsequent work will use similar models to simulate how disruptions, such as terrorist attacks, would interplay with consumer confidence to affect financial markets and the broader economy.

Sprigg, James A.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gases are emitted throughout the production lifecycle, during "uranium mining (open pit and underground), milling, conversion, enrich- ment (diffusion and centrifuge),

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A building life-cycle information system for tracking building performance metrics  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. One key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended performance of a building. This paper describes the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS); designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. BLISS is based on the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability. A BLISS extension to th e IFC that adds classes for building performance metrics is described. Metracker, a prototype tool for tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle, is presented.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2005 April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-26 (Rev. 9/11) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program September 2011 NISTIR 85-3273-26 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

103

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

104

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 (Rev. 5/10) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 May 2010 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

105

Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol Anand R Gopal1,4,6 and Daniel M Kammen1,2,3,5 1 Energy lifecycle results of the existing GREET model for Brazilian ethanol to derive lifecycle greenhouse gas this in regulation. Keywords: LCA, biofuels, sugarcane ethanol, greenhouse gas emissions, GREET 6 Corresponding

Kammen, Daniel M.

106

DOE Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM): Stage Exit V3 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(SDLC) used for information systems developed and maintained for the Department Of Energy DOE Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM): Stage Exit V3 More Documents &...

107

Glass Composition Constraint Recommendations for Use in Life-Cycle Mission Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The component concentration limits that most influence the predicted Hanford life-cycle HLW glass volume by HTWOS were re-evaluated. It was assumed that additional research and development work in glass formulation and melter testing would be performed to improve the understanding of component effects on the processability and product quality of these HLW glasses. Recommendations were made to better estimate the potential component concentration limits that could be applied today while technology development is underway to best estimate the volume of HLW glass that will eventually be produced at Hanford. The limits for concentrations of P2O5, Bi2O3, and SO3 were evaluated along with the constraint used to avoid nepheline formation in glass. Recommended concentration limits were made based on the current HLW glass property models being used by HTWOS (Vienna et al. 2009). These revised limits are: 1) The current ND should be augmented by the OB limit of OB ? 0.575 so that either the normalized silica (NSi) is less that the 62% limit or the OB is below the 0.575 limit. 2) The mass fraction of P2O5 limit should be revised to allow for up to 4.5 wt%, depending on CaO concentrations. 3) A Bi2O3 concentration limit of 7 wt% should be used. 4) The salt accumulation limit of 0.5 wt% SO3 may be increased to 0.6 wt%. Again, these revised limits do not obviate the need for further testing, but make it possible to more accurately predict the impact of that testing on ultimate HLW glass volumes.

McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

Stanford University

110

A review of battery life-cycle analysis : state of knowledge and critical needs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature review and evaluation has been conducted on cradle-to-gate life-cycle inventory studies of lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, and lithium-ion battery technologies. Data were sought that represent the production of battery constituent materials and battery manufacture and assembly. Life-cycle production data for many battery materials are available and usable, though some need updating. For the remaining battery materials, lifecycle data either are nonexistent or, in some cases, in need of updating. Although battery manufacturing processes have occasionally been well described, detailed quantitative information on energy and material flows is missing. For all but the lithium-ion batteries, enough constituent material production energy data are available to approximate material production energies for the batteries, though improved input data for some materials are needed. Due to the potential benefit of battery recycling and a scarcity of associated data, there is a critical need for life-cycle data on battery material recycling. Either on a per kilogram or per watt-hour capacity basis, lead-acid batteries have the lowest production energy, carbon dioxide emissions, and criteria pollutant emissions. Some process-related emissions are also reviewed in this report.

Sullivan, J. L.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

APPENDIX A: ENERGY USE AND EMISSIONS FROM THE LIFECYCLE OF DIESEL-LIKE FUELS DERIVED FROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho, 83209-8007, U.S.A. (e-mail: smitrose@isu.edu). #12 Committee, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho. References Anderson, R.S., and Peck, S.B. 1985 and reporting life-cycle duration in insects and arachnids. Eur. J. Entomol. 97: 285­303. Eggert, A

Delucchi, Mark

112

Exploring decisions' influence on life-cycle performance to aid design for Multi-X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem addressed in this paper is that design decisions can have a propagation effect spanning multiple life-phases influencing life-cycle metrics such as cost, time, and quality. It introduces a computational framework of a Knowledge of ... Keywords: Concurrent Synthesis, DFX, KICAD, Knowledge Modelling, Providence

Jonathan C. Borg; Xiu-Tian Yan; Neal P. Juster

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Management of lifecycle costs and benefits: Lessons from information systems practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the economic feasibility of information systems (IS) projects and operations remains a challenge for most organizations. This research investigates lifecycle cost and benefit management practices and demonstrates that, overall, although organizations ... Keywords: IT governance, IT value, Information management, Information system evaluation, Information system value

Egon Berghout; Menno Nijland; Philip Powell

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital investment projects for federal facilities. It also provides energy price indices based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts from 2012 to 2042.

115

Documenting performance metrics in a building life-cycle information system  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a new generation of green buildings, it will be necessary to clearly identify their performance requirements, and to assure that these requirements are met. A long-term goal is to provide building decision-makers with the information and tools needed to cost-effectively assure the desired performance of buildings, as specified by stakeholders, across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element required in achieving this goal is a method for explicitly documenting the building performance objectives that are of importance to stakeholders. Such a method should clearly define each objective (e.g., cost, energy use, and comfort) and its desired level of performance. This information is intended to provide quantitative benchmarks useful in evaluating alternative design solutions, commissioning the newly constructed building, and tracking and maintaining the actual performance of the occupied building over time. These quantitative benchmarks are referred to as performance metrics, and they are a principal element of information captured in the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS). An initial implementation of BLISS is based on the International Alliance for Interoperability`s (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations. Within BLISS, the IFC data model has been extended to include performance metrics and a structure for archiving changing versions of the building information over time. This paper defines performance metrics, discusses the manner in which BLISS is envisioned to support a variety of activities related to assuring the desired performance of a building across its life cycle, and describes a performance metric tracking tool, called Metracker, that is based on BLISS.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coal- or natural gas-fired power plants occur "up-of natural gas is lost before reaching the power plant." 30power plant. Yet, when it comes to upstream emissions, the lifecycle for natural gas

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Incorporating the Effect of Price Changes on CO2-Equivalent Emissions From Alternative-Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping the Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solids produced by corn-to-ethanol plants) Coproducts ofCoproducts of the corn-to-ethanol background GHG emissionsimpact on LCGE in the corn-to-ethanol lifecycle. In the

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

INCORPORATING THE EFFECT OF PRICE CHANGES ON CO2- EQUIVALENT EMSSIONS FROM ALTERNATIVE-FUEL LIFECYCLES: SCOPING THE ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solids produced by corn-to-ethanol plants) Coproducts ofCoproducts of the corn-to-ethanol background GHG emissionsimpact on LCGE in the corn-to-ethanol lifecycle. In the

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to close the gap on unregulated greenhouse gas emissions.a higher lifecycle greenhouse gas content than conventionalIN- FORMATION ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONs AssocIATEIDn wrri

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Review of Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs ANL/ESD/10-7 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

122

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-27 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27

123

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

124

LBNL-54244 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 44 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Greg Rosenquist, Katie Coughlin, Larry Dale, James McMahon, Steve Meyers Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 March 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ii iii ABSTRACT This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results

125

Step 6: Complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: Complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle 6: Complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why design to earn ENERGY STAR Design to earn ENERGY STAR Step 1: Include efficiency in your project specs Step 2: Meet with your team and set a goal Step 3: Apply for Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR recognition Step 4: Market your project as Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR

126

Lifecycle Evaluation of Radial Flow HEPA Filters Under Upset ...  

Project Test Plan Development ... been provided by the Department of Energys Office of Environmental Management under contract number

127

Life-cycle energy analyses of electric vehicle storage batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of several life-cycle energy analyses of prospective electric vehicle batteries are presented. The batteries analyzed were: Nickel-zinc; Lead-acid; Nickel-iron; Zinc-chlorine; Sodium-sulfur (glass electrolyte); Sodium-sulfur (ceramic electrolyte); Lithium-metal sulfide; and Aluminum-air. A life-cycle energy analysis consists of evaluating the energy use of all phases of the battery's life, including the energy to build it, operate it, and any credits that may result from recycling of the materials in it. The analysis is based on the determination of three major energy components in the battery life cycle: Investment energy, i.e., The energy used to produce raw materials and to manufacture the battery; operational energy i.e., The energy consumed by the battery during its operational life. In the case of an electric vehicle battery, this energy is the energy required (as delivered to the vehicle's charging circuit) to power the vehicle for 100,000 miles; and recycling credit, i.e., The energy that could be saved from the recycling of battery materials into new raw materials. The value of the life-cycle analysis approach is that it includes the various penalties and credits associated with battery production and recycling, which enables a more accurate determination of the system's ability to reduce the consumption of scarce fuels. The analysis of the life-cycle energy requirements consists of identifying the materials from which each battery is made, evaluating the energy needed to produce these materials, evaluating the operational energy requirements, and evaluating the amount of materials that could be recycled and the energy that would be saved through recycling. Detailed descriptions of battery component materials, the energy requirements for battery production, and credits for recycling, and the operational energy for an electric vehicle, and the procedures used to determine it are discussed.

Sullivan, D; Morse, T; Patel, P; Patel, S; Bondar, J; Taylor, L

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Lifecycle Management of Protection, Control and Associated Data Acquisition Infrastructure: Challenges and R&D Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection and control technologies are experiencing fundamental and revolutionary changes. In the transition from legacy electro-mechanical relays to the state of the art digital assets, utilities are facing the emerging challenges in the life-cycle management of a highly diverse and increasingly complicated P&C infrastructure. Most installed electro-mechanical devices are aging and close to their designed life cycle; meanwhile, new generation of microprocessor relays tend to have a much ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

129

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

center in Nevada with REA250. State Nevada Objectives Develop and apply: (1) a Geologic Heat Exchanger (GHE) model, (2) a life-cycle model, and (3) a total system model. The GHE...

130

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View...

131

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Decision support for the software product line domain engineering lifecycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software product line engineering is a paradigm that advocates the reusability of software engineering assets and the rapid development of new applications for a target domain. These objectives are achieved by capturing the commonalities and variabilities ... Keywords: Domain engineering, Feature models, NLP model inference, Software product lines

Ebrahim Bagheri; Faezeh Ensan; Dragan Gasevic

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure systems are critical to a countrys prosperity. It is extremely important to manage the infrastructure systems efficiently in order to avoid wastage and to maximize benefits. Deterioration of infrastructure systems is one of the primary issues in civil engineering today. This problem has been widely acknowledged by engineering community in numerous studies. We need to evolve efficient strategies to tackle the problem of infrastructure deterioration and to efficiently operate infrastructure. In this research, we propose stochastic models to predict the process of deterioration in engineering systems and to perform life-cycle analysis (LCA) of deteriorating engineering systems. LCA has been recognized, over the years, as a highly informative tool for helping the decision making process in infrastructure management. In this research, we propose a stochastic model, SSA, to accurately predict the effect of deterioration processes in engineering systems. The SSA model addresses some of the important and ignored areas in the existing models such as the effect of deterioration on both capacity and demands of systems and accounting for different types of failures in assessing the life-span of a deteriorating system. Furthermore, this research proposes RTLCA, a renewal theory based LCA model, to predict the life-cycle performance of deteriorating systems taking into account not only the life-time reliability but also the costs associated with operating a system. In addition, this research investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge. Thereafter, the RTLCA model along with SSA model is used to study the life-cycle of an example RC bridge located in seismic regions accounting for seismic degradation. It is expected that the models proposed in this research will be helpful in better managing our infrastructure systems.

Ramesh Kumar, - 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

targets prior to the commercialization of second generation biofuels.Biofuels made from byproduct feedstocks, primarily molasses ethanol from Asia and the Caribbean, can contribute significantly to LCFS carbon intensity targets

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008). Sugarcane-based bioethanol: energy for sustainableand Second Generation Bioethanol. Technical report, Rome. [

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switchgrass Ethanol, Soy Biodiesel, and Soy Green Dieselsugarcane ethanol and soybean biodiesel were introduced into2008]. Similarly, soybean biodiesel is derived from the

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

objectives of reducing foreign oil dependence and supportingagriculture and reducing foreign oil dependence? Thisoption to reduce Indias foreign oil dependence. I find

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s cap-and-trade and its impact on electricity markets.s planned cap-and-trade program for the electricity sector [

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Criteria for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 1and Tyner, W. (2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on WorldClifford, P. (2009). Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 129. [Birur2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on World AgriculturalPolicies for Biofuel Production. Conservation Biology, 22(

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

75 My View on the use of Biofuels in Low Carbon FuelCLCAs of Byproduct-based Biofuels . . . . . . . 49 5 FullLCA GHG Emissions of Biofuels using various Co-product

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Office of Fossil EnergyWater Lifecycle Planning and Management for Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Product Treatment in a Corn Ethanol LCA. . . . . . . . . .2003). The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited. . . . -Modified GREET Pathway for Corn Ethanol. pages 173. [CARB,

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use Change for Sorghum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Land Use Consequences of Higher Sorghum Prices . . . . . .2010] ICRISAT (2010). Sorghum Yields. [Inamdar, 1994

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A cloud approach to unified lifecycle data management in architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management: Integrating BIMs and SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of data integration throughout the lifecycle of a construction project among multiple collaborative enterprises remains unsolved due to the dynamics and fragmented nature of the construction industry. This study presents a novel cloud approach ... Keywords: Building information modeling, Business social networking services, Cloud computing, Life cycle data management, Self-organisation, Version control

Yi Jiao, Yinghui Wang, Shaohua Zhang, Yin Li, Baoming Yang, Lei Yuan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Will Model-based Definition replace engineering drawings throughout the product lifecycle? A global perspective from aerospace industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model-based Definition (MBD) approach is gaining popularity in various industries. MBD represents a trend in Computer-aided Design (CAD) that promises reduced time-to-market and improved product quality. Its main goal is to improve and accelerate ... Keywords: CAD, Engineering drawing, MBD, Model-based Definition, Product lifecycle

Virgilio Quintana; Louis Rivest; Robert Pellerin; Frdrick Venne; Fawzi Kheddouci

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT:1 A LIFE-CYCLE ENERGY CASE STUDY AND ANALYSIS2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for petroleum use (from driving) and26 residential and commercial power and natural gas use infrastructure) made up 44 to 47% of the life-cycle energy demands34 tallied. Energy elasticity calculations across the neighborhoods suggest that increased population35 density and reduced residential unit size

Kockelman, Kara M.

150

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast characteristics summary. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past six years, a waste volume forecast has been collected annually from onsite and offsite generators that currently ship or are planning to ship solid waste to the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Central Waste Complex (CWC). This document provides a description of the physical waste forms, hazardous waste constituents, and radionuclides of the waste expected to be shipped to the CWC from 1996 through the remaining life cycle of the Hanford Site (assumed to extend to 2070). In previous years, forecast data has been reported for a 30-year time period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted this year to maintain consistency with FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans. This document is a companion report to two previous reports: the more detailed report on waste volumes, WHC-EP-0900, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Volume Summary and the report on expected containers, WHC-EP-0903, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Container Summary. All three documents are based on data gathered during the FY 1995 data call and verified as of January, 1996. These documents are intended to be used in conjunction with other solid waste planning documents as references for short and long-term planning of the WHC Solid Waste Disposal Division`s treatment, storage, and disposal activities over the next several decades. This document focuses on two main characteristics: the physical waste forms and hazardous waste constituents of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). The major generators for each waste category and waste characteristic are also discussed. The characteristics of low-level waste (LLW) are described in Appendix A. In addition, information on radionuclides present in the waste is provided in Appendix B. The FY 1996 forecast data indicate that about 100,900 cubic meters of LLMW and TRU(M) waste is expected to be received at the CWC over the remaining life cycle of the site. Based on ranges provided by the waste generators, this baseline volume could fluctuate between a minimum of about 59,720 cubic meters and a maximum of about 152,170 cubic meters. The range is primarily due to uncertainties associated with the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program, including uncertainties regarding retrieval of long-length equipment, scheduling, and tank retrieval technologies.

