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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Photovoltaics (PV) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from PV projects. JEDI PV has default...

2

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Coal model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts from coal power generation projects. Applying a...

3

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from...

4

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Models Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version About JEDI Geothermal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Geothermal model allows users...

5

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three categories: Project Development and Onsite Labor Impacts Local Revenue and Supply Chain Impacts Induced Impacts JEDI model defaults are based on interviews with industry...

6

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

7

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Models The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) biofuel models include JEDI Dry Mill Corn Ethanol, JEDI Lignocellulosic Ethanol, and JEDI Biopower. These JEDI...

8

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/39/39/42122112.pdf Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Screenshot References: Modelling Ag Policy[1] Overview "The role of agricultural policies in addressing the development needs of poorer countries is high on the political agenda, for both structural reasons and as a result of recent market developments. In the first place,

9

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Model CSP Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from CSP projects. JEDI CSP has default information that can be utilized to run a generic impacts analysis assuming industry averages. Model users are encouraged to enter as much project-specific data as possible. Download the JEDI CSP Model Printable Version JEDI Home About JEDI Biofuels Models Coal Model CSP Model Geothermal Model Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model Natural Gas Model Photovoltaics Model Transmission Line Model Wind Model Download JEDI Methodology Interpreting Results Advanced Users Limitations of JEDI Models Publications Forum Webinars Contact Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback.

10

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Jump to: navigation, search Site head analysis jedi.jpg Overview Originally developed in 2002 for the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America project, the Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model was designed to be an easy-to-use, excel based calculator which uses IMPLAN's economic multipliers to estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. It comes as a separate model for wind, PV, natural gas, CSP, coal, and biofuels. Job's, earnings, and impact are outputs. Inputs are construction costs, equipment costs, O&M costs, financing parameters and any other costs associated with the project. With its success in

11

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Line Model Transmission Line Model The Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts associated with transmission line projects. Applying a similar user interface as other JEDI models, Transmission Line JEDI requires a few additional user inputs such as: Transmission Line Type Line Length Terrain Type Right-of-Way Characteristics. Results are presented in the same manner as those in other JEDI models. This allows the transmission line JEDI model to be used by itself or in conjunction with electricity generation JEDI models. As with all JEDI models, reasonable default values are provided. Individual projects may vary and when possible project specific data should be used to obtain the best estimate of economic development impacts.

12

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Limitations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limitations of JEDI Models Limitations of JEDI Models Results are an estimate, not a precise forecast. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are input-output based models, also appropriately called calculators or screening tools. As such, they share important limitations with all models based on input-output calculation methodologies. For the interested user, the Environmental Protection Agency recently published EPA Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy: A Resource for States1, which discusses and compares different types of models and screening tools for assessing economic impacts and jobs, including JEDI (see Chapter 5, pp. 136-142). The most important limitation to note is that JEDI results are estimates, not precise forecasts, for the following reasons.

13

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

14

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

15

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the construction phase and for the ongoing operations phase. For the construction phase, the impacts are broken out by project development and on-site labor impacts,...

16

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now: Project Development and On-site Labor (re-labeled from Direct) Turbine and Supply Chain Impacts (re-labeled from Indirect) Induced Impacts Impacts during the operating...

17

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

18

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

19

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering...

20

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

Tegen, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

22

Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R D  

SciTech Connect

The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called Materials-by-Design (MBD).'' The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials' performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

Young, J.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The basic user interface for the natural gas model is the same as the wind and coal models. Results are provided in the same format as the coal and wind models allowing...

26

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Downloading...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Excel 3.4 MB) JEDI Biofuels Models Cellulosic Model rel. C1.10.02 (Excel 723 KB) Corn Ethanol Model rel. CE1.10.02 (Excel 679 KB) Biopower Model rel. B3.14.13. (Excel 386...

27

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Help  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model, I receive a security alert message stating "the macros in the file have been disabled." How do I change the security setting, so I can run the model with the macros...

28

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aggregation Scheme - Base for most of the models, and the file JEDI Aggregation Scheme - PV for the solar photovoltaic model. In addition, the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau...

29

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development of a practical modeling framework for estimating the impact of wind technology on bird populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most pressing environmental concerns related to wind project development is the potential for avian fatalities caused by the turbines. The goal of this project is to develop a useful, practical modeling framework for evaluating potential wind power plant impacts that can be generalized to most bird species. This modeling framework could be used to get a preliminary understanding of the likelihood of significant impacts to birds, in a cost-effective way. The authors accomplish this by (1) reviewing the major factors that can influence the persistence of a wild population; (2) briefly reviewing various models that can aid in estimating population status and trend, including methods of evaluating model structure and performance; (3) reviewing survivorship and population projections; and (4) developing a framework for using models to evaluate the potential impacts of wind development on birds.

Morrison, M.L. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States); Pollock, K.H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning, and output (total economic activity) for a given power generation...

32

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

36

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Job and Economic Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects Preprint March 2004 * NREL/CP-500-35953 M. Goldberg MRG & Associates K. Sinclair and M. Milligan (Consultant) National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2004 Global WINDPOWER Conference Chicago, Illinois March 29-31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

37

Population, affluence, and environmental impact across development: Evidence from panel cointegration modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes urban population's and affluence's (GDP per capita's) influence on environmental impact in developed and developing countries by taking as its starting point the STIRPAT framework. In addition to considering environmental impacts ... Keywords: Environment and development, Environmental/Carbon Kuznets Curve, FMOLS panel cointegration, GHG emissions, IPAT, Population and environment, STIRPAT

Brantley Liddle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modeling the determinants of the social impacts of agricultural development projects  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to help policy-makers improve the social sustainability of development projects, this study identifies the key determinants of farmers' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the floodwater spreading project (FWSP) on the Gareh-Bygone plain in Iran. In order to analyze the links between the various factors that affect the experience of social impact, a theoretical framework was developed. Stratified random sampling was used to survey 138 farm households from the four villages in the region. One male and one female from each house were interviewed face-to-face using a questionnaire, resulting in a total of 276 interviews. Structural factors were found to be the largest contribution to stakeholders' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the project. Results from a cluster analysis suggested that the level of floodwater information, level of participation, water access, ownership change, and environmental worldview were the most important factors explaining attitude towards social impact of the FWSP.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: Ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Department of Rural Development Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iman, Mohammad Taghi, E-mail: Iman@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NRELs JEDI Model  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 M. Costanti Bozeman, Montana Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 M. Costanti

40

Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R&D  

SciTech Connect

The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called ``Materials-by-Design (MBD).`` The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials` performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

Young, J.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model; Period of Performance: December 1, 2003--May 31, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic development potential that wind power offers is often an overlooked aspect of today's wind power projects. Much has been written about how wind can spur economic development, but few have attempted to quantify these impacts. Using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Jobs, Economic Development, and Impacts Model (JEDI), the author examined six counties in Montana to quantify these impacts. The overriding project goal was to illuminate economic development opportunities from wind project development for six Montana counties using an objective economic modeling tool. Interested stakeholders include the agriculture community, wind developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, and other decision-makers. The Model was developed to enable spreadsheet users with limited or no economic modeling background to easily identify the statewide economic impacts associated with constructing and operating wind power plants. The Model's User Add-In feature allows users to conduct county-specific analyses using county IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for PLANning) multipliers, while state-level multipliers are contained within the Model as default values for all 50 states.

Costanti, M.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze...

45

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May...

46

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Jobs and Economic Development Impact  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet Thumbnail of the JEDI fact sheet. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind

47

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface...

49

User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Impact of Snow Model Complexity at Three CLPX Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have developed snow process understanding by exploring the impact of snow model complexity on simulation performance. This paper revisits this topic using several recently developed land surface models, including the Simplified ...

Xia Feng; Alok Sahoo; Kristi Arsenault; Paul Houser; Yan Luo; Tara J. Troy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Social impact models of opinion dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate models of opinion formation which are based on the social impact theory. The following approaches are discussed: (i) general mean field theory of social impact, (ii) a social impact model with learning, (iii) a model of a finite group with a strong leader, (iv) a social impact model with dynamically changing social temperature, (v) a model with individuals treated as active Brownian particles interacting via a communication field. 1

Janusz A. Ho?lyst; Krzysztof Kacperski; Frank Schweitzer; Janusz A. Ho?lyst; Krzysztof Kacperski; Frank Schweitzer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Environment Impact Evaluation of Coal Development Based on BP Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the Environment impact of coal development, this paper selected evaluation indicators of the Environment impact of coal development according to certain principles and constructed Environment impact model of the coal development ... Keywords: Environment Impact, Coal Development, BP neural network

Kai Guo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Economic Development Impacts of 20% Wind (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will require enourmous investment in wind farms, manufacturing, and infrastructure. This investment will create substantial economic development impacts on local, regional, and national levels. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 outlines the various economic development impacts from a 20% wind scenario.

Kelly, M.; Tegen, S.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and modeling the impact of system parameters on levelized cost of electricity .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells which are at the right intersection of cost and performance to… (more)

Kang, Moon Hee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Name Computable General Equilibrium Models for...

56

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Partnership for Economic Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.pep-net.org/programs/mpia/ Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A computable general equilibrium model that accounts for the interactions among sectors and institutions, and their links with the global economy. A

59

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate and prioritize policies across an economy and clearly explain the process

60

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Whatcom County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Whatcom County, Washington, near Mt. Baker, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Whatcom County was chosen due to both identified geotherrnal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Whatcom County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Skamania County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Skamania County, Washington, near Mt. Adams, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Skamania County was chosen due to both identified geothermal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Skamania County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects...

63

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Title Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Publication Type Report...

65

WEC Model Development at Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2C 2C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Wave Energy Converter Model Development at Sandia Outline  Overview of SNL's WEC Modeling Activities * Wave Energy Development Roadmap * MHK Reference Models - Diana Bull * WEC Model Tool Development - Kelley Ruehl Reference Models and SNL Array Modeling presented in next session Wave Energy Development Roadmap Overall Goal and Motivation  Goal: Develop a suggested path for WEC development from design to commercialization.  Motivation: Guide industry towards successful design optimizations, prototype deployments, and utility scale commercialization by providing a roadmap incorporating numerical modeling and experimentation.

66

DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More November 20, 2013 - 11:54am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 20: Live Webinar on Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office

67

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Title Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties...

68

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the environment. So scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Colorado State University and the California Air Resources Board have set out to characterize the roles of various particles as atmospheric change agents on a regional scale.

69

Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model (ENVISAGE) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model (ENVISAGE) Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: go.worldbank.org/ZC77UJYJ50 Related Tools TransportToolkit Prototype Threshold 21 Model General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK) ... further results Designed to analyze a variety of issues related to the economics of climate

70

Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Model interoperability via Model Driven Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the factors that contribute to the inherent complexity of the software development process is the gap between the design and the formal analysis domains. Software design is often considered a human oriented task while the analysis phase draws on ... Keywords: Model Driven Development, Model interoperability, Petri Nets, Software development, UML

Mohamed A. Ameedeen; Behzad Bordbar; Rachid Anane

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Model Kcmil Thousand Circular Mils kV kilovolts MW Megawatt NESC National Electrical Safety Code NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory O&M Operations and Maintenance...

73

Environmental impacts of increased hydroelectric development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27 iii 3 . 2 . 7 Energy Security Benefits . . . . . . . 3 . 3 IMPACTS OF GENERATION USING FOSSIL FUELS . . . 3 . 3 . 1 Water Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . 3 . 2 Air Quality...

74

Impacts of Marcellus Shale Development on Municipal Governments in Susquehanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Marcellus Shale Development on Municipal Governments in Susquehanna and Washington Marcellus shale gas development. The study focused on how gas development is affecting the demand (1) their already extensive shale activity; (2) their divergent geographical, cultural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

75

Analysis of the potential impacts of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to analyze the considerations regarding the environmental impacts of shale gas development by a rational, objective, fact-based assessment. Flowback… (more)

Yi, Hyukjoong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

Goff, S.; Goff, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development < LEDSGP‎ | analysis/impacts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate

78

Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Agency/Company /Organization: DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, University of Heidelberg Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/docs/ecol_econ_2006.pdf Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Screenshot References: Computable general equilibrium models[1] Abstract "Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and

80

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Malheur County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Malheur County, shown in Figure 1. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Malheur County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued responding as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. Public service impacts include costs such as education, fire protection, roads, waste disposal, and water supply. The project assumption discussion notes experiences at other geothermal areas. The background section compares geothermal with conventional power plants. Power plant fuel distinguishes geothermal from other power sources. Other aspects of development are similar to small scale conventional thermal sources. The process of geothermal development is then explained. Development consists of well drilling, gathering system construction, power plant construction, plant operation and maintenance, and wellfield maintenance.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTISPMA/Resources/handbook.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) Gold Standard Program Model Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results A handbook that seeks to provide project managers and policy analysts with

82

General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Implementation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact[1] Resources Productive Uses Productive Uses of Energy for Rural Development, R. Anil Cabraal, Douglas F. Barnes, and Sachin G. Agarwal, Annual Rev. Environ. Resour. 2005. 30:117-44. Millennium Development Goals: Status 2004, United Nations Energy and Gender Bioenergy-Based Productive Use Platforms for Rural Economic

83

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01018.pdf RelatedTo: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Screenshot

84

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Deschutes County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be Deschutes County. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Deschutes County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economical impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result for the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Harney County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Harney Count. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Harney County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Development Impacts Assessment Tools help country, regional, and local policymakers find tools and online resources to assess the impacts of low-emission development strategies (LEDS). These tools equip decision makers with information to explore policy options and build consensus with stakeholders to acheive low-emission development. LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit Pages in category "LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits" The following 65 pages are in this category, out of 65 total.

87

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

China Refrigerator Information Label: Specification Development and Potential Impact  

SciTech Connect

In the last five years, China's refrigerator market has grown rapidly, and now urban markets are showing signs of saturation, with ownership rates in urban households reaching 92%. Rural markets continue to grow from a much lower base. As a result of this growth, the Chinese government in 2006 decided to revise the refrigerator standards and its associated efficiency grades for the mandatory energy information label. In the Chinese standards process, the efficiency grades for the information label are tied to the minimum standards. Work on the minimum standards revision began in 2006 and continued through the first half of 2007, when the draft standard was completed under the direction of the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS). Development of the information label grades required consideration of stakeholder input, continuity with the previous grade classification, ease of implementation, and potential impacts on the market. In this process, CLASP, with the support of METI/IEEJ, collaborated with CNIS to develop the efficiency grades, providing technical input to the process, comment and advice on particular technical issues, and evaluation of the results. After three months of effort and three drafts of the final grade specifications, this work was completed. In addition, in order to effectively evaluate the impact of the label on China's market, CLASP further provided assistance to CNIS to collect data on both the efficiency distribution and product volume distribution of refrigerators on the market. The new information label thresholds to be implemented in 2008 maintain the approach first adopted in 2005 of establishing efficiency levels relative to the minimum standard, but increased the related required efficiency levels by 20% over those established in 2003 and implemented in 2005. The focus of improvement was on the standard refrigerator/freezer (class 5), which constitutes the bulk of the Chinese market. Indeed, the new requirements to achieve grade 1 on the label are now virtually as stringent as those for US Energy Star-qualified or EU A-grade refrigerators. When the energy information label went into effect in March 2005, refrigerator manufacturers were required to display their declared level of efficiency on the label and report it to the China Energy Label Center (CELC), a newly established unit of CNIS responsible for label program management. Because of the visible nature of the label, it was found, through a METI/IEEJ-supported study, that MEPS non-compliance dropped from 4% to zero after the label became mandatory, and that the percentage of higher-grade refrigerators increased. This suggests that the label itself does have potential for shifting the market to higher-efficiency models (Lin 2007). One challenge, however, of assessing this potential impact is the lack of a comprehensive baseline of market efficiency and a program to evaluate the market impact on a yearly basis. As a result, the impact evaluation in this study draws upon the market transformation experience of the related EU energy information label, for which quantitative assessments of its market impact exist. By assuming a parallel process unfolding in China, it is possible to look at the potential impact of the label to 2020. The results of the analysis demonstrates that a robust market transformation program in China focused on the energy information label could save substantial amounts of electricity by 2020, totaling 16.4 TWh annually by that year, compared to a case in which the efficiency distribution of refrigerators was frozen at the 2007 level. Remarkably, the impact of a successful market transformation program with the label would essentially flatten the consumption of electricity for refrigerator use throughout most of the next decade, despite the expectations of continued growth in total stock by nearly 190 million units. At the end of this period, total consumption begins to rise again, as the least efficient of the units have been mostly removed from the market. Such a level of savings would reduce CO{sub

Fridley, David; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Lin, Jiang; Jianhong, Cheng; Sakamoto, Tomoyuki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

90

Simon Thoma Implementation and Impact of the Millennium Development Goals on Development Policies in Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Pakistan Implementation and Impact of the Millennium Development Goals on Development Policies in Pakistan are asked to make special efforts to move towards the Goals. Pakistan as a developing country faces many in Pakistan. The first research hypothesis states that the Goals do not have a direct impact on development

Richner, Heinz

91

The Development of Impact-Oriented Climate Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appropriate scenarios of future climate must be developed prior to any assessment of the impacts of climate change. Information needed was examined in consultation with those having experience in scenario use. Most assessors require regional ...

P. J. Robinson; P. L. Finkelstein

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Power Development's Economic Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power Development's Economic Impact on Rural Communities June 12, 2013 Audio with Jason Brown, Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank Economist (MP3 2.5 MB). Download Windows Media...

93

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcards), Wind Powering America (WPA), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Impacts Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model is a user-friendly tool that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. EERE Information Center

94

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency Webcast Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his is a PDF of PowerPoint™ slides presented during the 17 February 2009 webcast, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency. The webcast was based on work conducted for the report, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency (product number 1016085). The webcast and the slides include the following information: Modeling approaches and assumptions Summary of results for two approaches How model output can be applied by utilities Planned refinements to the model in 2009 and beyond, includin...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

Modeling the dynamic crush of impact mitigating materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crushable materials are commonly utilized in the design of structural components to absorb energy and mitigate shock during the dynamic impact of a complex structure, such as an automobile chassis or drum-type shipping container. The development and application of several finite-element material models which have been developed at various times at LLNL for DYNA3D will be discussed. Between the models, they are able to account for several of the predominant mechanisms which typically influence the dynamic mechanical behavior of crushable materials. One issue we addressed was that no single existing model would account for the entire gambit of constitutive features which are important for crushable materials. Thus, we describe the implementation and use of an additional material model which attempts to provide a more comprehensive model of the mechanics of crushable material behavior. This model combines features of the pre-existing DYNA models and incorporates some new features as well in an invariant large-strain formulation. In addition to examining the behavior of a unit cell in uniaxial compression, two cases were chosen to evaluate the capabilities and accuracy of the various material models in DYNA. In the first case, a model for foam filled box beams was developed and compared to test data from a 4-point bend test. The model was subsequently used to study its effectiveness in energy absorption in an aluminum extrusion, spaceframe, vehicle chassis. The second case examined the response of the AT-400A shipping container and the performance of the overpack material during accident environments selected from 10CFR71 and IAEA regulations.

