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1

Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling‎ Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole

2

Development Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Development Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(9) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

3

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Category:Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the...

5

Definition: Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploration Drilling Exploratory drilling is the Initial phase of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal Exploration is the exploration of the subsurface in search of viable active geothermal regions with the goal of building a geothermal power plant, where hot fluids drive turbines to create electricity. Exploration methods include a broad range of disciplines including geology, geophysics, geochemistry and engineering. Geothermal regions with adequate heat flow to fuel power plants are found in rift zones, subduction zones and mantle plumes. Hot spots are characterized by four geothermal elements. An active region will have: Heat Source - Shallow

6

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Eligibility...

7

Self propelled drilling rig starts offshore exploration  

SciTech Connect

Ocean Drilling and Exploration Co. recently commissioned its new $12 million self-propelled, semisubmersible drilling rig, Ocean Prospector, at Mitsubishi Shipyard, Japan, where the rig was built. Initial trail runs completed adjacent to the shipyard indicated that the ship has a speed of 7 kn ahead and 3 kn astern. Steering also is reported to be excellent. The rig has a minimum turning radius of approx. 2 barge lengths and shows instant response. This rig is powered by 4 Fairbanks Morse, 10-cylinder opposed piston, model 38D8-1/8 diesel engines. Each engine is rated at 1,600 hp at 720 rpm and they drive eight 1,600 kw, traction type D-C generators and two 1,000 kw A-C generators. The rated operating depth of the unit afloat is 600 ft of water. The overall length of Ocean Prospector is just over 344 ft, with the beam measuring 263-1/2 ft. During transit, when the rig will be completely deballasted, it will have a draft of approx. 20 ft. When it reaches the drilling site, ballast water will be pumped into the 18 ballast tanks until the draft is increased to 70 ft. At this point, the underside of the main deck will be 50 ft above the mean surface of the sea. Drilling operations will be conducted while the rig is at the 70 ft draft. The mooring system will consist of eight 2-3/4 in. chains, each measuring 3,300 ft in length and connected to a 15-ton anchor.

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to prevent the waste of oil and gas, promote environmental stewardship, and regulate the exploration,

9

Exploration geothermal gradient drilling, Platanares, Honduras, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a review and summary of the core drilling operations component of the Honduras Geothermal Resource Development Project at the Platanares geothermal prospect in Honduras, Central America. Three intermediate depth (428 to 679 m) coreholes are the first continuously cored geothermal exploration boreholes in Honduras. These coring operations are part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) effort funded by the Agency for International Development (AID) and implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) in cooperation with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (ENEE) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy, thermal gradient, and flow test data of the boreholes. The primary objectives of this coring effort were (1) to obtain quantitative information on the temperature distribution as a function of depth, (2) to recover fluids associated with the geothermal reservoir, (3) to recover 75% or better core from the subsurface rock units, and (4) to drill into the subsurface rock as deeply as possible in order to get information on potential reservoir rocks, fracture density, permeabilities, and alteration histories of the rock units beneath the site. The three exploration coreholes drilled to depths of 650, 428 and 679 m, respectively, encountered several hot water entries. Coring operations and associated testing began in mid-October 1986 and were completed at the end of June 1987.

Goff, S.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Ruefenacht, H.D.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.; Ramos, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Details Activities (20) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: In 2005, Idaho National Laboratory was conducting a study of historical exploration practices and success rates for geothermal resources identification. Geo Hills Associates (GHA) was contracted to review and accumulate copies of published literature, Internet information, and unpublished geothermal exploration data to determine the level of exploration and drilling activities that occurred for all of the currently

11

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

Dunn, James C.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a highly efficient tool that both delivers high level of force for the pressure available and inherently increases downhole reliability because parts are less subject to contamination. The On-Off feature is essential to drilling to allow the Driller to turn off the tractor and pull back while circulating in cleanout runs that keep the hole clean of drilling debris. The gripping elements have wide contact surfaces to the formation to allow high loads without damage to the formation. As part of the development materials evaluations were conducted to verify compatibility with anticipated drilling and well bore fluids. Experiments demonstrated that the materials of the tractor are essentially undamaged by exposure to typical drilling fluids used for horizontal coiled tubing drilling. The design for the MDT was completed, qualified vendors identified, parts procured, received, inspected, and a prototype was assembled. As part of the assembly process, WWT prepared Manufacturing instructions (MI) that detail the assembly process and identify quality assurance inspection points. Subsequent to assembly, functional tests were performed. Functional tests consisted of placing the MDT on jack stands, connecting a high pressure source to the tractor, and verifying On-Off functions, walking motion, and operation over a range of pressures. Next, the Shop Demonstration Test was performed. An existing WWT test fixture was modified to accommodate operation of the 3.38 inch diameter MDT. The fixture simulated the tension applied to a tractor while walking (pulling) inside 4.0 inch diameter pipe. The MDT demonstrated: (1) On-off function, (2) Pulling forces proportional to available differential pressure up to 4000 lbs, (3) Walking speeds to 1100 ft/hour. A field Demonstration of the MDT was arranged with a major oil company operating in Alaska. A demonstration well with a Measured Depth of approximately 15,000 ft was selected; however because of problems with the well drilling was stopped before the planned MDT usage. Alternatively, functional and operational tests were run with the MDT insi

Western Well Tool

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

13

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

David B. Burnett

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first objective of this project is to develop a user-friendly, PC, foam drilling computer model, FOAM, which will accurately predict frictional pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocity, foam quality, and other drilling variables. The model will allow operating and service companies to accurately predict pressures and flow rates required at the surface and downhole to efficiently drill oil and gas wells with foam systems. The second objective of this project is to develop a lightweight drilling fluid that utilizes hollow glass spheres to reduce the density of the fluid and allow drilling underbalanced in low-pressure reservoirs. Since the resulting fluid will be incompressible, hydraulics calculations are greatly simplified, and expensive air compressors and booster pumps are eliminated. This lightweight fluid will also eliminate corrosion and downhole fire problems encountered with aerated fluids. Many tight-gas reservoirs in the US are attractive targets for underbalanced drilling because they are located in hard-rock country where tight, low-permeability formations compound the effect of formation damage encountered with conventional drilling fluids.

Maurer, W.; Medley, G. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Exploration, Drilling and Development Operations in the Bottle Rock Area of the Geysers Steam Field, With New Geologic Insights and Models Defining Reservoir Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MCR Geothermal Corporation pioneered successful exploratiory drilling the Bottle Rock area of the Geysers Steam Field in 1976. The wellfield is characterized by a deep reservoir with varied flowrates, temperatures, pressures, and stem chemistries being quite acceptable. More detailed reservoir engineering tests will follow as production commences.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) development for air drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When downhole contact between the BHA and formation was optimum, as it was during rotation, high signal levels were experienced. Survey data acquired at the connections, when the BHA was totally at rest, is excellent. GEC intends modifying the system to optimize operations consistent with these disparate factors. A Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) of 89.9 hours appears reasonable from the data. It is not possible to infer an MTBF figure from this test. It is quite obvious, however, that the system reliability performance has been significantly improved since FT {number_sign}5 was performed almost two years earlier. Based on the above results, GEC concludes that it is certainly feasible to attain 100 hours MTBF, for the Model 27, in any and all situations, and hence to provide a reliable MWD for air-drilling.

Harrison, W.A.; Rubin, L.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call...

22

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005 and contains the following discussions: (1) Qualification Testing; (2) Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; (3) Field Test Demonstration; and (4) Commercial order for SR-CDP from Torch International. The objective of this contract is to develop and demonstrate ''cost effective'' Composite Drill Pipe. It is projected that this drill pipe will weigh less than half of its steel counter part. The resultant weight reduction will provide enabling technology that will increase the lateral distance that can be reached from an offshore drilling platform and the depth of water in which drilling and production operations can be carried out. Further, composite drill pipe has the capability to carry real time signal and power transmission within the pipe walls. CDP can also accommodate much shorter drilling radius than is possible with metal drill pipe. As secondary benefits, the lighter weight drill pipe can increase the storage capability of floating off shore drilling platforms and provide substantial operational cost savings.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Steve Loya

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Alloy Development for Measurement While Drilling Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, For oil and gas drilling applications, one of the giant technical ... of Type 2507 Duplex Stainless Steel in Synthetic Seawater and Hydraulic Fluids.

24

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the most definitive in providing the necessary data for successful citing of geothermal exploration, production, and injection wells, which appears to be electrical geophysical...

25

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description Potter Drilling has recently demonstrated hydrothermal spallation drilling in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface without contact between the rock and the drill head. This process virtually eliminates the need for tripping. Previous tests of flame-jet spallation achieved ROP of 50 ft/hr and higher in hard rock with minimal wear on the drilling assembly, but operating this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology in a fluid-filled borehole and as a result has the potential to achieve similarly high ROP that is uncompromised by stability or cuttings transport issues.

26

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.

Tom Champness; Tony Worthen; John Finger

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

James C. Leslie

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Sandia/DOE geothermal drilling and completion technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs 25% by 1982 and 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has managed this technology development program since October 1977, and this paper presents an overview of the program. A statement of program goals and structure is given. The content of the FY-79 program is presented and recent results of R and D projects are given. Plans for development of an advanced drilling and completion system are discussed.

Barnette, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 and contains the following discussions: Qualification Testing; Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; Field Test Demonstration; Development of Ultra-Short Radius Composite Drill Pipe (USR-CDP); and Development of Smart USR-CDP.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie, II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Case study of the Wendel-Amedee Exploration Drilling Project, Lassen County, California, User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wendel-Amedee KGRA is located in Honey Lake basin in Lassen County, California, on the boundary between the Modoc Plateau and the Basin and Range geologic provinces. A variety of geophysical surveys was performed over the project property. Geophysical data helped in establishing the regional structural framework, however, none of the geophysical data is sufficiently refined to be considered suitable for the purpose of siting an exploration drill hole. Drilling of reservoir confirmation well WEN-1 took place from August 1 to September 22, 1981. Pulse and long-term flow testing subjected the reservoir to a maximum flow of 680 gpm for 75 hours. At that rate, the well exhibited a productivity index of 21.6 gpm/psi; the reservoir transmissivity was 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ md-ft/cp. The maximum bottom-hole temperature recorded during testing was 251/sup 0/F. The conceptual model of the geothermal resource at Wendel Hot Springs calls on ground water, originating in the neighboring volcanic highlands, descending through jointed and otherwise permeable rocks into the granitic basement. Once in the basement, the fluid is heated as it continues its descent, and lateral movement as dictated by the hydrologic gradient. It then rises to the discharge point along transmissive faults. 45 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