Templeton, K.J.

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Step 8: Work with the building owner to complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: Work with the building owner to complete the ENERGY STAR 8: Work with the building owner to complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why you should design to earn the ENERGY STAR Follow EPA's step-by-step process Step 1: Assemble a team Step 2: Set an energy performance target Step 3: Evaluate your target using ENERGY STAR tools Step 4: Design to be energy efficient

152

Reduction of Electric Vehicle Life-Cycle Impacts through Battery Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Electric Vehicle Life-Cycle Impacts through Battery Recycling 29 th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit Ft. Lauderdale, FL March 15, 2012 The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on behalf of the Government. Why think about recycling?  Material scarcity alleviated

153

To Recycle or Not to Recycle: That Is the Question - Insights from Life-Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRS BULLETIN MRS BULLETIN * VOLUME 37 * APRIL 2012 * www.mrs.org/bulletin © 2012 Materials Research Society MANUFACTURING * RECYCLING Why recycle? The most commonly stated reason for recycling is to reduce burdens associated with the disposal of our never-ending stream of wastes. Waste disposal potentially causes air and water pollution and is costly; moreover, landfi lls compete with other land uses. In addition, recycling can extend our supply of materials to alleviate scarcity and to moderate rising prices of raw materials. Furthermore, recycling is often more environmentally benign than using virgin raw materials and can reduce energy use and emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Life-cycle analysis Despite these positive attributes, not all recycling processes

154

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers of possible revisions to energy-efficiency standards. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. DOE's preferred approach involves comparing the total life-cycle cost (LCC) of owning and operating a more efficient appliance with the LCC for a baseline design. This study describes the method used to conduct the LCC analysis and presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design can reduce the LCC in each of the product classes considered.

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers,Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate life-cycle cost for a standard (2 in. {times} 2 in. {times} 1 in.) glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA filter in the complex is $4,753.

Moore, P.; Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gilbert, H. [Gilbert (Humphrey), McLean, VA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

Valero, O.J.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, Transportationtransportation vehicles at specific stages in the lifecycle (Table 1). These studies tend to quantify social costs

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

CO2 Footprint Life-Cycle Analyses: EPRI CoalFleet Study Cases and State of Knowledge Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life-cycle analyses of the global warming potential of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, sometimes known as a carbon footprint and expressed in CO2-equivalent emissions, have been used to compare the environmental impacts of technologies with different energy conversion characteristics and upstream and downstream uses of energy and materials. Historically, such analyses have been conducted to assess the benefits of electricity production and delivery from renewable energy sources and alternative fuel trans...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

Interoperable, life-cycle tools for assuring building performance: An overview of a commercial building initiative  

SciTech Connect

A key impediment to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of buildings is the complexity and cost of managing information over the life cycle of a building. A surprisingly large fraction of the total cost of buildings is embodied in the decision making and information management process due to the structure of the building industry, the numerous people and companies involved in the process, the current nature of the building acquisition process, and the long time periods over which buildings operate once design and construction are completed. The authors suggest that new interoperable software tools could greatly facilitate and rationalize this complex process, thereby reducing time and cost, and greatly improving the habitability and environmental impact of these buildings. They describe a series of projects in which they are building and testing several prototype toolkits as part of a building life-cycle information system that will allow interoperable software tools to function more effectively throughout the design, construction, commissioning, and operations phases.

Selkowitz, S.; Piette, M.A.; Papamichael, K.; Sartor, D.; Hitchcock, R.; Olken, F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Bloyd, C.; Putsche, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and venting of coal bed methane in individual exportingthe development of coal-bed methane (p. 84). Given this, I

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products, Part 3: LED Environmental Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the third part of a larger U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project to assess the life-cycle environmental and resource impacts in the manufacturing, transport, use, and disposal of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting products in relation to incumbent lighting technologies. All three reports are available on the DOE website (www.ssl.energy.gov/tech_reports.html). Part 1: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent and LED Lamps; Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance; Part 3: LED Environmental Testing. Parts 1 and 2 were published in February and June 2012, respectively. The Part 1 report included a summary of the life-cycle assessment (LCA) process and methodology, provided a literature review of more than 25 existing LCA studies of various lamp types, and performed a meta-analysis comparing LED lamps with incandescent and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). Drawing from the Part 1 findings, Part 2 performed a more detailed assessment of the LED manufacturing process and used these findings to provide a comparative LCA taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. Both reports concluded that the life-cycle environmental impact of a given lamp is dominated by the energy used during lamp operationthe upstream generation of electricity drives the total environmental footprint of the product. However, a more detailed understanding of end-of-life disposal considerations for LED products has become increasingly important as their installation base has grown. The Part 3 study (reported herein) was undertaken to augment the LCA findings with chemical analysis of a variety of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps using standard testing procedures. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different models, were tested to determine whether any of 17 elements were present at levels exceeding California or Federal regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste. Key findings include: The selected models were generally found to be below thresholds for Federally regulated elements; All CFLs and LED lamps and most incandescent lamps exceeded California thresholds for Copper; Most CFL samples exceeded California thresholds for Antimony and Nickel, and half of the LED samples exceeded California thresholds for Zinc; The greatest contributors were the screw bases, drivers, ballasts, and wires or filaments; Overall concentrations in LED lamps were comparable to cell phones and other types of electronic devices, and were generally attributable to components other than the internal LED light sources; Although the life-cycle environmental impact of the LED lamps is favorable when compared to CFLs and incandescent lamps, recycling will likely gain importance as consumer adoption increases. This study was exploratory in nature and was not intended to provide a definitive indication of regulatory compliance for any specific lamp model or technology. Further study would be needed to more broadly characterize the various light source technologies; to more accurately and precisely characterize a specific model; or to determine whether product redesign would be appropriate.

Tuenge, Jason R.; Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricityAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

170

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, it produces energy and does not emit fossil carbonCCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood

Florida, University of

171

Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis (from: greenhouse gas, regulated emissions and energy use in transportation) model, which is the LCA

Kammen, Daniel M.

172

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT AND URBAN SUSTAINABILITY OCTOBER 2010 CEC-500-2013-129 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University for: California Energy Commission Erik Stokes Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

173

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIFECYCLE ENERGY: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California, Berkeley Department of Civil-1712 510-642-7300 Contract Number: 500-02-004 Work Authorization MR-048 Prepared for: California Energy

174

Use case and task models: An integrated development methodology and its formal foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

User Interface (UI) development methods are poorly integrated with standard software engineering practice. The differences in terms of artifacts involved, development philosophies, and lifecycles can often result in inconsistent system and UI specifications ... Keywords: Use case models, conformance, integrated development methodology, task models, verification

Daniel Sinnig; Patrice Chalin; Ferhat Khendek

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES--INTEGRATED LIFE-CYCLE OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVES FOR THE HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT--WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the ongoing integrated life-cycle optimization efforts to achieve both design flexibility and design stability for activities associated with the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford. Design flexibility is required to support the Department of Energy Office of River Protection Balance of Mission objectives, and design stability to meet the Waste Treatment Plant construction and commissioning requirements in order to produce first glass in 2007. The Waste Treatment Plant is a large complex project that is driven by both technology and contractual requirements. It is also part of a larger overall mission, as a component of the River Protection Project, which is driven by programmatic requirements and regulatory, legal, and fiscal constraints. These issues are further complicated by the fact that both of the major contractors involved have a different contract type with DOE, and neither has a contract with the other. This combination of technical and programmatic drivers, constraints, and requirements will continue to provide challenges and opportunities for improvement and optimization. The Bechtel National, Inc. team is under contract to engineer, procure, construct, commission and test the Waste Treatment Plant on or ahead of schedule, at or under cost, and with a throughput capacity equal to or better than specified. The Department of Energy is tasked with the long term mission of waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. While each mission is a compliment and inextricably linked to one another, they are also at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of expectations of one another. These mission requirements, that are seemingly in opposition to one another, pose the single largest challenge and opportunity for optimization: one of balance. While it is recognized that design maturation and optimization are the normal responsibility of any engineering firm responsible for any given project, the aspects of integrating requirements and the management of issues across contract boundaries is a more difficult matter. This aspect, one of a seamless systems approach to the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site, is the focus of the Optimization Studies. This ''big O''Optimization of Life-Cycle operations is what is meant when the term ''optimization'' is used on the River Protection Project and initiatives cited in this paper. From the early contractor centric methods and processes used to move toward an integrated solution, through extensive partnering approaches, to the current quality initiatives with multi-organizational participation, significant progress is being made towards achieving the goal of truly integrated life-cycle optimization for the Department of Energy's River Protection Project and Waste Treatment Plant.

Auclair, K. D.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Program Record 13006 (Offices of Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies: Life-Cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 13006 Date: April 24, 2013 Title: Life-cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles Originator: Tien Nguyen & Jake Ward Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Pat Davis Date: April 25, 2013 Items: DOE is pursuing a portfolio of technologies with the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and petroleum consumption while being cost-effective. This record documents the assumptions and results of analyses conducted to estimate the life-cycle costs resulting from several fuel/vehicle pathways, for a future mid-size car. The results are summarized graphically in the following figure. Costs of Operation for Future Mid-Size Car

178

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Use case-driven component specification: a medical applications perspective to product line development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modular and flexible software components can be useful for reuse across a class of domain-specific applications or product lines. By varying the composition of components suited to a particular product line, an assortment of applications can be developed ... Keywords: component specifications, generation of component-based systems, medical domain, software lifecycle

M. Brian Blake; Kevin Cleary; Sohan R. Ranjan; Luis Ibanez; Kevin Gary

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Multi-criteria lifecycle evaluation of transportation fuels derived from biomass gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a domestic biofuel industry has been a major policy thrust of the United States federal government in the first decade of the 21st century. Cellulosic biofuels have been identified as the primary candidate ...

Stark, Addison Killean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Life-cycle analysis and the ecology of Sarah C. Davis1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and demonstration plants outside the OECD in order to develop supply chain concepts, assess feedstock particular in rural areas), is more urgent than the supply of clean transport fuels. However, biofuels and diversify energy supply. Using lignocellulosic-biomass as feedstock, second-generation biofuels could avoid

DeLucia, Evan H.

182

Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Monitoring and Evaluation: Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing mission of this project is the development of statistical tools for analyzing fisheries tagging data in the most precise and appropriate manner possible. This mission also includes providing statistical guidance on the best ways to design large-scale tagging studies. This mission continues because the technologies for conducting fish tagging studies continuously evolve. In just the last decade, fisheries biologists have seen the evolution from freeze-brands and coded wire tags (CWT) to passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, balloon-tags, radiotelemetry, and now, acoustic-tags. With each advance, the technology holds the promise of more detailed and precise information. However, the technology for analyzing and interpreting the data also becomes more complex as the tagging techniques become more sophisticated. The goal of the project is to develop the analytical tools in parallel with the technical advances in tagging studies, so that maximum information can be extracted on a timely basis. Associated with this mission is the transfer of these analytical capabilities to the field investigators to assure consistency and the highest levels of design and analysis throughout the fisheries community. Consequently, this project provides detailed technical assistance on the design and analysis of tagging studies to groups requesting assistance throughout the fisheries community. Ideally, each project and each investigator would invest in the statistical support needed for the successful completion of their study. However, this is an ideal that is rarely if every attained. Furthermore, there is only a small pool of highly trained scientists in this specialized area of tag analysis here in the Northwest. Project 198910700 provides the financial support to sustain this local expertise on the statistical theory of tag analysis at the University of Washington and make it available to the fisheries community. Piecemeal and fragmented support from various agencies and organizations would be incapable of maintaining a center of expertise. The mission of the project is to help assure tagging studies are designed and analyzed from the onset to extract the best available information using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The overarching goals of the project is to assure statistically sound survival studies so that fish managers can focus on the management implications of their findings and not be distracted by concerns whether the studies are statistically reliable or not. Specific goals and objectives of the study include the following: (1) Provide consistent application of statistical methodologies for survival estimation across all salmon life cycle stages to assure comparable performance measures and assessment of results through time, to maximize learning and adaptive management opportunities, and to improve and maintain the ability to responsibly evaluate the success of implemented Columbia River FWP salmonid mitigation programs and identify future mitigation options. (2) Improve analytical capabilities to conduct research on survival processes of wild and hatchery chinook and steelhead during smolt outmigration, to improve monitoring and evaluation capabilities and assist in-season river management to optimize operational and fish passage strategies to maximize survival. (3) Extend statistical support to estimate ocean survival and in-river survival of returning adults. Provide statistical guidance in implementing a river-wide adult PIT-tag detection capability. (4) Develop statistical methods for survival estimation for all potential users and make this information available through peer-reviewed publications, statistical software, and technology transfers to organizations such as NOAA Fisheries, the Fish Passage Center, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey (USGS), US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Public Utility Districts (PUDs), the Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), and other members of the Northwest fisheries community. (5) Provide and maintain statistical software for tag analysis

Skalski, John

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Methods of dealing with co-products of biofuels in life-cycle analysis and consequent results within the U.S. context.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Products other than biofuels are produced in biofuel plants. For example, corn ethanol plants produce distillers grains and solubles. Soybean crushing plants produce soy meal and soy oil, which is used for biodiesel production. Electricity is generated in sugarcane ethanol plants both for internal consumption and export to the electric grid. Future cellulosic ethanol plants could be designed to co-produce electricity with ethanol. It is important to take co-products into account in the life-cycle analysis of biofuels and several methods are available to do so. Although the International Standard Organization's ISO 14040 advocates the system boundary expansion method (also known as the 'displacement method' or the 'substitution method') for life-cycle analyses, application of the method has been limited because of the difficulty in identifying and quantifying potential products to be displaced by biofuel co-products. As a result, some LCA studies and policy-making processes have considered alternative methods. In this paper, we examine the available methods to deal with biofuel co-products, explore the strengths and weaknesses of each method, and present biofuel LCA results with different co-product methods within the U.S. context.

Wang, M.; Huo, H.; Arora, S. (Energy Systems)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Aerosol Life Cycle IOP The primary objectives that make up the Aerosol Life Cycle IOP can be broken down into three categories: Scientific; Logistical; and GVAX preparation. Scientific Objectives The science goals are to conduct intensive aerosol observations in a region exposed to anthropogenic, biogenic, and marine emissions with atmospheric processing times depending on air mass trajectories and time of day. Take advantage of new instruments in the MAOS (e.g., SP2, HR-PTRMS, ACSM, Trace Gas Suite, PASS-3, Aethelometer, UHSAS). Within this broad umbrella are embedded three main foci: Aerosol light absorption: How does the aerosol mass absorption coefficient (absorption per unit mass of BC) vary with atmospheric processing? Do observations agree with a shell-core model?

188

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to be one of the major sources of uncertainty in numerical simulations of climate and weather. Improvement of the representation of clouds in numerical models requires fundamental...

189

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: Theof Biobased Polymers and Bioenergy, Journal of IndustrialTransport: Analysis of Bioenergy Transport Chains Using

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HDDV) Baseline: Diesel (crude oil) (g/mi) Biodiesel (SD100 (a primary resource, such as crude oil or coal, to a finishedexample, the transport of crude oil from the wellhead to a

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sulfur) ICEV, natural gas (CNG) ICEV, LPG (P95/BU5) ICEV,Methanol Ethanol Methane (CNG, LNG) Propane (LPG) Hydrogen (M85 (wood) Natural gas CNG (wood) Note: percentage changes

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from soybeans; methanol, SNG and hydrogen from wood. GREETgrass, and wheat; methanol and SNG from wood; biodiesel fromwood; hydrogen, methanol, and SNG from wood; biodiesel from

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identified strategic process-science foci: aerosol nucleation and growth and aerosol aging and mixing state. BNL is the lead laboratory responsible for the design and...