Logan, R.W.; McMichael, L.D.

1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Deformable human body model development  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (EERE) is supporting the development ofgoals. For the most part EERE program impacts are estimatedcase, which removes any EERE program activities that are

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/documents/suca/evaluation_guide.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/model-energy-efficiency-program-impac Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This document provides guidance on model approaches for calculating energy, demand and emissions savings resulting from energy efficiency programs. It

100

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Factors that Impact Implementing a System Development Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿This paper presents the findings of empirical research from 61 companies, mostly from the United States, to identify the factors that may impact implementation of a system development methodology (SDM). The study uses a survey instrument to ... Keywords: Systems development methodology, analysis and design, project management, life cycle, managers, implementation.

Tom L. Roberts, Jr.; Michael L. Gibson; Kent T. Fields; R. Kelly Rainer, Jr.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling Impacts of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies on Power Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a modeling approach that simulate the impacts of different climate change mitigation technologies on power grids for power system planning purposes. Because the historical data is less credible when new technologies are being deployed to the system, it is then critical to model them to address their impacts. This paper illustrated how to integrate modeling results obtained from different modeling tools to give a reasonable forecast of the future. Building simulation tools, distribution power grid modeling tools, and power system planning tools are used to model and aggregate the impacts from the end-use to the system level. Electricity generation, production cost, emission, and transmission congestions are used to quantify the influence of different mitigation technologies. Modeling results have shown that the cross-discipline modeling approach provided the modeler with the necessary time resolution and input details to address the variables that influence the modeling results. Different modeling issues are also addressed in the paper.

Nguyen, Tony B.; Lu, Ning; Jin, Chunlian

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties Title Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication...

104

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air Quality Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air Quality Impacts of DER Speaker(s): Robert Van Buskirk Date: January 30, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare A critical challenge for the atmospheric sciences is to understand the anthropogenic impacts on atmospheric chemistry over spatial scales ranging from the urban to the regional, and ultimately to the global, and over corresponding time scales ranging from minutes to weeks and ultimately annual trends. A similar challenge for energy policymakers is to integrate an understanding of impact dynamics into the economic dynamics of energy supply and demand. The challenges of dynamic analysis of emissions impacts from the energy sector have substantially increased with a new

106

China Refrigerator Information Label: Specification Development and Potential Impact  

SciTech Connect

In the last five years, China's refrigerator market has grown rapidly, and now urban markets are showing signs of saturation, with ownership rates in urban households reaching 92%. Rural markets continue to grow from a much lower base. As a result of this growth, the Chinese government in 2006 decided to revise the refrigerator standards and its associated efficiency grades for the mandatory energy information label. In the Chinese standards process, the efficiency grades for the information label are tied to the minimum standards. Work on the minimum standards revision began in 2006 and continued through the first half of 2007, when the draft standard was completed under the direction of the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS). Development of the information label grades required consideration of stakeholder input, continuity with the previous grade classification, ease of implementation, and potential impacts on the market. In this process, CLASP, with the support of METI/IEEJ, collaborated with CNIS to develop the efficiency grades, providing technical input to the process, comment and advice on particular technical issues, and evaluation of the results. After three months of effort and three drafts of the final grade specifications, this work was completed. In addition, in order to effectively evaluate the impact of the label on China's market, CLASP further provided assistance to CNIS to collect data on both the efficiency distribution and product volume distribution of refrigerators on the market. The new information label thresholds to be implemented in 2008 maintain the approach first adopted in 2005 of establishing efficiency levels relative to the minimum standard, but increased the related required efficiency levels by 20% over those established in 2003 and implemented in 2005. The focus of improvement was on the standard refrigerator/freezer (class 5), which constitutes the bulk of the Chinese market. Indeed, the new requirements to achieve grade 1 on the label are now virtually as stringent as those for US Energy Star-qualified or EU A-grade refrigerators. When the energy information label went into effect in March 2005, refrigerator manufacturers were required to display their declared level of efficiency on the label and report it to the China Energy Label Center (CELC), a newly established unit of CNIS responsible for label program management. Because of the visible nature of the label, it was found, through a METI/IEEJ-supported study, that MEPS non-compliance dropped from 4% to zero after the label became mandatory, and that the percentage of higher-grade refrigerators increased. This suggests that the label itself does have potential for shifting the market to higher-efficiency models (Lin 2007). One challenge, however, of assessing this potential impact is the lack of a comprehensive baseline of market efficiency and a program to evaluate the market impact on a yearly basis. As a result, the impact evaluation in this study draws upon the market transformation experience of the related EU energy information label, for which quantitative assessments of its market impact exist. By assuming a parallel process unfolding in China, it is possible to look at the potential impact of the label to 2020. The results of the analysis demonstrates that a robust market transformation program in China focused on the energy information label could save substantial amounts of electricity by 2020, totaling 16.4 TWh annually by that year, compared to a case in which the efficiency distribution of refrigerators was frozen at the 2007 level. Remarkably, the impact of a successful market transformation program with the label would essentially flatten the consumption of electricity for refrigerator use throughout most of the next decade, despite the expectations of continued growth in total stock by nearly 190 million units. At the end of this period, total consumption begins to rise again, as the least efficient of the units have been mostly removed from the market. Such a level of savings would redu

Fridley, David; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Lin, Jiang; Jianhong, Cheng; Sakamoto, Tomoyuki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Wind turbine blades wind their way by train through Denver. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20894 Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will lead to benefits to rural landowners and towns, the manufacturing sector, and infrastructure across America.[1] The following provide more information about wind energy and economic development: Resources European Wind Energy Association. Economic Benefits of Wind This page outlines the economic benefits of wind energy in Europe. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (March 2013). Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado. Accessed November 29, 2013. This fact sheet summarizes a recent analysis, commissioned by the Wyoming

109

Integrated Computational Modeling of Welding – Development to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated computational modeling is considered as a viable pathway to ... lack of a standard verification and validation (V&V) documents to build a technical case. ... Evolution with the Impact of Anisotropic Grain Boundary Energy and Mobility.

110

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Model April 3, 2013 The important relationships between climate change and agriculture are uncertain, particularly the feedbacks related to the carbon cycle. Nevertheless, vegetation models have not yet considered the full impacts of management practices and nitrogen feedbacks on the carbon cycle. We are working to meet this need. We have integrated three crop types (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) into the Community Land Model (CLM). In developing the agriculture version of CLM, we added plant processes related to management practices and nitrogen cycling. A manuscript documenting our changes to CLM has been accepted for publication in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions ("Modeling

111

Modeled Impact of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibrium experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s climate model are used to investigate the impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate. Regions of altered land cover include large portions of Europe, India, ...

Kirsten L. Findell; Elena Shevliakova; P. C. D. Milly; Ronald J. Stouffer

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fault-Impact models based on delay and packet loss for IEEE 802.11g  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we derive fault-impact models for wireless network traffic as it could be used in the control traffic for smart grid nodes. We set up experiments using a testbed with 116 nodes which uses the protocol IEEE 802.11g. We develop models for ...

Daniel Happ, Philipp Reinecke, Katinka Wolter

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

Brownell, J.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reducedpurposes. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts ofFigure 2: Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling environmental impact of unfired bricks in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brick manufacturing requires a considerable amount of energy and land, but these numbers have been difficult to quantify in rural parts of the developing world. The environmental impact of unfired bricks in India is ...

Zachau Walker, Miriam E. (Miriam Elizabeth)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Developments in the CSU-RAMS Aerosol Model: Emissions, Nucleation, Regeneration, Deposition, and Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado State University – Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) has undergone development focused upon improving the treatment of aerosols in the microphysics model, with the goal of examining the impacts of aerosol characteristics, ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; Susan C. Van Den Heever

117

Neutrino Mass Models: Impact of non-zero reactor angle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk neutrino mass models are reviewed and the impact of a non-zero reactor angle and other deviations from tri-bimaximal mixing are discussed. We propose some benchmark models, where the only way to discriminate between them is by high precision neutrino oscillation experiments.

Stephen F. King

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

118

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country priorities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and

119

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Developing model checkers using PAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last two decades, model checking has emerged as an effective system analysis technique complementary to simulation and testing. Many model checking algorithms and state space reduction techniques have been proposed. Although it is desirable ...

Yang Liu; Jun Sun; Jin Song Dong

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Magnetostatics and the electric impact model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The action of certain static magnetic fields on charged test particles is interpreted as a consequence of the interaction of the particles with electric dipole distributions emitted by other charged particles in relative motion. The dipole model of electric forces was initially conceived to emulate Coulomb's law, but is applied here to a wide class of phenomena, such as forces between parallel conductors, a relativistic correction of Biot--Savart's law, and the magnetic moment of a current loop.

Bhola N. Dwivedi; Horst Wilhelm; Klaus Wilhelm

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet) Title The Impact of Wind Development on...

125

An efficient load model for analyzing demand side management impacts  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of implementing Demand Side Management (DSM) in power systems is to change the utility's load shape--i.e. changes in the time pattern and magnitude of utility's load. Changing the load shape as a result of demand side activities could change the peak load, base load and/or energy demand. Those three variables have to be explicitly modeled into the load curve for properly representing the effects of demand side management. The impact of DSM will be manifested as higher or lower reliability levels. This paper presents an efficient technique to model the system load such that the impact of demand side management on the power system can be easily and accurately evaluated. The proposed technique to model the load duration curve will facilitate the representation of DSM impacts on loss-of-load probability, energy not served and energy consumption. This will provide an analytical method to study the impact of DSM on capacity requirements. So far iterative methods have been applied to study these impacts. The proposed analytical method results in a faster solution with higher accuracy. It takes only 18 seconds on an 80486 PC to solve each case study involving different peak and base loads, and energy use.

Rahman, S.; Rinaldy (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An Agent Model for Personal Development Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an agent-based support model for leadership, which can be used by an ambient system to support a leader in the development of his team member(s). Using model-based reasoning, an intelligent agent analyses the development level of ... Keywords: leadership, agent-based support model

Tibor Bosse; Rob Duell; Zulfiqar A. Memon; Jan Treur; C. Natalie van der Wal

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Development Model Project Development Model NREL developed the Project Development Model to evaluate the risks and investment decisions required for successful renewable energy project development. The two-phase iterative model includes elements in project fundamentals and project development based off commercial project development practices supported by tools such as pro formas and checklists. Project Fundamentals or BEPTC(tm) Renewable Energy Project Development Tool For help with the BEPTC phase of your project, check out the Renewable Energy Project Development Tool, developed by NREL for U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment effort. The tool helps you quickly establish the key motivators and feasibility of your project. Strong project fundamentals and an understanding of how a project fits

128

Indian Summer Monsoon Precipitation Climatology in a High-Resolution Regional Climate Model: Impacts of Convective Parameterization on Systematic Biases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to develop a better simulation of the climatology of monsoon precipitation in climate models, this paper investigates the impacts of different convective closures on systematic biases of an Indian monsoon precipitation climatology ...

P. Mukhopadhyay; S. Taraphdar; B. N. Goswami; K. Krishnakumar

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A model for simulating impacts of seismic events on large power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the capabilities and calculation logic of EPfast, a new simulation and impact analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory. The tool represents an emerging set of simulation models focusing on evaluating the vulnerability ... Keywords: multi-component disruptions, power network seismic performance, seismic system vulnerability, system collapse, uncontrolled islanding

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Leah E. Talaber Malone; James A. Kavicky; Stephen F. Folga; Stewart Cedres

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Users guide: simulation model for ammunition plants; prediction of wastewater characteristics and impact of reuse/recycle. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the algorithm and details the operating instructions required for an ammunition plant process model developed for DARCOM environmental personnel. The model was created to define the impact of increased ammunition production on the quantity and quality of the effluents discharged from the plants. It also allows assessment of the impact of recycle/reuse of wastewaters on final effluent quality. This model may be accessed through the Environmental Technical Information System.

Railsback, S.; Messenger, M.; Webster, R.D.; Bandy, J.T.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume I. Economic impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis identifies the economic impacts associated with OTEC development and quantifies them at the national, regional, and industry levels. It focuses on the effects on the United States' economy of the domestic development and utilization of twenty-five and fifty 400 MWe OTEC power plants by the year 2000. The methodology employed was characteristic of economic impact analysis. After conducting a literature review, a likely future OTEC scenario was developed on the basis of technological, siting, and materials requirements parameters. These parameters were used to identify the industries affected by OTEC development; an economic profile was constructed for each of these industries. These profiles established an industrial baseline from which the direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts of OTEC implementation could be estimated. Each stage of this analysis is summarized; and the economic impacts are addressed. The methodology employed in estimating the impacts is described.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

The development of a methodology to quantify the impacts of information management strategies on EPC projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops and demonstrates a methodology to quantify time and cost impacts on Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) projects resulting from information management driven process changes in design related activities. Many companies have implemented information technologies expecting to save time and effort, gain competitive advantage, improve productivity, better align objectives, and improve product quality. The premise of this research is that these benefits can be quantified in terms of time and cost project performance measures. While previous efforts to quantify benefits have been function-or technology-specific, and have provided sub-optimal results, the methodology presented allows quantification at a total project level. A schematic representation of the EPC Process was developed and field data from both owner and contractor companies was collected to serve as a baseline condition. Fifteen specific design related activities were modeled in detail and also loaded with associated field collected time and cost data. Potential process changes from increasing levels of information management were investigated. Monte Carlo simulation was used as the means by which time and cost impacts of the process changes were observed and measured. The impacts found in the specific design activities were used to adjust the baseline condition of the EPC process. Resimulation of the total process enabled quantification of impacts at a project level. The results of the research demonstrated that potential impacts from information management can be quantified. The results also showed that very aggressive levels of information management improvements may potentially improve total project activity time and labor cost by 7% and 8%, respectively. More conservative changes showed impacts to the same parameters at approximately 3% and 1%. The research also provided an indication of the relative impact various level of information management may have on project elapsed time. Finally, the research illustrated the importance of measuring the impacts at a total project-level. That is, the magnitude of impacts at the project-level were much lower than those observed at the activity or task level, thus providing a more realistic approximation of information management impacts.

Moreau, Karen Anne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Maui Electrical System Model Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.3.2 Load Profile 9 2.2.3.3 Wind Profile 9 2.2.3.4 Initial Commitment and Dispatch 10 2.2.3.5 Generic Energy.1.2 Independent Power Producers 2 2.1.3 Load Demand 2 2.2 Dynamics 4 2.2.1 Load Flow 4 2.2.1.1 Database Conversion 5 2.2.2.2 Governor/Turbine Models 5 2.2.2.3 Wind Farms 7 2.2.2.4 Dynamic Load Characteristic 7 2

136

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DES 10-59; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. National Park Service; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, South Pacific Division; Arizona Game and Fish Department; California Energy Commission; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public Lands Policy Coordination Office; Clark County, Nevada,

137

Techniques to Develop Data for Hydrogeochemical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting the environmental fate of chemicals leached from solid-waste disposal sites requires the use of hydrologic and geochemical models. These models need accurate input data, which require field sampling and analysis of soils, water, and waste. This manual provides guidance on developing input data so that utilities can increase their use of hydrogeochemical models.

1989-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling the onset of photosynthesis after the Chicxulub asteroid impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We do a preliminary modelling of the photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton at the very beginning of the Paleogene, just after the impact of the Chicxulub asteroid, which decisively contributed to the last known mass extinction of the Phanerozoic eon. We assume the worst possible scenario from the photobiological point of view: an already clear atmosphere with no ozone, as the timescale for soot and dust settling (years) is smaller than that of the full ozone regeneration (decades). Even in these conditions we show that most phytoplankton species would have had reasonable potential for photosynthesis in all the three main optical ocean water types. This modelling could help explain why the recovery of phytoplankton was relatively rapid after the huge environmental stress of that asteroid impact. In a more general scope, it also reminds us of the great resilience of the unicellular biosphere against huge environmental perturbations.

Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Rojas, Reinaldo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands marginal CO2 intensities of energy eff...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands the marginal CO2 intensities of en...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an effort to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study establishes a proof-of-concept for quantifying marginal CO2 intensi...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Transportation Sector Module 1995 - Model Developer's Report, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

As the description in Section 4 and Appendix B shows, the NEMS Transportation Model is made up of seven semi-independent submodules which address different vehicular modes of the transportation sector. Each submodule also contains methods to deal with the impacts of policyinitiatives and legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel. The transportation sector energy consumption is the sum of the energy consumption forecasts generated through the separate submodules.

John Maples

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Spatial Resolution Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating W. O'Hirok and C. Gautier Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction At the typical spatial resolution of climate and weather forecasting models, clouds are portrayed as uniform plane-parallel entities with three-dimensional (3D) radiative effects generally considered not important. However, as the resolution of these models increase, and with the development of "super parameterizations" (embedded cloud resolving models), there is a need to assess the spatial resolution where 3D effects should not be neglected (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2001). In this study, we perform

144

Analyze qualitatively development and climate impacts from pursuing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

impacts that could be qualitatively assessed include: Economic: employment, job creation, income, food production, rural electrification and stability in supply, terms of...

145

Analyze qualitatively development and climate impacts of LEDS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

impacts that could be qualitatively assessed include: Economic: employment, job creation, income, food production, rural electrification and stability in supply, terms of...

146

Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies to Predict the Impact Response of Explosives and Propellants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding and predicting the impact response of explosives and propellants remains a challenging area in the energetic materials field. Efforts are underway at LLNL (and other laboratories) to apply modern diagnostic tools and computational analysis to move beyond the current level of imprecise approximations towards a predictive approach more closely based on fundamental understanding of the relevant mechanisms. In this paper we will discuss a set of underlying mechanisms that govern the impact response of explosives and propellants: (a) mechanical insult (impact) leading to material damage and/or direct ignition; (b) ignition leading to flame spreading; (c) combustion being driven by flame spreading, perhaps in damaged materials; (d) combustion causing further material damage; (e) combustion leading to pressure build-up or relief; (f) pressure changes driving the rates of combustion and flame spread; (g) pressure buildup leading to structural response and damage, which causes many of the physical hazards. We will briefly discuss our approach to modeling up these mechanistic steps using ALE 3D, the LLNL hydrodynamic code with fully coupled chemistry, heat flow, mass transfer, and slow mechanical motion as well as hydrodynamic processes. We will identify the necessary material properties needed for our models, and will discuss our experimental efforts to characterize these properties and the overall mechanistic steps, in order to develop and parameterize the models in ALE 3D and to develop a qualitative understanding of impact response.