Zeisloft, J.; Sibbett, B.S.; Adams, M.C.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Drilling for energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Abstract From 1955 to 1962, approximately 40 wells were drilled in 15 California thermal areas for the purpose of exploring and developing natural steam to utilize for electric power generation. Twenty-four of the wells were drilled in the three areas which at present seem to have the greatest potential for the production of natural steam: The Geysers, Sonoma County; Casa Diablo, Mono County; and the Salton Sea area, Imperial County.Since June 1960, steam from The Geysers thermal area, produced at a rate of approximately 250,000 Ib/hr, has been utilized to operate a 12,500 kw

34

Siting and drilling recommendations for a geothermal exploration well, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available exploration data relevant to the GeoProducts leasehold in the Wendel-Amedee KGRA are reviewed and interpreted. On the basis of this interpretation, locations and procedures are recommended for drilling geothermal production wells capable of supplying fluid at a temperature of 250/sup 0/F or greater. The following are covered: stratigraphy and geological history, geologic structure, geochemistry, geophysics, temperature-gradient data, and fluid quality. (MHR)

McNitt, J.R.; Wilde, W.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Using Bayesian Network to Develop Drilling Expert Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long years of experience in the field and sometimes in the lab are required to develop consultants. Texas A&M University recently has established a new method to develop a drilling expert system that can be used as a training tool for young engineers or as a consultation system in various drilling engineering concepts such as drilling fluids, cementing, completion, well control, and underbalanced drilling practices. This method is done by proposing a set of guidelines for the optimal drilling operations in different focus areas, by integrating current best practices through a decision-making system based on Artificial Bayesian Intelligence. Optimum practices collected from literature review and experts' opinions, are integrated into a Bayesian Network BN to simulate likely scenarios of its use that will honor efficient practices when dictated by varying certain parameters. The advantage of the Artificial Bayesian Intelligence method is that it can be updated easily when dealing with different opinions. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to show a flexible systematic method to design drilling expert systems. We used these best practices to build decision trees that allow the user to take an elementary data set and end up with a decision that honors the best practices.

Alyami, Abdullah

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed that the HGS fluids act similarly to conventional fluids and that they have potential application in many areas, including underbalanced drilling, completions, and riserless drilling. Early field tests under this project are encouraging. These led to limited tests by industry (which are also described). Further field tests and cost analyses are needed to demonstrate the viability of HGS fluids in different applications. Once their effectiveness is demonstrated, they should find widespread application and should significantly reduce drilling costs and increase oil and gas production rates. A number of important oilfield applications for HGS outside of Underbalanced Drilling were identified. One of these--Dual Gradient Drilling (DGD) for deepwater exploration and development--is very promising. Investigative work on DGD under the project is reported, along with definition of a large joint-industry project resulting from the work. Other innovative products/applications are highlighted in the report including the use of HGS as a cement additive.

William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

TerraTek

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Recent developments in polycrystalline diamond-drill-bit design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of design criteria for polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits for use in severe environments (hard or fractured formations, hot and/or deep wells) is continuing. This effort consists of both analytical and experimental analyses. The experimental program includes single point tests of cutters, laboratory tests of full scale bits, and field tests of these designs. The results of laboratory tests at simulated downhole conditions utilizing new and worn bits are presented. Drilling at simulated downhole pressures was conducted in Mancos Shale and Carthage Marble. Comparisons are made between PDC bits and roller cone bits in drilling with borehole pressures up to 5000 psi (34.5 PMa) with oil and water based muds. The PDC bits drilled at rates up to 5 times as fast as roller bits in the shale. In the first field test, drilling rates approximately twice those achieved with conventional bits were achieved with a PDC bit. A second test demonstrated the value of these bits in correcting deviation and reaming.

Huff, C.F.; Varnado, S.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Support research for development of improved geothermal drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in background research needed to develop drill bits for the geothermal environment is reported. Construction of a full-scale geothermal wellbore simulator and geothermal seal testing machine was completed. Simulated tests were conducted on full-scale bits. Screening tests on elastometric seals under geothermal conditions are reported. (JGB)

Hendrickson, R.R.; Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Winzenried, R.W.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development of a system to provide diagnostics-while-drilling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes development of a system that provides high-speed, real-time downhole data while drilling. Background of the project, its benefits, major technical challenges, test planning, and test results are covered by relatively brief descriptions in the body of the report, with some topics presented in more detail in the attached appendices.

Wise, Jack LeRoy; Jacobson, Ronald David; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Knudsen, Steven Dell

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Program plan for the development of advanced synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight companys have teamed with Sandia Labs to work on five projects as part of a cooperative effort to advance the state of the ar in synthetic-diamond drill bit design and manufacture. DBS (a Baroid Company), Dennis Tool Company, Hughes Christensen Company, Maurer Engineering, Megadiamond, Security Diamond Products, Slimdril International, and Smith International. Objective of each project is to develop advanced bit technology that results in new commercial products with longer bit life and higher penetration rates in hard formations. Each project explores a different approach to synthetic-diamond cutter and bit design and, consequently, uses different approaches to developing the technology. Each of these approaches builds or the respective companies` capabilities and current product interests. Sandia`s role is to assure integration of the individual projects into a coherent program and tc provide unique testing and analytical capabilities where needed. One additional company, Amoco Production Research, will provide synthetic-diamond drill bit research expertise and field testing services for each project in the program.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1978-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drill bits, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report discusses and illustrates all progress in the first two years of this NETL/DOE supported program. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: (1) Specifications for both 5 5/16 inch and 3 3/8 inch composite drill pipe have been finalized. (2) All basic laboratory testing has been completed and has provide sufficient data for the selection of materials for the composite tubing, adhesives, and abrasion coatings. (3) Successful demonstration of composite/metal joint interfacial connection. (4) Upgrade of facilities to provide a functional pilot plant manufacturing facility. (5) Arrangements to have the 3 3/8 inch CDP used in a drilling operation early in C.Y. 2002. (6) Arrangements to have the 5 5/16 inch CDP marketed and produced by a major drill pipe manufacturer.

James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Volume 4. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastward toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastware toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description A comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach is proposed using existing geophysical exploration technology coupled with new seismic techniques and subject matter experts to determine the combination of geoscience data that demonstrates the greatest potential for identifying EGS drilling targets using non-invasive techniques. This proposed exploration methodology is expected to increase spatial resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness that is inherent in geological data, thereby reducing the uncertainty in the primary selection criteria for identifying EGS drilling targets. These criteria are, in order of importance: (1) temperatures greater than 200-250°C at 1-5 km depth; (2) rock type at the depth of interest, and; (3) stress regime.

55

Lunar exploration rover program developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) design concept began at Sandia National Laboratories in late 1991 with a series of small, proof-of-principle, working scale models. The models proved the viability of the concept for high mobility through mechanical simplicity, and eventually received internal funding at Sandia National Laboratories for full scale, proof-of-concept prototype development. Whereas the proof-of-principle models demonstrated the mechanical design`s capabilities for mobility, the full scale proof-of-concept design currently under development is intended to support field operations for experiments in telerobotics, autonomous robotic operations, telerobotic field geology, and advanced man-machine interface concepts. The development program`s current status is described, including an outline of the program`s work over the past year, recent accomplishments, and plans for follow-on development work.

Klarer, P.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Methods Drilling Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques CA-170-02-15 EA Mammoth Pacific Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area BLM BLM Central California District Office BLM Bishop Field Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration Drilling Methods

57

Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

Maish, A.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report reiterates the presentation made to DOE/NETL in Morgantown, WV on August 1st, 2002 with the addition of accomplishments made from that time forward until the issue date. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: {sm_bullet} Specifications for both 5-1/2'' and 1-5/8'' composite drill pipe have been finalized. {sm_bullet} Full scale testing of Short Radius (SR) CDP has been conducted. {sm_bullet} Successful demonstration of metal to composite interface (MCI) connection. {sm_bullet} Preparations for full scale manufacturing of ER/DW CDP have begun. {sm_bullet} Manufacturing facility rearranged to accommodate CDP process flow through plant. {sm_bullet} Arrangements to have the 3 3/8'' CDP used in 4 separate drilling applications in Oman, Oklahoma, and Texas.

James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

2002-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

59

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 and contains the following discussions: (1) Direct Electrical Connection for Rotary Shoulder Tool Joints; (2) Conductors for inclusion in the pipe wall (ER/DW-CDP); (3) Qualify fibers from Zoltek; (4) Qualify resin from Bakelite; (5) First commercial order for SR-CDP from Integrated Directional Resources (SR-CDP); and (6) Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Peter Manekas

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products. Topical report, September 1994--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses the development and testing of two products designed to advance the application of underbalanced drilling techniques. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment. The program predicts pressure and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test well measurements, and field data. This model does not handle air or mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. An incompressible drilling fluid was developed that utilizes lightweight solid additives (hollow glass spheres) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. This fluid is designed for underbalanced drilling situations where compressible lightweight fluids are inadequate. In addition to development of these new products, an analysis was performed to determine the market potential of lightweight fluids, and a forecast of underbalanced drilling in the USA over the next decade was developed. This analysis indicated that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30 percent of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the USA within the next ten years.

Medley, G.H., Jr; Maurer, W.C.; Liu, G.; Garkasi, A.Y.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Exploration and Development of U.S. Oil and Gas Fields, 1955-2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the exploration and development of oil and gas fields in the United States over the period 1955-2002. We make four contributions to explaining the economic evolution of the oil and gas industry during this period. First, we derive a testable model of the dynamics of competitive oil and gas field exploration and development. Second, we show how to empirically distinguish Hotelling scarcity effects from effects due to technological change. Third, we test these hypotheses using statewide panel data of exploration and development drilling. We find that the time paths of exploration, development and total wells drilled are dominated by Hotelling scarcity effects. Our final contribution is to offer an explanation for why fixed costs from exploration can make the contracting equilibrium in the mineral rights market efficient.

John R. Boyce; Linda Nstbakken

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology...

64

Oil and gas exploration and development in Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent oil and gas exploration activity has been widespread throughout Arizona. Development drilling has continued in the Dineh-bi-keyah and Teec-nos-Pos fields in the northeastern corner, and exploratory drilling continues to test potential Paleozoic reservoirs elsewhere on the plateau. Several shallow wells north of the Grand Canyon encountered shows and limited recoveries of oil from Permian and Triassic rocks. The greatest activity has occurred along the Overthrust trend from northwestern to southeastern Arizona. Several million acres were leased and eight exploratory wells drilled along this trend. None were discoveries, but the presence of a Laramide thrust fault in the vicinity of Tombstone was established. The other tests have neither proved nor disproved the concept of the Overthrust belt in southern Arizona. Recent discoveries in the nonmarine Tertiary and marine Paleozoic of southern Nevada have stimulated interest in the oil potential of similar rocks and structures in the Basin and Range province of Arizona, which are coincident with the Overthrust trend. Reported gas discoveries by Pemex in Miocene marine sediments of the Gulf of California have stimulated leasing in the Yuma area, where one uncompleted well is reported to be a potential producer. The Pedregosa basin of extreme southeastern Arizona remains an area of great interest to explorationists because of the presence of a 25,000-ft (7600-m) sequence of Paleozoic marine sediments similar to those of the Permian basin, and Cretaceous marine rocks, including coral-rudist reefs, similar to those that produce in Texas and Mexico.