194

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The syngas exiting the gasifier is cooled and then quenchedThe equipment downstream of the gasifier for conversion to

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States. 2000 and 2012 Ethanol from corn. USDA United States.year 2000. Ethanol from corn. Pimentel & Patzek (PP) UnitedRoughly 2000. Ethanol from corn, switchgrass, and wood;

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulosic biomass, such as switch grass or wood, the fermentable sugars must be extracted from the feedstock (

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001 Net Energy Balance of Corn-Ethanol, U. S. Department ofg/mi) Ethanol (E90 (corn)) Ethanol (E90 (grass)) Methanol (Ethanol (E100 (corn)) Ethanol (E100 (grass)) Methanol (

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motors Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory, May (ifeu.pdf. General Motors, Argonne National Lab, et al. ,volumes, published by Argonne National Laboratory, June (

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Life-Cycle Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...and environmental consequences of materials usage, recycling, and energy consumed in manufacture, use, and disposal ( Ref

200

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shapouri, Supply and Social Cost Estimates for Biomass fromBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply,

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a synthesis gas (syngas) consisting of CO, H 2 , CO 2 ,DRAFT WORKING MANUSCRIPT The syngas exiting the gasifier isdownstream catalysts. The syngas then undergoes a series of

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Infrastructure, Components and System Level Testing and Analysis of Electric Vehicles: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-353  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery technology is critical for the development of innovative electric vehicle networks, which can enhance transportation sustainability and reduce dependence on petroleum. This cooperative research proposed by Better Place and NREL will focus on predicting the life-cycle economics of batteries, characterizing battery technologies under various operating and usage conditions, and designing optimal usage profiles for battery recharging and use.

Neubauer, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

An Analysis of the Economic and Financial Life-Cycle Costs of Reverse-Osmosis Desalination in South Texas: A Case Study of the Southmost Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desalination provides a supply alternative for potable water for many communities, along with possible defenses against security threats potentially affecting clean water supplies. The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with building and operating the Southmost desalination facility (near Brownsville, TX) in South Texas are investigated using the spreadsheet model DESAL ECONOMICS. Primary data key to this analysis include actual initial construction costs, annual continued costs (i.e., for source-water acquisition and transport, pretreatment, purification, and delivery), capital replacement expenses, and desalination-process parameters. The input data used reflect the unique location and quality of source water, process-flow design, asset selection and configuration, management structure, local cost rates, and employed operational methods unique to the Southmost facility. Thus, the specific results are only applicable to the Southmost facility for a specific time, but do provide useful information and insight into life-cycle costs for public and commercial desalination facilities in a more general sense. Annuity equivalent costs are reported (on both a $/acre-foot (ac-ft) and $/1,000 gallons of finished water basis, f.o.b. (free on board) municipal delivery point) for seven individual operational/expense areas, as well as for the entire desalination facility. Results are also presented across different cost types, categories, and items. The baseline results are deterministic, but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses of useful life, initial construction costs, annual energy costs, and production efficiency rate, amongst others. The current estimated total annual life-cycle costs (in 2006 dollars) to produce and deliver desalinated water to a point in the municipal delivery-system infrastructure for the Southmost facility are $769.62/ac-ft {$2.3619/1,000 gal.}. These baseline estimates apply to the Southmost facility and are sensitive to changes in the production efficiency level, and costs incurred for energy, chemicals, initial construction, etc. Also, results indicate significant outlays, beyond those of Initial Construction, are involved with desalination. For the Southmost facility, when a commitment was made to build a facility for $26.2 million, an implicit commitment for another $39.1 million (basis 2006 dollars) was also made for Continued and Capital Replacement costs. Investigation into life-cycle costs during the design and planning stages of a desalination facility can assist with determining the least-cost asset configuration to adopt and operational methods to employ. Also included are modifications to certain key data-input parameters that provide modified results which facilitate a more fair basis of comparing facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to use when comparing to similarlycalculated values (for other facilities or technologies), are $615.01/ac-ft/yr {$1.8874/1,000 gal./yr} (basis 2006 dollars).

Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Rogers, C.; Lacewell, R.; Norris, J.; Leal, J.; Garza, J.; Adams, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Trilinos developers SQE guide : ASC software quality engineering practices.  

SciTech Connect

The Trilinos Project is an effort to develop algorithms and enabling technologies within an object-oriented software framework for the solution of large-scale, complex multi-physics engineering and scientific problems. A new software capability is introduced into Trilinos as a package. A Trilinos package is an integral unit and, although there are exceptions such as utility packages, each package is typically developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. The Trilinos Developers SQE Guide is a resource for Trilinos package developers who are working under Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) and are therefore subject to the ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices as described in the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan: ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices Version 3.0 document [1]. The Trilinos Developer Policies webpage [2] contains a lot of detailed information that is essential for all Trilinos developers. The Trilinos Software Lifecycle Model [3]defines the default lifecycle model for Trilinos packages and provides a context for many of the practices listed in this document.

Willenbring, James Michael; Heroux, Michael Allen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NREL: Energy Analysis - Sustainable Biomass Resource Development and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Biomass Resource Development and Use Sustainable Biomass Resource Development and Use A flowchart illustrating the process flow of life-cycle assessment. Enlarge image NREL's international work in sustainability analysis includes biomass resource use and impact assessment. This analysis examines how we can use existing resources in a sustainable manner. It also examines the environmental and socio-economic impacts of resource development and use. Our analysts also look at the relationship of sustainable land use and biomass resource development. They look at whether there is available land to support bioenergy. They also study how we can use this available land for biomass resource development in a sustainable manner. Another key question is how biomass resource development is linked to food supply,

210

Spiral Development for Safeguards Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Safeguards instrumentation is highly specialized, so a common approach in the US has been to develop initial prototypes for performance, operability and security within the US National Laboratories for the IAEA and then seek one or more commercial partners. Transfer of technology from US National Laboratories is a legal requirement for products that have the potential for mass production. Other important objectives include minimizing time to deployment and lifecycle cost, and optimizing product maintainability, sustainability and manufacturability. Unfortunately, the deployment of systems developed via this model has sometimes been seriously delayed or never adopted because of the difficulty of optimizing the significant parameters of the process between the public and private sectors. The authors suggest that forming an R&D partnership between a research laboratory and a commercial company much earlier in the process would provide significant advantages. The present US practice leads to unnecessary expenditures during the early R&D phase since many decisions are made based on research needs that are counterproductive for commercialization and manufacturability. If the ultimate goal of the project is to produce a reliable and cost effective commercial product, the commercial input is needed early and often. The new model of developing systems in a closer collaboration with the private sector, in a spiral Commercialization by Design approach, should also limit the long term financial mortgages that Member States frequently experience with respect to safeguards instrumentation development using the present process. As a concrete example, the potential for incorporating Wire Integrity Verification Technology into the iCobra Reader System is discussed.

Koskelo, M.; Undem, Halvor A.; Good, Morris S.; Frazar, Sarah L.; Schanfein, Mark; Kadner, S.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

Toward energy sustainability in Hong Kong : a life-cycle cost analysis case study on low thermal energy transfer envelopes for a mid-rise commercial building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xiv, 102, [62] leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CIVL 2004 Rybkow Within the past two decades, sustainable development, once a (more)

Rybkowski, Zofia Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Safeguards and Security Technology Development Directory. FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Safeguards and Security Technology Development Directory is published annually by the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is Intended to inform recipients of the full scope of the OSS R&D program. It is distributed for use by DOE headquarters personnel, DOE program offices, DOE field offices, DOE operating contractors, national laboratories, other federal agencies, and foreign governments. Chapters 1 through 7 of the Directory provide general information regarding the Technology Development Program, including the mission, program description, organizational roles and responsibilities, technology development lifecycle, requirements analysis, program formulation, the task selection process, technology development infrastructure, technology transfer activities, and current research and development tasks. These chapters are followed by a series of appendices which contain more specific information on aspects of the Program. Appendix A is a summary of major technology development accomplishments made during FY 1992. Appendix B lists S&S technology development reports issued during FY 1992 which reflect work accomplished through the OSS Technology Development Program and other relevant activities outside the Program. Finally, Appendix C summarizes the individual task statements which comprise the FY 1993 Technology Development Program.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports technology development and technical assistance for the remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The core of the program is centered on delivering proactive, responsive expertise and technologies with highly-leveraged, carefully selected investments that maximize impact on life-cycle cleanup costs and risks across the DOE complex. The program currently focuses on four main priorities: improved sampling and characterization strategies, advanced predictive capabilities, enhanced remediation methods, and improved long-term performance evaluation and monitoring. In FY 2010, the program developed a detailed research and development (R&D) plan in support of a larger initiative to integrate R&D efforts across EM. This paper provides an overview of the high priority action areas and the program s near-term technical direction.

Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of a Catalyst/Sorbent for Methane Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project led to the further development of a combined catalyst and sorbent for improving the process technology required for converting CH{sub 4} and/or CO into H{sub 2} while simultaneously separating the CO{sub 2} byproduct all in a single step. The new material is in the form of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consists of a CaO core surrounded by an alumina-based shell capable of supporting a Ni catalyst. The Ni is capable of catalyzing the reactions of steam with CH{sub 4} or CO to produce H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, whereas the CaO is capable of absorbing the CO{sub 2} as it is produced. The absorption of CO{sub 2} eliminates the reaction inhibiting effects of CO{sub 2} and provides a means for recovering the CO{sub 2} in a useful form. The present work showed that the lifecycle performance of the sorbent can be improved either by incorporating a specific amount of MgO in the material or by calcining CaO derived from limestone at 1100 C for an extended period. It also showed how to prepare a strong shell material with a large surface area required for supporting an active Ni catalyst. The method combines graded particles of {alpha}-alumina with noncrystalline alumina having a large specific surface area together with a strength promoting additive followed by controlled calcination. Two different additives produced good results: 3 {micro}m limestone and lanthanum nitrate which were converted to their respective oxides upon calcination. The oxides partially reacted with the alumina to form aluminates which probably accounted for the strength enhancing properties of the additives. The use of lanthanum made it possible to calcine the shell material at a lower temperature, which was less detrimental to the surface area, but still capable of producing a strong shell. Core-in-shell pellets made with the improved shell materials and impregnated with a Ni catalyst were used for steam reforming CH{sub 4} at different temperatures and pressures. Under all conditions tested, the CH{sub 4} conversion was large (>80%) and nearly equal to the predicted thermodynamic equilibrium level as long as CO{sub 2} was being rapidly absorbed. Similar results were obtained with both shell material additives. Limited lifecycle tests of the pellets also produced similar results that were not affected by the choice of additive. However, during each lifecycle test the period during which CO{sub 2} was rapidly absorbed declined from cycle to cycle which directly affected the corresponding period when CH{sub 4} was reformed rapidly. Therefore, the results showed a continuing need for improving the lifecycle performance of the sorbent. Core-in-shell pellets with the improved shell materials were also utilized for conducting the water gas shift reaction in a single step. Three different catalyst formulations were tested. The best results were achieved with a Ni catalyst, which proved capable of catalyzing the reaction whether CO{sub 2} was being absorbed or not. The calcined alumina shell material by itself also proved to be a very good catalyst for the reaction as long as CO{sub 2} was being fully absorbed by the core material. However, neither the alumina nor a third formulation containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were good catalysts for the reaction when CO{sub 2} was not absorbed by the core material. Furthermore, the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing catalyst was not as good as the other two catalysts when CO{sub 2} was being absorbed.

B.H. Shans; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus Satrio; Karl Albrecht; Tanya Harris Janine Keeley; Ben Silva; Aaron Shell; Molly Lohry; Zachary Beversdorf

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development of residential-conservation-survey methodology for the US Air Force. Interim report. Task two  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A US Air Force (USAF) Residential Energy Conservation Methodology was developed to compare USAF needs and available data to the procedures of the Residential Conservation Service (RCS) program as developed for general use by utility companies serving civilian customers. Attention was given to the data implications related to group housing, climatic data requirements, life-cycle cost analysis, energy saving modifications beyond those covered by RCS, and methods for utilizing existing energy consumption data in approaching the USAF survey program. Detailed information and summaries are given on the five subtasks of the program. Energy conservation alternatives are listed and the basic analysis techniques to be used in evaluating their thermal performane are described. (MCW)

Abrams, D. W.; Hartman, T. L.; Lau, A. S.

1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle System Research and Development Project: Hybrid Vehicle Potential Assessment. Volume 1. Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of investigations conducted under Ce Hybrid Vehicle Potential Assessment Task are reported in 10 volumes. This volume contains an overview of the study and its results. The purpose of the overall study was to determine if the petroleum fuel savings achievable through the use of hybrid electric vehicles is worth the R and D expenditures needed to develop the hybrid vehicles and to determine R and D priorities. It was concluded that by the year 2010 hybrid vehicles could replace 80% of the automotive power that would otherwise be produced from petroleum fuels; the public should not suffer any mobility loss through the use of hybrid vehicles; high initial and life-cycle costs are a limiting factor; and R and D funds should be spent for systems design and the development of low-cost batteries and controllers. (LCL)

Surber, F.T.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mixed Waste Integrated Program -- Problem-oriented technology development  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is responding to the need for DOE mixed waste treatment technologies that meet these dual regulatory requirements. MWIP is developing emerging and innovative treatment technologies to determine process feasibility. Technology demonstrations will be used to determine whether processes are superior to existing technologies in reducing risk, minimizing life-cycle cost, and improving process performance. Technology development is ongoing in technical areas required to process mixed waste: materials handling, chemical/physical treatment, waste destruction, off-gas treatment, final forms, and process monitoring/control. MWIP is currently developing a suite of technologies to process heterogeneous waste. One robust process is the fixed-hearth plasma-arc process that is being developed to treat a wide variety of contaminated materials with minimal characterization. Additional processes encompass steam reforming, including treatment of waste under the debris rule. Advanced off-gas systems are also being developed. Vitrification technologies are being demonstrated for the treatment of homogeneous wastes such as incinerator ash and sludge. An alternative to conventional evaporation for liquid removal--freeze crystallization--is being investigated. Since mercury is present in numerous waste streams, mercury removal technologies are being developed.

Hart, P.W.; Wolf, S.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Berry, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of the Supply Chain Optimization and Planning for the Environment (SCOPE) Tool - Applied to Solar Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

life-cycle [5]. 3. Electricity distribution and circularity:on the local electricity mix and distribution system e?1]. Data on distribution losses, electricity used by the

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Fletcher, Tristan; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler...

220

GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Li Li 收件人 School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology Battery Recycling: How to Make It Happen Analysis can help identify a clear path for battery production and recycling  Purpose is to clear the road for mass-market introduction of battery-powered vehicles by identifying any roadblocks on the way  Life cycle analysis (LCA) is used to identify significant environmental issues  Availability of recycling processes can:  Assure against major waste problems at end-of-life  Reduce environmental impacts  Reduce raw material supply issues  Reduce net material costs  Create viable business opportunities  Economic and institutional constraints must also be accounted for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Software Assurance Automation throughout the Lifecycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... STIX Use Cases ? STIX provides a common mechanism for addressing structured cyber threat ... MAEC ? HTML Transform (XSL) ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Roles and Lifecycle | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDAs, cell phones); *Return all property to the APR or Custodial Officer upon leaving the organization or Department and complete an HQ F 3293.1, "Employee Final Separation...

223

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jacobson (2009) ?nds that both corn-E85 (85% ethanol and15% gasoline) and cellulosic-E85 degrade air quality by up

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels that can be used to satisfy national biofuel targets.biofuels will be the principal mechanism by which the GHG intensity targets

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

LIFE-CYCLE COSTING WORKSHOP FOR ENERGY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... analyses throughout the government, it is required under the FEMP rule (10 ... been included along with energy conservation as a designated goal for ...