Maienschein, J L; Nichols III, A L; Reaugh, J E; McClelland, M E; Hsu, P C

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

EBS Model Development and Evaluation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Enginerred Barrier Systems (EBS) model evaluation and development is fundamental to the design and analysis of disposal concepts for generic repository systems; this report centers on progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay barrier performance.

148

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental ImpactReport  

SciTech Connect

This environmental impact report (EIR) has been prepared pursuant to the applicable provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its implementing guidelines (CEQA Guidelines), and the Amended University of California Procedures for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (UC CEQA Procedures). The University of California (UC or the University) is the lead agency for this EIR, which examines the overall effects of implementation of the proposed 2006 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP; also referred to herein as the 'project' for purposes of CEQA) for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL; also referred to as 'Berkeley Lab,' 'the Laboratory,' or 'the Lab' in this document). An LRDP is a land use plan that guides overall development of a site. The Lab serves as a special research campus operated by the University employees, but it is owned and financed by the federal government and as such it is distinct from the UC-owned Berkeley Campus. As a campus operated by the University of California, the Laboratory is required to prepare an EIR for an LRDP when one is prepared or updated pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.09. The adoption of an LRDP does not constitute a commitment to, or final decision to implement, any specific project, construction schedule, or funding priority. Rather, the proposed 2006 LRDP describes an entire development program of approximately 980,000 gross square feet of new research and support space construction and 320,000 gross square feet of demolition of existing facilities, for a total of approximately 660,000 gross square feet of net new occupiable space for the site through 2025. Specific projects will undergo CEQA review at the time proposed to determine what, if any, additional review is necessary prior to approval. As described in Section 1.4.2, below, and in Chapter 3 of this EIR (the Project Description), the size of the project has been reduced since the Notice of Preparation for this EIR was issued. This reduction was in response to consultation with the City of Berkeley as well as other factors. CEQA requires that, before a decision can be made by a state or local government agency to approve a project that may have significant environmental effects, an EIR must be prepared that fully describes the environmental effects of the project. The EIR is a public informational document for use by University decision-makers and the public. It is intended to identify and evaluate potential environmental consequences of the proposed project, to identify mitigation measures that would lessen or avoid significant adverse impacts, and to examine feasible alternatives to the project. The information contained in the EIR is reviewed and considered by the lead agency prior to its action to approve, disapprove, or modify the proposed project.

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

150

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ruth Baranowski, NRELPIX 16410 The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis Introduction The economic...

151

NWCC Guidelines for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 The primary objective of this study is to provide examples of thorough and consistent analysis and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development.

Michael Taylor, Northwest Economic Associates Alan Fox, Northwest Economic Associates Jill Chilton, Northwest Economic Associates NWCC Economic Development Work Group Contributors Steve Clemmer, Lisa Daniels, Ed DeMeo, Rick Halet, Ron Lehr, Michael Milligan Vince Robinson

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.; Bonner, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate, Land, Water Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/mosaicc/66705/en/ FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Screenshot References: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC)[1] "FAO-MOSAICC (for MOdelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change) is a system of models designed to carry out each step of the impact

154

NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

A new simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes.

Hudon, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

Tallman, Tyler N.; Radel, Tracy E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.; Smith, Brandon M. (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Radel, Ross F.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Procedures for evaluating health impacts resulting from development of energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a compilation of formats, protocols, and procedures that may be used by communities and state agencies to evaluate health impacts resulting from the development of energy resources. The manual also considers ways of using these evaluations to develop plans for coping with health impacts. It is an outgrowth of a study of health problems experienced by impacted communities in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comes from price impacts of both the investor's own trades and other concurrent ... Indeed price impact of large trades have been considered as one of the main ...

159

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor Valeryi Sizyuk

Harilal, S. S.

160

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;#12;Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy;#12;Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six-scale solar energy development in six southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new

Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Modelling the environmental impact of an aluminium pressure die casting plant and options for control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a model (MIKADO) to analyse options to reduce the environmental impact of aluminium die casting. This model will take a company perspective, so that it can be used as a decision-support tool for the environmental management of a ... Keywords: Aluminium die casting plant, Environmental decision-support tool, Environmental impact assessment, Integrated Assessment Model, Modelling

Belmira Neto; Carolien Kroeze; Leen Hordijk; Carlos Costa

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect

This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic impacts of the development of energy-efficient technologies.

Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Development of Rail Temperature Prediction Model SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preventing track buckling is important to the railroad industry’s goal of operational safety. It is a common practice for railroads to impose slow orders during hot weather when the risk of track buckling is high. Numerous factors affect track buckling, but the instantaneous rail temperatures and stress-free (neutral) rail temperatures are the most critical factors. Unfortunately, neither of these two temperatures is easily obtainable. Decisions for slow orders are often based on an arbitrary, ambient temperature limit. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development has initiated a research project to develop a model for predicting rail temperatures based on real-time meteorological forecast data. The rail temperature prediction model is based on the heat transfer process of a rail exposed to the sun. In developing such a model, a rail-weather station was established, composed of a portable weather station and a short segment of rail track with temperature sensors installed on both rails. The model has proven to be able to predict the maximum rail temperature within a few degrees and within 30 minutes of the actual time when the maximum rail temperature occurs during the day. The model is being validated for three locations where real-time weather data and rail temperature are collected. A prototype webbased

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of an Integrated Global Energy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to develop a forefront analysis tool for application to enhance understanding of long-term, global, nuclear-energy and nuclear-material futures. To this end, an existing economics-energy-environmental (E{sup 3}) model was adopted, modified, and elaborated to examine this problem in a multi-regional (13), long-term ({approximately}2,100) context. The E{sup 3} model so developed was applied to create a Los Alamos presence in this E{sup 3} area through ''niche analyses'' that provide input to the formulation of policies dealing with and shaping of nuclear-energy and nuclear-materials futures. Results from analyses using the E{sup 3} model have been presented at a variety of national and international conferences and workshops. Through use of the E{sup 3} model Los Alamos was afforded the opportunity to participate in a multi-national E{sup 3} study team that is examining a range of global, long-term nuclear issues under the auspices of the IAEA during the 1998-99 period . Finally, the E{sup 3} model developed under this LDRD project is being used as an important component in more recent Nuclear Material Management Systems (NMMS) project.

Krakowski, R.A.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Technical analysis. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the detailed results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report examines the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This summary presents the significant results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report summarizes the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phases of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

Thompson, Tammy M.

169

Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

2011-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

Lasting social impact : Community Development Venture Capital investing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Development Venture Capital Funds (CDVC) funds are an emerging group of Community Development Financial Institutions, that make equity investments in businesses in economically distressed areas. As equity investors, ...

Silberberg, Hattie Paige

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

China Refrigerator Information Label: Specification Development and Potential Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Energy Consumption .. 13 Table 8 EUreporting their energy consumption figures directly to theto self-report the energy consumption of each model to CNIS

Fridley, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Final EIS/EIR) has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Proposed Action includes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a 48 megawatt (gross) geothermal power plant with ancillary facilities (10-12 production well pads and 3-5 injection well pads, production and injection pipelines), access roads, and a 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. Alternative locations for the power plant site within a reasonable distance of the middle of the wellfield were determined to be technically feasible. Three power plant site alternatives are evaluated in the Final EIS/EIR.

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Developing performance and impact indicators and targets in public and education libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors trace recent changes in the idea of evaluating performance in UK education and libraries and examine some of the differences in impact assessment between the two fields; concluding that little attention has so far been given by librarians ... Keywords: Development planning, Education libraries, Impact assessment, Performance indicators, Public libraries

Sharon Markless; David Streatfield

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives Clean Energy Market Analysis Toolkit 3b.3. Prioritize development options 3c. Analytical Decision Making -...

176

“The Long-run Macroeconomic Impacts of Fuel Subsidies in an Oil-importing Developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developing and emerging market countries have subsidies on fuel products. Using a small open economy model with a non-traded sector I show how these subsidies impact the steady state levels of macroeconomic aggregates such as consumption, labor supply, and aggregate welfare. These subsidies can lead to crowding out of non-oil consumption, inefficient inter-sectoral allocations of labor, and other distortions in macroeconomic variables. Across steady states aggregate welfare is reduced by these subsidies. This result holds for a country with no oil production and for a net exporter of oil. The distortions in relative prices introduced by the subsidy create most of the welfare losses. How the subsidy is financed is of secondary importance. Aggregate welfare is significantly higher if the subsidies are replaced by lump-sum transfers of equal value.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Model development for household waste prevention behaviour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

Bortoleto, Ana Paula, E-mail: a.bortoleto@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

LOCAL POPULATION IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE GEYSERS - CALISTOGA REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socio-Economic Impacts of Geothermal Develop- ment. LawrenceMatlock, 1978. Summary of 1977 Geothermal Drilling - WesternUnited States, Geothermal Energy Magazine vo. 6, no. 5, pp.

Haven, Kendal F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China Authors biophysical effects of small (China's Nu River basin, and compare effects The hydropower sector currently comprises eighty percent of global capacity for renewable energy generation

Tullos, Desiree

182

Response to 'Comments on Factors that Impact the Implementation of a Systems Development Methodology'  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿This correspondence is a response to ¿Comments on Factors that Impact Implementing a System Development Methodology,¿ by Yadav et al. [24]. We are gratified to see that researchers are closely examining our work. However, we must take issue ...

Tom L. Roberts, Jr.; Michael L. Gibson; R. Kelly Rainer, Jr.; Kent T. Fields

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Wind and Water Nexus: Impacts of Wind Development on Water Use...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind and Water Nexus: Impacts of Wind Development on Water Use in the Energy Sector March 20, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all...

184

On the Development of Regional Climatic Scenarios for Policy-Oriented Climatic-Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review on the development of climatic scenarios related to policy-oriented assessment of the impact of climatic variations is presented. It seeks to provide background information needed to evaluate the extent to which existing regional ...

Peter J. Lamb

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are presented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices. Capsule: "Combining dynamical modeling of high-impact weather using traditional regional climate models with statistical techniques allows for comprehensive sampling of the full distribution, uncertainty estimation, direct assessment of impacts, and increased confidence in future changes."

Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The impact of accounting for research and development on innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines whether a change in the accounting rule for research and development (R&D) cost is associated with changes in the innovation process. Specifically, I examine whether R&D expenditure, the number of patents ...

Li, Lei (Lynn Lei)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Volume 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Volume 1 Executive Summary Chapters 1-7, 14-16 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

188

Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Agency/Company /Organization: MetroBike Focus Area: Non-Motorized Transport, Transportation Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.metrobike.net/index.php?s=file_download&id=26 Cost: Free Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Screenshot References: Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future[1] This paper discusses the history of bike-sharing from the early 1st generation program to present day 3rd generation programs. Included are a detailed examination of models of provision, with benefits and detriments

189

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Development of Models to Simulate...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

190

Device Scale Model Development for Transport Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gary J. stiegel Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Chris Guenther Computational Science Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P. O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4483 chris.guenther@netl.doe.gov 8/2006 Gasification Technologies Device Scale MoDel DevelopMent for tranSport reactor Background Coal gasification is an efficient and environmentally acceptable technology that can utilize the vast coal reserves in the United States to produce clean affordable power and reduce dependence on foreign oil. Coal and other carbon containing materials can be gasified to produce a synthesis gas. This syngas can be fed to a

191

TWP-ICE Global Atmospheric Model Intercomparison: Convection Responsiveness and Resolution Impact  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of global atmospheric model (GAM) simulations of tropical convection during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE). The distinct cloud properties, precipitation, radiation, and vertical diabatic heating profiles associated with three different monsoon regimes (wet, dry, and break) from available observations are used to evaluate 9 GAM forecasts initialized daily from realistic global analyses. All models well captured the evolution of large-scale circulation and the thermodynamic fields, but cloud properties differed substantially among models. For example, liquid water path and ice water path differed by up to two orders of magnitude. Compared with the relatively well simulated top-heavy heating structures during the wet and break period, most models had difficulty in depicting the bottom-heavy heating profiles associated with cumulus congestus. The best performing models during this period were the ones whose convection scheme was most responsive to the free tropospheric humidity. Compared with the large impact of cloud and convective parameterizations on model cloud and precipitation characteristics, resolution has relatively minor impact on simulated cloud properties. However, one feature that was influence by the resolution study in several models was the diurnal cycle of precipitation. Peaking at a different time from convective precipitation, large-scale precipitation generally increases in high resolution forecasts and modulates the total precipitation diurnal cycle. Overall, the study emphasizes the importance of more environmental responsive convective parameterizations to capture various types of convection and the substantial diversity among large-scale cloud and precipitation schemes in current GAMs. This experiment has also demonstrated itself to be a very useful testbed for those developing cloud and convection schemes in these models.

Lin, Yanluan; Donner, Leo J.; Petch, Jon C.; Bechtold, P.; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Komori, T.; Wapler, K.; Willett, M.; Xie, X.; Zhao, M.; Xie, Shaocheng; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Impact of Spectral Nudging on Cloud Simulation with a Regional Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of spectral nudging on cloud simulation with a regional atmospheric model was examined. Simulated cloudiness of the Regional Model (REMO) and the Spectrally Nudged REMO (SN-REMO) were intercompared and evaluated with satellite-derived ...

Insa Meinke; Beate Geyer; Frauke Feser; Hans von Storch

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the ULBNL-63728 Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non .............................................................................................................. 9 4. Baseline Profile (BLP) Models

194

Impacts of Land Surface Model Complexity on a Regional Simulation of a Tropical Synoptic Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multimode Chameleon Surface Model (CHASM) with different levels of complexity in parameterizing surface energy balance is coupled to a limited-area model (DARLAM) to investigate the impacts of complexity in land surface representations on the ...

H. Zhang; J. L. McGregor; A. Henderson-Sellers; J. J. Katzfey

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Models for managing the impact of an epidemic Daniel Bienstock ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

However, even a much milder epidemic would have vast social impact as services such as health care, police and utilities became severely hampered by staff.

196

Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2012 ... A major source of the execution cost comes from price impacts of both the investor's own trades and other concurrent institutional trades.

197

Impacts of Modeled Recommendations of the National Commission on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the new CAFE standards, which forces an increase in the sale of hybrid vehicles. The NCEP and the CAFE cases have similar impacts on petroleum consumption and imports,

198

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Impact of Taxation on the Development of Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contractor report reviews past and current tax mechanisms for the development and operation of geothermal power facilities. A 50 MW binary plant is featured as the case study. The report demonstrates that tax credits with windows of availability of greater than one year are essential to allow enough time for siting and design of geothermal power systems. (DJE 2005)

Gaffen, Michael; Baker, James

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

Matthews, K.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A simple model of impact dynamics in many dimensional systems, with applications to heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model of impact dynamics in many dimensional systems, with applications to heat exchangers present a simple hybrid model of impact dynamics in heat exchangers. The method, based on graph theory and experimental evidence. 1 Introduction A heat exchanger typically consists of a large number of thin pipes

Bristol, University of

203

Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks Committee Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks) Departmental Member Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) represent a promising future direction

Victoria, University of

204

Building Energy Model Development for Retrofit Homes  

SciTech Connect

Based on previous research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Florida Solar Energy Center providing technical assistance to implement 22 deep energy retrofits across the nation, 6 homes were selected in Florida and Texas for detailed post-retrofit energy modeling to assess realized energy savings (Chandra et al, 2012). However, assessing realized savings can be difficult for some homes where pre-retrofit occupancy and energy performance are unknown. Initially, savings had been estimated using a HERS Index comparison for these homes. However, this does not account for confounding factors such as occupancy and weather. This research addresses a method to more reliably assess energy savings achieved in deep energy retrofits for which pre-retrofit utility bills or occupancy information in not available. A metered home, Riverdale, was selected as a test case for development of a modeling procedure to account occupancy and weather factors, potentially creating more accurate estimates of energy savings. This “true up” procedure was developed using Energy Gauge USA software and post-retrofit homeowner information and utility bills. The 12 step process adjusts the post-retrofit modeling results to correlate with post-retrofit utility bills and known occupancy information. The “trued” post retrofit model is then used to estimate pre-retrofit energy consumption by changing the building efficiency characteristics to reflect the pre-retrofit condition, but keeping all weather and occupancy-related factors the same. This creates a pre-retrofit model that is more comparable to the post-retrofit energy use profile and can improve energy savings estimates. For this test case, a home for which pre- and post- retrofit utility bills were available was selected for comparison and assessment of the accuracy of the “true up” procedure. Based on the current method, this procedure is quite time intensive. However, streamlined processing spreadsheets or incorporation into existing software tools would improve the efficiency of the process. Retrofit activity appears to be gaining market share, and this would be a potentially valuable capability with relevance to marketing, program management, and retrofit success metrics.

Chasar, David; McIlvaine, Janet; Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Documentation of the petroleum market model (PMM). Appendix: Model developer`s report  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) is required to provide complete model documentation to meet the EIA Model Acceptance Standards. The EIA Model Documentation: Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System provides a complete description of the Petroleum Market Model`s (PMM) methodology, and relation to other modules in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This Model Developer`s Report (MDR) serves as an appendix to the methodology documentation and provides an assessment of the sensitivity of PMM results to changes in input data. The MDR analysis for PMM is performed by varying several sets of input variables one-at-a-time and examining the effect on a set of selected output variables. The analysis is based on stand-alone, rather than integrated, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) runs. This means that other NEMS modules are not responding to PMM outputs. The PMM models petroleum refining and marketing. The purpose of the PMM is to project petroleum product prices, refining activities, and movements of petroleum into the United States and among domestic regions. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption in, the refining industry. The PMM is also used to analyze a wide variety of petroleum-related issues and policies, in order to foster better understanding of the petroleum refining and marketing industry and the effects of certain policies and regulations. The PMM simulates the operation of petroleum refineries in the United States, including the supply and transportation of crude oil to refineries, the regional processing of these raw materials into petroleum products, and the distribution of petroleum products to meet regional demands. The essential outputs of this model are product prices, a petroleum supply/demand balance, demands for refinery fuel use, and capacity expansion.

Not Available

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of Electronic Acquisition Model for Project ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have independent decision support models to ... An agent-based communication environment called Electronic Acquisition Model for Project ...

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

A three-story prototype commercial building model for energy standard development and assessment  

SciTech Connect

Annual hourly simulation programs are generally used in the development and assessment of the impacts of building energy standards. These simulation programs require the specification of a building model as input to the simulation. Results of the simulations are sensitive to the building model, so care must be taken in the choice of the model to ensure representative results. A three-story prototype commercial building model is being used in developing requirements for the revision of ASHRAE Standard 90.1. The prototype is generic but has the capability to represent a broad range of commercial building types, sizes, orientations, and aspect ratios.