Nations, D.; Doss, A.K.; Ubarra, R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

67

GRR/Section 5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development 5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development 05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf 05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A person may not drill or operate a geothermal well or drill an exploratory well without obtaining a permit from the Administrator of the Nevada

68

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through...

69

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through...

70

Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Careers to someone by E-mail Share Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal Careers on Facebook Tweet about Energy Education and Workforce...

71

Development of a Low-Cost Rotary Steerable Drilling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project had the goal to develop and commercialize a low-cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures to reduce operating costs by a minimum of 50% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50% over the currently offered systems. The LCRSS system developed under this project does reduce operating costs by 55% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50%. The developed product is not commercializable in its current form. The overall objective was to develop and commercialize a low cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures (20,000 psi/150 C) while reducing the operating costs by 50% and the lost-in-hole charges by 50% over the currently available systems. The proposed reduction in costs were to be realized through the significant reduction in tool complexity, a corresponding increase in tool reliability as expressed in the mean-time between failure (MTBF), and a reduction in the time and costs required to service tools after each field operation. Ultimately, the LCRSS system was to be capable of drilling 7 7/8 in. to 9 5/8 in. borehole diameters. The project was divided into three Phases, of which Phases I & II were previously completed and reported on, and are part of the case file. Therefore, the previously reported information is not repeated herein. Phase III included the fabrication of two field ready prototypes that were to be subjected to a series of drilling tests at GTI Catoosa, DOE RMOTC, and at customer partnering wells, if possible, as appropriate in the timing of the field test objectives to fully exercise all elements of the LCRSS. These tests were conducted in an iterative process based on a performance/reliability improvement cycle with the goal of demonstrating the system met all aspects required for commercial viability. These tests were conducted to achieve continuous runs of 100+ hours with well trajectories that fully exercised the tool's build/turn/drop/hold target capabilities and its higher end ratings for bit weight, torque and rotary speed. The tool teardowns were rigorously analyzed at the conclusion of each field run to assess component wear rates and to fully document any detrimental behavior(s) observed.

Roney Nazarian

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

High speed drilling research advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that the Amoco Production Company's Tulsa Research Center is developing a High Speed Drilling System (HSDS) to improve drilling economics for both exploration and development wells. The system is targeted for areas where historically the drilling rate is less than 25 ft/hr over a large section of hole. Designed as a five-year development program, work began on the system in late 1984. A major service company is participating in the project. The objective of the HSDS project is to improve drilling efficiency by developing improvements in the basic mechanical drilling system. The HSDS approach to improved drilling economics is via the traditional routes of increasing penetration rate (ROP) and bit life, increasing hole stability and reducing trouble time.

Warren, T.M.; Canson, B.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development of a high-temperature diagnostics-while-drilling tool.  

SciTech Connect

The envisioned benefits of Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) are based on the principle that high-speed, real-time information from the downhole environment will promote better control of the drilling process. Although in practice a DWD system could provide information related to any aspect of exploration and production of subsurface resources, the current DWD system provides data on drilling dynamics. This particular set of new tools provided by DWD will allow quicker detection of problems, reduce drilling flat-time and facilitate more efficient drilling (drilling optimization) with the overarching result of decreased drilling costs. In addition to providing the driller with an improved, real-time picture of the drilling conditions downhole, data generated from DWD systems provides researchers with valuable, high fidelity data sets necessary for developing and validating enhanced understanding of the drilling process. Toward this end, the availability of DWD creates a synergy with other Sandia Geothermal programs, such as the hard-rock bit program, where the introduction of alternative rock-reduction technologies are contingent on the reduction or elimination of damaging dynamic effects. More detailed descriptions of the rationale for the program and early development efforts are described in more detail by others [SAND2003-2069 and SAND2000-0239]. A first-generation low-temperature (LT) DWD system was fielded in a series of proof-of-concept tests (POC) to validate functionality. Using the LT system, DWD was subsequently used to support a single-laboratory/multiple-partner CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) entitled Advanced Drag Bits for Hard-Rock Drilling. The drag-bit CRADA was established between Sandia and four bit companies, and involved testing of a PDC bit from each company [Wise, et al., 2003, 2004] in the same lithologic interval at the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) test facility near Catoosa, OK. In addition, the LT DWD system has been fielded in cost-sharing efforts with an industrial partner to support the development of new generation hard-rock drag bits. Following the demonstrated success of the POC DWD system, efforts were initiated in FY05 to design, fabricate and test a high-temperature (HT) capable version of the DWD system. The design temperature for the HT DWD system was 225 C. Programmatic requirements dictated that a HT DWD tool be developed during FY05 and that a working system be demonstrated before the end of FY05. During initial design discussions regarding a high-temperature system it was decided that, to the extent possible, the HT DWD system would maintain functionality similar to the low temperature system, that is, the HT DWD system would also be designed to provide the driller with real-time information on bit and bottom-hole-assembly (BHA) dynamics while drilling. Additionally, because of time and fiscal constraints associated with the HT system development, the design of the HT DWD tool would follow that of the LT tool. The downhole electronics package would be contained in a concentrically located pressure barrel and the use of externally applied strain gages with thru-tool connectors would also be used in the new design. Also, in order to maximize the potential wells available for the HT DWD system and to allow better comparison with the low-temperature design, the diameter of the tool was maintained at 7-inches. This report discusses the efforts associated with the development of a DWD system capable of sustained operation at 225 C. This report documents work performed in the second phase of the Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) project in which a high-temperature (HT) version of the phase 1 low-temperature (LT) proof-of-concept (POC) DWD tool was built and tested. Descriptions of the design, fabrication and field testing of the HT tool are provided. Background on prior phases of the project can be found in SAND2003-2069 and SAND2000-0239.

Chavira, David J.; Huey, David (Stress Engineering Services, Inc.); Hetmaniak, Chris (Stress Engineering Services, Inc.); Polsky, Yarom; King, Dennis K.; Jacobson, Ronald David; Blankenship, Douglas Alan; Knudsen, Steven Dell; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Mansure, Arthur James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

GRR/Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development 05TXADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.5: Application To Drill, Deepen, Reenter, or Plug Back 16 TAC 3.78: Fees and Financial Security Requirements 16 TAC 3.37: Statewide Spacing Rule 16 TAC 3.38: Well Densities 16 TAC 3.39: Proration and Drilling Units: Contiguity of Acreage and Exception 16 TAC 3.33: Geothermal Resource Production Test Forms Required Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

75

GRR/Section 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil and Gas (DOGGR) administers geothermal well drilling activities (permitting, drilling,

76

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to crude oil in the presence of an initial brine saturation can render rocks mixed-wet. Subsequent exposure to components of synthetic oil-based drilling fluids can alter the wetting toward less water-wet or more oil-wet conditions. Mixing of the non-aromatic base oils used in synthetic oil-based muds (SBM) with an asphaltic crude oil can destabilize asphaltenes and make cores less water-wet. Wetting changes can also occur due to contact with the surfactants used in SBM formulations to emulsify water and make the rock cuttings oil-wet. Reservoir cores drilled with SBMs, therefore, show wetting properties much different from the reservoir wetting conditions, invalidating laboratory core analysis using SBM contaminated cores. Core cleaning is required in order to remove all the drilling mud contaminants. In theory, core wettability can then be restored to reservoir wetting conditions by exposure to brine and crude oil. The efficiency of core cleaning of SBM contaminated cores has been explored in this study. A new core cleaning procedure was developed aimed to remove the adsorbed asphaltenes and emulsifiers from the contaminated Berea sandstone cores. Sodium hydroxide was introduced into the cleaning process in order to create a strongly alkaline condition. The high pH environment in the pore spaces changed the electrical charges of both basic and acidic functional groups, reducing the attractive interactions between adsorbing materials and the rock surface. In cores, flow-through and extraction methods were investigated. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was assessed by spontaneous imbibition tests and Amott wettability measurements. Test results indicating that introduction of sodium hydroxide played a key role in removing adsorbed materials were confirmed by contact angle measurements on similarly treated mica surfaces. Cleaning of the contaminated cores reversed their wettability from oil-wet to strongly water-wet as demonstrated by spontaneous imbibition rates and Amott wettability indices.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-WA-a.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Geothermal Act 78.60 RCW Geothermal Rules 332-17 WAC Triggers None specified In Washington geothermal drilling and well development are regulated by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR). Geothermal production wells and core holes deeper than 750ft require the developer go through the whole WSDNR permitting process (which requires a public hearing) and require that the developer complete the State Environmental

78

OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS & HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit-fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all major preparations for the high pressure drilling campaign. Baker Hughes encountered difficulties in providing additional pumping capacity before TerraTek's scheduled relocation to another facility, thus the program was delayed further to accommodate the full testing program.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development 05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative All wells drilled in search or in support of the recovery of geothermal

80

Development of production drill bits and blast rounds  

SciTech Connect

In recent years there has been considerable interest in the development of computer models to describe rock fragmentation by blasting. The interest for this work has come primarily for application to large scale coal or mineral surface mines. However, the basic models developed for these applications are equally applicable for examining typical underground oil shale operations. Models that can predict blasting results starting from first principles can impact room and pillar mining in a number of ways including optimizing round design, control of particle size, evaluation of new explosives, minimizing pillar damage, and developing blasting schemes that can be used in conjunction with continuous miners. In this study, the authors explore how these codes can be used to model the blasting geometry encountered in room and pillar mining operations.