2001-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= {total energy, total fossil energy, CO 2 , SO X, PM, freshmaterial input (say, fossil energy, electricity, water) andnet energy balance, fossil energy use, electricity etc. The

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy-resources/ egrid/index.html. U.S. Environmentalare taken from the EPAs eGrid database [27]. Water consumed

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production, energy consumption can be analyzed independent from increases in off-shoring and outsourcing of fabrication by US

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable and alternative energy technologies. However, sometal bene?ts of alternative energy, namely, lifecycletechnologies such as alternative energy and non-conventional

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increase the price of coal relative to natural gas as ancoal and energy for natural gas, a change in relative prices

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power consumption than a desktop PC require, constant interaction with servers over wireless internet, and in some cases also telecommunications

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Lifecycle perspectives on product data management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implementing a new IT system often requires the enterprise to transform in order to maximally leverage the capabilities generated by the new system. The challenge in using IT as an enabler to change arises from the need ...

Hines, Erisa K. (Erisa Kimberly)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Li Li School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology Battery Recycling: How to Make It Happen Analysis can help identify a clear...

234

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicators of greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity of di?erent fuels are being used to justify long-term policies supporting renewable energy.

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by substituting fossil fuels with biofuels increasesalternative to conventional fossil fuels including oilsand,of input intensity (say, fossil fuel, electricity, or water)

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions due to us corn ethanol production: A comprehensivebiofuels such as corn ethanol can reduce GHG emissions (dea ?nal good (say, corn ethanol produced by wet-milling Iowa

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The lifecycle of powerful AGN outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the course of this conference, much evidence was presented that points to an intimate connection between the energetic outflows driven by AGN and the energy budget and quite possibly also the evolution of their gaseous environments. However, it is still not clear if and how the AGN activity is triggered by the cooling gas, how long the activity lasts for and how these effects give rise to the observed distribution of morphologies of the outflows. In this contribution we concentrate on the high radio luminosity end of the AGN population. While most of the heating of the environmental gas may be due to less luminous and energetic outflows, these more powerful objects have a very profound influence on their surroundings. We will describe a simple model for powerful radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars that explains the dichotomy of their large-scale radio morphologies as well as their radio luminosity function.

Christian R. Kaiser; Philip N. Best

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rst and second generation biofuel targets. Energy Policy,Land clearing and the biofuel carbon debt. Science, 319(Life cycle assessment of biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Overview of developing programs in solar desiccant cooling for residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview is provided of the ongoing work in desiccant cooling under the national solar heating and cooling research program. Open cycle adsorption and absorption systems are examined. The different dehumidifier bed configurations are the distinguishing features of these systems. The basic operating principles of each dehumidifier concept are explained along with some discussion of their comparative features. Performance predictions developed by SERI for a solar desiccant solar system employing an axial-flow desiccant wheel dehumidifier are presented. In terms of life-cycle cost and displaced fossil-fuel energy, the results indicate that it should be beneficial to use solar desiccant coolers in residential applications. Although no prototype testing of any of these concepts is currently underway, test results are expected and will be reported within one year.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports applied research and technology development (AR&TD) for remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The program centers on delivering advanced scientific approaches and technologies from highly-leveraged, strategic investments that maximize impact to reduce risk and life-cycle cleanup costs. The current groundwater and soil remediation program consists of four applied programmatic areas: Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies Applied Field Research Initiative Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management. This paper provides an overview of the applied programmatic areas, fiscal year 11 accomplishments, and their near-term technical direction.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Aylward, R. S.; Cercy, Mike; Seitz, Roger; Ramirez, Rosa; Skubal, Karen L.; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Biochar and Sustainable Development: A Story About  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Energetic, and Economic Potential of Biochar Biochar, a stable charcoal product, greatly enhances crop, and life-cycle data analysis to quantify biochar's potential. Engineering Phototropic Bacteria to Convert n. Biochar-Based Fibers for Personal Protective Equipment Replacing current technologies for chemical

243

Battery developments: The positive connection to a greener future  

SciTech Connect

Extraordinary innovations are being made in the performance of today`s portable electronic equipment. But, although electronics manufacturers have been leaping generations ahead of themselves technologically, they are still forced to look back to see battery technology struggling to close the distance that ever widens with each new electronics breakthrough. The need to improve battery performance, namely in the area of battery longevity, has stemmed from a growing consumer demand and has become one of the electronics industry`s newest challenges. Battery manufactures like Duracell, Ovonic Battery Company (OBC), Ergenics, Matsushita, and Sony Corporation are answering the call with research and development programs that will aid the transition to more efficient, environmentally friendly batteries. Traditionally, the market was dedicated to primary batteries, or non-rechargeable, disposable batteries that are composed of zinc-carbon, alkaline-manganese, mercury oxide, silver oxide, lithium metal, and lead-acid. Conventional lead-acid automotive batteries, while rechargeable, are toxic and not recyclable; new secondary battery designs will satisfy the needs of the electronics industry, while offering environmental benefits. The new types, such as rechargeable nickel metal-hydride (NiMH), lithium-ion, and lithium-polymer have longer life-cycles and are also recyclable. Zinc-air batteries, which are classified as primary batteries, are not rechargeable but offer substantial power and environmental benefits. Portable computers, cellular telephones, video camcorders, stereo equipment, and LCD televisions are a few of the many practical applications that will benefit from new battery technology.

Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development and testing of Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1 (PDC-1) is a 12-m-diameter prototype concentrator that evolved from a six-year effort to produce a unit with low life-cycle costs for use with thermal-to-electric energy conversion devices. The concentrator assembly features panels made of a resin transfer molded balsa core/fiberglass sandwich with plastic reflective film as the reflective surface and a ribbed framework to hold the panels in place. The concentrator assembly tracks in azimuth and elevation on a base frame riding on a circular track. In 1982, PDC-1 was installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Initial optical testing showed that the panels did not exhibit the proper parabolic contour. After reassembly to correct this problem, further optical testing discovered thermal gradients in the panels with daily temperature changes. In spite of this, PDC-1 has sufficient optical quality to operate satisfactorily in a dish-electric system. With suggested improvements, its performance could be increased. The PDC-1 development effort provided the impetus for creating innovative optical testing methods and also provided valuable information for use in designing and fabricating concentrators of future dish-electric systems.

Dennison, E.W.; Thostesen, T.O.

1984-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

A LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS MODEL(LEM): LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS, MOTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas or petroleum coke in refineries.............................100 Emissions of pollutants from by greenhouse gas...........................................................................14 Results-Tropsch (F-T) diesel from natural gas................................................41 Biodiesel derived

Delucchi, Mark

246

Current Status of Deep Geological Repository Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk provided an overview of the current status of deep-geological-repository development worldwide. Its principal observation is that a broad consensus exists internationally that deep-geological disposal is the only long-term solution for disposition of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Also, it is now clear that the institutional and political aspects are as important as the technical aspects in achieving overall progress. Different nations have taken different approaches to overall management of their highly radioactive wastes. Some have begun active programs to develop a deep repository for permanent disposal: the most active such programs are in the United States, Sweden, and Finland. Other countries (including France and Russia) are still deciding on whether to proceed quickly to develop such a repository, while still others (including the UK, China, Japan) have affirmatively decided to delay repository development for a long time, typically for a generation of two. In recent years, a major conclusion has been reached around the world that there is very high confidence that deep repositories can be built, operated, and closed safely and can meet whatever safety requirements are imposed by the regulatory agencies. This confidence, which has emerged in the last few years, is based on extensive work around the world in understanding how repositories behave, including both the engineering aspects and the natural-setting aspects, and how they interact together. The construction of repositories is now understood to be technically feasible, and no major barriers have been identified that would stand in the way of a successful project. Another major conclusion around the world is that the overall cost of a deep repository is not as high as some had predicted or feared. While the actual cost will not be known in detail until the costs are incurred, the general consensus is that the total life-cycle cost will not exceed a few percent of the value of the electricity generated by the power reactors that have produced the waste. Of course, the current international situation is that no nation is currently willing to take any radioactive waste from another nation for deep disposal. This means that every nation will ultimately need to develop its own deep repository. This makes no sense, however--many nations have only a modest amount of waste, or do not have appropriate geological settings for a repository, or both. Ultimately, the need for one or more multi-national or international repositories will emerge, although so far this has not happened.

Budnitz, R J

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

The development of a life cycle cost model for railroad tunnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Life Cycle Costing is one of the most popular ways of assessing a project's or an investment's worth to a company. This method of assessment is often applied to all stages of a investment's lifecycle, starting from ...

Angeles, Jon Virgil V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

Pienkos, P. T.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development and demonstration of treatment technologies for the processing of US Department of Energy mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Mixed waste is defined as waste contaminated with chemically hazardous (governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) and radioactive species [governed by US Department of Energy (DOE) orders]. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is responding to the need for DOE mixed waste treatment technologies that meet these dual regulatory requirements. MWIP is developing emerging and innovative treatment technologies to determine process feasibility. Technology demonstrations will be used to determine whether processes are superior to existing technologies in reducing risk, minimizing life-cycle cost, and improving process performance. The Program also provides a forum for stakeholder and customer involvement in the technology development process. MWIP is composed of six technical areas that support a mixed-waste treatment system: (1) systems analysis, (2) materials handling, (3) chemical/physical separation, (4) waste destruction and stabilization, (5) off-gas treatment, and (6) final waste form stabilization. The status of the technical initiatives and the current research, development, and demonstration in each of these areas is described in this paper.

Berry, J.B.; Bloom, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kuchynka, D.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An environmental pressure index proposal for urban development planning based on the analytic network process  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a new approach to prioritize urban planning projects according to their environmental pressure in an efficient and reliable way. It is based on the combination of three procedures: (i) the use of environmental pressure indicators, (ii) the aggregation of the indicators in an Environmental Pressure Index by means of the Analytic Network Process method (ANP) and (iii) the interpretation of the information obtained from the experts during the decision-making process. The method has been applied to a proposal for urban development of La Carlota airport in Caracas (Venezuela). There are three options which are currently under evaluation. They include a Health Club, a Residential Area and a Theme Park. After a selection process the experts chose the following environmental pressure indicators as ANP criteria for the project life cycle: used land area, population density, energy consumption, water consumption and waste generation. By using goal-oriented questionnaires designed by the authors, the experts determined the importance of the criteria, the relationships among criteria, and the relationships between the criteria and the urban development alternatives. The resulting data showed that water consumption is the most important environmental pressure factor, and the Theme Park project is by far the urban development alternative which exerts the least environmental pressure on the area. The participating experts coincided in appreciating the technique proposed in this paper is useful and, for ranking ordering these alternatives, an improvement from traditional techniques such as environmental impact studies, life-cycle analysis, etc.

Gomez-Navarro, Tomas, E-mail: tgomez@dpi.upv.e [Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n. 46022, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Melon, Monica, E-mail: mgarciam@dpi.upv.e [Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n. 46022, Valencia (Spain); Acuna-Dutra, Silvia, E-mail: sacuna@unimet.edu.v [Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Metropolitana, Autopista Guarenas, Sector La Urbina, Distribuidor Metropolitano, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Diaz-Martin, Diego, E-mail: ddiaz@unimet.edu.v [Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Metropolitana, Autopista Guarenas, Sector La Urbina, Distribuidor Metropolitano, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of the sodium/sulfur battery technology for utility applications  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of battery energy storage systems for electric utilities. An important part of this DOE program is the engineering of the battery subsystem. Because lower costs are possible and less space is required compared with conventional battery technologies, two advanced battery systems are being developed: sodium/sulfur and zinc/bromine. A brief description of the development approach being followed along with the current status of the sodium/sulfur technology is described in this paper. Of immediate relevance, a factory integrated modular sodium/sulfur system has been designed that incorporates many of the advantages of this technology. Each module (designated as NAS-P{sub AC}) combines a 600-kWh sodium/sulfur battery, a 300 kW power converter and a control system. In addition to the potential for low life-cycle cost, other specific benefits include excellent portability and an installed system-level footprint that is about 20% of an equivalent system using lead-acid batteries. The sodium/sulfur battery is designed to deliver its rated energy for 1500 cycles or 5 years of maintenance-free operation.

Braithwaite, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, A.A. [Silent Power, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporation: 20,500 for upgrades to existing accounting software and training Three Eagles Development Corporation, Picuris Pueblo: 10,800 to update computer and account...

254

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assumptions made, analysis methods used, and preliminary results of research to determine the design specifications for a hybrid electric-powered and internal combustion engine-powered vehicle that would optimize the fuel economy of passenger automobiles are described. Information is included on body and component design, selection of spark-ignition engine and Ni-Zn batteries, life-cycle costs and life-cycle fuel consumption. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

For Developers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developers Developers Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) OSCARS Case Study Documentation User Manual FAQ Design Specifications Functional Specifications Notifications Publications Authorization Policy Default Attributes Message Security Clients For Developers DCN/OSCARS Implementation (Aug 2007) AAA BSS Pathfinder Topology Path realization Dojo development Interfaces Links Hardware Requirements DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net For Developers DCN/OSCARS Implementation (Aug 2007)

256

Development of a Total Energy, Environment and Asset Management (TE2AM tm) Curriculum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Wisconsin Department of Engineering Professional Development (EPD) has completed the sponsored project entitled, Development of a Total Energy, Environment and Asset Management (TE2AM) Curriculum. The project involved the development of a structured professional development program to improve the knowledge, skills, capabilities, and competencies of engineers and operators of commercial buildings. TE2AM advances a radically different approach to commercial building design, operation, maintenance, and end-?of-?life disposition. By employing asset management principles to the lifecycle of a commercial building, owners and occupants will realize improved building performance, reduced energy consumption and positive environmental impacts. Through our commercialization plan, we intend to offer TE2AM courses and certificates to the professional community and continuously improve TE2AM course materials. The TE2AM project supports the DOE Strategic Theme 1 -? Energy Security; and will further advance the DOE Strategic Goal 1.4 Energy Productivity. Through participation in the TE2AM curriculum, engineers and operators of commercial buildings will be eligible for a professional certificate; denoting the completion of a prescribed series of learning activities. The project involved a comprehensive, rigorous approach to curriculum development, and accomplished the following goals: 1. Identify, analyze and prioritize key learning needs of engineers, architects and technical professionals as operators of commercial buildings. 2. Design and develop TE2AM curricula and instructional strategies to meet learning needs of the target learning community. 3. Establish partnerships with the sponsor and key stakeholders to enhance the development and delivery of learning programs. 4. Successfully commercialize and sustain the training and certificate programs for a substantial time following the term of the award. The project team was successful in achieving the goals and deliverables set forth in the original proposal. Though attempts were made to adhere to the original project timeline, the team requested, and was granted a 6-?month project extension, during which time the project was completed.

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Methods Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISO committee and more information on standardization effects pertaining to AOCS. Methods Development Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemi

258

Development Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, twenty-eighth of an annual series, describes mineral, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada in 2006: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of orebodies, new mines opened, and expansion and other activities of existing mines. Statistics of known gold and silver deposits, and directories of mines

Mark Alden; Stavros Anthony; Cedric Crear; Thalia M. Dondero; Dorothy Sewell Gallagher; Jason Geddes; Ron Knecht; James D. Leavitt; Howard Rosenberg; Jack L. Schofield; Steve Sisolak; James E. Rogers; Milton D. Glick; Jeffrey Thompson; Interim Dean; James V. Taranik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Process Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Although melt loss had become the major cost factor in ingot production, it was the soaring cost of energy during the 1973 energy crisis that triggered the search for more-efficient remelt processes. This effort also sought to develop process that were less labor intensive and more...