Jarnagin, R.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Systems Group Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Combustion Technologies Group Electrochemical Technologies Group Grid Integration Group Laser...

209

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a similar nameplate capacity (e.g., based on kilowatt-hours generated, rather than kilowatts installed). In either case, capacity factor and energy production should be...

210

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Publication...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Report No. TP-6A20-50400. August. Nelson, T.D.; Dumas, L.J. (2011). "Maximizing Job Creation: An Analysis of Alternatives for the Transformation of the Kansas City Plant."...

211

Solar PV Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the DOE SunShot Initiative, in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for a webinar on August 21, 2013, at 2-3 p.m. EST highlighting the Scenario Solar PV Jobs and Economic...

212

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

default values representative of a "typical" offshore wind project constructed in water with an average depth of 25 meters and no farther than 100 nautical miles from a port....

213

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined by growth in per capita income and employment? Objective To address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Background * Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. * Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. * Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show

214

Loose strands: searching for evidence of public access ICT impact on development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Telecenters, libraries and internet cafés are often credited as being important venues for making information and communication technologies (ICTs) more widely available for people in developing and developed countries. Although numerous case ... Keywords: ICTs, cybercafés, impact, libraries, public access computing, telecentres

Araba Sey; Michelle Fellows

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Impact of risk and uncertainty on sustainable development of Kolubara lignite basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper analyzes the various risks and uncertainties and their possible impact on the future development of the Kolubara lignite basin area (Belgrade metropolitan region). What has been examined are the risks caused by the global financial crisis to ... Keywords: energy policy, lignite coal basin, privatisation, risks, sustainable development, uncertain

Slavka Zekovic; Miodrag Vujosevic

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Global Modeling of the Contrail and Contrail Cirrus Climate Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite considerable technological advances, aviation impacts on global climate are significant and may constitute a future constraint on the continued growth of air travel. The most important but least understood component in aviation climate ...

Ulrike Burkhardt; Bernd Kärcher; Ulrich Schumann

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid wastes: Development of the WASTED model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of the Waste Analysis Software Tool for Environmental Decisions (WASTED) model. This model provides a comprehensive view of the environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management systems. The model consists of a number of separate submodels that describe a typical waste management process: waste collection, material recovery, composting, energy recovery from waste and landfilling. These submodels are combined to represent a complete waste management system. WASTED uses compensatory systems to account for the avoided environmental impacts derived from energy recovery and material recycling. The model is designed to provide solid waste decision-makers and environmental researchers with a tool to evaluate waste management plans and to improve the environmental performance of solid waste management strategies. The model is user-friendly and compares favourably with other earlier models.

Diaz, R. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Warith, M. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)]. E-mail: mwarith@ryerson.ca

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located 0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Supplement. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supplement to the Technical Analysis presents additional results for a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. This supplementary analysis examines the new Department of Interior air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, and their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Economic Development, People and Policy Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Training materials, Workshop Website: einstitute.worldbank.org/ei/course/low-carbon-development Cost: Paid References: Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling[1] Program Overview This course has the following modules - (i) Introduction to Low Carbon Development Planning; (ii) Overview for Policymakers; (iii) Power; (iv) Household; (v) Transport - which introduce you to climate change

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Impact of Transport Schemes on Modeled Dust Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study is performed with the CHIMERE-DUST chemistry transport model in order to evaluate the modeled mineral dust spread due to the horizontal transport scheme accuracy. Three different schemes are implemented in the model: the ...

Maria Raffaella Vuolo; Laurent Menut; Hélène Chepfer

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS FROM COAL, NATURAL GAS, AND WIND POWER Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Suzanne Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado The information contained in this poster is subject to a government license. * WINDPOWER 2006 * Pittsburgh, PA * June 4-7, 2006 * NREL/PO-500-39908 Michael Milligan, Consultant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado How does JEDI II work? The user enters data specific to the new coal, gas, or wind plant: * Year of installation * Size of the project * Location * Cost ($/kW) * Any other site-specific information

224

Kinetic Model Development for Lignin Pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin pyrolysis poses a significant barrier to the formation of liquid fuel products from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at higher temperatures than other biomass components (e.g. cellulose and hemi-cellulose) and tends to form radicals species that lead to cross-linking and ultimately char formation. A first step in the advancement of biomass-to-fuel technology is to discover the underlying mechanisms that lead to the breakdown of lignin at lower temperatures into more stable and usable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin (B-O4, a-O4, B-B, B-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to bond homolysis reactions, a variety of concerted elimination pathways are under investigation that tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

Clark, J.; Robichaud, D.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

center in Nevada with REA250. State Nevada Objectives Develop and apply: (1) a Geologic Heat Exchanger (GHE) model, (2) a life-cycle model, and (3) a total system model. The GHE...

227

Development and application of a photovoltaic financial model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the relative immaturity of the solar farm industry, there are very few comprehensive financial models in use. I address this by developing a photovoltaic NPV financial model and apply the model to various base cases ...

Dietz, Brad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function Ken relaxation length, v sat ø h''i (¸ 0:05¯m), the energy distribution function is not well described calculation of impact ionization coefficient requires the use of a high energy distribution function because

Dunham, Scott

229

Sustainable energy for developing countries : modelling transitions to renewable and clean energy in rapidly developing countries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of this thesis is first to adapt energy models for the use in developing countries and second to model sustainable energy transitions… (more)

Urban, Frauke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Using Random Effects to Build Impact Models When the Available Historical Record Is Short  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the affect of weather and climate on human activities requires the construction of impact models that are able to describe the complex links between weather and socioeconomic data. In practice, one of the biggest challenges is the ...

Filipe Aires

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Impact of Satellite Sounding Data on the Systematic Error of a Numerical Weather Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of satellite sounding data on the systematic errors of the numerical weather prediction model of the Israel Meteorological Service has been investigated. In general, satellite data have been shown to reduce systematic error, and in ...

Noah Wolfson; Albert Thomasell; Arnold Gruber; George Ohring

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Impact of a Spectral Gravity Wave Parameterization on the Stratosphere in the Met Office Unified Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a parameterized spectrum of gravity waves on the simulation of the stratosphere in the Met Office Unified Model (UM) is investigated. In the extratropical mesosphere, the gravity wave forcing acts against the mean zonal wind and it ...

A. A. Scaife; N. Butchart; C. D. Warner; R. Swinbank

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling the Biosphere–Atmosphere System: The Impact of the Subgrid Variability in Rainfall Interception  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subgrid variability in rainfall distribution has been widely recognized as an important factor to include in the representation of land surface hydrology within climate models. In this paper, using West Africa as a case study, the impact of the ...

Guiling Wang; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Impact of Domain Size on Modeled Ozone Forecast for the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of model domain extent and the specification of lateral boundary conditions on the forecast quality of air pollution constituents in a specific region of interest. A developmental version of the national Air ...

Pius Lee; Daiwen Kang; Jeff McQueen; Marina Tsidulko; Mary Hart; Geoff DiMego; Nelson Seaman; Paula Davidson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

On the Impact of WRF Model Vertical Grid Resolution on Midwest Summer Rainfall Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model exploratory sensitivity simulations were performed to determine the impact of vertical grid resolution (VGR) on the forecast skill of Midwest summer rainfall. Varying the VGR indicated that a refined VGR, ...

Eric A. Aligo; William A. Gallus Jr.; Moti Segal

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Impact of aerothermal modeling on the estimation of turbine blade life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of aerothermal modeling on estimates of turbine blade heat transfer and life was assessed for three high pressure turbine blades. The work was conducted as part of a project aimed at the evaluation of the effect ...

Collin, Jean E., 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Impact of Tropical Forcing on Extratropical Predictability in a Simple Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of tropical forcing on the predictability of the extratropical atmosphere is studied. Using a two-layer spectral model, numerical experiments and diagnostic analyses have been carried out to examine the enhancement of predictability ...

Jianchun Qin; Walter A. Robinson

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Modeling the Impact of Land Surface Degradation on the Climate of Tropical North Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradation of the land surface has been suggested as a cause of persistent drought in tropical north Africa. A general circulation model is used to assess the impact of degradation of five regions within tropical north Africa. Idealized ...

Douglas B. Clark; Yongkang Xue; Richard J. Harding; Paul J. Valdes

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

240

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The econometric submodels of the Energy Policy Socioeconomic Impact Model (EPSIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Socioeconomic Impact Model (EPSIM) is an econometric simulation model that runs on IBM-compatible personal computers. It can be used to assess the economic impact of energy policies and programs, such as utility rate designs and demand-side management programs, on various population groups, such as minority and low-income households. The econometric submodels that constitute the internal structure of EPSIM are described in detail.

Butler, J.G.; Poyer, D.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Appropriate Methodology for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance. It may also support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. However, there is a need for a theoretically sound method for assessing the economic impacts of wind power development. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. Northwest Economic Associates (NEA), under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), investigated three case study areas in the United States where wind power projects were recently developed. The full report, ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power,'' is available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. The methodology used for that study is summarized here in order to provide guidance for future studies of the economic impacts of other wind power developments. The methodology used in the NEA study was specifically designed for these particular case study areas; however, it can be generally applied to other areas. Significant differences in local economic conditions and the amount of goods and services that are purchased locally as opposed to imported from outside the will strongly influence results obtained. Listed below are some of the key tasks that interested parties should undertake to develop a reasonable picture of local economic impacts that may accrue from existing or future wind development.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

A georeferenced Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to analyze the climate change impacts on the ski industry in Andorra and the effect of snowmaking as future adaptation strategy. The present study is the first attempt to analyze the ski industry in the Pyrenees region and will contribute to a better understanding of the vulnerability of Andorran ski resorts and the suitability of snowmaking as potential adaptation strategy to climate change. The resulting model can be used as a planning support tool to help local stakeholders understand the vulnerability and potential impacts of climate change. This model can be used in the decision-making process of designing and developing appropriate sustainable adaptation strategies to future climate variability.

Pons-Pons, M; Rosas-Casals, M; Sureda, B; Jover, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) remove heat from the air and use it to heat water, presenting an energy-saving opportunity for homeowners. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a simulation model to study the inter- actions of HPWHs and space conditioning equipment, related to climate and installa- tion location in the home. This model was created in TRNSYS and is based on data from HPWHs tested at NREL's Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory. The HPWH model accounts for the condenser coil wrapped around the outside of the storage tank, and uses a data-based performance map. Researchers found that simulated energy use was within 2% of lab results, which confirms

245

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind Power (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using economic multipliers, JEDI II measures the potential employment (job and earnings) and economic development impacts (output) from new power plants by calculating the dollar flow from construction and annual operations. In its default form, JEDI II conducts state-specific analyses. County or regional analyses require additional multipliers.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

John Collins

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Look at the U.S. Energy System – A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economical in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gases. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This paper discusses the systematic approach used to develop the 2050 Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), which allows the user to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand. It also provides an overall systems understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This paper also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rational for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing 2050 SIM.

Layne Pincock; John W. Collins

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ENSO Prediction with Markov Models: The Impact of Sea Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of seasonally varying linear Markov models are constructed in a reduced multivariate empirical orthogonal function (MEOF) space of observed sea surface temperature, surface wind stress, and sea level analysis. The Markov models are ...

Yan Xue; Ants Leetmaa; Ming Ji

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Impact of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) on Building Energy Performance Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. National Institute for Building Sciences (NIBS) started the development of the National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Its goal is to define standard sets of data required to describe any given building in necessary detail so that any given AECO industry discipline application can find needed data at any point in the building lifecycle. This will include all data that are used in or are pertinent to building energy performance simulation and analysis. This paper describes the background that lead to the development of NBIMS, its goals and development methodology, its Part 1 (Version 1.0), and its probable impact on building energy performance simulation and analysis.

Bazjanac, Vladimir

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modified SDOF Models for Improved Representation of the Impact Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requires electrolytics #12;Reliability predictor models · MIL-HDBK 217F ­ Last updated in 1995 ­ Does

Feraboli, Paolo

252

Effective use of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for geothermal development projects  

SciTech Connect

Both the developed and developing nations of the world would like to move toward a position of sustainable development while paying attention to the restoration of natural resources, improving the environment, and improving the quality of life. The impacts of geothermal development projects are generally positive. It is important, however, that the environmental issues associated with development be addressed in a systematic fashion. Drafted early in the project planning stage, a well-prepared Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can significantly add to the quality of the overall project. An EIA customarily ends with the decision to proceed with the project. The environmental analysis process could be more effective if regular monitoring, detailed in the EIA, continues during project implementation. Geothermal development EIAs should be analytic rather than encyclopedic, emphasizing the impacts most closely associated with energy sector development. Air quality, water resources and quality, geologic factors, and socioeconomic issues will invariably be the most important factors. The purpose of an EIA should not be to generate paperwork, but to enable superb response. The EIA should be intended to help public officials make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences and take proper actions. The EIA process has been defined in different ways throughout the world. In fact, it appears that no two countries have defined it in exactly the same way. Going hand in hand with the different approaches to the process is the wide variety of formats available. It is recommended that the world geothermal community work towards the adoption of a standard. The Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)(OLADE, 1993) prepared a guide that presents a comprehensive discussion of the environmental impacts and suggested mitigation alternatives associated with geothermal development projects. The OLADE guide is a good start for providing the geothermal community a standard EIA format. As decision makers may only read the Executive Summary of the EIA, this summary should be well written and present the significant impacts (in order of importance), clarifying which are unavoidable and which are irreversible; the measures which can be taken to mitigate them; the cumulative effects of impacts; and the requirements for monitoring and supervision. Quality plans and Public Participation plans should also be included as part of the environmental analysis process.

Goff, S.J.

2000-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power--Case Studies Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance (O&M). It may also add to the supply of electric power in the area and support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. While there is a growing body of information about the local impacts of wind power, the economic impacts from existing wind power developments have not been thoroughly and consistently analyzed. Northwest Economic Associates, under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), conducted a study and produced a report entitled ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power.'' The primary objective of the study was to provide examples of appropriate analyses and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development, using case studies of three existing projects in the United States. The findings from the case studies are summarized here; more detail is available in the report, available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. It should be noted that specific results presented apply only to the respective locales studied and are not meant to be representative of wind power in general. However, qualitative findings, discussed below, are likely to be replicated in most areas where wind development occurs.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Advanced Model and Methodology Development [Heat Transfer and Fluid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Model and Advanced Model and Methodology Development Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Advanced Model and Methodology Development Electrorefiner Model for Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel Electrorefiner Model for Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Click on image to

256

Frameworks for model-driven development of web applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes model driven development of dynamic web application using a few different frameworks. Those are the following open source Java frameworks: Modelibra, ModelibraWicket and Wicket. Modelibra is a domain model framework. ModelibraWicket ... Keywords: application development, framework, model, web component

Vensada Okanovi?; Dzenana Donko; Tadej Mateljan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Closure Modeling of Fully Developed Baroclinic Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple second-order closure models of quasi-geostrophic turbulence are derived, applying either to two-layer flows within isentropic boundaries, or to Eady-type frontogenesis with vanishing potential vorticity; homogeneity and horizontal isotropy ...

Jean-Michel Hoyer; Robert Sadourny

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Selection of Model in Developing Information Security Criteria for Smart Grid Security System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, the "Smart Grid" has emerged as one of the best advanced energy supply chains. This paper looks into the security system of smart grid via the smart planet system. The scope focused on information security criteria that impact on consumer trust and satisfaction. The importance of information security criteria is perceived as the main aspect to impact on customer trust throughout the entire smart grid system. On one hand, this paper also focuses on the selection of the model for developing information security criteria on a smart grid.

Ling, Amy Poh Ai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling dynamic developable meshes by the Hamilton principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new dynamic developable surface model is proposed. The proposed model represents developable surfaces using triangle meshes. A novel algorithm is proposed to introduce the Hamilton principle into these meshes such that the resulting ... Keywords: Developable surface, Hamilton principle, Physical-based simulation

Yong-Jin Liu; Kai Tang; Ajay Joneja

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Enterprise Model for Developing Distributed Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise is a programming environment for designing, coding, debugging, testing, monitoring, profiling, and executing programs for distributed hardware. Developers using Enterprise do not deal with low-level programming details such as marshalling ...

Jonathan Schaeffer; Duane Szafron; Greg Lobe; Ian Parsons

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Developing fundamentally based models for autoignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is renewed interest in autoignition, especially due to the recent development of the homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, highly promising with its low Nox and particulate emissions and high efficiency. ...

Wijaya, Catherina D. (Catherina Dewi)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Stimulation Prediction Models Project Description The proposal is in response to DOE FOA DE-PS36-08GO99018/DE-FOA-0000075, specifically: the Topic Area: Stimulation Prediction Models - "To develop and validate models to predict a reservoir's response to stimulation and/or to quantitatively compare existing stimulation prediction models," and the Target Specification: "Development of stimulation prediction models capable of accurately predicting the location, spacing, orientation, and flow properties of created fractures."

264

Development of a Regional Climate Model of the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Arctic region climate system model has been developed to simulate coupled interactions among the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, and land surface of the western Arctic. The atmospheric formulation is based upon the NCAR regional climate model ...

Amanda H. Lynch; William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh; Gunter Weller

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Systematic development of coarse-grained polymer models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coupling between polymer models and experiments has improved our understanding of polymer behavior both in terms of rheology and dynamics of single molecules. Developing these polymer models is challenging because of ...

Underhill, Patrick Theodore

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Role of Convective Model Choice in Calculating the Climate Impact of Doubling CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the parameterization of vertical convection in calculating the climate impact of doubling CO2 is assessed using both one-dimensional radiative-convective vertical models and in the latitude-dependent Hadley-baroclinic model of Lindzen ...

R. S. Lindzen; A. Y. Hou; B. F. Farrell

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Social Impact of Informational Production: Software Development as an Informational Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their larger social impact. Opening software meansthe information society. The social impact of this is quiteare. IV. The Social Impact of Software Practice: Failures,

Eischen, Kyle

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Berkeley ReadyMade Impact Assessment: Developing an Effective and Efficient Assessment Template for Social Enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work lead to broader social impact. For example, a nonprofitand Resources for Assessing Social Impact (TRASI). 3 2.need to evaluate broad social impact of proposed programs

Brown, Clair; Chait, Ariel; Freeman, Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Climatic Impact of Amazon Deforestation—A Mechanistic Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent general circulation model (GCM) experiments suggest a drastic change in the regional climate, especially the hydrological cycle, after hypothesized Amazon basinwide deforestation. To facilitate the theoretical understanding of such a ...