Baloo, G.L. (Energy Mining Div., UNOCAL Corp., Parachute, CO (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Status Report A Review of Slimhole Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1994 report reviews the various applications of slimhole technology including for exploration in remote areas, low-cost development wells, reentering existing wells, and horizontal and multilateral drilling. Advantages of slimholes to regular holes are presented. Limitations and disadvantages of slimholes are also discussed. In 1994, slimhole drilling was still an ongoing development technology. (DJE 2005)

Zhu, Tao; Carroll, Herbert B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

DOE/GRI development and testing of a downhole pump for jet-assist drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to accelerate development and commercialization of a high pressure downhole pump (DHP{trademark}) to be used for ultra-high pressure, jet-assisted drilling. The purpose of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in the drilling of deeper gas and oil wells where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. As a means to accomplishing this objective, a second generation commercial prototype of a DHP is to be designed, fabricated, tested in the laboratory, and eventually tested in the field. The design of the DOE commercial prototype DHP is current in progress. The layout of the complete DHP is expected to be completed by mid-April. Fabrication and laboratory experimentation is expected to be completed in September. Pending successful completion of the laboratory testing phase, the DOE commercial DHP should be ready for testing in the field by the end of the calendar year.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

GRR/Section 5-CO-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-a - Drilling and Well Development CO-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-CO-a - Drilling and Well Development 05COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Regulations & Policies Rules and Regulations for Permitting the Development and Appropriation of Geothermal Resources Through the Use of Wells CRS 37-90.5-107 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

85

GRR/Section 5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development 05ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Oregon Water Resources Department Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development Oregon Department of State Lands Oregon Department of Energy Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Regulations & Policies ORS 522.005(11) ORS 522.025 ORS 522.115 ORS 522.125 ORS 522.135 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf

86

GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Utah Administrative Code Section R655-1 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Although not regulated under the Administrative Rules for Water Wells,

87

GRR/Section 5-ID-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID-a - Drilling and Well Development ID-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-ID-a - Drilling and Well Development 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies IC §42-233: Appropriation of Water, Geothermal IC §42-4003: Permits IC §42-4004: Processing Applications IC §42-4011: Name of Owner Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Best Practices Community outreach Talk to the local county Potential Roadblocks Incomplete applications result in longer approval times by IDWR 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

88

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies MCA 37-43-104: Monitoring Wells MCA 37-43-302: License Requirements MCA 37-43-306: Bonding Requirements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

89

Drilling optimization using drilling simulator software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling operations management will face hurdles to reduce costs and increase performance, and to do this with less experience and organizational drilling capacity. A technology called Drilling Simulators Software has shown an extraordinary potential to improve the drilling performance and reduce risk and cost. Different approaches have been made to develop drilling-simulator software. The Virtual Experience Simulator, geological drilling logs, and reconstructed lithology are some of the most successful. The drilling simulations can run multiple scenarios quickly and then update plans with new data to improve the results. Its storage capacity for retaining field drilling experience and knowledge add value to the program. This research shows the results of using drilling simulator software called Drilling Optimization Simulator (DROPS) in the evaluation of the Aloctono block, in the Pirital field, eastern Venezuela. This formation is characterized by very complex geology, containing faulted restructures, large dips, and hard and abrasive rocks. The drilling performance in this section has a strong impact in the profitability of the field. A number of simulations using geological drilling logs and the concept of the learning curve defined the optimum drilling parameters for the block. The result shows that DROPS has the capability to simulate the drilling performance of the area with reasonable accuracy. Thus, it is possible to predict the drilling performance using different bits and the learning-curve concept to obtain optimum drilling parameters. All of these allow a comprehensive and effective cost and drilling optimization.

Salas Safe, Jose Gregorio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development 05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Engineering Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Code §13-183-65 Draft Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

91

Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The design of a water jet drill for development of geothermal resources. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water jet drilling of rock is shown to be a feasible method for potential improvement in gaining access to the earth's resources. Drilling rates of up to 280 in./min in sandstone and 40 in./min in granite have been achieved. While the addition of polymers to the jet stream is found advantageous the low (15%) level of improvement and the difficulty in maintaining concentrate negated further development. The application of confining pressure was found to reduce jet performance, but this was found to be a function more of the rock response than of the jet parameters. Field tests of water jets underground indicated the jet system could be modified to cope with this change. Water jets were found to be more effective, for drilling larger holes, where a combined water jet:roller bit system was developed and laboratory and field trials of this are described. As well as determining the controlling parameters affecting jet drilling performance, and proving that rock compressive strength is not one of them, the research examined other methods of improving jet cutting performance. At jet pressures below 10,000 psi abrasive laden jets were found most advantageous while, for drilling granite, a cavitating flow proved more effective at pressures above 10,000 psi. A reason for this is postulated. Experiments to develop a standardized cavitation resistance test for rock specimens have also been undertaken.

Summers, David A.; Lehnhoff, Terry F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Program to develop improved downhole drilling motors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made during Phase I of the program toward finding solutions to the seal-and-bearing problems. A seal-test facility was designed and built to test full-scale seals for downhole motors. The tests will simulate closely the environment imposed on seals used in actual motor drilling. Many seal designs and concepts were considered, including novel designs and modifications to conventional seal types. Several of the most promising designs (including some novel designs) have been designated for testing in Phase II. Some of these seals have already been obtained and are available for testing. The preliminary design for a seal-bearing package test stand was completed. This facility will allow tests of full-size seal-bearing packs at simulated downhole conditions. The design of a new seal-bearing package was completed and is scheduled for full-scale testing in Phase II. This package will allow worn seals and bearings to be replaced easily. New thrust bearings were selected for application in the seal-bearing package. These bearings offer much greater load capacity and should increase bearing life significantly. (JGB)

Black, A.D.; Green, S.J.; Matson, L.W.; Maurer, W.C.; Nielsen, R.R.; Nixon, J.D.; Wilson, J.G.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of downhole instruments for use in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia developed high temperature logging instruments for use in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project. These tools - Kuster mechanical tools for measuring temperature, pressure, and flow; a temperature and pressure tool built around an electronic memory; and a timing and control unit to power a downhole sampler - were all designed for slickline operation to temperatures up to 400/sup 0/C. The drilling of the scientific well and the application of these tools in it were successful. The technology advances made in the development of these tools have been transferred to industry. These advances should prove valuable in future scientific and commercial applications.

Carson, C.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, E.K. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING  

SciTech Connect

Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Final report on the design and development of a Rolling Float Meter for drilling-fluid outflow measurement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation, which is the loss of well drilling fluids to the formation while drilling, is a common problem encountered while drilling geothermal wells. The rapid detection of the loss of well drilling fluids is critical to the successful and cost-effective treatment of the wellbore to stop or minimize lost circulation. Sandia National Laboratories has developed an instrument to accurately measure the outflow rate of drilling fluids while drilling. This instrument, the Rolling Float Meter, has been under development at Sandia since 1991 and is now available for utilization by interested industry users. This report documents recent Rolling Float Meter design upgrades resulting from field testing and industry input, the effects of ongoing testing and evaluation both in the laboratory and in the field, and the final design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wright, E.K.; Glowka, D.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

From: Development of New Types of Non-Damaging Drill-in and Completion Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluids behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. This is the final report on a program that has been operating for 7 years, including the last four years under the sponsorship of the U.S. DOE. Accomplishments of Research Program The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a removable filtercake has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed. The program has been an unqualified success. We have accomplished the following: Development of New Laboratory Testing Practices Established standard testing practices Identification of key factors involved in formation damage Established appropriate cleanup practices for removal of formation damage to optimize productivity. DE26-98FT34174.000 Development of New Drilling Fluids Established New Guidelines for horizontal well completion practices Drill in fluid design and maintenance Cleanup fluid design and use Development of new well drill in fluids Low solids polymer carbonate DIFs Polymer free high density DIFs Low Density Drill in fluid design

David B. Burnett Harold Vance

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration,...

100

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Program to develop improved downhole drilling motors. Semiannual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are described: the history of turbodrill development, positive displacement motor development, the theory of turbodrills, the theory of positive displacement motors, basic motor components, forces on thrust bearings, thrust bearing design, radial bearing design, rotary seal design, sealed lubrication system, lubricants, and project status. Included in appendices are materials on high-temperature lubricants and a progress report on the design of downhole motor seal, bearing, and lubrication test systems. (MHR)

Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Power Industry Development Paths and Natural Gas Market Risks: Cycles of Markets, Drilling, and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current natural gas market is depressed by a combination of unusual factorsa great excess of supply and weak demand. Excess supply comes from the momentum of exploration and production (EP) to the new U.S. gas shale plays, a phenomenon barely 18 months old and a game-changing event in the industry. Weak demand comes from the "Great Recession." The seeds for correcting this imbalance would appear to be a dramatic cutback in drilling, which has collapsed over the past year and which is a principal focu...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Interactive Graphics Developments in Energy Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing world conditions have brought about new economic rules for energy explorationrules that are helping bring interactive computer graphics into the search for fossil fuels.

Thomas Gardner; H. Nelson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Program to develop improved downhole drilling motors. Semi-annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported in two main sections: downhole drilling motor design and design of downhole motor seal, bearing, and test lubrication systems. Information on downhole drilling motor design is presented under the following subsection headings: Turbodrill development; positive displacement motor development; theory of Turbodrills; theory of positive displacement motors; basic motor components; forces on thrust bearings; thrust bearing design; radial bearing design; rotary seal design; sealed lubrication system; lubricants; and project status. The appendix contains information on high temperature lubricants. Information on the design of downhole motor seal, bearing, and test lubrication systems is presented under the following subsection headings: seal, bearing, and lubrication test design criteria; basic test conditions; independent and dependent variable parameters; alternative concepts for seal test apparatus; design of the seal test system; and bearing test system description. A schedule for remaining tasks is included. (JGB)

Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Offshore underbalanced drilling system could revive field developments. Part 2: Making this valuable reservoir drilling/completion technique work on a conventional offshore drilling platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1, presented in the July issue, discussed the emerging trend to move underbalanced drilling (UBD) operations into the offshore arena, following its successful application in many onshore areas. This concluding article delves into the details of applying UBD offshore. Starting with advantages the technique offers in many maturing or complex/marginal prospects, the UBD system for offshore platforms use is described. This involves conversion of the conventional rotary system, use of rotating diverters, design of the surface fluid separation system and the necessary gas (nitrogen or natural gas) injection system to lighten the fluid column. Commonly faced operational challenges for offshore UBD are listed along with recommended solutions.

Nessa, D.O.; Tangedahl, M.J.; Saponja, J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Topical report, Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, lower drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{reg_sign}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, {open_quotes}Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,{close_quotes} is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase II. In the downhole pump approach shown in the following figure, conventional drill pipe and drill collars are used, with the DHP as the last component of the bottom hole assembly next to the bit. The DHP is a reciprocating double ended, intensifier style positive displacement, high-pressure pump. The drive fluid and the high-pressure output fluid are both derived from the same source, the abrasive drilling mud pumped downhole through the drill string. Approximately seven percent of the stream is pressurized to 30,000 psi and directed through a high-pressure nozzle on the drill bit to produce the high speed jet and assist the mechanical action of the bit to make it drill faster.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leveraging regionaL expLoration Leveraging regionaL expLoration to DeveLop geoLogic Framework For co 2 Storage in Deep FormationS Background The Midwestern region encompasses numerous coal-fired power plants that could be adversely impacted by carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission control restrictions. Geologic sequestration could be a viable option to mitigate the CO 2 emissions within this region. Unfortunately, the understanding of rock properties within deep forma- tions in the region is poorly understood due to lack of deep well data. Under this project, regional geologic characterization is being refined with new rock property data being collected in collaboration with regional oil and gas drilling companies. Description The project is designed to develop an improved understanding of the geologic frame-

112

Advanced Drilling through Diagnostics-White-Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed data link that would provide dramatically faster communication from downhole instruments to the surface and back again has the potential to revolutionize deep drilling for geothermal resources through Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD). Many aspects of the drilling process would significantly improve if downhole and surface data were acquired and processed in real-time at the surface, and used to guide the drilling operation. Such a closed-loop, driller-in-the-loop DWD system, would complete the loop between information and control, and greatly improve the performance of drilling systems. The main focus of this program is to demonstrate the value of real-time data for improving drilling. While high-rate transfer of down-hole data to the surface has been accomplished before, insufficient emphasis has been placed on utilization of the data to tune the drilling process to demonstrate the true merit of the concept. Consequently, there has been a lack of incentive on the part of industry to develop a simple, low-cost, effective high-speed data link. Demonstration of the benefits of DWD based on a high-speed data link will convince the drilling industry and stimulate the flow of private resources into the development of an economical high-speed data link for geothermal drilling applications. Such a downhole communication system would then make possible the development of surface data acquisition and expert systems that would greatly enhance drilling operations. Further, it would foster the development of downhole equipment that could be controlled from the surface to improve hole trajectory and drilling performance. Real-time data that would benefit drilling performance include: bit accelerations for use in controlling bit bounce and improving rock penetration rates and bit life; downhole fluid pressures for use in the management of drilling hydraulics and improved diagnosis of lost circulation and gas kicks; hole trajectory for use in reducing directional drilling costs; and downhole weight-on-bit and drilling torque for diagnosing drill bit performance. In general, any measurement that could shed light on the downhole environment would give us a better understanding of the drilling process and reduce drilling costs.