260

Instrument Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for Cloud and Aerosol Characterization for the ARM Central Facility: Multiple Remote Sensor Techniques Development K. Sassen Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt lake City, UT 84112 overcome the poor data-handling capabilities that handi- capped multiple-channellidar studies in the past. The true diversity of transmitted and received polarization states of our system is illustrated at the bottom of Table 1. Note that the first full POL field tests will be made at the upcoming 1991 Project First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Field Observations II campaign, where our unit will be one of severallidars and radars located at a central site serving as the hub for research aircraft operations. The increasingly complex data collected by the POL and other remote sensors using different wave-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FARADAYIC Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FARADAYIC FARADAYIC Development of Electrically Mediated Electrophoretic Deposition for Thermal Barrier Coatings F A R A D A Y T E C H N O L O G Y , IN C . Joseph Kell 1 , Heather McCrabb 1 , Binod Kumar 2 1 Faraday Technology, Inc., Clayton, Ohio, USA 2 University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio, USA Contact: josephkell@faradaytechnology.com; heathermccrabb@faradaytechnology.com Background There is a need for an affordable, non-line-of-sight method of coating complex-shaped turbine engine components with thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that have controllable thickness distributions and a microstructure that is sufficiently strain-tolerant and will survive in the turbine environment. Typically plasma spray (PS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) are used to deposit TBCs Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a non-line-of-sight process that is easy to control

262

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The views expressed in this paper are solely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the World Bank or its member countries and should not be attributed to This paper examines the effect of foreign ownership on value added of firms in sub-Saharan Africa, using firm-level data from the Regional Program on Enterprise Development at the World Bank. The econometric analysis shows that foreign ownership has a significant effect on value added only when it exceeds a majority share. The results for Africa are consistent with the existing literature on foreign investment which argues that majority ownership creates appropriate incentives and provides greater opportunity to raise firm-level value added. 1

Vijaya Ramach; Manju Kedia Shah

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nozzle development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste iii Executive Summary As renewable electricity becomes a larger portion of the electricity generation mix, new strategies will be required to accommodate fluctuations in...

265

INPUT VALIDATION TESTING: A SYSTEM LEVEL, EARLY LIFECYCLE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnston '12, chelsea Karpenko '12, Lauriane rougeau '13 and catherine White '12. Johnston was a member, a maintenance mechanic and material handler at Cornell for 30 years who served in many roles, including presi

Offutt, Jeff

266

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy Efficiency Design Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL 53950 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Lutz, James D., Alexander B. Lekov, Peter Chan, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Stephen Meyers, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL...

267

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy Efficiency Design Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on...

268

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cars capable of running on E85 in addition to gasoline, inthat these would run on E85 50% of the time; estimates seemflex fuel vehicles are run on E85 less than 1% of the time.

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

OVERVIEW OF THE LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS MODEL (LEM) Mark A. Delucchi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, FCV ICEV ICEV BPEV Coal ICEV ICEV ICEV, FCV BPEV Natural gas ICEV ICEV, FCV ICEV ICEV ICEV, FCV BPEV be vented or flared · natural gas to hydrogen via reforming · coal to synthetic crude oil · diesel fuel mixtures that contain greenhouse gases (for example, the venting of coalbed gas from coal mines

Delucchi, Mark

270

Survey and taxonomy of botnet research through life-cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of all current threats to cybersecurity, botnets are at the top of the list. In consequence, interest in this problem is increasing rapidly among the research community and the number of publications on the question has grown exponentially in recent ... Keywords: Attack, botnet, defense, detection, survey, taxonomy

Rafael A. Rodrguez-Gmez, Gabriel Maci-Fernndez, Pedro Garca-Teodoro

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interest in alternatives to fossil fuels has risen significantly during the current decade.Although a variety of different alternative technologies have experienced rapid growth,biofuels have emerged (more)

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Lifecycle and System Perspectives on the Recycling of Paper and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Trends in Water Treatment Technology & Sustainability ... Material and Energy Beneficiation of the Automobile Shredder Residues Measurement ... Pt- doped TiO2 Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenols in Wastewater.

273

Vehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation.com This white paper is intended to serve asthe results in this white paper, we encourage the reader toare the focus of this white paper but the methodology is

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Life-cycle assessment of NAND flash memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy- resources/ egrid/index.html. U.S. Environmentalbased on data from the EPAs eGrid database [16], with a GWP

Boyd, Sarah; Horvath, A; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suggest that on average biorefineries derive 60% of theirtable 4.3). Ethanol biorefineries use either coal or naturals output) 5 . Coal-using biorefineries can either switch to

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming Non-renewable energy Mineral extraction9-4) and primary non-renewable energy (resource) (upperMJ of primary non-renewable energy). Results are presented

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of US corn ethanol Commodity priceEthanol production using corn, switchgrass, and wood;intensity of coal-based corn ethanol: EBAMM model estimate

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cneaf /coal/page/acr/table34.html 9. Price of natural gasfor energy, the prices of coal, natural gas, and electricityPrice of coal energy 0.0020 ($/MJ) Price of natural gas en-

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stack (e.g. , residential wood combustion), and ground-levelvehicles (T) Residential wood combustion (L) Road dust b (T)based on residential wood combustion and solvent emissions a

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Sponsored Research Lifecycle Part I: Finding a Sponsor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Chair Oregon Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Henry Lorenzen Oregon Tom Karier intensive research methods of the past. Dan Schill of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game expressed was one of "the big three" fishery stocks for Idaho but the population collapsed in the late 1980s from

Bieber, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

second generation feedstock such as cellulosic biomass willcellulosic conversion technologies are expected to allow switching between a variety of different feedstock

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

User Preferences for Life-Cycle Decision Support Tools ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jane C. Bare National Risk Management Research ... to thank Matt Heberling, Hale Thurston (both ... survey process; Jennifer Saxe, Mary Ann Curran ...

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tyner. Impact of biofuel production on world agriculturalexample in the case of biofuel production, process LCA wouldrepresentation of biofuel production (see figure [2.5]). We

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.4 Food inventory and biofuels . . . . . . . . . 3.53 Economics of biofuels: Impact on food and 3.1Net welfare change due to biofuels under the three

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optimizing inventory levels using financial, lifecycle and forecast variance data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant inventory write-offs have recently plagued ATI Technologies, a world leader in graphics and media processors. ATI's product-centric culture has long deterred attention from supply chain efficiency. Given that ...

Hwang, Irene S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shipped from a regional coal fired plant (i.e. , no fartherimpacts from the coal-fired power plant to the fly ash wouldby combustion in coal-fired power plants. In 2006, more than

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of US corn ethanol Commodity priceintensity of coal-based corn ethanol: EBAMM model estimateintensity of gas-based corn ethanol: EBAMM model estimate 8.

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Conceptual and Methodological Issues in Lifecycle Analyses of Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions in the corn/ethanol fuelcycle. Whether or notsuch as is enjoyed by corn ethanol, ultimately causes aIt is well known that corn-ethanol plants, for example,

Delucchi, Mark

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model estimate 8. Price of coal energy: average deliveredLCE when the future price of coal increases by 50% relativea function of change in price of coal p c is, ?? bf = [(1 ?

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Impact of DNA damage proteins on the adenoviral lifecycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. , Bridge, G. , and Flint, S.J. (2007). The adenovirus L4Oncogene 26, 4797-4805. Flint, S.J. , and Gonzalez, R.A. (782-783. Gonzalez, R.A. , and Flint, S.J. (2002). Effects of

Lakdawala, Seema Sailesh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on biofuels on food and oil prices and compare them to othera steep decline in oil prices and a consequent decline inon biofuels on food and oil prices and compare them to other

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Vehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, aircraft, high-Gasoline Vehicle (CGV), Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV),Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV), and Battery Electric

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Economics of Lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of upper bound on different biofuel producers A simplewith demand for storage Biofuel effect depends on cropHolst, and D. Zilberman. Biofuel and the food versus fuel

Rajagopal, Deepak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Comparison of data models for plant lifecycle information management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several data models have been defined for enabling information interoperability during the process plant life cycle. The data models differ in details and their scopes are different, making it difficult to compare and evaluate them. While the importance ... Keywords: Aex, Ifc, Interoperability, Iso 15926, Plant Modeling, Step

Pekka Siltanen; Antti Prnnen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced hydrogen storage systems could also be a cost competitive alternative to pumped hydro and compressed air energy storage (CAES) under certain circumstances. Context: As...

297

Developers | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developers Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers Welcome to Developers.Data.gov This community brings together developers from...

298

APPENDIX B: DATA FOR OTHER COUNTRIES An Appendix to the Report, "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................... 31 Natural gas production and trade.......................................................................................... 32 Natural gas losses in distribution........................................................................................................................... 45 Natural gas production and transmission

Delucchi, Mark

299

APPENDIX D: CO2 EQUIVALENCY FACTORS An Appendix to the Report, "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of different biofuels can be produced, including Fisher-Tropsch liquids (FTL), dimethyl ether (DME that would be used for biofuel production. These fuels include Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL), methanol such as dimethyl ether (DME) or Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL) made from lignocellulosic biomass. A relatively

Delucchi, Mark

300

APPENDIX X: PATHWAY DIAGRAMS An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions Centralized electrolytic H2 transmission Electrolysis Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions Electrolytic H2 Nuclear power plant Electrolysis Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions

Delucchi, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Damage Development on Stone Armored Breakwaters and Revetments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to calculate damage progression on a rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, or jetty trunk armor layer. The methods apply to uniform-sized armor stone (0.75W50 ? W50 ? 1.25W50, W50 = median weight of armor stone) as well as riprap (0.125W50 ? W50 ? 4W50) exposed to depthlimited wave conditions. The equations discussed herein are primarily intended to be used as part of a life-cycle analysis, to predict the damage for a series of storms throughout the lifetime of the structure. This lifecycle analysis including damage prediction allows engineers to balance initial cost with expected maintenance costs in order to reduce the overall cost of the structure. The equations are intended to provide a tool for accurate damage estimates in order to reduce the possibility of unexpected maintenance costs. INTRODUCTION: Rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, and jetty projects require accurate damage prediction as part of life-cycle analyses. But few studies have been conducted to determine damage progression on stone armor layers for variable wave conditions over the life of a structure. Previous armor stability lab studies were intended to determine damage for the peak of a design storm. As such, most previous laboratory studies were begun with an undamaged

Jeffery A. Melby

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011): An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power  

SciTech Connect

The model offshore wind power legislation focused on two aspects: compensation for use of ocean space and environmental assessment. In particular, the model legislation recommends the adoption of a rent and royalty scheme that is premised on high rent and low royalties in order to stimulate qualified bids from developers who are motivated to begin production as early as possible and to discourage sham bidding. The model legislation also includes a provision that sets royalties at a lower rate in the early years of project operation, and that provides states with the discretion to waive or defer rent and/or royalties for a period of time to meet the goals and objectives of energy independence, job creation, reduced emissions of conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases and increased state requirements for electricity from renewable sources. The environmental impact assessment (EIA) is structured to provide a systematic and interdisciplinary evaluation of the potential positive and negative life-cycle effects of a proposed offshore wind project on the physical, biological, cultural and socio-economic attributes of the project.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

NETL: Computational and Basic Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optimize the fossil energy plant lifecycle, from process synthesis and design to plant operations. Models are also being developed that consider uncertainties in operating...

304

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and ...  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an integrated system that reduces the total life-cycle cost of used fuel storage while improving overall safety. This multicanister ...

305

Process Wrapped in Culture Leads PRO-TEC's Quest for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Product on Fleet Life-Cycle Fuel Savings (Technical ... Apply different annealing cycle based on ... Developed adaptive annealing cycles with chemistry ...

2012-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

VAP Development: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release  

SciTech Connect

This white paper provides a plan to formalize the evaluation of newly developed VAPs and a framework for the development of value-added products through four different stages: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release.

Jensen, M; Collis, Fast, J; Flynn, C; Mather, J; McFarlane, S; Monroe, J; Sivaraman, C; Xie, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Staff Development Program Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Staff Development and the Individual," in S. Caldwell (Ed.) Staff Development: A Handbook of Effective Practices. Oxford, OH: National Staff Development Council. Lieberman, A....

308

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

RESERVATION OF RIGHTS A number of governments and agencies participated in the development of this Kootenai Subbasin Plan,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during a prescribed burn at the University of Idaho's experimental forest. NATIONAL CENTER FOR LANDSCAPE that successful data sharing efforts must: have a plan that addresses the entire data lifecycle from design with the build-out of an experimental communication and data network on the Powell Ranger District in Idaho

310

Model Refinement Needs A model developed by Peters and Marmorek (2003) will be used to generate predictions for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Chair Oregon Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Henry Lorenzen Oregon Tom Karier - October X X X X X Lifecycle Chart - Diagram life cycle use of tagging technology to help clarify relevance-Chair Oregon Rhonda Whiting Montana W. Bill Booth Idaho James A. Yost Idaho Bill Bradbury Oregon Tom Karier

311

Coal Development (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

312

Technikon Green Energy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technikon Green Energy Development November 16, 2009 2 Technikon'sRenewable Energy Testing Center 60,000 sq. ft. Energy Application Validation and Development Laboratory Formed...

313

Regional Development Authorities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance...

314

Information Solutions: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development IS provides management, maintenance, and development of APS Internet and Intranet web pages. Contact Webmaster Configuring Dreamweaver: Windows | Mac Improving...

315

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of...

316

Geothermal development opportunities in developing countries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the Seminar on geothermal development opportunities in developing countries, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy and presented by the National Geothermal Association. The overall objectives of the seminar are: (1) Provide sufficient information to the attendees to encourage their interest in undertaking more geothermal projects within selected developing countries, and (2) Demonstrate the technological leadership of US technology and the depth of US industry experience and capabilities to best perform on these projects.

Kenkeremath, D.C.

1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

Technical Guidelines Development Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (TGDC). The TGDC has been chartered by the US Election Assistance ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: DATE: EXECUTIVE CORE QUALIFICATION 1: LEADING CHANGE This core qualification encompasses the ability to develop and implement an organizational vision which integrates key national and program

319

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix D: sensitivity analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report on the Sensitivity of Mission Analysis and Trade-off Studies provides an analysis of the sensitivity of the results of previous mission analysis and performance specification studies to the possible variations of the values of significant parameters as projected to the year 1985. These parameters include vehicle usage by purpose, driving cycles, trip lengths, ownership projections, and life-cycle costs. Tabulated data are included from calculations with variations in these parameters. (LCL)

Traversi, M.

1979-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Workflow methodology for collaborative design and manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During product development processes, collaboration has become a common practice between different departments and companies that are involved in their activities. Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) tools can facilitate collaboration among distributed ... Keywords: collaborative engineering, extended enterprise, product lifecycle management, workflow Management

Carlos Vila; Antonio Estruch; Hctor R. Siller; Jos V. Abelln; Fernando Romero

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of these tools continues to grow. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides Web development capabilities to government agencies and organizations interested in converting training and education programs based on traditional means of communication into a variety of tools that suit the technology skills of today's health care providers and patients. ORISE develops Web-based training and informational products that expand the reach of targeted health messages to key audiences. Our specific capabilities include: Web applications development User experience testing

322

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Essays in development economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 looks at the empirical estimation of the welfare impacts of bargaining. Bargaining for retail goods is common in developing countries, but rare in the developed world. The welfare implications of this difference ...

Keniston, Daniel Eben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

China Business Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China Business Development Postgraduate Programme #12;Programme: China Business Development with China: Intercultural Management 3 1 Daily life and business behaviour explained from a cultural perspective Chinese strategic thinking China's political constellation and its impact on business life Human

Steels, Luc

339

Biodiesel SRM Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Industrial Quality (INMETRO) on the development of the certified reference materials (CRMs) for biofuels, specifically bioethanol and biodiesel ...

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cooperative method development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of methods tools and process improvements is best to be based on the understanding of the development practice to be supported. Qualitative research has been proposed as a method for understanding the social and cooperative aspects of ... Keywords: Cooperative method development, D.2.9 [Software]: Software Engineering --- Management, Empirical research, Human factors, Research methodology, Software engineering

Yvonne Dittrich; Kari Rnkk; Jeanette Eriksson; Christina Hansson; Olle Lindeberg

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mechanisms in Plant Development  

SciTech Connect

This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM DEVELOPER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved photographic developer is presented having very high energy development fine grain characteristics and a long shelf life. These characteristics are obtained by the use of aminoacetic acid in the developer, the other constituents of which are: sodium sulfite, hydroquinone, sodiunn borate, boric acid and potassium bromide, 1-phenyl-3-pyrazolidone.