Ning Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Xubin Zeng

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Market Model Simulation: The Impact of Increased Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce energy consumption of gasoline, the U.S. Congress passed the ... from information in a Solomon Smith Barney report on Australian Magnesium, United States .... The market model was used to analyze three scenarios. First ...

272

A new approach for modeling the peak utility impacts from a proposed CUAC standard  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new Berkeley Lab approach for modeling the likely peak electricity load reductions from proposed energy efficiency programs in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This method is presented in the context of the commercial unitary air conditioning (CUAC) energy efficiency standards. A previous report investigating the residential central air conditioning (RCAC) load shapes in NEMS revealed that the peak reduction results were lower than expected. This effect was believed to be due in part to the presence of the squelch, a program algorithm designed to ensure changes in the system load over time are consistent with the input historic trend. The squelch applies a system load-scaling factor that scales any differences between the end-use bottom-up and system loads to maintain consistency with historic trends. To obtain more accurate peak reduction estimates, a new approach for modeling the impact of peaky end uses in NEMS-BT has been developed. The new approach decrements the system load directly, reducing the impact of the squelch on the final results. This report also discusses a number of additional factors, in particular non-coincidence between end-use loads and system loads as represented within NEMS, and their impacts on the peak reductions calculated by NEMS. Using Berkeley Lab's new double-decrement approach reduces the conservation load factor (CLF) on an input load decrement from 25% down to 19% for a SEER 13 CUAC trial standard level, as seen in NEMS-BT output. About 4 GW more in peak capacity reduction results from this new approach as compared to Berkeley Lab's traditional end-use decrement approach, which relied solely on lowering end use energy consumption. The new method has been fully implemented and tested in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) version of NEMS and will routinely be applied to future versions. This capability is now available for use in future end-use efficiency or other policy analysis that requires accurate representation of time varying load reductions.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris; Chan, Peter; Coughlin, Katie

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Overview of GREET Model Development at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Vehicle Use Vehicle Cycle Fuel Cycle Well to Pump PumptoWheels #12;4 WTW AnalysisVehicle (NG ) H 2 FCV (Electrolysis) GHGEmissions(g/mi.) Pump to Wheels Well to Pump #12;5 LCA Models have Motors Corporation (2000-05): produced two reports that are standard citation by auto and oil industry

Argonne National Laboratory

274

The impact of pollution on stellar evolution models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An approach is introduced for incorporating the concept of stellar pollution into stellar evolution models. The approach involves enhancing the metal content of the surface layers of stellar models. In addition, the surface layers of stars in the mass range of 0.5-2.0 Solar masses are mixed to an artificial depth motivated by observations of lithium abundance. The behavior of polluted stellar evolution models is explored assuming the pollution occurs after the star has left the fully convective pre main sequence phase. Stellar models polluted with a few Earth masses of iron are significantly hotter than stars of the same mass with an equivalent bulk metallicity. Polluted stellar evolution models can successfully reproduce the metal-rich, parent star tau Bootis and suggest a slightly lower mass than standard evolution models. Finally, the possibility that stars in the Hyades open cluster have accreted an average of 0.5 Earth masses of iron is explored. The results indicate that it is not possible to rule out stellar pollution on this scale from the scatter of Hyades stars on a color-magnitude diagram. The small amount of scatter in the observational data set does rule out pollution on the order of 1.5 Earth masses of iron. Pollution effects at the low level of 0.5 Earth masses of iron do not produce substantial changes in a star's evolution.

Aaron Dotter; Brian Chaboyer

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Impact of ASCAT Scatterometer Wind Observations on the High-Resolution Limited-Area Model (HIRLAM) within an Operational Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Denial experiments, also denoted observing system experiments (OSEs), are used to determine the impact of an observing system on the forecast quality of a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. When the impact is neutral or positive, new ...

Siebren de Haan; Gert-Jan Marseille; Paul de Valk; John de Vries

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Developing Models and Test Structures of Next-Generation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, We are developing models and test structures of next-generation photovoltaics. In order to flexibly treat 2D and 3D nanostructures, with full ...

277

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting...

278

Development of Medical Simulation Computer Models: Medical Ice...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application in Advanced Laparoscopic Procedures Application in Emergency Response Current Research on Medical Slurry Cooling Development of Medical Simulation Computer Models...

279

Development of an electrical model of a resistive micromegas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developped a model to simulate the behavior of a resistive micromegas (MICROMEsh GAseous Structure) detector to a discharge using an electronic software (Virtuoso).

Samarati, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Correlations Tests in Nuclear Mass Model Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlation testing provides a quick method of discriminating amongst potential terms to include in a nuclear mass formula or functional; however a firm mathematical foundation of the method has not been previously set forth. Here, the necessary justification for correlation testing is developed and more detail of the motivation behind its use is given. We provide a quantitative demonstration of the method's performance and short-comings, highlighting also potential issues a user may encounter. In concluding we suggestion some possible future developments to improve the limitations of the method.

Bertolli, M G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Volume 5, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 New Mexico and Utah Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 12 and 13 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

283

A theoretical approach for dynamic modelling of sustainable development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a theoretical model for a dynamic system based on sustainable development. Due to the relatively absence of theoretical studies and practical issues in the area of sustainable development, Romania aspires to the principles of sustainable ... Keywords: economic development, economic system, economic welfare, natural environment, resources scarcity, sustainable development

Corina-Maria Ene; Anda Gheorghiu; Anca Gheorghiu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Assistance to Clean Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Assistance to Clean Energy Agency/Company /Organization: Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com//w/images/2/2d/Nora Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Assistance to Clean Energy Screenshot References: Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Assistance to Clean Energy[1] Overview "The approaches proposed in this report should be viewed as a selection of

285

New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources February 7, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Exploration and field development in the largest continuous oil play in the lower 48 states, located in North Dakota and eastern Montana, will be guided by new geo-models developed with funding from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The three-year project to develop exploration and reservoir models for the Bakken Shale resource play was conducted by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), through research funded by FE's Oil and Natural Gas Program. A "play" is a shale formation containing significant accumulations of natural gas or oil. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates the Bakken Shale

286

New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources February 7, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Exploration and field development in the largest continuous oil play in the lower 48 states, located in North Dakota and eastern Montana, will be guided by new geo-models developed with funding from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The three-year project to develop exploration and reservoir models for the Bakken Shale resource play was conducted by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), through research funded by FE's Oil and Natural Gas Program. A "play" is a shale formation containing significant accumulations of natural gas or oil. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates the Bakken Shale

287

Modeling the Impact of Convective Entrainment on the Tropical Tropopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) cloud-resolving model of deep moist convective events reveal net cooling near the tropopause (15–18 km above ground), caused by a combination of large-scale ascent and small-scale ...

F. J. Robinson; S. C. Sherwood

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Modeling the impact of lifestyle on health at scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in computational epidemiology to date has concentrated on estimating summary statistics of populations and simulated scenarios of disease outbreaks. Detailed studies have been limited to small domains, as scaling the methods involved poses considerable ... Keywords: computational epidemiology, geo-temporal modeling, machine learning, online social networks, ubiquitous computing

Adam Sadilek; Henry Kautz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Experiments for foam model development and validation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments  

SciTech Connect

Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

Jeffery, Nicole [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunke, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pultrusion manufacturing process development by computational modelling and methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the modelling and development of computational schemes to simulate pultrusion processes. Two different computational methods, finite differences and elements, are properly developed and critically analyzed. The methods are applied ... Keywords: Degree of cure, Finite difference method, Finite element method, Numerical modelling, Pultrusion, Temperature

P. Carlone; G. S. Palazzo; R. Pasquino

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Storm tide impact and consequence modelling: Some preliminary observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid growth of urban development in coastal areas of Queensland (Australia) has significantly increased the number of people exposed to the risk of storm tides generated by tropical cyclones. To gain a better understanding of the vulnerability and ... Keywords: Cyclone, Hazard, Risk, Storm tide, Vulnerability

K. J. Granger; D. I. Smith

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste The document describes the initial work on designing and developing requirements for a total system performance assessment (TSPA) model that can support preliminary safety assessments for a mined geologic repository for high-level waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in salt host rock at a generic site. A preliminary generic salt TSPA model for HLW/SNF disposal has been developed and tested for an isothermal repository in salt, for emplaced waste that is assumed to have no decay heat; for salt

294

Development of a model for reactive emissions from industrial stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a model, CAPAS, capable of estimating short-term concentrations of primary and secondary pollutants resulting from point source emissions. The model is designed to simulate the complex interaction of plume dispersion and non-linear ... Keywords: Air pollutants, Dispersion models, Non-linear chemistry, Plume reactivity, Stiff solvers

Luis E. Olcese; Beatriz M. Toselli

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evaluating the use of Social Impact Assessment in the context of agricultural development projects in Iran  

SciTech Connect

The utilisation of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) in Iran is analysed in terms of its policy context and its application in practice. Five case studies where SIA was employed in conjunction with Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) for agricultural development projects are evaluated. In addition, the performance of the policy context is assessed. This research revealed that there are legal and institutional constraints to the effective functioning of SIA in Iran, and that there are deficiencies in the operating guidelines. There were serious problems associated with the way SIA was undertaken in all five case studies. Recommendations to improve the policy framework for the conduct of SIA are made. The recommendations advocate for a higher profile of SIA within legislation, for social issues to have greater emphasis in official guidelines for the conduct of EIA and SIA, and for a range of measures to increase the professionalism of SIA practice.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Faculty of Agriculture, Yasuj University, Yasuj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Gholam Hossein, E-mail: zamani@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: Frank.Vanclay@utas.edu.a [Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Investigation of ecosystems impacts from geothermal development in Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of three years of field ecological investigation in Imperial Valley Environmental Program is presented. The potential terrestrial habitat impacts of geothermal development are discussed for shorebirds and waterfowl habitat, the endangered clapper rail, powerline corridors, noise effects, animal trace element burdens, and the desert community. Aquatic habitats are discussed in terms of Salton Sea salinity, effects of geothermal brine discharges to the Salton Sea, trace element baselines, and potential toxicity of brine spills in freshwater. Studies of impacts on agriculture involved brine movement in soil, release of trace metals, trace element baselines in soil and plants, water requirements of crops, and H{sub 2}S effects on crop production in the presence of CO{sub 2} and ozone.

Shinn, J.H.; Ireland, R.R.; Kercher, J.R.; Koranda, J.J.; Tompkins, G.A.

1979-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the development of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Project Shoal Area (PSA and surrounding area that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and State of Nevada personnel to evaluate the impact of proposed water-use scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the PSA and surrounding Fairview Basin. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to groundwater levels near the PSA and others did not, together they demonstrate the utility of the management tool for the evaluation of proposed changes in groundwater use in or near the PSA.

G. Lamorey; S. Bassett; R. Schumer; D. Boyle; G. Pohll; J. Chapman

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

299

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

300

Development of hydrogeological modelling approaches for assessment of consequences of hazardous accidents at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces some modeling approaches for predicting the influence of hazardous accidents at nuclear reactors on groundwater quality. Possible pathways for radioactive releases from nuclear power plants were considered to conceptualize boundary conditions for solving the subsurface radionuclides transport problems. Some approaches to incorporate physical-and-chemical interactions into transport simulators have been developed. The hydrogeological forecasts were based on numerical and semi-analytical scale-dependent models. They have been applied to assess the possible impact of the nuclear power plants designed in Russia on groundwater reservoirs.

Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pereverzeva, S.A. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT): Model description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MODEL.................................................................................................................................7 I. Basic Methodology on Food............................................................................................. 7

Mark W. Rosegrant; Claudia Ringler; Siwa Msangi; Timothy B. Sulser; Tingju Zhu; Sarah A. Cline

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program and its impact on geothermal exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study showed that the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program has had only a negligible effect on geothermal development and the response to the program was far less than expected. The streamlining of environmental regulations and leasing policies, and the granting of intangible drilling cost write-offs and depletion allowances to operators would have had a greater impact on geothermal energy development. The loan guaranty program did not promote the undertaking of any new projects that would not have been undertaken without it. The program only accelerated the pace for some development which might have commenced in the future. Included in the study are recommendations for improving the operation of the program thereby increasing its attractiveness to potential applicants.

Nasr, L.H.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Exploration strategies based on an understanding of the geologic processes that transfer heat from the mantle to the upper crust, and foster the conditions for shallow hydrothermal circulation or enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) exploration, are required to search efficiently for 'blind' geothermal resources. We propose a genetically based screening protocol to assess potentially prospective geothermal resources, beginning at the plate boundary scale and progressively focusing in on the scale of a producing

304

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Telecom Paristech, LTCI Paris, France Abstract--In this paper we present a new analysis of energy.5% of world-wide electrical energy is responsible to cellular network and 80% of this is consumed at baseEnergy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility Thanh Tung Vu Telecom

307

Modeling of CO2 Reduction Impacts on Energy Prices with Modelica Philip Machanick1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price mean reversion rate" ; Real relEnergyPrice (start = 1); Real energyCostTrend (start = 1); Real[i,j,k]; end nextStep; equation energyCostTrend = relEnergyPrice * energyUse / baseEnergyUse; // usefulModeling of CO2 Reduction Impacts on Energy Prices with Modelica Philip Machanick1 , Ariel Liebman1

Machanick, Philip

308

Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Analysis and Management of the Visual Resource, Incline Village, Nevada, April 23-25, 1979. 2 / AssociatesEvolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1 2/ Brian A/ The method can be used to train evaluators to use explicit criteria (vividness, intactness and unity

Standiford, Richard B.

309

Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar charged particles of solar and cosmic origin. Therefore variations of the geomagnetic field occurring to the atmosphere under the consideration of different shielding properties of the geomagnetic field. The present

Wehrli, Bernhard

310

Volume 2, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Arizona and California Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 8 and 9 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

311

Volume 7, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Comments and Responses July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

312

Volume 3, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Colorado Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapter 10 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

313

Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Impacts of a gas cartel on the European gas market – selected results from the supply model EUGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

b, * This article introduces the simulation model EUGAS which allows a quantitative analysis of the long-term natural gas supply of Europe. Based on chosen parameter specifications, the simulation shows that no discernible physical gas scarcity at least for the next 20-30 years will occur in Europe. Significant investments in new production and transport facilities will be necessary during the next decades. Diversification of supplies and political considerations will have a significant impact on the development of new natural gas resources. Possibly, a new built gas cartel similar to the OPEC may modify the gas supply pattern of Europe.

J. Perner A; A. Seeliger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Flow Model Development for the Idaho National Laboratory OU 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional (2D), steady-state groundwater flow model was developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sitewide groundwater model. A total of 224 wells inside the model domain were used to calibrate the 2D flow model. Three different calibration techniques, zonation approach, pilot point approach and coupled zonation/pilot point approach, were explored and applied during the model development. The pilot point approach allows modelers to model aquifer heterogeneities at various scales, and extract the maximum amount of data from available monitoring data, permitting the best possible representation of flow and transport at the INL.

Hai Huang; Swen Magnuson; Thomas Wood

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Development of an Ocean Model Adjoint for Decadal Prediction | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of an Ocean Model Adjoint for Decadal Prediction Development of an Ocean Model Adjoint for Decadal Prediction Development of an Ocean Model Adjoint for Decadal Prediction This project will develop an adjoint of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP; version 2.0.1) using automatic differentiation (AD) techniques. We have already had success with AD on sea ice models and will use this knowledge with POP. It is now unequivocal that the Earth's climate system is warming. The most recent IPCC assessment concludes that the increased temperatures in the latter 20th century are very likely due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases, and continued greenhouse emissions will likely result in even larger increases during the 21st century. Even if controls could be put on greenhouse emissions immediately, there is still some climate change that

317

Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) Development and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) was developed for application to tall stack plumes dispersing over nearly flat terrain. Emphasis is on convective and high-wind conditions. The meteorological component is based on observational and ...

Steven R. Hanna; Robert J. Paine

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Model-driven development of multi-core embedded software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model-driven development is worthy of further research because of its proven capabilities in increasing productivity and ensuring correctness. However, it has not yet been explored for multi-core processor-based embedded systems, whose programming is ...

Pao-Ann Hsiung; Shang-Wei Lin; Yean-Ru Chen; Nien-Lin Hsueh; Chih-Hung Chang; Chih-Hsiong Shih; Chorng-Shiuh Koong; Chao-Sheng Lin; Chun-Hsien Lu; Sheng-Ya Tong; Wan-Ting Su; William C. Chu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Baroclinic Development in Observations and NASA GSFC General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparative diagnostic analyses of developing synoptic-scale baroclinic disturbances in NCEP–NCAR reanalyses and the NASA–NCAR (NASCAR) and Aries [NASA’s Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP)] general circulation model simulations ...

Dennis P. Robinson; Robert X. Black

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

LLNL researchers develop first kinetic model of plasma focus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13013device 01302013 LLNL researchers develop first kinetic model of plasma focus device Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Deuterium ion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Social impact management through planning and development : Hedonic Psychology and a new approach to tourism in Zanzibar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes a new approach to tourism planning and development based on three threads in the literature on social impact management: (1) the current approach to tourism studies; (2) the writings and activities of ...

Metzger, A. Tell (Adam Tell), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The urban economic development impacts of ethnic entrepreneurship : a case study of Dominican entrepreneurs in Lawrence, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the process through which ethnic entrepreneurship impacts urban economic development. In many urban places across the United States, demographic change has led to the rise of ethnic communities and the ...

Cheigh, Brian Chaneung

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Security Sector Reform: a new framework for security assistance? : the Security-Development Nexus' impact on policies towards the South.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to investigate the security-development nexus' impact on donor policies towards fragile and post-conflict states in the South. The thesis… (more)

Nikolaisen, Trine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Land Market Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development: An Empirical Study of Rail Transit in Washington, D.C. and Atlanta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development:An Empirical Study of Rail Transit in Washington, D.C. andMarket Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development:

Cervero, Robert

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Impact of Climate Drift on Twenty-First-Century Projection in a Coupled Atmospheric–Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing climate drift in coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) usually requires 1000–2000 years of spinup, which has not been practical for every modeling group to do. For the purpose of evaluating the impact of climate ...

Mao-Chang Liang; Li-Ching Lin; Ka-Kit Tung; Yuk L. Yung; Shan Sun

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Local and Mesoscale Impacts of Wind Farms as Parameterized in a Mesoscale NWP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wind farm parameterization has been developed for the mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF). The effects of wind turbines are represented by imposing a momentum sink on the mean flow; ...

Anna C. Fitch; Joseph B. Olson; Julie K. Lundquist; Jimy Dudhia; Alok K. Gupta; John Michalakes; Idar Barstad

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels  

SciTech Connect

A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of a PMV-based thermal comfort modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concentrates on the modelling development for a PMV-based thermal comfort system. Operators can define their own expression towards the surroundings by inserting the respective value of PMV and the system will generate the compressor and fan ... Keywords: climatic modelling, predicted mean vote (PMV), thermal comfort

Shazmin Aniza Abdul Shukor; Karl Kohlhof; Zul Azhar Zahid Jamal

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Visual agent-based model development with repast simphony.  