FINGER,JOHN T.; GLOWKA,DAVID ANTHONY; LIVESAY,BILLY JOE; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and Development 1991 November 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas ... Production figures in this report may differ slightly from

114

Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

115

Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies...

116

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...

117

The economics of petroleum exploration and development in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The international oil and gas industry views China as a key country in its search for petroleum exploration and development investment opportunities. China offers a (more)

Hou, Wanwan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

What happened to exploration and drilling dollars, and do I have anything to say about the direction of my industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Those active in the natural resource industries are trying to cope with new tax laws, fewer investors, fluctuating oil markets, changing rules governing natural gas sales, and an increase in imports to serve a diminished domestic market. On the bright side, drilling and acreage costs are down, though federal royalties remain at previously set levels. An analysis of the status and sources of investment dollars, the activity directions and options of the independents and majors, and a description of the new marketplace will be presented. There are appropriate arenas in which individuals, companies, and trade organizations should be involved. Knowing how, when, and where, will be discussed.

Wilson, D.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Indonesian drilling maintains steady pace  

SciTech Connect

Offshore drilling activity in Indonesia increased nominally the first quarter of 1985 to an average 29 rigs. Barring any further problems with oil prices and markets, operators are expected to maintain essentially the current general level of appraisal/development work for the rest of this year. There are still a number of prospective regions to be explored in Southeast Asia. Regional developments are described for the South China Sea area, the Java Sea, South Sumatra, Kalimantan, Irian Jaya and the Malacca Strait.

Not Available

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HydroPulse Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

J.J. Kolle

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Development of a model to calculate mechanical specific energy for air hammer drilling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling for hydrocarbons is an expensive operation; consequently operators try to save costs by reducing the number of days spent during this operation. Drilling efficiently with the highest attainable rate of penetration is one of the ways drilling time could be reduced. Real-time monitoring of Mechanical Specific Energy will enable drilling engineers to detect when the optimum drilling rate for a given set of drilling parameters is not being achieved. Numerous works have been done on air hammers and rock Mechanical Specific Energy. Previous research has shown that Mechanical Specific Energy, which is a ratio that quantifies the input energy and Rate of Penetration (ROP) of a drilling system, is directly proportional to the rock compressive strength being drilled. The Mechanical Specific Energy model utilizes drilling parameters such as ROP, Weight on bit (WOB), RPM, torque, flow-rate, bottom-hole pressure, and bottom-hole temperature to show how effectively energy being put into the drill string is being converted to ROP at the bit. This research effort proposes a new model to calculate the Mechanical Specific Energy for air hammer drilling systems. A thermodynamic model for the air hammer from which the piston impact velocity and kinetic energy is obtained is presented. To be able to estimate the effective energy delivered to the rock by the hammer, the stress wave propagation model is used and factored into the Mechanical Specific Energy model. The Mechanical Specific Energy values obtained from the application of this model provide a qualitative indicator of formation pressure changes and a means for drilling engineers to detect when optimum drilling rate is not being achieved. It can be deduced from the model that the impact energy of the hammer is greatly affected by the pressure drop across the hammer and since the hammer accounts for about sixty percent of the energy required for destroying the rock, the ROP can be varied by varying the pressure drop across the hammer.

Okuchaba, Boma Jeremiah

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Update on slimhole drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories manages the US Department of Energy program for slimhole drilling. The principal objective of this program is to expand proven geothermal reserves through increased exploration made possible by lower-cost slimhole drilling. For this to be a valid exploration method, however, it is necessary to demonstrate that slimholes yield enough data to evaluate a geothermal reservoir, and that is the focus of Sandia`s current research.

Finger, J.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of modifications for Coflexip flexible drilling pipe for high-temperature and -pressure geothermal service. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coflexip (France) flexible drilling pipe can provide economies in drilling geothermal wells. However, the current liner materials cannot take the high temperatures (approx.250C) and pressures (approx.69 MPa). Development was undertaken to replace the liner with higher temperature materials and, thus increase the temperature capability of the flexible pipe. DuPont Teflon PFA 350, L'Garde EPDM Y267 and L'Garde AFLAS 291 were considered but they all require backing by a closely woven stainless steel fabric to prevent extrusion. A graphite-reinforced EPDM elastomer was developed which has the potential of meeting the pressure-temperature requirements without the metal fabric reinforcement.

Friese, G.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

128

JOINT-INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP A HOLLOW SPHERE DUAL-GRADIENT DRILLING SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI) formed a joint-industry partnership to fund the development of a hollow sphere dual-gradient drilling (DGD) system. Phase I consisted of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and distributing information and data regarding a new DGD system for use by the oil and gas industry. Near the end of Phase I, DOE provided funding to the project that was used to conduct a series of critical follow-on tests investigating sphere separation in weighted waterbase and oilbase muds. Drilling costs in deep water are high because seawater pressure on the ocean floor creates a situation where many strings of casing are required due to the relatively close spacing between fracture and pore pressure curves. Approximately $100 million have been spent during the past five years on DGD systems that place pumps on the seafloor to reduce these drilling problems by reducing the annulus fluid pressure at the bottom of the riser. BP estimates that a DGD system can save $9 million per well in the Thunderhorse Field and Conoco estimates it can save $5 to $15 million per well in its deepwater operations. Unfortunately, previous DGD development projects have been unsuccessful due to the high costs ($20 to $50 million) and reliability problems with seafloor pump systems. MTI has been developing a simple DGD system concept that would pump hollow glass spheres into the bottom of the riser to reduce density of the mud in the riser. This eliminates the requirement for seafloor pumps and replaces them with low cost mud pumps, shale shakers, and other oilfield equipment that can be operated on the rig by conventional crews. A $1.8 million Phase I joint-industry project funded by five service companies and three operators showed that hollow spheres could be pumped well, but difficulties were encountered in separating the spheres from a polymer mud supplied by Halliburton due to the high viscosity of this mud at the low shear rates encountered on oilfield shale shaker screens. As a result, an excessive amount of this polymer mud flowed across the screen with the beads instead of through the screen. At the completion of the Phase I project, it was concluded that the hollow sphere system would not work effectively with the polymer mud tested. ExxonMobil and Shell engineers proposed that additional sphere separation tests needed to be conducted with weighted oilfield waterbase and oilbase muds to determine if the DGD system would work with these muds. The DOE agreed to provide a $200,000 grant for these tests. The DOE-funded tests, described in this report, showed that the spheres could be pumped with conventional oilfield centrifugal and triplex mud pumps and separated effectively from both oilfield waterbase and oilbase muds using conventional oilfield shale shakers and hydrocyclones. As a result of the success of these DOE tests, this DGD system is ready for full-scale field testing, first on land wells and later in the offshore environment. Maurer Technology Inc. is currently proposing a Phase II project to oil companies to further develop this DGD concept. This project would be funded by four to eight operators. If Phase II tests are successful, Noble plans to commercialize this system with a service company partner that will market and operate the DGD system on Noble's and other drilling contractors' rigs.

William C. Maurer; Colin Ruan; Greg Deskins

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Chena Hot Springs geothermal field was intensively explored, tested, and developed without a wireline unit between October 2005 and August 2006. Due to the remote location of the project and its small size of 0.4 MW, it was necessary to perform the work without the geothermal industry infrastructure typically utilized in the 48 contiguous states. This could largely be done because some of the wells were capable of artesian flow at below boiling temperatures. The geology, consisting of

130

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Use of geothermal heat for sugar refining in Imperial County: drilling and resource development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project plans and procedures to be used in drilling and completing both the production and injection wells for Holly Sugar Company are described. The following are included: general site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, permits, environmental report, and schedule.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Development of Risk Assessment System for Coal-Bed Methane Underbalanced Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As there are a lot of factors with complexity and uncertainty, the process of coal-bed methane under balanced drilling has great risk. In order to overcome the one-sidedness and limitation caused by single evaluation method, the combined evaluation model ... Keywords: coal-bed methane, underbalanced drilling, combined evaluation model, risk assessment system

Xiujuan Yang; Qingyang Wen; Xiangzhen Yan; Yan Xia

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Research projects needed for expediting development of domestic oil and gas resources through arctic, offshore, and drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the research projects which were identified at an industry-government workshop on Arctic, Offshore, and Drilling Technology (AODT) held at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, January 5-7, 1981. The purpose of the workshop was to identify those problem areas where government research could provide technology advancement that would assist industry in accelerating the discovery and development of US oil and gas resouces. The workshop results are to be used to guide an effective research program. The workshop identified and prioritized the tasks that need to be implemented. All of the projects listed in the Arctic and Offshore sections were selected as appropriate for a Department of Energy (DOE) research role. The drilling projects identified as appropriate only for industry research have been separated in the Drilling section of this report.