Berry, F.G.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GrantEconomic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBGEDIF) (Oklahoma) Community Development Block GrantEconomic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBGEDIF) (Oklahoma) <...

344

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Principal Investigator develops a Statement of ... a consortium to develop the technology ... DEVELOPING STANDARD REQUIREMENTS FOR FATIGUE ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

Individual Development Plan (IDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Individual Development Plan (IDP) Individual Development Plan (IDP) SAMPLE 10/01/2012 to 09/30/2013 Training Reason Developmental Activity Description Training Cost Travel Cost Total Cost Hours Start Date/ Completion Date Short Range Goal 1: Enhance Leadership Skills Development Mentoring Receive mentoring from a higher grade employee (s) and provide mentoring to lower grade employee(s). 0 0 0 TBD 1/1/2013 Development Instructor led EM Leadership Excellence Program - Interpersonal Communication Skills 0 0 0 8 6/15/2013 Development Instructor led Federal Executive Institute (OPM): Leadership for a Democratic Society $18,300 0 0 30 day residential TBD Development Shadowing Shadow one or more SES employees for one or two day period to learn leadership techniques. 0 0 0 TBD TBD

346

Semantic Developer | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semantic Developer Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers You are here Data.gov Communities Developers As the Semantic...

347

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

348

Economic Development and Pollutants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the correlation of economic development and pollutants in Brazil from 1960 to 2008. This investigation is (more)

Trnros, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Workforce Development & Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Player to see images here. Welcome to Workforce Development & Education K-12 StudentsSchools High School Students Teachers Undergraduate & Graduate StudentsFaculty Berkeley Lab...

350

Resources for Program Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may assist those who are developing programs to enhance the knowledge and skills of mathematics, science and technology teachers and provide opportuntities for students to...

351

Technology Development Loans (Wisconsin)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Technology Development Loans help innovative companies with promising economic futures clear the hurdles associated with bringing new technologies, products, and concepts to market. Loan funds...

352

Energy Education & Workforce Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I. Introduction of the Energy Literacy and Energy 101 Initiatives -Michelle Fox & Matt Garcia II. Energy 101 Curricular Framework Development - Jim Turner III. Energy 101...

353

Alloy Development and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gerald Bourne2; Joseph Jankowski2; 1Boeing; 2Colorado School of Mines; .... development of conventional superalloys has relied on the addition of heavy...

354

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials, APPENDIX A: Energy Use and Emissions from the Lifecycle of Diesel-Like Fuels Derived From Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIKE FUELS DERIVED FROM BIOMASS An Appendix to the Report, LIKE FUELS DERIVED FROM BIOMASS An Appendix to the Report AFUEL Transesterified, biomass-derived oil or biodiesel can

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Graphite technology development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

NONE

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Wind Economic Development (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Technical Assistance to Developers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

358

NERSC Science Gateway Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Forward Design Forward Home » R & D » Science Gateway Development Science Gateway Development Science gateways are conduits for bringing HPC to the web. NERSC assists in the development and hosting of gateways that make NERSC compute and data resources more broadly useful. To ease the development of these gateways, the NERSC Web Toolkit (NEWT) makes science gateways accessible to anyone familiar with HTML and javascript. You can find more detailed information about science gateway development in the related NERSC user documentation and at the NEWT website. What are some use cases? A science gateway can be tailored to the needs within a team of researchers allowing them to share data, simulation results, and information among users who may be geographically distributed.

359

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Utah Technology Commercialization Office Location: Salt Lake City, UT Project Title Energy Innovation Commercialization Center Proposed Action or Project Description The project proposes to create an Energy Innovation Commercialization Center at the University of Utah. The scope of work for this project is in two phases: tasks necessary to create the Center and actual commercialization and outreach to other institutions. Specific activities for Phase I for the Center startup include 1) negotiating contract, prepare correspondence, establishing website, meetings, scheduling activities, developing metrics, and designing and creating a database. Phase 2 activities for Center

360

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Microsystem Product Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

Polosky, M -A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development The Environmental Energy Technologies Division performs analysis, research, and development leading to better energy technologies and reduction of adverse energy-related environmental impacts. The Division carries out research on batteries and fuel cells, electricity grid technologies, energy-efficient building technologies; energy analysis; environmental impacts of energy use, including on air quality and climate, indoor environmental quality, and sensors and materials for energy applications. Batteries and Fuel Cells Advanced energy technologies for low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries and fuel cells for automotive and stationary applications. Buildings Energy Efficiency Working with industry to develop technologies for buildings that increase energy efficiency, and improve the comfort, health and safety of building occupants.

363

Sustaining development in Detroit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of this thesis is to propose a strategy for stabilizing and increasing the disparate pieces of development that form the traces of the once great industrial city of Detroit. It focuses primarily on Fordism as a ...

Resnick, Noah Samuel, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

DC Conductor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual development of promising conductors and line configurations for HVDC overhead transmission lines. It details analytic and experimental work conducted to determine the performance of the proposed concepts and ranks the most promising concepts.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

366

Feature - Argonne Develops ARDAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lab's capability to analyze and evaluate the performance of prototype plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) with the development of a tool called the Argonne Real-Time Data...

367

COMMISSION REPORT DEVELOPING RENEWABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incorporate the market transformation goal described above and "develop milestones to measure progress towards plus: SILVER Bronze plus: BRONZE Stringency/EnergySavings Interim milestones for this programmatic goal

368

Community Development Fund (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available...

369

PNNL: Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

business looking for a door to the Laboratory? The Economic Development Office at PNNL is here to help you start, grow, or relocate your business. We help you tap into...

370

Advanced Interconnect Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Essays on development finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays that examine investment choices in less developed countries. Chapter 1 examines how the structure of existing microfinance contracts may discourage risky but high-expected return ...

Fischer, Gregory M. (Gregory Mark)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Political elites and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays on the behavior of political elites and their effect on economic development. The first two chapters focus on political dynasties in the Philippines while the third chapter analyzes ...

Querubn Borrero, Pablo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Review: 1991 industry developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is NUEXCO`s annual summary of the previous year`s (1991) events. There are reviews of major nuclear developments in each continent, as well as international developments. Specific topics include fuels, waste management, new facilities, and decommissioning. Nuclear activities in the following countries are noted: South Africa, Yemen, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Namibia, France, Japan, Taiwan, China, Korea, India, Pakistan, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Italy, Czechoslovakia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Canada, USA, Argentina, Brazil, and Uraguay.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Developmental Assignment Opportunity DATE: NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: TITLE: ASSIGNMENT NUMBER: ASSIGNMENT BEGINS: ENDS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: EMAIL ADDRESS: ASSIGNMENT LOCATION HOST ORGANIZATION: PURPOSE OF ASSIGNMENT: ASSIGNMENT POSITION: ASSIGNMENT DUTIES: EXECUTIVE COR QUALIFICATIONS TO BE ADDRESSED: OFFICE ADDRESS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: E-MAIL ADDRESS: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP)

375

Customer Communications Architecture Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study outlines a process for integrating requirements for the Smart Grid from representative sources and provides a structure for categorizing requirements. The process then provides an approach to the development of a tool that can be used for evaluating current and emerging standards as well as products in the marketplace. Significantly the work draws from bodies of work that have been developed by the energy industry. The results are a set of requirements metrics that can be built upon and used ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

from Wind Energy Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These comments are submitted on behalf of the Clean Energy State Alliance (CESA) (electronically and by mail). CESA is a non-profit, multi-state coalition of state clean energy funds and programs working together to develop and promote clean energy technologies. CESA seeks to identify and address barriers to the development and growth of viable renewable energy resources in the United States. The California Energy Commission is a member of CESA. CESA offers its assistance and resources to the Commission and staff in the guidelines development process. CESA has substantial experience and expertise on the avian protection and wind siting issues that the Commission will consider in this Docket. Most notably, CESA is working actively with the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Minerals Management Service, and several states (Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, and others) to develop reasonable and effective approaches to addressing the impacts of wind projects on avian species. Many of the issues that the Commission will consider in this Docket are also being addressed by other states and federal agencies. CESA is available to provide relevant information and approaches that these other agencies and guidance development processes are employing, developing, and/or evaluating.

Dockets Office Ms; Dear Commissioners

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spreadsheet) -- imported petroleum by source (Table 117 inthe LEM estimates the sources of petroleum the particularestimates the source of finished petroleum products supplied

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E STIMATES OF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTIONOF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTION PLANTS A.

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change to Ethanol, E85 corn, C0/NG50/B50, where the B50on five fuels: RFG, M85, E85, LPG, and CNG. The vehicle wasPM E85 CNG LPG Off-cycle emissions,

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proportional to the length of the pipelines (EPA/GRI, 1996),average shipment length for the pipeline, tram, and conveyoraverage length for the Black Mesa slurry pipeline, and then

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide the worlds uranium enrichment services. With theseenergy efficiency of uranium enrichment, in mWh-enrichment-gas Motor-vehicle flows Uranium enrichment Agriculture Fuel

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LPG oil LPG NGL57 n.e. LPG CNG NG NG n.a. 2649% 2617% n.a.diesel b ZM F-T D SD100 M100 CNG CH2c E100 calc. calc. calc.Highway k exp. Diesel M100 CNG Gas LNG LNG CH2 CH2 LH2 LH2

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum, and restricts regenerative energy to be less thanthe extra energy made available by regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking (for fuel-cell vehicles without electro-chemical energy

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass (lignin) and biogas for process heat. TheyBTU-lignin/BTU-fuel) and emission factors for biogas (g/BTU-gas) by biogas-use factors (BTU-gas/BTU-fuel). The emission

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residual Oil Distillate Oil Motor Gasoline Other Petroleumthe use of lubricating oil by motor vehicles is based on theuse of lubricating oil related to motor- vehicle use (g/mi).

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel or power generation (coal, natural gas, fuel oil,generation mix for power used to compress fossil natural gas.power (% of electricity generation [EVs, hydrogen vehicles]) NGL = natural gas

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplemental data) -- natural gas supply and disposition (petroleum, coal, or natural-gas supply of the U. S. (or ofAnnual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by methanol, ethanol, and SNG plants in the year 2000 havemethanol, biodiesel, SNG). GHGLC E,F = CO 2-equivalentrequirements with natural gas. SNG/wood: For 1994, I assume

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Research (NIPER), to calculate the density ofthe API gravity reported by NIPER to calculate the density

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of charcoal from biomass combustion (g-CO 2 /bu-crop) WB,Aerosols from biomass combustion have constituents otheris about 0.06) Coke combustion Biomass fuel combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions for natural-gas power plants. Moreover, the CH4separately from the natural gas-to-power plants fuelcycle,= of total natural-gas used by power plants, the fraction

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LNG and LH2 .252 vi Energy consumptionwhich means that the consumption of the LNG facility itselfthe energy self-consumption of the overall LNG chain has

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors for wood residue combustion. Mann and Spath (1997)CH4/NMOC ratio for wood-waste combustion (see below), andN2O/NO x ratio for wood-waste combustion. Emission factors

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n.a. n.a. CNG = compressed natural gas; LNG = ;liquefiedgases; CNG = compressed natural gas; Exh. = exhausthydrogen CNG = compressed natural gas CO = carbon monoxide

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case of N2O from coal-fired plants, I have allowed foremissions of NO 2 from coal-fired plants (lb/106-BTU) (EPAsthat an average U. S. coal-fired plant that uses coal with

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced, is estimated as: DCW = AF ? AW ? ( 1+ FGD ) ? ( 1BTU / TM eq. 98 where: DCW = diesel fuel consumed to

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment emissions from corn/ethanol and wood bio- fuelMulti-modal emissions Corn-ethanol production, energy use:biodiesel fuel cycles, and corn/ ethanol fuel cycles. GHGCH

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report. Note on natural gas storage Natural gas is stored innatural gas storage..2.6 TCF of natural gas were added to storage facilities and

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= EIT Avg,US,T ? ? REITM GP ? RTD GP ,C ? NGC GP,C GP CS U ,use - 0.5 . imports) 63 RTD GP,C = the average transmissionGL TM ,GP ,92 = GL TM ,US,92 ? RTD GP,C ? RLTM GP where the

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

16.355J / ESD.355J Advanced Software Engineering, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reading and discussion subject on advanced topics in the engineering of software systems. Focus on software development. Topics differ but are chosen from: software process and lifecycle; requirements development, ...

Leveson, Nancy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SRL online Analytical Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R&D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R&D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control & Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

Jenkins, C.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

SRL online Analytical Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

Jenkins, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Emergency Response Guideline Development  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geothermal materials development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health illiterate"-an increasing problem among special populations that appears to contribute to health disparities. Health literacy refers to the ability to read and understand materials related to personal health, as well as navigate the health system. To assist government agencies and organizations educate populations facing

406

Guidebook on biogas development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook covers the practical aspects of small-scale biogas development suitable for use in rural areas in developing countries, especially those of the ESCAP region. It is intended that all aspects of biogas are covered so that someone with no knowledge of the subject can, with confidence, design, build, operate and maintain a biogas plant. Information on biogas technology in China is also included. Chapters cover: the biogas process; factors effecting gas-plant design and operation; the classification and design principles of plants; design, size and site selection; the construction of digesters; gas holders and pipes; household gas appliances and their use; starting and operating a biogas digester; servicing and safety; improving gas-plant performance; commercial uses of biogas; the effluent and its uses, biogas-plant development programmes; community plants; and economics. In the annexes, designs for biogas plants of the fixed-dome, bag and floating gas-holder type are presented. 9 references.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assignment #1: Developing Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this assignment is to give you some experience developing algorithms. According to Wikipedia, an algorithm is a finite list of well-defined instructions for accomplishing some task that, given an initial state, will terminate in a defined end-state [1]. 1. Consider the following initial state: A bag containing sliced bread A jar containing peanut butter A jar containing jelly A plastic knife Develop an algorithm for producing, as an end-state, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Be as precise as possible when developing your list of instructions. 2 Hand-In Instructions The assignment is due at the start of class on August 27 th. You are required to turn in a typed document. The document should include your name, your username, the date, the course number, and the assignment number. For example:

Andrew R. Dalton; Andy Dalton (adalton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Developing electronic textbooks  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a new approach to the development of engineering education materials. The ``Electronic Textbook`` represents the logical progression of the printed textbook in the Electronic Age. The concept behind this approach is simple; to place all of the information contained in a textbook in electronic form. Currently, paper texts exist on the market with electronic supplements, however, this Electronic Textbook would include supplements fully integrated in the whole text. The computer hardware and software needed to make this advance possible have existed for nearly ten years, and they have been readily available to engineering educators and students for over three years. Computer based ``tools`` in engineering textbooks as are prevalent today range from computer styled algorithms and code snippets, to fully developed software applications with graphical user interfaces on floppy disks attached to the back covers of books. The next logical step in publishing is to dispense with the paper book entirely, by distributing textbooks via electronic media such as CD-ROM. Electronic Textbooks use the full range of multi-media technologies in the learning and teaching process including video clips, computer animations and fully functional numerical engines as integral parts of the textbook material. This is very appealing since interactive media provide teaching tools that appeal to divergent learning styles. The advantages of Electronic Textbooks lead to several challenges. Special attention must be paid to the development of user interfaces; navigation is of particular importance when non- linear exploration is encouraged. These issues are being addressed at the Sandia National Laboratories by an electronic documentation development team. This team includes experts in engineering, in human factors, and in computer hardware and software development. Guidelines for the development of electronic textbooks based on the experiences of this team are provided.