SciTech Connect

Repast is a widely used, free, and open-source agent-based modeling and simulation toolkit. Three Repast platforms are currently available, each of which has the same core features but a different environment for these features. Repast Simphony (Repast S) extends the Repast portfolio by offering a new approach to simulation development and execution. This paper presents a model of physical infrastructure network interdependency as an introductory tutorial and illustration of the visual modeling capabilities of Repast S.

North, M. J.; Tatara, E.; Collier, N. T.; Ozik, J.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago; PantaRei Corp.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Rigorous evaluation of a soil heat transfer model for mesoscale climate change impact studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of Climate Change on plant development as well as on carbon and nitrogen cycling in soils is an important research topic for Global Change impact assessment at the regional scale. These changes affect the availability and quality of ground ... Keywords: Energy balance, GLOWA-Danube, Land surface, Mesoscale, Soil temperature

Markus Muerth; Wolfram Mauser

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control  

SciTech Connect

The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

Inmuong, Uraiwan, E-mail: uraiwan@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rithmak, Panee, E-mail: panrit@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Srisookwatana, Soomol, E-mail: soomol.s@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Traithin, Nathathai, E-mail: nathathai.t@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Maisuporn, Pornpun, E-mail: pornpun.m@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of an optimal impact energy absorber for highway crash cushions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a new and efficient method of absorbing a vehicle??s kinetic energy for highway safety crash cushions. A vehicle that makes a direct impact with a rigid highway structure traveling at highway speeds can be fatal for its occupants. Crash cushions are implemented on roadways in front of these rigid structures with the intent to ??soften?? the impact. The cushion will bring a vehicle to a stop at safe rates before it impacts the rigid structure. The energy absorbing component of the crash cushion must meet four main requirements. The cushion must reduce the vehicles speed at a rate that does not allow the occupant to impact the vehicle interior at velocities greater than 12 m/s. The cushion must then bring the vehicle to a complete stop with deceleration rates below 20 g??s. A crash cushion must satisfy these requirements for an 820 kg vehicle and a 2000 kg vehicle traveling at 100 km/hr. Advanced design methodologies were applied to enable multiple, innovative design concepts. These concepts made use of the deformation of steel in structural pipe, structural angle, and structural plate to reduce the velocity of a vehicle at a safe rate. Critical design parameters were identified which allowed for efficient and effective numerical experiments to be conducted. The data collected from these experiments were then validated when compared to physical test data. After the data had been collected, each of the designs was compared to one another in order to decide upon the best design. The design selected was the deforming plate concept which makes use of steel plate mounted in a fashion that created two arms that acted similar to two cantilever beams. A wedge was forced beneath these arms deforming them upward. This design is effective because the deformation can be easily controlled by the thickness of the plate, the moment arm created by the wedge, and the geometry of the wedge. Steel plate is a readily available material that requires minimal manufacturing for installation preparation making it cost-effective, and easy to install. In the event of impact with the cushion, new parts will be inexpensive and readily available. Being reusable, easy to repair and low in cost, the energy absorbing concept presented herein is a cost effective alternative to existing energy absorbing technology. Due to replaceable parts being readily available, repair time and cost will be reduced compared to other designs that require new parts to be fabricated for replacement. This will make for a competitive design.

Michalec, Christopher Ryan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producersâ?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A â??multi-methodâ? or â??mixed methodâ? research methodology was employed for each case study.

Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Modeling the Development and Use of Strategic Information Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful adoption of a strategic information system SIS is shown to hinge upon a favorable decision to develop a SIS and on a favorable decision to use the developed SIS. A model is exhibited that integrates the factors that lie behind these two ...

Francis D. Tuggle; H. Albert Napier

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluating a graphical notation for modelling software development methodologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work aims at evaluating a graphical notation for modelling software (and other kinds of) development methodologies, thus demonstrating how useful the graphical aspects can be for sharing knowledge between the people responsible for documenting information ... Keywords: Cognitive dimensions, Graphical notation, Method engineering, Software development methodologies

Kenia Sousa; Jean Vanderdonckt; Brian Henderson-Sellers; Cesar Gonzalez-Perez

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mercury Speciation in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Experimental Studies and Model Development  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding of the catalytic reactions that are promoted by solid surfaces present in coal combustion systems and develop a mathematical model that described key phenomena responsible for the fate of mercury in coal-combustion systems. This objective was achieved by carefully combining laboratory studies under realistic process conditions using simulated flue gas with mathematical modeling efforts. Laboratory-scale studies were performed to understand the fundamental aspects of chemical reactions between flue gas constituents and solid surfaces present in the fly ash and their impact on mercury speciation. Process models were developed to account for heterogeneous reactions because of the presence of fly ash as well as the deliberate addition of particles to promote Hg oxidation and adsorption. Quantum modeling was used to obtain estimates of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions. Based on the initial findings of this study, additional work was performed to ascertain the potential of using inexpensive inorganic sorbents to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants without adverse impact on the salability fly ash, which is one of the major drawbacks of current control technologies based on activated carbon.

Radisav Vidic; Joseph Flora; Eric Borguet

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model to Predict the Interactions between Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2 and Fluid, Rocks in EGS Reservoirs Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2 and Fluid, Rocks in EGS Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description In order to develop this model, databases will be assembled and/or updated for thermodynamic and kinetic rate laws for water/brine/rock/CO2 interactions at the pressures and temperatures common to EGS systems. In addition to a literature search, extrapolation of existing data and experimental laboratory work will be conducted to calibrate and verify the datasets.

340

Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair There are over 100 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S., which generate approximately 20% of the nation's electricity. These plants range from 15 to 40 years old. Extending the service lives of the current fleet of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years is imperative to allow for the environmentally-sustainable energy infrastructure being developed and matured. Welding repair of irradiated nuclear reactor materials (such as austenitic stainless steels) is especially challenging because of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model  

SciTech Connect

Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

Lin Shoufu, E-mail: linshf2003@126.co [School of Economics, FuJian Normal University, Fuzhou City, 350007, Fujian Province (China) and School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China) and Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Zhao Dingtao, E-mail: box@ustc.edu.c [School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China); Marinova, Dora, E-mail: D.Marinova@curtin.edu.a [Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development and Validation of WECC Variable Speed Wind Turbine Dynamic Models for Grid Integration Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes reduced-order, simplified wind turbine models for analyzing the stability impact of large arrays of wind turbines with a single point of network interconnection.

Behnke, M.; Ellis, A.; Kazachkov, Y.; McCoy, T.; Muljadi, E.; Price, W.; Sanchez-Gasca, J.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

VISION Model : description of model used to estimate the impact of highway vehicle technologies and fuels on energy use and carbon emissions to 2050.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The VISION model has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide estimates of the potential energy use, oil use, and carbon emission impacts to 2050 of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicle technologies and alternative fuels. DOE supports research of advanced transportation technologies (including fuels) and is frequently asked to provide estimates of the potential impacts of successful market penetration of these technologies, sometimes on a relatively quick-turnaround basis. VISION is a spreadsheet model in Microsoft Excel that can be used to respond rapidly to quick-turnaround requests, as well as for longer-term analyses. It uses vehicle survival and age-dependent usage characteristics to project total light and heavy vehicle stock, total vehicle miles of travel (VMT), and total energy use by technology and fuel type by year, given market penetration and vehicle energy efficiency assumptions developed exogenously. Total carbon emissions for on-highway vehicles by year are also estimated because life-cycle carbon coefficients for various fuels are included in VISION. VISION is not a substitute for the transportation component of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS incorporates a consumer choice model to project market penetration of advanced vehicles and alternative fuels. The projections are made within the context of the entire U.S. economy. However, the NEMS model is difficult to use on a quick-turnaround basis and only makes projections to 2025. VISION complements NEMS with its relative ''user-friendliness'' and by extending the time frame of potential analysis. VISION has been used for a wide variety of purposes. For illustration, we have listed some of its most recent and current uses in Table 1.1. Figures 1.1-1.3 illustrate the results of some of those runs. These graphs are not actual model output, but they are based on model results. The main body of this report describes VISION's methodology and data sources. The methodology and data sources used in the light- and heavy-vehicle portions of the model are discussed separately. Some suggestions for future improvements to the model are made. Appendix A provides instructions on how to run the VISION model. Appendix B describes the procedure for updating the model with the latest EIA Annual Energy Outlook (AEO).

Singh, M.; Vyas, A.; Steiner, E.

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, January 1994--January 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of GSAM development is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the system, including the resource base, exploration and development practices, extraction technology performance and costs, project economics, transportation costs and restrictions, storage, and end-use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level. This disaggregation allows direct evaluation of alternative extraction technologies based on discretely estimated, individual well productivity, required investments, and associated operating costs. GSAM`s design allows users to evaluate complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives as they directly impact the gas market. Key activities completed during the past year include: conducted a comparative analysis of commercial reservoir databases; licensed and screened NRG Associates Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the US reservoir database; developed and tested reduced form reservoir model production type curves; fully developed database structures for use in GSAM and linkage to other systems; developed a methodology for the exploration module; collected and updated upstream capital and operating cost parameters; completed initial integration of downstream/demand models; presented research results at METC Contractor Review Meeting; conducted other briefings for METC managers, including initiation of the GSAM Environmental Module; and delivered draft topical reports on technology review, model review, and GSAM methodology.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate assessments of reserves and evaluation of productivity trends for gas condensate systems depend on a basic understanding of phase and fluid flow behavior. In gas condensate reservoirs, the gas flow depends on liquid drop out at pressures below the dewpoint pressure. The liquid initially accumulates as a continuous film along the porous media because of the low interfacial tension. Then, as the volume of condensate increases, the interfacial tension increases and capillary forces become more important. Modeling fluid flow in these systems must consider the dependence of relative permeability on both viscous and capillary forces. This research focuses on the evaluation of several recently proposed relative permeability models and on the quantification of their impact on reservoir fluid flow and well performance. We selected three relative permeability models to compare the results obtained in the modeling of relative permeabilities for a published North Sea gas condensate reservoir. The models employ weighting factors to account for the interpolation between miscible and immiscible flow behavior. The Pusch model evaluated using Fevang's weighting factor gave the best estimation of relative permeability when compared to the published data. Using a sector model, we evaluated the effects at the field scale of the selected gas condensate relative permeability models on well performance under different geological heterogeneity and permeability anisotropy scenarios. The Bette and Pusch models as well as the Danesh model, as implemented in a commercial reservoir simulator, were used to quantify the impact of the relative permeability models on fluid-flow and well performance. The results showed that, if the transition between miscible and immiscible behavior is not considered, the condensate saturation could be overestimated and the condensate production could be underestimated. After twenty years of production, the heterogeneous model using the selected relative permeability models predicted between 7.5 - 13% more condensate recovery than was estimated using an immiscible relative permeability model. Using the same relative permeability models, the anisotropic model forecast between 3 - 10% more condensate recovery than predicted using an immiscible relative permeability model. Results using the anisotropic model showed that vertical communication could affect the liquid distribution in the reservoir.

Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Development of inverse modeling techniques for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the non-isothermal, multiphase, multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching and parameter estimation based on data obtained during testing and exploitation of geothermal fields. The TOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding simulation output can be calculated. In addition, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. One of the advantages of inverse modeling is that it overcomes the time and labor intensive tedium of trial- and error model calibration. Furthermore, the estimated parameters refer directly to the numerical model used for the subsequent predictions and optimization studies. This paper describes the methodology of inverse modeling and demonstrates an application of the method to data from a synthetic geothermal reservoir. We also illustrate its use for the optimization of fluid reinjection into a partly depleted reservoir.

Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy standards and model codes development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the energy standards and model codes process for the voluntary sector within the United States. The report was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Building Energy Standards Program and is intended to be used as a primer or reference on this process. Building standards and model codes that address energy have been developed by organizations in the voluntary sector since the early 1970s. These standards and model codes provide minimum energy-efficient design and construction requirements for new buildings and, in some instances, existing buildings. The first step in the process is developing new or revising existing standards or codes. There are two overall differences between standards and codes. Energy standards are developed by a consensus process and are revised as needed. Model codes are revised on a regular annual cycle through a public hearing process. In addition to these overall differences, the specific steps in developing/revising energy standards differ from model codes. These energy standards or model codes are then available for adoption by states and local governments. Typically, energy standards are adopted by or adopted into model codes. Model codes are in turn adopted by states through either legislation or regulation. Enforcement is essential to the implementation of energy standards and model codes. Low-rise residential construction is generally evaluated for compliance at the local level, whereas state agencies tend to be more involved with other types of buildings. Low-rise residential buildings also may be more easily evaluated for compliance because the governing requirements tend to be less complex than for commercial buildings.

Conover, D.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This service report was undertaken at the February 2, 2004, request of Senator John Sununu to perform an assessment of the Conference Energy Bill of 2003. This report summarizes the CEB provisions that can be analyzed using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and have the potential to affect energy consumption, supply, and prices. The impacts are estimated by comparing the projections with the CEB provisions to the AEO2004 Reference Case.

Andy Kydes

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL# 5793E LBNL# 5793E Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Jason P. Brown 1 USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jbrown@ers.usda.gov John Pender USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jpender@ers.usda.gov Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 RHWiser@lbl.gov Eric Lantz National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 eric.lantz@nrel.gov Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 20 Sawmill Road, Milan, NY 1257 BHoen@lbl.gov Pre-print of article submitted for publication to Energy Economics. Download from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988312001466

352

Development of a simplified model for cooling and dehumidifying coils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise understanding of the cooling coil in air handler units is vital to assure the proper temperature and humidity in conditioned space while minimizing the associated costs of operating the air conditioning system. Several models have been developed in the past to characterize the overall heat transfer coefficient of this component. However, these models require specific details about the coil construction which make them impractical for in-situ applications. A simplified engineering model suitable for application to existing coils in the field is therefore needed in the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) industry. The objective of this study is to develop a simplified model suitable for use with field measured data to characterize the overall heat transfer coefficient of in-situ water-to-air cooling coils. This model uses the electrical resistance analogy to treat the heat transfer process in the coil. Field measured data combined with a theoretical analysis are the basis for the development of the model. Non-linear regressions are applied to the data to trace the heat transfer behavior of the coil. The coefficients obtained from the regressions account for the physical characteristics of the coil under study as well as for the properties of the fluids involved (air and water). The calibration of these parameters to data generated by a coil manufacturer's simulation program allows the application of the resulting model to different types of cooling coils with different characteristics. Correlations are developed to predict the coefficients of the model and make it suitable for application to water cooling coils with a range of physical characteristics. The resulting model is validated by testing it on data from two different buildings at Texas excellent in both cases, predicting the thermal resistance of the coils and the return water temperature with an average deviation of 3.5% and 1.2 'F, respectively. Finally, the model is used to develop algorithms to simulate the two most common chilled water loops in buildings: the two-way valve and the blending station arrangement. These algorithms are incorporated in software developed at the Energy Systems Laboratory at Texas A&M University, College Station, which is used to simulate building heating, cooling and energy consumption based on a simplified air-side model. This addition enhances the capability of the software to simulate the response of the water-side to changes occurring in the space conditioning area, providing, in this way, a clear picture of the heat transfer phenomena that occurs in the cooling coil. The upgraded software was tested on a campus building and there was good agreement between the conditions.

Maldonado, Eliezer

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Developing Generic Dynamic Models for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection Grid  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) has built three major power flow cases for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection (EI) based on various levels of energy/environmental policy conditions, technology advances, and load growth. Using the power flow cases, this report documents the process of developing the generic 2030 dynamic models using typical dynamic parameters. The constructed model was validated indirectly using the synchronized phasor measurements by removing the wind generation temporarily.

Kou, Gefei [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL] [ORNL; Markham, Penn N [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of an Ingestion Pathway Model for AXAIRQ  

SciTech Connect

AXAIRQ is a dose mode code used for prospective accident assessment at the Savannah River Site and is primarily used to show regulatory compliance. For completeness of pathway analysis, an ingestion model, AXINGST, has been developed for use with, and incorporation in, AXAIRQ. Currently available ingestion models were referenced as a basis for AXINGST. AXINGST calculates a conservative ingestion dose following an atmospheric release of radionuclides and includes site specific variables where applicable.

Simpkins, A.A.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

Brozyna, K.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Development of an Energy Consumption Model at a Multi-Product Chemical Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plant-wide energy model is being developed to be used primarily as a planning tool to evaluate the impact of energy conservation projects and plant expansions on the total plant energy balance. Statistical analysis of historical data from each production unit has generated regression equations which correlate the various energy utilities with production rate and other variables. The form of the model varies from unit to unit. Startups, shutdowns, and unit interruptions are simulated using a Monte Carlo technique. In some units, energy consumption does not correlate with production rate, which indicates that energy savings may be possible through better control of energy usage. The model should also lay the framework for an on-line energy management program.

Wyhs, N. A.; Logsdon, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Further Developments on the Geothermal System Scoping Model: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses further developments and refinements for the uses of the Geothermal System Scoping Model in an effort to provide a means for performing a variety of trade-off analyses of surface and subsurface parameters, sensitivity analyses, and other systems engineering studies in order to better inform R&D direction and investment for the development of geothermal power into a major contributor to the U.S. energy supply.

Antkowiak, M.; Sargent, R.; Geiger, J. W.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

DEVELOPMENT OF A FLEXIBLE, MULTIZONE, MULTIFAMILY BUILDING SIMULATION MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Weatherization of multifamily buildings is gaining increased attention in the U.S. Available energy audit tools for multifamily buildings were found to need desirable improvements. On the wish list of field experts for enhanced features was the basic ability to model multizone buildings (i.e., one thermal zone per dwelling unit) with simplified user inputs, which allows a better analysis of decentralized and centralized HVAC and domestic hot water systems of multifamily buildings without having to create detailed building models. To address the desired capabilities, development of an enhanced energy audit tool was begun in 2011. The tool is a strategically structured, flexible, one-zone-per-unit, DOE-2.1e model coupled with a simplified user interface to model small to large multifamily buildings with decentralized or centralized systems and associated energy measures. This paper describes the modeling concept and its implementation.

Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

365

Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, July 1996--July 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of GSAM development is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the system, including the resource base, exploration and development practices, extraction technology performance and costs, project economics, transportation costs and restrictions, storage, and end-use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and subreservoir level. This disaggregation allows direct evaluation of alternative extraction technologies based on discretely estimated, individual well productivity, required investments, and associated operating costs. GSAM`s design allows users to evaluate complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives as they directly impact the gas market. GSAM development has been ongoing for the past five years. Key activities completed during the past year are described.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Developing measurement selection strategy for neural network models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with an application of the theory of optimum experimental design to the problem of selecting the data set for developing neural models. Another objective is to show that neural network trained with the samples obtained according to D-optimum ...