Canja, S.; Williams, C.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II of a 5-phase overall compressed air energy storage (CAES) development program was performed to characterize and explore potential CAES sites and to prepare a research and development plan. This volume for Phase II activities contains an evaluation of the suitability of seven selected sites to undergo field drilling and air injection testing; a bibliography; results of a literature search on the effects of air injection of aquifer-caprock well systems; reservoir data for the sites; cost estimates; and predicted potential risks from a CAES plant. (LCL)

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DEVELOPMENT OF A MUD-PULSE HIGH-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT-WHILE-DRILLING (MWD) SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The overall program objective is to develop a mud-pulse measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool for oil and gas drilling operations that can be used where downhole temperatures are as high as 195 C (383 F). The work was planned to be completed in two phases: Phase I and an optional Phase II. The objectives of Phase I were first to identify critical components of existing MWD systems that can or cannot operate at 195 C. For components not able to meet the higher standard, one of several strategies was pursued: (1) locate high-temperature replacement components, (2) develop new designs that eliminate the unavailable components, or (3) use cooling to keep components at acceptable operating temperatures (under 195 C). New designs and components were then tested under high temperatures in the laboratory. The final goal of Phase I was to assemble two high-temperature MWD prototype tools and test each in at least one low-temperature well to verify total system performance. Phase II was also envisioned as part of this development. Its objective would be to test the two new high-temperature MWD prototype tools in wells being drilled in the United States where the bottom-hole temperatures were 195 C (or the highest temperatures attainable). The high-temperature MWD tool is designed to send directional and formation data to the surface via mud pulses, to aid in the drilling of guided wellbores. The modules that comprise the tool are housed in sealed barrels that protect the electronics from exposure to down-hole fluids and pressures. These pressure barrels are hung inside a non-magnetic collar located above the drilling assembly. A number of significant accomplishments were achieved during the course of the Phase I project, including: (1) Tested two MWD strings for function in an oven at 195 C; (2) Conducted field test of prototype 195 C MWD tool (at well temperatures up to 140-180 C); (3) Tested ELCON hybrid chip with processor, clock, and memory in a custom package for 700 hours at 200 C; (4) Contracted with APS Technology to conduct study of thermoelectric cooling of downhole electronics; (5) Conducted successful Peltier cooling test with APS Technology; (6) Tested and improved the electronics of Sperry Sun's Geiger Muller-based gamma detector for operation at 195 C; (7) Developed two high-temperature magnetometers (one in-house, one with Tensor); and (8) Encouraged outside source to develop lithium/magnesium high-temperature batteries (operating temperature of 125 to 215 C). One of this project's greatest achievements was improvement in Sperry Sun's current tool with changes made as a direct result of work performed under this project. These improvements have resulted in longer life and a more robust MWD tool at the previous temperature rating of 175 C, as well as at higher temperatures. A field test of two prototype 195 C MWD tools was conducted in Lavaca County, Texas. The purpose of this operation was to provide directional services on a sidetrack of a straight hole. The sidetrack was to intersect the formation up-dip above the water/gas interface. In addition, the gamma tool provided formation data including seam tops and thickness. Results from these field tests indicate progress in the development of a 195 C tool. Although the pulsers failed downhole in both tools, failure of the pulsers was determined to be from mechanical rather than electrical causes. Analysis of the economics of the 195 C tool highlights the greatest obstacle to future commercialization. Costs to screen individual components, then subassemblies, and finally completed tools for high-temperature operations are very high. Tests to date also show a relatively short life for high-temperature tools--on the order of 300 hours. These factors mean that the daily cost of the tool will be higher (3 to 5 times more) than a conventional tool.

John H. Cohen; Greg Deskins; William Motion; Jay Martin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

137

DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal Energy Resources DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal Energy Resources February 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Focusing on reducing the upfront costs of geothermal development as well as improve its effectiveness, the U.S. Department of Energy today announced plans to leverage oil and gas expertise to test the reliability and efficiency of geothermal power generation at oil and gas fields. DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy will combine efforts to have experts test and validate low temperature geothermal power generation technologies at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) near Casper, Wyoming.

138

Advanced drilling systems study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geothermal COMPAX drill bit development. Final technical report, July 1, 1976-September 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to develop and demonstrate the performance of new drill bit designs utilizing sintered polycrystalline diamond compacts for the cutting edges. The scope included instrumented rock cutting experiments under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and pressure, diamond compact wear and failure mode analysis, rock removal modeling, bit design and fabrication, full-scale laboratory bit testing, field tests, and performance evaluation. A model was developed relating rock cutting forces to independent variables, using a statistical test design and regression analysis. Experiments on six rock types, covering a range of compressive strengths from 8 x 10/sup 3/ psi to 51 x 10/sup 3/ psi, provided a satisfactory test of the model. Results of the single cutter experiments showed that the cutting and thrust (penetration) forces, and the angle of the resultant force, are markedly affected by rake angle, depth of cut, and speed. No unusual force excursions were detected in interrupted cutting. Wear tests on two types of diamond compacts cutting Jack Fork Sandstone yielded wear rates equivalent at high cutting speeds, where thermal effects are probably operative. At speeds below approx. 400 surface feet per minute (sfm), the coarser sintered diamond product was superior. 28 refs., 235 figs., 55 tabs.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.; Flom, D.G.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 November 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 iii Contacts International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Oil and Gas, Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Reserves and Production Branch.

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141

Table 4.9 Uranium Exploration and Development Drilling, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating ... storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices ... 1972: 26.91: 11.82: 9.71: 3.61 ...

142

Drill report  

SciTech Connect

North Slope drilling activity is described. As of November 14, 1984, four rigs were actively drilling in the Kuparuk River field with another two doing workovers. Only one rig was drilling in the Prudhoe Bay field, with another doing workovers and one on standby.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of a method for predicting the performance and wear of PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is developed for predicting cutter forces, temperatures, and wear on PDC bits as well as integrated bit performance parameters such as weight-on-bit, drilling torque, and bit imbalance. A computer code called PDCWEAR has been developed to make this method available as a tool for general bit design and analysis. The method uses single-cutter data to provide a measure of rock drillability and employs theoretical considerations to account for interaction among closely spaced cutters on the bit. Experimental data are presented to establish the effects of cutter size and wearflat area on the forces that develop during rock cutting. Waterjet assistance is shown to significantly reduce cutting forces, thereby potentially extending bit life and reducing weight-on-bit and torque requirements in hard rock. The effects of several other design and operating parameters on bit life and drilling performance are also investigated.

Glowka, D.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Slimhole Drilling, Logging, and Completion Technology - An Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using slim holes (diameter < 15 cm) for geothermal exploration and small-scale power production can produce significant cost savings compared to conventional rotary-drilling methods. In addition, data obtained from slim holes can be used to lower the risks and costs associated with the drilling and completion of large-diameter geothermal wells. As a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories has worked with industry since 1992 to develop and promote drilling, testing, and logging technology for slim holes. This paper describes the current status of work done both in-house and contracted to industry. It focuses on drilling technology, case histories of slimhole drilling projects, data collection and rig instrumentation, and high-temperature logging tools.

FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Exploration-production studies in newly drilled Devonian-Shale gas wells. Annual report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian shale has been recognized as an important source of gas in the Appalachian Basin. The program aids producers in the collection of reservoir data not normally collected and assists in the evaluation of the effectiveness of zone selection and stimulation designs and methods. The study should provide a fuller understanding of the relationships that affect productivity in the Devonian shale. The relationships between gas flows and geological features that control the production characteristics in the Devonian shale are being developed.

Graham, R.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Newberry Exploratory Slimhole: Drilling And Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During July-November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5360' exploratory slimhole (3.895" diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia's program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling we performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well's data set includes: over 4000' of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for ...

John Finger Ronald; Ronald D. Jacobson; Charles E. Hickox

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced drilling systems study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

150

Arizona strip breccia pipe program: exploration, development, and production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the long-range plans for the Energy Fuels Corporation, they have embarked on one of the most active and aggressive uranium exploration programs in the US. These exploration efforts are located in the northwestern part of Arizona in an area referred to as the Arizona Strip. At a time when the domestic uranium industry is staggering to recover from its worst economic slump, Energy Fuels is spending millions of dollars a year on exploration, development, production, and milling. The reason for Energy Fuels' commitment to uranium exploration and production lies in the ground of Arizona in unique geologic formations called breccia pipes. Some of these structures, generally no more than 300 to 350 ft in diameter, contain uranium that is, on the average, five to ten times richer than ore found elsewhere in the US. The richness of this Arizona ore makes it the only conventionally mined uranium in the US that can compete in today's market of cheaper, high-grade foreign sources. Between January 1980 and December 1986, Energy Fuels has mined more than 10 billion lb of uranium from breccia pipe deposits at an average grade of 0.65% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Currently, Energy Fuels is operating six breccia pipe mines, and a plan of operations on a seventh mine has been submitted to the appropriate government agencies for the necessary mining permits.

Mathisen, I.W. Jr.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Exploration for hot dry rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Hot dry rock conceptual models for exploration, HDR test site investigations, and the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation with ad hoc exploration strategies. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high, local, upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. There appear to be much more widespread possibilities for similar HDR sites in the Great Plains area. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket. There is no direct information on the presence of abnormally high temperatures in this area, but the study does show that a combination of gravity and magnetic anomaly mapping with regional geological information derived from sparse drill holes in the Phanerozoic rocks is useful on a widespread basis for focusing on local areas for detailed evaluation.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

International oil and gas exploration and development activities  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

We report on progress in three areas. In part one, the wetting effects of synthetic base oils are reported. Part two reports progress in understanding the effects of surfactants of known chemical structures, and part three integrates the results from surface and core tests that show the wetting effects of commercial surfactant products used in synthetic and traditional oil-based drilling fluids. An important difference between synthetic and traditional oil-based muds (SBM and OBM, respectively) is the elimination of aromatics from the base oil to meet environmental regulations. The base oils used include dearomatized mineral oils, linear alpha-olefins, internal olefins, and esters. We show in part one that all of these materials except the esters can, at sufficiently high concentrations, destabilize asphaltenes. The effects of asphaltenes on wetting are in part related to their stability. Although asphaltenes have some tendency to adsorb on solid surfaces from a good solvent, that tendency can be much increased near the onset of asphaltene instability. Tests in Berea sandstone cores demonstrate wetting alteration toward less water-wet conditions that occurs when a crude oil is displaced by paraffinic and olefinic SBM base oils, whereas exposure to the ester products has little effect on wetting properties of the cores. Microscopic observations with atomic forces microscopy (AFM) and macroscopic contact angle measurements have been used in part 2 to explore the effects on wetting of mica surfaces using oil-soluble polyethoxylated amine surfactants with varying hydrocarbon chain lengths and extent of ethoxylation. In the absence of water, only weak adsorption occurs. Much stronger, pH-dependent adsorption was observed when water was present. Varying hydrocarbon chain length had little or no effect on adsorption, whereas varying extent of ethoxylation had a much more significant impact, reducing contact angles at nearly all conditions tested. Preequilibration of aqueous and oleic phases appeared to have little influence over surfactant interactions with the mica surface; the solubility in water of all three structures appeared to be very limited. Commercial emulsifiers for both SBM and OBM formulations are blends of tall oil fatty acids and their polyaminated derivatives. In part three of this report, we integrate observations on smooth surfaces with those in Berea sandstone cores to show the effects of low concentrations of these products with and without the added complexity of adsorbed material from crude oils. Unlike the polyethoxylated amines studied in part two, there are significant non-equilibrium effects that can occur when water first contacts oil with dissolved surfactant. Very oil-wet conditions can be produced on first contact. Surfactant dissolved in oil had less effect on wetting alteration for one combination of crude oil and surfactant, although the generality of this observation can only be assessed by additional tests with crude oils of different composition. The wettability-altering effect of surfactants on both mica and Berea sandstone was most significant when they contacted surfaces after adsorption of crude oil components. Tests without crude oil might underestimate the extent of wetting change possible with these SBM and OBM emulsifiers.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED DRILL COMPONENTS FOR BHA USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING CARBIDE, DIAMOND COMPOSITES AND FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this program was to develop an efficient and economically viable microwave processing technique to process cobalt cemented tungsten carbide with improved properties for drill-bits for advanced drilling operations for oil, gas, geothermal and excavation industries. The program was completed in three years and successfully accomplished all the states goals in the original proposal. In three years of the program, we designed and built several laboratory scale microwave sintering systems for conducting experiments on Tungsten carbide (WC) based composites in controlled atmosphere. The processing conditions were optimized and various properties were measured. The design of the system was then modified to enable it to process large commercial parts of WC/Co and in large quantities. Two high power (3-6 kW) microwave systems of 2.45 GHz were built for multi samples runs in a batch process. Once the process was optimized for best results, the technology was successfully transferred to our industrial partner, Dennis Tool Co. We helped them to built couple of prototype microwave sintering systems for carbide tool manufacturing. It was found that the microwave processed WC/Co tools are not only cost effective but also exhibited much better overall performance than the standard tools. The results of the field tests performed by Dennis Tool Co. showed remarkable advantage and improvement in their overall performance. For example: wear test shows an increase of 20-30%, corrosion test showed much higher resistance to the acid attack, erosion test exhibited about 15% better resistance than standard sinter-HIP parts. This proves the success of microwave technology for WC/Co based drilling tools. While we have successfully transferred the technology to our industrial partner Dennis Tool Co., they have signed an agreement with Valenite, a world leading WC producer of cutting and drilling tools and wear parts, to push aggressively the new microwave technology in to the marketplace.