Zadoks, R.I. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept.; Ratner, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Candidate Developmental Assignment Evaluation DATE:_______________ NAME OF SES CANDIDATE TITLE OF POSITION LOCATION ASSIGNMENT DURATION: Which Executive Core Qualification(s) was this assignment intended to meet? Leading Change Leading People Results Driven Business Acumen Building Coalitions/Communication Please provide a brief description of your assignment. Did the experience meet your expectation? Was this a good learning experience? 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.5 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Candidate Developmental Assignment Evaluation

410

Hydropower research and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of information on hydropower research and development (R and D) activities of the Federal government and hydropower industry. The report includes descriptions of on-going and planned R and D activities, 1996 funding, and anticipated future funding. Summary information on R and D projects and funding is classified into eight categories: fish passage, behavior, and response; turbine-related; monitoring tool development; hydrology; water quality; dam safety; operations and maintenance; and water resources management. Several issues in hydropower R and D are briefly discussed: duplication; priorities; coordination; technical/peer review; and technology transfer/commercialization. Project information sheets from contributors are included as an appendix.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Continuous chain bit development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continuous chain drill is a diamond drill bit in which the cutting surface can be replaced while the bit is still in the hole. The first prototype of the chain drill system was fabricated and tested in 1977. Problems were encountered with the mechanism used to cycle the bit. A second prototype bit was designed to circumvent these problems. An accelerated development and test program has provided field test results on Prototype II in less than 2 years. Field testing at Nevada Test Site has proven the feasibility of the downhole changing mechanism. The development and testing of this prototype are described.

St. Clair, J.A.; Duimstra, F.A.; Varnado, S.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Economic Development | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Development Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy Entrepreneurial Development Programs Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park Economic...

413

Nanotechnology Development in Arab States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanotechnology Development in Arab States ... to quickly build scientific capacity and track the worldwide developments in nanotechnology.

414

Technology Development | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Development Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Smart Grid Demand Response Federal Smart Grid Task Force Distributed Energy Recovery Act...

415

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems Location: Cambridge, MA Project Title TechBridge Energy Innovation Acceleration Program

416

Telecommunications in developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper brings out the rationale for and the course of abolition of monopolies in telecommunications, the emergence of independent regulation, competition and markets determining prices for Telecom and Information services in developed countries and ... Keywords: access, competition, convergence, corporatisation, degovernmentalisation, demonopolisation, internet cafes, public telephones, regulation, telecommunications, universal service/

T. H. Chowdary

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Standards Development as Hybridization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While users in the rest of the World have been offered 3G mobile phones based on either the CDMA2000 or W-CDMA standards, users in China have the additional option of using phones based on the TD-SCDMA standard. As a technology largely developed by Chinese ... Keywords: Global, Hybridization, Indigenous, Innovation, Mobile Phones, National, Technology

Xiaobai Shen, Ian Graham, James Stewart, Robin Williams

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Transportation in Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Africa that produces synthetic oil from coal, starts to use natural gas as feedstock in the production, natural gas, and petroleum into liquid fuels and chemicals. Sasol is now a privately owned companysolutions+ + + + Transportation in Developing Countries Greenhouse Gas Scenarios for South Africa

Delucchi, Mark

419

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of the March 1992 `Recent Developments` section of Nuexco. Specific issues mentioned are: (1) closure of Yankee Rowe, (2) steam-generator tube plugging at Trojan, (3) laser enrichment in South Africa, (4) the US uranium industry, (5) planning for two nuclear units in Taiwan, and (6) the establishment of a Czech/French joint venture.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Purposes of Strip Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...arriving at the most economical use of material. Economy of material usage must be considered so as to obtain fully the possible reductions of manufacturing costs through use of progressive dies. The strip development should be studied with a view toward using the narrowest possible carrier strips...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Portable Linear Accelerator Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Minac-3, a miniaturized linear accelerator system. It covers the current equipment capabilities and achievable modifications, applications information for prospective users, and technical information on high-energy radiography that is useful for familiarization and planning. The design basis, development, and applications history of Minac are also summarized.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

JAGUAR developer's manual.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JAGUAR (JAva GUi for Applied Research) is a Java software tool providing an advanced text editor and graphical user interface (GUI) to manipulate DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications) input specifications. This document focuses on the technical background necessary for a developer to understand JAGUAR.

Chan, Ethan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Developing architectural lighting representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a visualization system for architectural lighting designers. It starts by motivating the problem as both complex in its physics and social organization. Three iterations of prototypes for displaying time and space ... Keywords: architectural lighting design, energy efficiency, ethnographic fieldwork, information visualization, qualitative analysis

Daniel C. Glaser; Roger Tan; John Canny; Ellen Yi-Luen Do

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Bioenergy and Sustainable Development?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of raw materials). Rather than provide subsidies (other than for the poorest households), a range reserved 1543-5938/07/1121-0131$20.00 Key Words biodiesel, bioethanol, biofuels, biomass, clean energy greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For large- scale commercial biofuels to contribute to sustainable development

Bensel, Terrence G.

425

Security auditing course development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As people increasingly depend on computers and network systems, security auditing has become one of the most effective security practices to achieve defense-in-depth in organizations. It follows an effective process to measure policies, procedures ... Keywords: IT audit, IT education, curriculum development, security

Yin Pan

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Smart Charger Technology Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charger Technology Charger Technology Development Presented by: Frank Tuffner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Smart Grid R&D Peer Review November 4, 2010 Golden, CO Project Team: Michael Kintner-Meyer, PI Krishnan Gowri Richard Pratt Nathan Tenney Frank Tuffner PNNL-SA-75999 Analysis and Development Grid Capabilities for the Electrification of Transportation Goals and Objectives Funding Summary ($K) FY09 FY10 FY11 $350 $500 $500 Technical Scope GOAL: * Assure grid can support electrification of transportation * Assure that EVs/PHEVs will not create new peaks (locally or regionally) or electricity prices will not support large adoption of EVs/PHEVs Objectives: * Assess grid benefits and impacts of electrification of transportation * Technology demonstration * Actively engage in codes and standards

428

National Fertilizer Development Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h-L h-L National Fertilizer Development Center May 15, 1980 nww Hr. William Et Mott, Director Environmental Control Technology Division Office of Environment Dcpartiaent of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Mr. Mott: This is in response to your letter of May 5 requesting ccmments on a report dated Xarct; 1930 which summarizes a preliminary radiological survey of facilities used in the early 1950's for studies of recovery of uranium from leached zone ore. I have made a few suggested changes to the report, which is being returned to you. * Thaul, you for the opportunity to review this report. Sincerely, , Enclosure Development Branch . 1 -a' . I . . . PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY MUSCLE SHOALS, ALA&A Work .performed by the Health and Safety Research Division

429

Transmission Developers Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

% ~ % ~ Transmission Developers Inc. July 7, 2011 Mr. Anthony J. Como Director, Permitting and Siting Office ofElectricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence A venue SW, Room 8G-024 Washington, D.C. 20585 Subject: Champlain Hudson Power Express Project U.S. Department of Energy Presidential Permit Application PP-362 Dear Mr. Como: On January 25, 2010, Transmission Developers, Inc. ("TDI'' or "Applicants") submitted on behalf of Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. ("CHPEI") an application to the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") for a Presidential Permit and an amendment on August 5, 2010 (collectively, the "Application") in connection with the Champlain Hudson Power Express

430

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) The Regents of the University of California, UC San Diego Location: La Jolla, CA Project Title Regional Energy Innovation and Commercialization Proposed Action or Project Description The University of California San Diego and San Diego State University are partnering to address deficiencies in the process for translation of research discoveries to the private sector in the clean energy space in the greater San Diego region and accelerate the movement of clean energy innovation from the university laboratory into the marketplace. The Phase I objective for launching the Regional Energy Innovation Challenge includes tasks such as: 1) project management and planning (organizing advisory

431

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

PEATGAS process development status  

SciTech Connect

Since 1976, IGT has conducted over 200 peat-gasification tests in both laboratory- and process-development-unit (PDU)-scale equipment. The encouraging results demonstrate that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for the production of SNG. Based on a peat-gasification kinetic model developed from the laboratory and PDU data, cost estimates for commercial operation show that the conversion of peat to SNG by the PEATGAS process is competitive with other alternative SNG sources. If the results of a 19-month, $4 million feasibility study funded by the US Department of Energy are favorable, Minnesota Gas Co. plans to participate in the construction and operation of an 80 million SCF/day industrial plant for making SNG from peat.

Punwani, D.V.; Biljetina, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Central Florida Location: Orlando, FL Project Title MegaWatt Ventures Proposed Action or Project Description The University of Central Florida is dedicated to creating innovative programs that accelerate the

435

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

Customer Communications Architecture Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report builds on previous work to develop a tree of requirements metrics (TRM) that represents a detailed dictionary of primitive requirements for applications of the Smart Grid. The initial work was focused primarily, but not exclusively, on advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) systems. This project phase extends this work with some in-depth extraction of additional primitives obtained from the study of distributed energy resources and related subjects. Customer-sited distributed energy resources...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Update on INSIGHTS Development  

SciTech Connect

INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

Not Listed; Eric Burgett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Issue Development sheet Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

439

EPRI Transformer Guidebook Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are losing many of their subject matter experts through retirement and downsizing. This is particularly true in the case of power transformers, so that there is now a critical need for a comprehensive transformer reference book geared toward utility engineers. In 2007, the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI published the technical update report Transformer Guidebook Design 1013799. That report described the results of the initial project to develop the Copper Book, a comprehensive reference...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

Silicon web process development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon dendritic web is a ribbon form of silicon produced from the melt without die shaping, and capable of fabrication into solar cells with greater than 15% AM1 conversion efficiency. This quarterly report describes the work carried out during the period April to June 1980, as part of Phase III of a DOE/JPL-sponsored effort to develop silicon web process technology compatible with the national goals for low cost photovoltaic output power. We have successfully demonstrated eight hours of silicon web growth with closed loop melt level control, a key contract milestone. The result was achieved using a feedback system in which the change in output from a laser melt level sensor was used to control the rate at which silicon pellets were fed to replace the material frozen into web crystal. The melt level was controlled to about +- 0.1mm, well within the range required for stable long term web growth. This is an important step toward the development of a fully automated silicon web growth machine. A second major highlight of this quarter was the completion of an engineering design for a semi-automated web growth machine embodying all the desired features developed so far as part of this program (including e.g. melt replenishment, level sensing and control) as well as some system simplifications. The completed design will serve as a basis for complete system automation.

Duncan, C.S.; Seidensticker, R.G.; McHugh, J.P.; Skutch, M.E.; Hopkins, R.H.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

ABC Technology Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: `Provide a weapon`s grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon`s grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.` This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments.

NONE

1994-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Developer | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer header Developer header Developer Home > Developer > Posts by term > Developer Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: developer Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry developer New Robust References! Jweers 1 8 Aug 2013 - 08:12 Blog entry developer Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! Sfomail 17 May 2013 - 11:14 Blog entry developer Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Jweers 16 May 2013 - 14:22 Blog entry developer New Result Formats on OpenEI Jweers 25 Mar 2013 - 12:22 Blog entry developer OpenEI maintenance March 8-9, 2013 Rmckeel 8 Mar 2013 - 14:23 Blog entry developer Semantic Mediawiki Semantic Forms update Rmckeel 22 Oct 2012 - 07:23 Blog entry developer Current and historical incentive data available as XML! Rmckeel 11 Sep 2012 - 13:41

445

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Flexible armored blanket development  

SciTech Connect

An exploratory development contract was undertaken on December 23, 1977 which had as its purpose the development and demonstration of a flexible armored blanket design suitable for providing ballistic protection to nuclear weapons during shipment. Objectives were to design and fabricate a prototype blanket which will conform to the weapon shape, is troop-handleable in the field, and which, singly or in multiple layers, can defeat a range of kinetic energy armor piercing (AP) ammunition potentially capable of damaging the critical portion of the nuclear weapon. Following empirical testing, including the firing of threat ammunition under controlled laboratory and field test conditions, materials were selected and assembled into two blanket designs, each weighing approximately 54 kg/m{sup 2} (11 lbs/ft{sup 2}) and estimated to cost from $111 to $180 per ft{sup 2} in production. A firing demonstration to evidence blanket performance against terrorist/light infantry weapons, heavy infantry weapons, and aircraft cannon was conducted for representatives of the DOD and interested Sandia employees on April 12, 1978. The blankets performed better than anticipated defeating bullets up to 7.62 mm x 51 mm AP with one layer and projectiles up to 23 mm HEI with two layers. Based on these preliminary tests it is recommended that development work be continued with the following objectives: (1) the selection by the DOD of priority applications, (2) the specific design and fabrication of sufficient quantities of armored blankets for field testing, (3) the evaluation of the blankets by DOD operational units, with reports to Sandia Laboratories to enable final design.

Roth, E.S.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air Asia, The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) Partner: UN Habitat Sector: Land Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Website: cleanairinitiative.org/portal/node/7870

448

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Program Type Grant Program Loan Program Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help

449

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Sustainable Urban...

450

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Supervisor's Evaluation of Candidate's Performance During Developmental Assignment DATE:________________ NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: TITLE OF POSITION: LOCATION OF ASSIGNMENT: ASSIGNMENT DURATION: PART I: EVALUATION OF ASSIGNMENT OBJECTIVES Please evaluate the candidate's level of performance in meeting the objectives of the assignment as Successful or Unacceptable. Objectives Standards Performance Evaluation PLEASE RATE YOUR OVERALL EVALUATION OF THE CANDIDATE'S PERFORMANCE BY CIRCLING A NUMBER ON THE SCALE BELOW: EXCELLENT VERY GOOD SATISFACTORY POOR UNACCEPTABLE

451

ERCOT Wind Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, Texas leads the nation in wind development. Capacity reached 8005 MW in 2008, an addition of over 5000 MW in two years. Further, the state is committed to expanding the transmission system to tap as much as 18,456 MW of wind power. Focusing on the period 2008-2012, this study examines the market response to wind capacity, particularly in the time leading up to the expansion of the Texas transmission system. The study is introductory in nature, providing a foundation for more extensive analysi...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Evaluation of Formal Training DATE:_______________ CANDIDATE NAME: TITLE OF TRAINING PROGRAM: VENDOR/LOCATION: TRAINING DATES: Which Executive Core Qualification(s) was this assignment intended to meet? Leading Change Leading People Results Driven Business Acumen Building Coalitions/Communication Please check one for each of the following: Level of difficulty: Too Advanced ___ Appropriate ___ Too Elementary ___ Length of course: Too Long ___ Appropriate ___ Too Short ___ Instructor(s): Excellent ___ Satisfactory ___ Fair Poor ___ 1 until U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

453

Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development  

SciTech Connect

This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Mack LNG vehicle development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to install a production-ready, state-of-the-art engine control system on the Mack E7G natural gas engine to improve efficiency and lower exhaust emissions. In addition, the power rating was increased from 300 brake horsepower (bhp) to 325 bhp. The emissions targets were oxides of nitrogen plus nonmethane hydrocarbons of less than 2.5 g/bhp-hr and particulate matter of less than 0.05 g/bhp-hr on 99% methane. Vehicle durability and field testing were also conducted. Further development of this engine should include efficiency improvements and oxides of nitrogen reductions.

Southwest Research Institute

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s September 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific iems discussed include: (1) merger of Urangesellschaft and Interuran, (2) cessation of uranium mining in Bulgaria, (3) record operation of Limerick-2 and Tokai-2, (4) MRS in Wyoming, (5) low-level waste facilities at Perry, (6) closure of Trojan, (7) restart of Kozloduy-6, (8) agreements between Cogema and Minatom, (9) planning for a large nuclear power plant in Japan moves forward, (10) order of a new reactor at Civaux, (11) relicensing of Yankee Rowe, (12) operation of Bradwell-2, and (13) high-level waste management in Japan.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s August 2992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items discussed include: (1) non-proliferation in Argentina and Brazil, (2) a joint-venture uranium leaching project in the USA, (3) life extension for Yankee Rowe, (4) contracts for nuclear plants in the Republic of Korea, (5) cleanup of Wismut, (6) record operation of Three Mile Island-1, Oconee-1, and Cook-1, (7) closure of Kozloduy units, (8) China`s ascension to the non-proliferation treaty, and (9) a centrifuge enrichment facility in Japan.