Przemys?aw Pretki; Marcin Witczak

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Model Development for Atomic Force Microscope Stage Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Development for Atomic Force Microscope Stage Mechanisms Ralph C. Smith and Andrew G. Hatch of the Philippines Virginia Commonwealth University Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Richmond VA 23284 rcdelros titanate (PZT) devices employed in atomic force microscope stage mechanisms. We focus specifically on PZT

368

Draft Report Development of Model Curriculum in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft Report On Development of Model Curriculum in Renewable Energy Energy Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Powai, Mumbai ­ 400 076 August 2003 #12;Draft Renewable Energy energy systems for the future, it is necessary to incorporate renewable energy in the traditional

Banerjee, Rangan

369

A model of job satisfaction for collaborative development processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern software development relies on collaborative work as a means for sharing knowledge, distributing tasks and responsibilities, reducing risk of failures, and increasing the overall quality of the software product. Such objectives are achieved with ... Keywords: Job satisfaction, Log linear model, Pair programming

Witold Pedrycz; Barbara Russo; Giancarlo Succi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Study of Vehicle Front Structure Crashworthiness Based on Pole Impact with Different Position  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of occupant injury severity in frontal pole impact, this paper conducted a computer simulation study on the frontal pole impact of passenger car. Three types of frontal pole impact FE analysis models were developed according to different impact ... Keywords: Frontal pole impact, Impact position, Vehicle Structure Deformation, Crashworthiness

Qihui Li, Jikuang Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact on an ocean model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact by the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission (April­October 2003) and their impact on ocean model simulation. The diurnal variability captured by twice-daily scatterometer wind from the tandem mission

Talley, Lynne D.

372

Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fort Hood Army base in central Texas has more than 5,200 buildings and can be considered as typical of large Department of Defense Army bases in the continental United States. The annual utility bill of the base exceeds $25 million. Baseline monthly models for electricity use, electricity demand, gas use, and water use for the three cantonment areas of Fort Hood have been developed. Such models can be used as screening tools for detecting changes in future utility bills and also to track/evaluate the extent to which Presidential Executive Order 12902, mandating 30% decrease in energy utility bills from 1985 to 2005, is being met. In this analysis, 1990 has been selected as the baseline year to illustrate the predictive capability of the models. Since ascertaining the uncertainty of our predictions is very important for meaningful evaluations, we have also presented the relevant equations for computing the 95% prediction intervals of the regression models and illustrated their use with measured data over the period of 1989-1993. This study also evaluated two different types of energy modeling software- the Princeton Scorekeeping method (PRISM) and EModel- in order to ascertain which is more appropriate for baseline modeling of large Army installations such as Fort Hood. It was found that the EModel software, which has more flexibility to handle different types of linear single variate change point models, gave more accurate modeling results.

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fort Hood Army base in central Texas has more than 5,200 buildings and can be considered as typical of large Department of Defense Army bases in the continental United States. The annual utility bill of the base exceeds $25 million. Baseline monthly models for electricity use, electricity demand, gas use, and water use for the three cantonment areas of Fort Hood have been developed. Such models can be used as screening tools for detecting changes in future utility bills and also to track/evaluate the extent to which Presidential Executive Order 12902, mandating 30% decrease in energy utility bills from 1985 to 2005, is being met. In this analysis, 1990 has been selected as the baseline year to illustrate the predictive capability of the models. Since ascertaining the uncertainty of our predictions is very important for meaningful evaluations, we have also presented the relevant equations for computing the 95% prediction intervals of the regression models and illustrated their use with measured data over the period 1989 - 1993. This study also evaluated two different types of energy modeling software- the Princeton Scorekeeping method (PRISM) and EModel- in order to ascertain which is more appropriate for baseline modeling of large Army installations such as Fort Hood. It was found that the EModel software, which has more flexibility to handle different types of linear single variate change point models, gave more accurate modeling results.

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage the necessary temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the CNTA and surrounding Hot Creek Valley. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, geothermal energy production, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to the region near CNTA and others did not, together they demonstrate the usefulness of the management tool for managers who need to evaluate the impact proposed changes in groundwater use in or near CNTA may have on radionuclide migration.

Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modeling the Vulnerability of an Urban Groundwater System due to the Combined Impacts of Climate Change and Management Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change impact on a groundwater-dependent small urban town has been investigated in the semiarid hard rock aquifer in southern India. A distributed groundwater model was used to simulate the groundwater levels in the study region for the ...

M. Sekhar; M. Shindekar; Sat K. Tomer; P. Goswami

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Estimation of Climate Change Impact on Mean Annual Runoff across Continental Australia Using Budyko and Fu Equations and Hydrological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the climate change impact on mean annual runoff across continental Australia estimated using the Budyko and Fu equations informed by projections from 15 global climate models and compares the estimates with those from extensive ...

J. Teng; F. H. S. Chiew; J. Vaze; S. Marvanek; D. G. C. Kirono

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Impact of Isopycnal Diffusion on Heat Fluxes and the Transient Response of a Two-Dimensional Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (latitude–depth) ocean–climate model is used to assess the impact of calculating diffusive heat and salinity fluxes along and across isopycnal surfaces rather than in a vertical–horizontal coordinate system. Differences between ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

System Impacts from Interconnection of Distributed Resources: Current Status and Identification of Needs for Further Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents and evaluates system impacts from the interconnection of distributed resources to transmission and distribution systems, including a focus on renewable distributed resource technologies. The report also identifies system impact-resolution approaches and actions, including extensions of existing approaches. Lastly, the report documents the current challenges and examines what is needed to gain a clearer understanding of what to pursue to better avoid or address system impact issues.

Basso, T. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues  

SciTech Connect

Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

Robert F. Buell

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temp...

Ermolli, I; de Wit, T Dudok; Krivova, N A; Tourpali, K; Weber, M; Unruh, Y C; Gray, L; Langematz, U; Pilewskie, P; Rozanov, E; Schmutz, W; Shapiro, A; Solanki, S K; Woods, T N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing how JEDI II calculates economic impacts from wind projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s cap-and-trade and its impact on electricity markets.s planned cap-and-trade program for the electricity sector [

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Criteria for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 1–and Tyner, W. (2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on WorldClifford, P. (2009). Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 1–29. [Birur2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on World AgriculturalPolicies for Biofuel Production. Conservation Biology, 22(

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cizelj & Riesch-Oppermann: Modelling the Early Development of... page 1 of 19 MODELING THE EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF SECONDARY SIDE STRESS CORROSION CRACKS IN STEAM GENERATOR TUBES USING INCOMPLETE RANDOM understanding of the secondary side stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 in steam generator tubes seems to propose modeling and visualization of the kinetics of secondary side stress corrosion crack initiation

Cizelj, Leon

387

Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

SciTech Connect

The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

LNG SAFETY RESEARCH: FEM3A MODEL DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report for DE-FG26-04NT42030 covers a period from October 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. On December 9, 2004 a meeting was held in Morgantown to rescope the LNG safety modeling project such that the work would complement the DOE's efforts relative to the development of the intended LNG-Fluent model. It was noted and discussed at the December 9th meeting that the fundamental research being performed on surface to cloud heat transfer and low wind speed issues will be relevant to the development of the DOE LNG/Fluent Model. In general, it was decided that all research to be performed from December 9th through the remainder of the contract is to be focused on the development of the DOE LNG/Fluent model. In addition, all GTI activities for dissemination and transfer of FEM3A will cease and dissemination activities will focus on the new DOE LNG/Fluent model. The proposed new scope of work is presented in section 4 of this report. The work reported in the present document relates to the original scope of work which was in effect during the reporting period. The future work will be re-scoped to meet the requirements of the new scope of work. During the report period work was underway to address numerical problems present during simulation of low-wind-speed, stable, atmospheric conditions with FEM3A. Steps 1 and 2 in the plan outlined in the first Quarterly report are complete and steps 3 and 4 are in progress. During this quarter, the University of Arkansas has been investigating the effect upon numerical stability of the heat transfer model used to predict the surface-to-cloud heat transfer, which can be important for LNG vapor dispersion. Previously, no consideration has been given to ground cooling as a result of heat transfer to the colder gas cloud in FEM3A.

Jerry Havens; Iraj A. Salehi

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development of Fast-Time Simulation Techniques to Model Safety Issues in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of an agent-based simulation model of airDevelopment of an agent-based simulation model of airDevelopment of an agent-based simulation model of air

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of BaselineLoad Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

SciTech Connect

Both Federal and California state policymakers areincreasingly interested in developing more standardized and consistentapproaches to estimate and verify the load impacts of demand responseprograms and dynamic pricing tariffs. This study describes a statisticalanalysis of the performance of different models used to calculate thebaseline electric load for commercial buildings participating in ademand-response (DR) program, with emphasis onthe importance of weathereffects. During a DR event, a variety of adjustments may be made tobuilding operation, with the goal of reducing the building peak electricload. In order to determine the actual peak load reduction, an estimateof what the load would have been on the day of the event without any DRactions is needed. This baseline load profile (BLP) is key to accuratelyassessing the load impacts from event-based DR programs and may alsoimpact payment settlements for certain types of DR programs. We testedseven baseline models on a sample of 33 buildings located in California.These models can be loosely categorized into two groups: (1) averagingmethods, which use some linear combination of hourly load values fromprevious days to predict the load on the event, and (2) explicit weathermodels, which use a formula based on local hourly temperature to predictthe load. The models were tested both with and without morningadjustments, which use data from the day of the event to adjust theestimated BLP up or down.Key findings from this study are: - The accuracyof the BLP model currently used by California utilities to estimate loadreductions in several DR programs (i.e., hourly usage in highest 3 out of10 previous days) could be improved substantially if a morning adjustmentfactor were applied for weather-sensitive commercial and institutionalbuildings. - Applying a morning adjustment factor significantly reducesthe bias and improves the accuracy of all BLP models examined in oursample of buildings. - For buildings with low load variability, all BLPmodels perform reasonably well in accuracy. - For customer accounts withhighly variable loads, we found that no BLP model produced satisfactoryresults, although averaging methods perform best in accuracy (but notbias). These types of customers are difficult to characterize withstandard BLP models that rely on historic loads and weather data.Implications of these results for DR program administrators andpolicymakersare: - Most DR programs apply similar DR BLP methods tocommercial and industrial sector customers. The results of our study whencombined with other recent studies (Quantum 2004 and 2006, Buege et al.,2006) suggests that DR program administrators should have flexibility andmultiple options for suggesting the most appropriate BLP method forspecific types of customers.

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote,Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill February 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

394

Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNL's mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city  

SciTech Connect

An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM size distribution. The sensitivity of the model results to the initial sea spray profile further suggests there would be great benefit in better definition of the vertical profile of size resolved sea-spray for use in such model studies.

Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of a portable mechanical hysteresis measurement and imaging system for impact characterization in honeycomb sandwich structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Honeycomb sandwich materials are commonly used for aero-structures, but because the outer skins are typically thin, 2-10 plys, the structures are susceptible to impact damage. NDI methods such as tap tests, bond testers and TTU ultrasound are successfully deployed to find impact damage, but identifying the type/degree of damage is troublesome. As the type/degree of impact damage guides decisions by the maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) community regarding repair, the ability to characterize impacts is of interest. Previous work demonstrated that additional impact characterization may be gleaned from hysteresis loop area, as determined from an out-of-plane load-vs-displacement plot, where this parameter shows a correlation with impact energy. This presentation reports on current work involving the development of a portable hysteresis measurement and imaging system based on an instrumented tapper. Data processing and analysis methods that allow production of the load/displacement data from a single accelerometer are discussed, with additional reporting of tests of software to automatically vary pixel size during scanning to decrease C-scans inspection time.

Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K. [Center for NDE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Modeling Guidance for Developing Site-specific Nutrient Goals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the highest-profile challenges facing states and the regulated community is the development of scientifically sound nutrient goals, such as total maximum daily loads and site-specific numeric nutrient criteria. Goals must recognize that responses of receiving water to nutrients depend on site-specific characteristics (that is, morphology, hydrology, turbidity, temperature, etc.), all of which vary in space and time. There is a need for practical, model-based approaches and guidance for ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool {sup 14}C signature ({Delta} {sup 14}C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the {sup 14}C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass {Delta} {sup 14}C data, and with soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experimental treatments on soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

Parton, W.J.; Hanson, P. J.; Swanston, C.; Torn, M.; Trumbore, S. E.; Riley, W.; Kelly, R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein reservoir being the Marcellus Shale play. The Marcellus Shale play stretches across an area of 95,000 square

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Development, Verification, and Validation of Multiphase Models for Polydisperse Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes in detail the technical findings of the DOE Award entitled 'Development, Verification, and Validation of Multiphase Models for Polydisperse Flows.' The focus was on high-velocity, gas-solid flows with a range of particle sizes. A complete mathematical model was developed based on first principles and incorporated into MFIX. The solid-phase description took two forms: the Kinetic Theory of Granular Flows (KTGF) and Discrete Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM). The gas-solid drag law for polydisperse flows was developed over a range of flow conditions using Discrete Numerical Simulations (DNS). These models were verified via examination of a range of limiting cases and comparison with Discrete Element Method (DEM) data. Validation took the form of comparison with both DEM and experimental data. Experiments were conducted in three separate circulating fluidized beds (CFB's), with emphasis on the riser section. Measurements included bulk quantities like pressure drop and elutriation, as well as axial and radial measurements of bubble characteristics, cluster characteristics, solids flux, and differential pressure drops (axial only). Monodisperse systems were compared to their binary and continuous particle size distribution (PSD) counterparts. The continuous distributions examined included Gaussian, lognormal, and NETL-provided data for a coal gasifier.

Christine Hrenya; Ray Cocco; Rodney Fox; Shankar Subramaniam; Sankaran Sundaresan

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

LNG Safety Research: FEM3A Model Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial scope of work for this project included: (1) Improving the FEM3A advanced turbulence closure module, (2) Adaptation of FEM3A for more general applications, and (3) Verification of dispersion over rough surfaces, with and without obstacle using the advanced turbulence closure module. These work elements were to be performed by Chemical Hazards Research Center (CHRC), Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arkansas as a subcontractor to Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The tasks for GTI included establishment of the scientific support base for standardization of the FEM3A model, project management, technology transfer, and project administration. Later in the course of the project, the scope of work was modified by the National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) to remove the emphasis on FEM3A model and instead, develop data in support of NETL's FLUENT modeling. With this change, GTI was also instructed to cease activities relative to FEM3A model. GTI's technical activities through this project included the initial verification of FEM3A model, provision of technical inputs to CHRC researchers regarding the structure of the final product, and participation in technical discussion sessions with CHRC and NETL technical staff. GTI also began the development of a Windows-based front end for the model but the work was stopped due to the change in scope of work. In the meantime, GTI organized a workshop on LNG safety in Houston, Texas. The workshop was very successful and 75 people from various industries participated. All technical objectives were met satisfactorily by Dr. Jerry Havens and Dr. Tom Spicer of CHRC and results are presented in a stand-alone report included as Appendix A to this report.

Iraj A. Salehi; Jerry Havens; Tom Spicer

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Demand Management Demonstration Project, Stage 5: development of industrial load simulation model. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to design, develop, test and document a computer simulation model of electric utility generating costs required to meet industrial power demands and the effects of utility load management on these generating costs. The results showed that the model developed is a well conceived load management testing, marginal costing tool. What if situations can be readily tested to determine their impact on system profile and short run marginal costs. The terms unshaped and shaped refer to customers or system use patterns before and after some load management technique was tested. The total flexibility of the model is only apparent after the user has studied test runs in detail. Hourly marginal costs reveal many unexpected changes as a result of shaping loads. Other unexpected changes due to varying economic dispatch schedules while shaping, illustrate the unprecedental latitude for the user to explore optimum generation and load management combinations. The general concept of the model is depicted in the flow chart on the next page.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The impact of manufacturing offshore on technology development paths in the automotive and optoelectronics industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a two-case study of the impact of manufacturing offshore on the technology trajectory of the firm and the industry. It looks in particular at the automotive and optoelectronics industries. The ...

Fuchs, Erica R. H. (Erica Renee H.), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

PHEV Parcel Delivery Truck Model - Development and Preliminary Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes results of a study to determine the impact of drive cycles on the energy- and cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric delivery vans.

Barnitt, R

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supply and demand. The challenges of dynamic analysis of emissions impacts from the energy sector have substantially increased with a new focus on the emerging distributed...

409

Estimating catchment-scale impacts of wildfire on sediment and nutrient loads using the E2 catchment modelling framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 1.3 million ha of forested and agricultural land in south-eastern Australia was burnt by wildfires in early 2003. This paper describes a modelling process to assess the impacts of the fires on the quality of receiving waters and river systems ... Keywords: Catchment modelling, E2, Nutrient loads, Sediment loads, Water quality, Wildfire

Paul M. Feikema; Gary J. Sheridan; Robert M. Argent; Patrick N. J. Lane; Rodger B. Grayson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

Not Available

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Vehicle Transient Air Conditioning Analysis: Model Development& System Optimization Investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a transient air conditioning (A/C) system model using SINDA/FLUINT analysis software. It captures all the relevant physics of transient A/C system performance, including two-phase flow effects in the evaporator and condenser, system mass effects, air side heat transfer on the condenser/evaporator, vehicle speed effects, temperature-dependent properties, and integration with a simplified cabin thermal model. It has demonstrated robust and powerful system design optimization capabilities. Single-variable and multiple variable design optimizations have been performed and are presented. Various system performance parameters can be optimized, including system COP, cabin cool-down time, and system heat load capacity. This work presents this new transient A/C system analysis and optimization tool and shows some high-level system design conclusions reached to date. The work focuses on R-134a A/C systems, but future efforts will modify the model to investigate the transient performance of alternative refrigerant systems such as carbon dioxide systems. NREL is integrating its transient air conditioning model into NRELs ADVISOR vehicle system analysis software, with the objective of simultaneously optimizing A/C system designs within the overall vehicle design optimization.

Hendricks, T. J.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF FLEXIBLE, MULTIZONE MULTIFAMILY BUILDING SIMULATION MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Since 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a multifamily building energy audit tool sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization program. Although weatherization of multifamily buildings is gaining increased attention in the U.S, available energy audit tools for multifamily buildings were found to need desirable improvements. On the wish list of field experts was the basic ability to model multizone buildings (i.e., one thermal zone per dwelling unit) with simplified user inputs, which allows a better analysis of decentralized and centralized HVAC and domestic hot water systems of multifamily buildings without having to create detailed building models. This paper describes detailed procedure of evaluation of the tool to perform an energy analysis in an existing multifamily building.