Dinesh Agrawal; Rustum Roy

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

International oil and gas exploration and development: 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report starts where the previous quarterly publication ended. This first publication of a new annual series contains most of the same data as the quarterly report, plus some new material, through 1991. It also presents historical data covering a longer period of time than the previous quarterly report. Country-level data on oil reserves, oil production, active drilling rigs, seismic crews, wells drilled, oil reserve additions, and oil reserve-to-production rations (R/P ratios) are listed for about 85 countries, where available, from 1970 through 1991. World and regional summaries are given in both tabular and graphical form. The most popular table in the previous quarterly report, a listing of new discoveries, continues in this annual report as Appendix A.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling  

SciTech Connect

Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology.

Smith, J. (George E. Failing Co., Enid, OK (US)); Edwards, B. (Sierra Drilling Co., Calgary (CA))

1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

Neeraj Gupta

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Session 10: The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico: The Experiences Gained from Its Exploration and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto case study demonstrated the value of a multidisciplinary effort for exploring and developing a geothermal field. There was no problem in recognizing the geothermal potential of the Cerro Prieto area because of the many obvious surface manifestations. However, the delineation of the geothermal reservoir at depth was not so straightforward. Wells drilled near the abundant surface manifestations only produced fluids of relatively low enthalpy. Later it was determined that these zones of high heat loss corresponded to discharge areas where faults and fractures allowed thermal fluids to leak to the surface, and not to the main geothermal reservoir. The early gravity and seismic refraction surveys provided important information on the general structure of the area. Unaware of the existence of a higher density zone of hydrothermally altered sediments capping the geothermal reservoir, CFE interpreted a basement horst in the western part of the field and hypothesized that the bounding faults were controlling the upward flow of thermal fluids. Attempting to penetrate the sedimentary column to reach the ''basement horst'', CFE discovered the {alpha} geothermal reservoir (in well M-5). The continuation of the geothermal aquifer (actually the {beta} reservoir) east of the original well field was later confirmed by a deep exploration well (M-53). The experience of Cerro Prieto showed the importance of chemical ratios, and geothermometers in general, in establishing the subsurface temperatures and fluid flow patterns. Fluid chemical and isotopic compositions have also been helpful to determine the origin of the fluids, fluid-production mechanisms and production induced effects on the reservoir.

Lippman, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Geothermal exploration and development in Nevada through 1973  

SciTech Connect

A brief description is given of Nevada's geothermal resources, and exploration activity for geothermal power through 1973. The use, geology, exploration, and regulation of the State's geothermal energy resources are discussed.

Garside, L.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Development of a portable x-ray computed tomographic imaging system for drill-site investigation of recovered core  

SciTech Connect

A portable x-ray computed tomography (CT) system was constructed for imaging core at drill sites. Performing drill-site-based x-ray scanning and CT analysis permits rapid evaluation of core properties (such as density, lithologic structure, and macroporosity distribution) and allows for real-time decision making for additional core-handling procedures. Because of the speed with which scanning is performed, systematic imaging and electronic cataloging of all retrieved core is feasible. Innovations (such as a novel clamshell shielding arrangement integrated with system interlocks) permit safe operation of the x-ray system in a busy core handling area. The minimization of the volume encapsulated with shielding reduces the overall system weight and facilitates instrument portability. The x-ray system as originally fabricated had a 110 kV x-ray source with a fixed 300-micron focal spot size. A 15 cm image intensifier with a cesium iodide phosphor input screen was coupled to a CCD for image capture. The CT system has since been modified with a 130 kV micro-focal x-ray source. With the x-ray system's variable focal spot size, high-resolution studies (10-micron resolution) can be performed on core plugs and coarser (100-micron resolution) images can be acquired of whole drill cores. The development of an aluminum compensator has significantly improved the dynamic range and accuracy of the system. An x-ray filter has also been incorporated, permitting rapid acquisition of multi-energy scans for more quantitative analysis of sample mineralogy. The x-ray CT system has operated reliably under extreme field conditions, which have varied from shipboard to arctic.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Pruess, Jacob

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Exploration for Uranium Ore (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation describes permitting procedures and requirements for exploration activities. For the purpose of this legislation, exploration is defined as the drilling of test holes or...

169

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of crude oils by surface-active agents from drilling fluids or other oil-field chemicals is more difficult to detect and quantify than bulk contamination with, for example, base fluids from oil-based muds. Bulk contamination can be detected by gas chromatography or other common analytical techniques, but surface-active contaminants can be influential at much lower concentrations that are more difficult to detect analytically, especially in the context of a mixture as complex as a crude oil. In this report we present a baseline study of interfacial tensions of 39 well-characterized crude oil samples with aqueous phases that vary in pH and ionic composition. This extensive study will provide the basis for assessing the effects of surface-active contaminant on interfacial tension and other surface properties of crude oil/brine/rock ensembles.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced information technology infrastructure to better support resource development and resource conservation. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells. The broad goal of this grant is to increase domestic production from Alaska's known producing fields through the implementation of preferred upstream management practices. (PUMP). Internet publication of extensive and detailed geotechnical data is the first task, improving the permitting process is the second task, and building an advanced geographical information system to offer continuing support and public access of the first two goals is the third task. Excellent progress has been made on all three tasks; the technical objectives as defined by the approved grant sub-tasks have been met. The end date for the grant was March 31, 2006.

Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Drilling and general petroleum engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-nine papers are included in the Drilling and General Petroleum Engineering Volume of the SPE Annual Conference and Exhibition proceedings. The conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 25-28, 1994. The papers cover such topics as: extended reach well drilling, development of marginal satellite fields, slim hole drilling, pressure loss predictions, models for cuttings transport, ester-based drilling fluid systems, borehole stability, cementing, operations, bit failures, roller core bits, well tracking techniques, nitrogen drilling systems, plug failures, drill bit and drillstring dynamics, slim hole vibrations, reserve estimates, enhanced recovery methods, waste disposal, and engineering salary trends. A separate abstract and indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Drilling technology/GDO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

Kelsey, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comparison of the ParTrack mud/cuttings release model with field data based on use of synthetic-based drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for the calculation of the spreading and deposition of drilling mud and cuttings has been developed. The calculations are based on a Lagrangian particle approach, which means that the properties of the discharge are represented by moving particles ... Keywords: Deposition, Drilling fluids, Modeling, Oil exploration, Spreading

Henrik Rye; Mark Reed; Tone K. Frost; Toril I. Re Utvik

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of US organizations sponsored by the US Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: (1) surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; (2) the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; (3) geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and (4) reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Critique of Drilling Research  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years the Department of Energy has been funding research to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Generally that research has been effective and helped to make geothermal energy economically attractive to developers. With the increased competition for the electrical market, geothermal energy needs every advantage it can acquire to allow it to continue as a viable force in the marketplace. In drilling related research, there is essentially continuous dialogue between industry and the national laboratories. Therefore, the projects presented in the Program Review are focused on subjects that were previously recommended or approved by industry.

Hamblin, Jerry

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Deepwater drilling riser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal focus of this paper is to discuss and summarize, from the manufacturer's perspective, the primary milestones in the development of the marine riser system used to drill in record water depths off the U.S. east coast. This riser system is unique in that it used advanced designs, material technology, and quality control to enable safe operation in water depths beyond the capability of conventional drilling riser systems. Experience and research have led to design improvements that are now being incorporated in new riser systems that have the potential of expanding the frontiers to increasingly deeper water.

Chastain, T.; Stone, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Turnkey drilling  

SciTech Connect

The recent surge in the popularity of turnkey drilling has produced a number of questions about turnkey operations from both operators and contractors. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) has no approved turnkey contract (although several of the member districts have printed one), leaving the parties participating in a turnkey well unsure of their responsibilities and obligations. Additionally, operators are finding liens filed against turnkey wells they thought were paid for. The term turnkey itself is often misunderstood and applied to a variety of guaranteed well commitments. Some turnkeys require the contractor to provide everything from location preparation to final production pipe or plugs. Others allow contingencies for stuck pipe, lost circulation, kicks and bad storms.

Pierce, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NETL: News Release - New DOE Projects to Develop High-Tech Drilling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36 months Pinnacle Technologies, San Francisco, CA, will review current and past stimulation techniques for deep-well completions to develop data that help minimize the...