NONE

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Photonics Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLV??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average home??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nation??s energy consumption ?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

Bill Turner

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

SYSTRAN MT dictionary development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTRAN has demonstrated success in the MT field with its long history spanning nearly 30 years. As a general-purpose fully automatic MT system, SYSTRAN employs a transfer approach. Among its several components, large, carefully encoded, high-quality dictionaries are critical to SYSTRAN's translation capability. A total of over 2.4 million words and expressions are now encoded in the dictionaries for twelve source language systems (30 language pairs- one per year!). SYSTRAN'S dictionaries, along with its parsers, transfer modules, and generators, have been tested on huge amounts of text, and contain large terminology databases covering various domains and detailed linguistic rules. Using these resources, SYSTRAN MT systems have successfully served practical translation needs for nearly 30 years, and built a reputation in the MT world for their large, mature dictionaries. This paper describes various aspects of SYSTRAN MT dictionary development as an important part of the development and refinement of SYSTRAN MT systems. There are 4 major sections: 1) Role and Importance of Dictionaries in the SYSTRAN Paradigm describes the importance of coverage and depth in the dictionaries; 2) Dictionary Structure discusses the specifics of

Laurie Gerber; Jin Yang

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Views of software development environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an abstract model of software development and then explores its implications for software development environments (SDEs). It explores the automation of engineering, i.e., what to automate, and the engineering of automation, ...

W. Stinson

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA The goal of the Research and Development Investment Criteria initiative is to measurably improve the performance of the government's...

463

Advanced Application Development Program Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of the Tranmission Reliability program's Advanced Applications Research and Development activity area. This program develops and demonstrates tools to monitor and control the grid with...

464

Kansas Certified Development Companies (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kansas Certified Development Companies (CDC) assist businesses by developing loan packages that meet the financial need of a project. These packages often contain multiple sources of project...

465

Argonne TDC: Regional Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Economic Development Argonne participates in economic development activities with State of Illinois agencies and programs, business and industrial organizations, and...

466

Developing Human Performance Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRCs risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

New MCNPX developments  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle extended (MCNPX) radiation transport code has been upgraded significantly to Version MCNPX2.4.0. It is now based on the latest MCNP4C3 and MCNPX2.3.0 releases to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). In addition to all of the advances from earlier versions of MCNP and MCNPX, important new capabilities have been developed. The Monte Carlo method was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the Manhattan Project in the early 1940s. MCNP and MCNPX are heirs to those early efforts. Over 400 person-years have been invested in the research, development, programming, documentation, and databases for these codes. MCNP is a general-purpose neutron (0-MeV to 20-MeV), photon (1-keV to 1-GeV), and electron (1-keV to 1-GeV) transport code for calculating *MCNPX, MCNP, LAHET, and LCS are trademarks of the Regents of the University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory. the time-dependent, continuous-energy transport of these particles in three-dimensional geometries. MCNP is perhaps the most widely used and well-known physics simulation code in the world today. MCNPX extends MCNP to track nearly all particles at all energies. MCNPX combined MCNP and the LAHET Code System (LCS). LCS is based on the Oak Ridge High Energy Transport Code. LCS uses models for particles in physics regimes where there are no tabulated data, including the Bertini and ISABEL models. MCNPX has additional models to LCS, such as the CEM model. MCNPX2.3.0 was released to RSICC in December 2001 and is based on MCNP4B. The principal features of MCNPX2.3.0 are (1) Physics for 34 particle types; (2) High-energy physics above the giga-electron volt range; (3) Neutron, proton, and photonuclear 150-MeV libraries: (4) Photonuclear physics; (5) Mesh tallies; (6) Radiography tallies; (7) Secondary particle production biasing; (8) VAVILOV energy straggling for charged particles; and (9) Automatic configuration for compilation. The focus of this work is MCNPX2.4.0, which is due for imminent release. MCNPX2.4.0 merges MCNPX2.3.0 with MCNP4C3 and adds important new features.

Hendricks, J. S. (John S.); McKinney, G. W. (Gregg W.); Waters, L. S. (Laurie S.); Hughes, H. G. (Henry Grady); Snow, E. C. (Edward Clark)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Microchip developed by UCSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

engineer Wentai Liu has been engineer Wentai Liu has been working on an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind for 20 years. Photo by Jim MacKenzie. June 24, 2008 By Tim Stephens (831) 459-2495; stephens@ucsc.edu Last year, Wentai Liu watched as surgeons implanted a microchip he had designed into the eye of a blind patient. For Liu, a professor of electrical engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, it was a major milestone in two decades of work on an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind. Ten patients are now enrolled in a clinical trial of the device based on Liu's microchip at four leading ophthalmic centers in the United States. Patients are also enrolled in trials in Mexico, Switzerland, France, and the United Kingdom. Developed through a large

469

Fuel Cell Development Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and sustainable fuel cell solutions UTC Power About Us PureCell ® Model 400 Solution Process Overview Power Conditioner Converts DC power to high-quality AC power 3 Fuel Cell Stack Generates DC power from hydrogen and air 2 Fuel Processor Converts natural gas fuel to hydrogen

470

PNNL: Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Calendar Events Calendar left arrow January 2014 right arrow Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Scheduled events for January 4, 2014 Calendar contains no events. Past Events 2013 September 20, 2013 - Startup Weekend Tri-Cities January 29, 2013 - PTAC Class: Developing Your Capability Statement January 24, 2013 - Economic Outlook Summit January 23, 2013 - Women in Business Conference January 10, 2013 - Venture Investment and Partnering Forum January 07, 2013 - New Routes for U.S.-Japan Collaboration / Ambassadorial Outreach Tour 2012 November 29, 2012 - Innovation Summit October 18, 2012 - Funding for Startups from the National Cancer Institute October 11, 2012 - Career Fair October 09, 2012 - Understanding Government Contracting Solicitations

471

Development of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the Internet has reached enormous popularity, but at the same time its weaknesses become evident: Huge efforts have to be taken to manage all participating nodes, and the infrastructure is not suitable to integrate emerging network paradigms such as sensor networks or delay tolerant networks. Therefore several research projects try to reinvent the Internet and provide a network architecture which is better armed for future needs. This thesis is situated in the ANA project which builds an autonomic network based on a clean slate approach. The ultimate goal is to develop a novel autonomic network architecture that enables flexible, dynamic, and fully autonomic formation of networks. In an ANA node two main components can be identified: The MINMEX and the Playground. The Playground hosts the elements (functional blocks) providing networking functionality. The MINMEX ties these functional blocks together and dispatches the data amongst them.

Technische Informatik Und; Ariane Keller; Supervisor Prof; Dr. B. Plattner; Advisor Theus Hossmann; Dr. Martin May; Dr. Rainer Baumann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Geothermal development in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kampaeng and Fang geothermal areas are considered areas of interest for exploitation of geothermal energy. The technologies of exploration and development have been studied by Thai scientists and engineers during the past four years. The first geothermal deep exploration well was drilled, in cooperation with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in the San Kampaeng geothermal area. In 1985, supplementary work is planned to define the deep structural setting in greater detail before starting to drill the next deep exploration well. In Fang geothermal area some shallow exploitation wells have been drilled to obtain fluid to feed a demonstration binary system of 120 kWe, with the technical cooperation of BRGM and GEOWATT, France.

Praserdvigai, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Liquid fuel reformer development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Argonne National Laboratory we are developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to a clean hydrogen feed for a fuel cell. The process incorporates a partial oxidation/steam reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. We have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, low-sulfur diesel fuel, and a regular diesel fuel. We achieved complete conversion of the feed to products. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 800 C. For the two diesel fuels, higher temperatures, >850 C, were required to approach similar levels of hydrogen in the product stream. At 800 C, hydrogen yield of the low sulfur diesel was 32%, while that of the regular diesel was 52%. Residual products in both cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, ethylene, and methane.

Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Development of mirror specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed by PNL for Sandia Laboratories under a contract titled Survey and Analysis of Mirror Silvering Technology and Heliostat Glass Evaluation is described. The primary purpose for the work was to develop specifications that will enhance the durability and lifetime of heliostat mirrors. The contract was initiated with a technical survey of the present commercial silvered glass mirror industry and an analytical investigation of the degradation phenomena experienced by the heliostat mirrors at Sandia's Livermore test facility. The main thrust was to evaluate the present methods of silver deposition and protection in order to recommend a specification for the heliostat mirror silvering process that would extend the lifetime of the Barstow mirror field. In addition, several advanced concepts for enhancing mirror lifetime were investigated. Technical and measurement support for evaluation of the Barstow heliostat glass and updating the glass specification was also provided. (WHK)

Lind, M.A.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Lessons for Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Argentina was one of the first countries in the world to implement a comprehensive reform of its electricity sector in the recent period. Among developing countries only Chile has had a comparably comprehensive and successful reform. This paper traces the history of the Argentine reform, which began in 1992, and assesses its progress and its lessons. We conclude that the reform was very successful prior to the collapse of the Argentine peso in early 2002. We suggest lessons for the generation, transmission and distribution sectors, as well as the economic regulation of electricity and the general institutional environment favourable to reform. We note that the achievements of the sector are now threatened by the delays in tackling the financial consequences of the peso devaluation.

Michael G. Pollitt; Michael Pollitt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Geothermal development in Australia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Developing architectural lighting representations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a visualization system for architectural lighting designers. It starts by motivating the problem as both complex in its physics and social organization. Three iterations of prototypes for displaying time and space varying phenomena are discussed. Fieldwork is presented to identify where in practice they will be most effective. A set of user studies, one of which is analyzed in fine-grained detail, show how building designers incorporate visualization on hypothetical design problems. This has positive implications for both energy efficiency and lighting quality in buildings. CR Categories: H.1.2 [Models and Principles]: User/Machine SystemsHuman factors; D.2.2 [Software Engineering]: Design

Daniel C. Glaser; Roger Tan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Panel: How Can Software Reliability Engineering (SRE) Help System Engineers and Software Architects?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This panel session will discuss how Systems Engineers and Software Architects can benefit porn using SRE. Members of the panel will discuss how their respective organizations use (or anticipate using) SRE earlier in the software development life-cycle. ...

Panel chair; W. Ehrlich; J. Musa; P. Mangan; R. Yacobellis

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Information Security Architecture: An Integrated Approach to Security in the Organization, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By providing clear and organized methods, this text incorporates the knowledge developed during the past decade that has pushed the information security lifecycle from infancy to a more mature, understandable, and manageable state.

Jan Killmeyer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Mission analysis and performance specification studies report. Appendix A. [LYFECC and WANDC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of Task I, mission analysis and performance specifications, for the Near-Term Hybrid Vehicle (NTHV) development program are presented. The items researched included trip characteristics, market potential, life-cycle cost and performance specifications of NTHV's. (LCL)

Not Available

1979-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development lifecycle sdlc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Bifurcation in Eddy Life Cycles: Implications for Storm Track Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing a number of very high resolution, nonhydrostatic experiments of baroclinic lifecycles, it was concluded that the intensity of the near-surface baroclinic development influences the upper-level wave to such an extent that it could ...

Isidoro Orlanski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Supervisory Control Strategy Development  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 of this collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focused on the design of the hierarchical supervisory control for multiple-module units. The state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design made developing a detailed hierarchical control difficult at this time. However, other simultaneous and ongoing efforts have contributed to providing the needed information. This report summarizes the results achieved under Task 4 of this Financial Assistance Award. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 discusses the IRIS control functions. Next, it briefly reviews the current control concepts, and then reviews the maneuvering requirements for the IRIS plant. It closes by noting the benefits that automated sequences have in reducing operator workload. Section 3 examines reactor loading in the frequency domain to establish some guidelines for module operation, paying particular attention to strategies for using process steam for desalination and/or district heating. The final subsection discusses the implications for reactor control, and argues that using the envisioned percentage (up to 10%) of the NSSS thermal output for these purposes should not significantly affect the NSSS control strategies. Section 4 uses some very general economic assumptions to suggest how one should approach multi-module operation. It concludes that the well-known algorithms used for economic dispatching could be used to help manage a multi-unit IRIS site. Section 5 addresses the human performance factors of multi-module operation. Section 6 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

483

Community-Driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community-Driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Community-Driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Community-driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Agency/Company /Organization: International Fund for Agricultural Development Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.ifad.org/english/cdd/pub/decisiontools.pdf Community-driven Development Decision Tools for Rural Development Programs Screenshot References: Community-Driven Development Decision Tools[1] Overview "The CDD Decision Tools is the final outcome of a series of studies conducted from 2003-08 by IFAD on the CDD activities and approaches it sponsors in a number of countries in Western and Central Africa (WCA). The

484

Trust Anchor Fact Sheet.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection Cryptographically secure software providing independent testing, monitoring, and control of energy control system component operation Cryptographically secure software providing independent testing, monitoring, and control of energy control system component operation Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Project Lead: Sandia National Laboratories The Concept The Approach Commercial-off-the-shelf energy control systems and components are primarily designed, produced, and maintained by foreign companies. With control of commercial hardware and software supply chains and routine access through configuration and updates, foreign developers have an unprecedented

485

Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nation has embarked on an aggressive program to develop its indigenous resources of geothermal energy. For more than a decade, geothermal energy has been heralded as one of the more promising forms of energy alternate to oil and gas for electric power generation, but during the last fifteen years, the total capacity in the U.S. has reached 502 MWe, about half the size of a single modern nuclear power plant. And yet, the United States, especially its western and Gulf coast states, is believed to possess a vast resource base of geothermal heat at depths up to 3 to 10 km. Many estimates of these potential resources suitable for the production of electric power have been published and they range over a spectrum of more than a factor of 100. This variation suggests that the potential is essentially unknown. Table 1 gives a range of published forecasts for the year 1985 and the equivalent potential in number of 1000 Mwe power plants and in oil consumption in millions of barrels per day. In view of the estimated construction of about 200 to 250 nuclear power reactors by 1985-90, the pessimistic forecasts clearly show that the contribution of geothermal energy to the Nation's energy supply may indeed be small. The optimistic forecasts represent more than 15% of the total electric power requirements estimated for the year 1985. The Task Force for Geothermal Energy, in the Federal Energy Administration Project Independence Blueprint report of November 1974, established a national goal for 1985 of 20,000 to 30,000 MWe, the latter value representing an equivalent energy supply of one million barrels of oil per day. This goal was clearly a compromise between what is worth a national effort and what might be realistically achieved. The potential for adding or replacing the equivalent of some 25 nuclear power plants or for conserving one million barrels of oil per day should be an adequate incentive for the Nation to accelerate the development of a viable geothermal industry.

Kruger, Paul

1975-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

486

Three Essays on Development Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December December MMD, FDD UNIP, UPND December Wards withand Development (FDD), United National Independence Party (

Nakagawa, Hideyuki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Standards and agile software development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the adaptability of agile methodologies to software development standards laid down by ISO. On the basis of this analysis, guidelines are proposed for developing software in such a way that the development process conforms to ... Keywords: ISO/IEC 12207:1995, agile methodologies, documentation, extreme programming, software development, standardization

W. H. Morkel Theunissen; Derrick G. Kourie; Bruce W. Watson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Development framework components as commonplaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the practice of using front-end web development frameworks and associated plug-ins to develop web application interfaces and suggests returning to a rhetorical foundation for determining the propriety of code use and vetting of an ... Keywords: code libraries, commonplaces, design, development frameworks, extreme usability, front-end development, rhetoric, topoi, user interfaces

Tom Lindsley

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

CNST Researchers Develop Integrated Nanomechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CNST Researchers Develop Integrated Nanomechanical Sensor for Atomic Force Microscopy. June 1, 2011. ...

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

491