Im, Piljae [ORNL; Malhotra, Mini [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lacking a detailed characterization of the resource base and a comprehensive borehole-to-burnertip evaluation model of the North American natural gas system, past R&D, tax and regulatory policies have been formulated without a full understanding of their likely direct and indirect impacts on future gas supply and demand. The recent disappearance of the deliverability surplus, pipeline deregulation, and current policy debates about regulatory initiatives in taxation, environmental compliance and leasing make the need for a comprehensive gas evaluation system critical. Traditional econometric or highly aggregated energy models are increasingly regarded as unable to incorporate available geologic detail and explicit technology performance and costing algorithms necessary to evaluate resource-technology-economic interactions in a market context. The objective of this research is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the natural gas system, including resource base, exploration and development, extraction technology performance and costs, transportation and storage and end use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level and the impact of alternative extraction technologies on well productivity and economics. GSAM evaluates the complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives in the context of the evolving gas markets. Scheduled for completion in 1995, a prototype is planned for early 1994. ICF Resources reviewed relevant natural gas upstream, downstream and market models to identify appropriate analytic capabilities to incorporate into GSAM. We have reviewed extraction technologies to better characterize performance and costs in terms of GSAM parameters.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

1 BIDM: The Business Intelligence Development Model Catalina Sacu-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Business Intelligence (BI) has been a very dynamic and popular field of research in the last few years as it helps organizations in making better decisions and increasing their profitability. This paper aims at creating some structure in the BI field of research by creating a BI development framework that relates the current BI development stages and their main characteristics. This framework can be used by organizations to identify their current BI stage and reach the desired one. 1. Introduction: BI & Maturity Modelling In nowadays economy, organizations have a lot of information to gather and process in order to be able to take the best decisions as fast as possible (Misner et al., 2002). One of the solutions that can improve the decision making process is Business Intelligence (BI). According to (Gray & Negash, 2003), BI systems “combine data gathering, data storage, and knowledge management

Marco Spruit; Marco Spruit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Data collection handbook to support modeling the impacts of radioactive material in soil  

SciTech Connect

A pathway analysis computer code called RESRAD has been developed for implementing US Department of Energy Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines. Hydrogeological, meteorological, geochemical, geometrical (size, area, depth), and material-related (soil, concrete) parameters are used in the RESRAD code. This handbook discusses parameter definitions, typical ranges, variations, measurement methodologies, and input screen locations. Although this handbook was developed primarily to support the application of RESRAD, the discussions and values are valid for other model applications.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Jones, L.G.; Wang, Y.Y.; Faillace, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Loureiro, C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Chia, Y.P. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Geology

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Environmental and institutional models of system development: a national criminal history system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article tests two competing theories of system development referred to here as environmental and institutional models. These models form the basis for most explanations of why systems are developed and utilized. We will examine both models in detail ...

Kenneth C. Laudon

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotordynamic coefficients of a gas labyrinth seal are assumed to be frequency independent. However, this assumption loses its validity as rotor surface velocity approaches Mach 1. The solution procedure of 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer which assumes frequency independent force coefficients is modified to allow for calculating frequency dependent force coefficients. A comparative study of the impact of using frequency-dependent model and the original frequency-independent model on stability analysis is made. The results indicate that frequency dependency of force coefficients should be accounted for in stability analysis as rotor surface velocity approaches a significant fraction of Mach number. The bulk flow rotordynamic analysis model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to investigate the impact of leakage-flow models on predictions. A number of leakage models are incorporated in the one-control volume model, and a comparative study is made. Kinetic energy carryover factor of a leakage equation is one of the dominant factors in seal cross-force generation. A leakage equation based on a model proposed by Gamal which uses Hodkinson?s kinetic energy carryover factor is found to improve predictions of direct damping and cross-coupled stiffness. A test case is implemented to study the impact of variation of seal axial radial clearance on stability characteristics. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer and subsequent bulk flow models are based on the assumption of isothermal flow across the labyrinth seal. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to include energy equation, and the flow process is assumed to be adiabatic. However, predicted cross-coupled stiffness and direct damping coefficients using the new model do not compare well with the experimental results by Picardo as compared to the isothermal model. The impact of using real gas properties on static and rotordynamic characteristics of the seal is studied.

Thorat, Manish R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of Standardized Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Shutdown Operations Integrated in SPAR Level 1 Model  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear plant operating experience and several studies show that the risk from shutdown operation during Modes 4, 5, and 6 at pressurized water reactors and Modes 4 and 5 at boiling water reactors can be significant. This paper describes using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s full-power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development of risk evaluation models for commercial nuclear power plants. The shutdown models are integrated with their respective internal event at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the SPAR full-power model with shutdown event tree logic. Preliminary human reliability analysis results indicate that risk is dominated by the operator’s ability to correctly diagnose events and initiate systems.

S. T. Khericha; J. Mitman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development impact models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Essays on the Impact of Development on Agricultural Land Amenities and Values in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market land prices ignore the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services; hence, too much agricultural land may be developed. Correct land valuation must include these non-market values. Values of ecosystem services provided by the Richland-Chambers constructed wetlands are assessed through meta-analysis to derive confidence intervals for the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for wetland services. Replacement costs are also used to estimate cost savings of creating wetlands to cleanse river water instead of constructing a conventional wastewater treatment facility. Benefit transfer is used to estimate WTP for non-market agricultural land amenities. Ecosystem services of runoff in the western and recharge in the eastern part of Comal County based on hydrological models are also calculated. Finally, seemingly unrelated regression is used to quantify the effects of growth on current agricultural land values in Texas. Using two different meta-analysis transfer functions, mean WTP for the Richland-Chambers wetlands are $843 and $999 / acre / year. Estimated 95% confidence interval is $95 to $7,435 / acre / year. This confidence interval clearly indicates the uncertainty associated with valuing ecosystem goods and services. The replacement cost of the Richland?Chambers constructed wetlands is estimated to be $1,688 / acre / year. Aggregate WTP to preserve farm and ranchland non-market amenities in Comal County is estimated to be $1,566 / acre. Using hydrologic models, the runoff is valued at $79 / acre, whereas, recharge value is $1,107 / acre. Development will cause a change in recharge, runoff, and pollution which will decrease societal welfare by $1,288 / acre. Seemingly unrelated regression results show that a percentage increase in population growth in the closest metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is associated with increases in land values of approximately $2 / acre. A one-mile increase in distance from the nearest MSA decreased land values by $4 / acre in 1997, $6 / acre in 2002, and $8 / acre in 2007. The diversity of studies illustrates that a cookbook type of methodology is not appropriate for valuing ecosystem goods and services. On the other hand, development contributes positively to land values through encroachment on agricultural lands.

Machingambi, Memory

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Current Status and Potential Impacts Regarding the Proposed Development of a Rail Line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a description of the current status regarding the proposed development of a rail line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Nye County, Southern Nevada, which includes potential impacts analyzed during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and the subsequent creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the rail line. Potential impacts are addressed within the context of impacts to natural and human environmental resources found within the geographic area of the proposed federal project. Potential impacts to these resources have been fully analyzed in the Rail Alignment Draft EIS (DEIS). This paper includes a summary of the potential impacts analyzed in the DEIS. Examples of potential impacts include land use conflicts, air quality, water use, and impacts to biological and cultural resources, among others. In conclusion: Based on its obligations under the NWPA and its decision to select the mostly rail scenario for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, DOE needs to ship these materials by rail in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE prepared the Rail Alignment EIS to provide the background, data, information, and analyses to help decision makers and the public understand the potential environmental impacts that could result from constructing and operating a railroad for shipment of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing rail line in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. This railroad would consist of a rail line, railroad operations support facilities, and other related infrastructure. DOE will use the Rail Alignment EIS to decide whether to construct and operate the proposed railroad, and if so, to: - Select a rail alignment (Caliente rail alignment or Mina rail alignment) in which to construct the railroad; - Select the common segments and alternative segments within either a Caliente rail alignment or a Mina rail alignment. The Department would use the selected common segments and alternative segments to identify the public lands to be included in right-of-way applications; - Decide where to construct proposed railroad operations support facilities; - Decide whether to restrict use of the rail line to DOE trains, or whether to allow commercial shippers to operate over the rail line; and - Determine what mitigation measures to implement. (authors)

Lanthrum, G. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Gunnerson, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Session: Why avian impacts are a concern in wind energy development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This lunchtime session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session provided a more detailed overview of the environmental community's perspective on wind power's impacts on birds. The presentation described how wind projects impact birds, detailing the species distribution of collisions at various sites around the US and discussing problems such as avoidance, habitat disturbance, and cumulative effects on populations. The presentation, ''Wind Turbines and Birds'', was given by Gerald Winegrad from the American Bird Conservancy.

Winegrad, Gerald

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Financial Impact of Good Condenser Vacuum in Industrial Steam Turbines: Computer Modeling Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial turbine throttle conditions are fixed by plant designs - materials of construction, steam requirements, etc. Condensing turbine exhaust conditions are limited by the atmosphere to which residual heat is rejected; and are fixed by installed condenser surface area and the steam space characteristics. Since the steam rate and shaft power costs are dependent on the available enthalpy drop across the machine, the steam must condense at the lowest practical thermal state. Thus, air presence and cooling rate must be controlled. The condensing turbine is not an isolated system. It directly affects the use of boiler fuel and the purchase of power. Its condensate requires reheating to feedwater temperature: steam is used, backpressure power is made, for example. Its performance affects the entire steam system and must be monitored persistently. Because of the complexities (and advantages) of systems analyses, computer modeling is demonstrated in this paper to fully evaluated the network effects and the financial impact of good condenser vacuum.

Viar, W. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Development of a Two-Dimensional Finite-Element PBL Model and Two Preliminary Model Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a two-dimensional finite-element model for simulating atmospheric flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) of the earth. The finite-element method provides a useful alternative to the conventional finite-difference method in ...

L. P. Chang; E. S. Takle; R. L. Sani

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Zonally Averaged Ocean Model for the Thermohaline Circulation. Part I: Model Development and Flow Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional latitude–depth ocean model is developed on the basis of the zonally averaged balance equations of mass, momentum, heat, and salt. Its purpose is to investigate the dynamics and variability of the buoyancy-forced thermohaline ...

Daniel G. Wright; Thomas F. Stocker

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

431

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Use of GIS and 3D Modeling for Development and Conceptualization of a Performance Assessment Model for Decommissioning of a Complex Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and 3D geo-spatial modeling were employed to facilitate development and conceptualization of a performance assessment (PA) model that will be used to evaluate the health impacts of residual radioactivity at a former nuclear materials processing facility site in New York. Previous operations have resulted in a number of different sources of radiological contamination that must be assessed during site decommissioning. A performance assessment model is being developed to estimate radiological dose to potential receptors through the simulation of the release and transport of radionuclides, and exposure to residual contamination for hundreds to thousands of years in the future. A variety of inputs are required to parameterize the performance assessment model, such as: distance from the waste to surface water bodies, thickness of geologic units for saturated transport, saturated thickness of the geologic units, and spatial and temporal average of percent of waste that is saturated. GIS and 3D modeling are used to analyze and abstract aleatory uncertainty associated with the dimensionality of the geologic system into epistemic uncertainty for one- and two-dimensional process models for flow and transport of radionuclides. Three-dimensional geo-spatial modeling was used to develop the geologic framework and the geometrical representation of the residual contamination within the geologic framework. GIS was used in the initial development and parameterization of the transport pathways, to provide spatial context to the PA model, and to link it to the 3D geologic framework and contamination geometry models. Both the GIS and 3-D modeling were used to interpret the results of runs of the PA model. (authors)

Esh, D. W.; Gross, A. J.; Thaggard, M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Two White Flint North, MS T7J8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluation of PV performance models and their impact on project risk.  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic systems are often priced in $/W{sub p}, where Wp refers to the DC power rating of the modules at Standard Test Conditions (1000 W/m{sup 2}, 25 C cell temperature) and $ refers to the installed cost of the system. However, the true value of the system is in the energy it will produce in kWhs, not the power rating. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, the annual energy yield (kWh/kW{sup p}) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. Understanding energy yield is a key part of understanding system value. System performance models are used during project development to estimate the expected output of PV systems for a given design and location. Performance modeling is normally done by the system designer/system integrator. Often, an independent engineer will also model system output during a due diligence review of a project. A variety of system performance models are available. The most commonly used modeling tool for project development and due diligence in the United States is probably PVsyst, while those seeking a quick answer to expected energy production may use PVWatts. In this paper, we examine the variation in predicted energy output among modeling tools and users and compare that to measured output.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Proposed Method of Developing Air Quality Models for a Limited Wind Fetch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed for developing air quality models of a limited wind fetch. The basic model equation is a transient solution to a diffusion equation. This basic model equation is compared to those of the existing models, straightline airflow ...

Edward Y. T. Kuo

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Report: Evaluating the Impact of Newer Researcher Training & Development: Which Direction Forward? (Report of a Joint Seminar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.srhe.ac.uk/publications.gpi.asp ). Tony led the first session by providing an update on the practice of evaluating impact of researcher development programmes, to include higher education staff with research roles as well as postgraduate researchers, with suggestions about how... this? - keeping and nurturing the best researchers (stemming the brain drain); - generating research income for institutions, grant awards but also REF returns subsequently; - PRES & CROS survey results may be a criterion for government funding...

Gough, Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Economic Development Impacts from Wind Power in the Western Governors' Association States (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Governors' Association created the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Committee (CDEAC) "to utilize the region's diverse resources to produce affordable, sustainable, and environmentally reponsible energy." This conference poster, prepared for WINDPOWER 2007 in Los Angeles, outlines the economic impact to the Western United States from new wind energy projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NGFAST: a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U.S. state borders and import points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. ...

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Stephen M. Folga

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The impact and management of cognitive gap in high performance product development organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close alignment of applied research and development units with manufacturing operational structures can provide excellent opportunities for maintaining robust product pipelines and reducing product development cycle times. Within such an integrated ... Keywords: Adaption, Innovation, O3 (technological change), Organizational development, Problem solving, Product development, Research and development

Kathryn W. Jablokow; David E. Booth

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Model driven software development: a practitioner takes stock and looks into future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss our experience in use of models and model-driven techniques for developing large business applications. Benefits accrued and limitations observed are highlighted. We describe possible means of overcoming some of the limitations and experience ... Keywords: meta modeling, model driven engineering workbench, model driven enterprise, model transformation, modeling, separation of concerns, software product lines

Vinay Kulkarni

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Tropical Cyclone Data Impact Studies: Influence of Model Bias and Synthetic Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of assimilating dropwindsonde data and enhanced atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) on tropical cyclone track forecasts are examined using the Navy global data assimilation and forecasting systems. Enhanced AMVs have the largest impact ...

Carolyn A. Reynolds; Rolf Langland; Patricia M. Pauley; Christopher Velden

442

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Tropical Cyclone Data Impact Studies: Influence of Model Bias and Synthetic Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of assimilating dropwindsonde data and enhanced atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) on tropical cyclone track forecasts are examined using the Navy global data assimilation and forecasting systems. Enhanced AMVs have the largest impact ...

Carolyn A. Reynolds; Rolf Langland; Patricia M. Pauley; Christopher Velden

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

445

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

This research project has two primary objectives: (1) to further develop and refine the Multiscale Air Quality Simulation Platform-Variable Grid Resolution (MAQSIP-VGR) model, an advanced variable-grid-resolution air quality model, to provide detailed, accurate representation of the dynamical and chemical processes governing the fate of anthropogenic emissions in coastal environments; and (2) to improve current understanding of the potential impact of onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) emissions on O{sub 3} and particulate matter nonattainment in the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding states.

Kiran Alapaty; Adel Hanna

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

Standardizing model-based in-vehicle infotainment development in the German automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of existing HMI development processes in the automotive domain, a reference process for software engineering has been developed. This process was used to develop a domain data model and a model-based specification language in order ... Keywords: HMI, automotive, domain data model, interaction design, model-based language, specification, user interface design

Steffen Hess; Anne Gross; Andreas Maier; Marius Orfgen; Gerrit Meixner

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced High-Temperature Reactor Dynamic System Model Development: April 2012 Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a large-output fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). An early-phase preconceptual design of a 1500 MW(e) power plant was developed in 2011 [Refs. 1 and 2]. An updated version of this plant is shown as Fig. 1. FHRs feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR is designed to be a “walk away” reactor that requires no action to prevent large off-site releases following even severe reactor accidents. This report describes the development of dynamic system models used to further the AHTR design toward that goal. These models predict system response during warmup, startup, normal operation, and limited off-normal operating conditions. Severe accidents that include a loss-of-fluid inventory are not currently modeled. The scope of the models is limited to the plant power system, including the reactor, the primary and intermediate heat transport systems, the power conversion system, and safety-related or auxiliary heat removal systems. The primary coolant system, the intermediate heat transport system and the reactor building structure surrounding them are shown in Fig. 2. These systems are modeled in the most detail because the passive interaction of the primary system with the surrounding structure and heat removal systems, and ultimately the environment, protects the reactor fuel and the vessel from damage during severe reactor transients. The reactor silo also plays an important role during system warmup. The dynamic system modeling tools predict system performance and response. The goal is to accurately predict temperatures and pressures within the primary, intermediate, and power conversion systems and to study the impacts of design changes on those responses. The models are design tools and are not intended to be used in reactor qualification. The important details to capture in the primary system relate to flows within the reactor vessel during severe events and the resulting temperature profiles (temperature and duration) for major components. Critical components include the fuel, reactor vessel, primary piping, and the primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers (P-IHXs). The major AHTR power system loops are shown in Fig. 3. The intermediate heat transfer system is a group of three pumped salt loops that transports the energy produced in the primary system to the power conversion system. Two dynamic system models are used to analyze the AHTR. A Matlab/Simulink?-based model initiated in 2011 has been updated to reflect the evolving design parameters related to the heat flows associated with the reactor vessel. The Matlab model utilizes simplified flow assumptions within the vessel and incorporates an empirical representation of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS). A Dymola/Modelica? model incorporates a more sophisticated representation of primary coolant flow and a physics-based representation of the three-loop DRACS thermal hydraulics. This model is not currently operating in a fully integrated mode. The Matlab model serves as a prototype and provides verification for the Dymola model, and its use will be phased out as the Dymola model nears completion. The heat exchangers in the system are sized using spreadsheet-based, steady-state calculations. The detail features of the heat exchangers are programmed into the dynamic models, and the overall dimensions are used to generate realistic plant designs. For the modeling cases where