182

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, Douglas K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kuhns, Douglass J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wiersholm, Otto (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

184

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

185

Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

186

Establishing nuclear facility drill programs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Support research for development of improved geothermal drill bits. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full-scale geothermal wellbore simulator and geothermal seal testing machine were constructed. The major emphasis in the Phase II program, in addition to constructing the above research simulators, includes: simulated tests on full-scale components, i.e., full-scale bits; screening tests on elastomeric seals under geothermal conditions; and initial considerations of research needs for development of sealed high-temperature bits. A detailed discussion of the work is presented. (MHR)

hendrickson, R.R.; Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Winzenried, R.W.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Foam drilling simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the use of compressible drilling fluids is experiencing growth, the flow behavior and stability properties of drilling foams are more complicated than those of conventional fluids. In contrast with conventional mud, the physical properties of foam change along the wellbore. Foam physical and thermal properties are strongly affected by pressure and temperature. Many problems associated with field applications still exist, and a precise characterization of the rheological properties of these complex systems needs to be performed. The accurate determination of the foam properties in circulating wells helps to achieve better estimation of foam rheology and pressure. A computer code is developed to process the data and closely simulate the pressure during drilling a well. The model also offers a detailed discussion of many aspects of foam drilling operations and enables the user to generate many comparative graphs and tables. The effects of some important parameters such as: back-pressure, rate of penetration, cuttings concentration, cuttings size, and formation water influx on pressure, injection rate, and velocity are presented in tabular and graphical form. A discretized heat transfer model is formulated with an energy balance on a control volume in the flowing fluid. The finite difference model (FDM) is used to write the governing heat transfer equations in discretized form. A detailed discussion on the determination of heat transfer coefficients and the solution approach is presented. Additional research is required to analyze the foam heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity.

Paknejad, Amir Saman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation of liquid lift approach to dual gradient drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past, the oil and gas industry has typically used the single gradient system to drill wells offshore. With this system the bottom hole pressure was controlled by a mud column extending from the drilling rig to the bottom of the wellbore. This mud column was used to achieve the required bottom hole pressure. But, as the demand for oil and gas increased, the industry started exploring for oil and gas in deep waters. Because of the narrow margin between the pore and fracture pressures it is somewhat difficult to reach total depth with the single gradient system. This led to the invention of the dual gradient system. In the dual gradient method, heavy density fluid runs from the bottom hole to the mudline and a low density fluid from the mudline to the rig floor so as to maintain the bottom hole pressure. Several methods have been developed to achieve the dual gradient drilling principle. For this research project, we paid more attention to the liquid lift, dual gradient drilling (riser dilution method). This method of achieving dual gradient drilling was somewhat different from the others, because it does not utilize elaborate equipment and no major changes are made on the existing drilling rigs. In this thesis the technical feasibility of using the liquid lift method over the other methods of achieving dual gradient drilling was determined. A computer program was developed to simulate the wellbore hydraulics under static and dynamic conditions, injection rate and base fluid density required to dilute the riser fluid and finally, u-tubing phenomena. In this thesis we also identified some problems associated with the liquid lift method and recommendations were made on how these problems can be eliminated or reduced. Emphases were placed on the effect of u-tubing, injection rate of base fluid at the bottom of the riser and well control issues facing this system.

Okafor, Ugochukwu Nnamdi

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geothermal Compax drill bit development. Semiannual technical report, July 1, 1976--December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results obtained from instrumented single-diamond compact cutter experiments, wear and failure mode analysis, and preliminary bit design concepts are described. A model was developed relating rock cutting forces to the independent diamond cutting variables, using a statistical test design and regression analysis. The model was tested with additional independent cutting data and a satisfactory fit obtained. Experiments on two rock types (with compressive strengths of 8 x 10/sup 3/ psi and 21 x 10/sup 3/ psi respectively) were completed and a third has been initiated. Preliminary analysis of single cutter experimental results indicates that optimum rake angles for cutters on an actual bit will be a function of each cutter's engagement (depth of cut). Wear test results on five types of COMPAX/sup R/ diamond compacts continuously cutting sandstone under non-impact conditions are reported. Wear rates for both types were equivalent at high cutting speeds, where thermal effects were thought to be operative. At speeds below approximately 400 sfm, the coarser sintered diamond product was superior. The wear rate of a diamond compact tested on Texas Pink granite was calculated and found to be almost two orders of magnitude greater than the wear rate of the same product as determined by CR and D. The higher wear rate is thought to be the result of cyclic impact loading and thermal effects at the cutter-rock interface. Test results are also discussed for interrupted cuts with high negative back rake angles which generated cracks in diamond compacts. Preliminary bit design concepts were developed, including various options dependent upon compact attachment techniques, bit body materials, and available technology for actual construction. Diamond compact attachment is discussed in the Appendix of this report.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Flom, D.G.

1976-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production...

192

High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Underbalanced drilling in remedial operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators are finding additional applications for underbalanced drilling (UBD) technology that deliver benefits besides faster, more trouble-free drilling and improved well productivity. Underbalanced workovers, completions and re-drills are being performed with impressive results. This article will describe some of the jobs and applications, and detail the special surface equipment being used to make this a success. This is the fifth in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development in this field. The paper discusses deep gas wells in the Texas Panhandle, gas and condensate wells near Mobile, Alabama, and the Austin Chalk wells in Texas and Louisiana.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

Judzis, Arnis (Salt Lake City, UT); Black, Alan D. (Coral Springs, FL); Green, Sidney J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Robertson, Homer A. (West Jordan, UT); Bland, Ronald G. (Houston, TX); Curry, David Alexander (The Woodlands, TX); Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W. (Cypress, TX)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Drainhole drilling projects under way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that many operators are taking advantage of continued developments in drainhole drilling technology to increase productivity in certain fields. Previously untapped prospects are under renewed scrutiny to determine if drainhole and horizontal drilling can make them more attractive. Producing properties are being reevaluated as well. Drainhole drilling typically involves reentering an existing well and cutting through the casing to drill a relatively short length of horizontal wellbore. Although separating drainhole and horizonal or extended-reach drilling is somewhat of a gray area, one difference is that a drainhole well turns to the horizontal much quicker. The radius of turn to 90/sup 0/ can be as little as 30 to 50 ft. Additionally, the length of horizontal kick in a drainhole well is typically in the 300- to 500-ft range compared to 1000 ft or more in extended-reach drilling. A final separating characteristic is that drainhole drilling can be associated with several horizontal lengths of wellbore coming off a single vertical hole.

Burton, B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Drilling Through Gas Hydrates Formations: Managing Wellbore Stability Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As hydrocarbon exploration and development moves into deeper water and onshore arctic environments, it becomes increasingly important to quantify the drilling hazards posed by gas hydrates. To address these concerns, a 1D semi-analytical model for heat and fluid transport in the reservoir was coupled with a numerical model for temperature distribution along the wellbore. This combination allowed the estimation of the dimensions of the hydratebearing layer where the initial pressure and temperature can dynamically change while drilling. These dimensions were then used to build a numerical reservoir model for the simulation of the dissociation of gas hydrate in the layer. The bottomhole pressure (BHP) and formation properties used in this workflow were based on a real field case. The results provide an understanding of the effects of drilling through hydratebearing sediments and of the impact of drilling fluid temperature and BHP on changes in temperature and pore pressure within the surrounding sediments. It was found that the amount of gas hydrate that can dissociate will depend significantly on both initial formation characteristics and bottomhole conditions, namely mud temperature and pressure. The procedure outlined suggested in this work can provide quantitative results of the impact of hydrate dissociation on wellbore stability, which can help better design drilling muds for ultra deep water operations.

Khabibullin, Tagir R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

European Geothermal Drilling Experience-Problem Areas and Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal drilling has long been restricted in Western Europe to the sole dry steam field of Larderello in Italy. In the last few years, a wider experience is building up as a consequence of intensified exploration and development programs carried out for evaluation and production of both low- and high-enthalpy geothermal resources. A sample of some 40 boreholes indicates the problem areas which are given.

Baron, G.; Ungemach, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Acoustical properties of drill strings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Slope exploration slow but hopes remain high  

SciTech Connect

Alaska North Slope exploratory drilling has been sparse this winter. Attention focused on a pair of ARCO alaska Inc. wildcats in the West Colville high sector west of Kuparuk River oil field and two BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. wildcats in the Badami area at Mikkelson Bay. In both prospects, the drilling effort was to prove up more production that could support commercial development of the respective areas. Though there has been relatively little exploratory drilling this winter, both of the slope`s major producers have indicated they are far from finished with exploration in Alaska. The paper discusses the debate over the use of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, leasing and licensing, the federal leasing outlook, and Russian-US leasing.

NONE

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Initial Report on the Development of a Monte Carlo-Markov Chain Joint Inversion Approach for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and subsequent characterization of potential resources typically employ a variety of geophysical, geologic and geochemical techniques. However, since the data collected by each technique provide information directly on only one or a very limited set of the many physical parameters that characterize a geothermal system, no single method can be used to describe the system in its entirety. Presently, the usual approach to analyzing disparate data streams for geothermal applications is to invert (or forward model) each data set separately and then combine or compare the resulting models, for the most part in a more or less ad hoc manner. However, while each inversion may yield a model that fits the individual data set, the models are usually inconsistent with each other to some degree. This reflects uncertainties arising from the inevitable fact that geophysical and other exploration data in general are to some extent noisy, incomplete, and of limited sensitivity and resolution, and so yield non-unique results. The purpose of the project described here is to integrate the different model constraints provided by disparate geophysical, geological and geochemical data in a rigorous and consistent manner by formal joint inversion. The objective is to improve the fidelity of exploration results and reservoir characterization, thus addressing the goal of the DOE Geothermal Program to improve success in exploration for economically viable resources by better defining drilling targets, reducing risk, and improving exploration/drilling success rates.

Foxall, W; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Dyer, K; Sun, Y

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

SciTech Connect

During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program and its impact on geothermal exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study showed that the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program has had only a negligible effect on geothermal development and the response to the program was far less than expected. The streamlining of environmental regulations and leasing policies, and the granting of intangible drilling cost write-offs and depletion allowances to operators would have had a greater impact on geothermal energy development. The loan guaranty program did not promote the undertaking of any new projects that would not have been undertaken without it. The program only accelerated the pace for some development which might have commenced in the future. Included in the study are recommendations for improving the operation of the program thereby increasing its attractiveness to potential applicants.

Nasr, L.H.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal drilling technology update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a drill string enclosure which consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of a mechanical counter pressure Bio-Suit System for planetary exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is critical for human spaceflight and particularly for human planetary exploration. The MIT Man Vehicle Laboratory is developing a Bio-Suit EVA System, based on mechanical counterpressure ...

Sim, Zhe Liang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Application and Prospect of Distributed Temperature Sensor in Oil-Gas Exploration Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining temperature information is of great significance to distinguish borehole conditions, monitor oil-field performance, and optimize working system after hydrocarbon exploration and production started. Distributed temperature sensor is developed ... Keywords: distributed, temperature, sensor, application

Yang Chuan; Chen Ping; Ma Tianshou; Han Xiong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established an Extreme Drilling Lab to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 feet. This paper details the challenges of ultra-deep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETLs Research and Development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Their physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480 F around a single drill cutter. This simulator will not yet be operational by the planned conference dates; therefore, the results will be limited to identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETLs test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Labs studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL's research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL's test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory's studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T.H.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Alpine Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drilling Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alpine Geothermal Drilling Name Alpine Geothermal Drilling Address PO Box 141 Place Kittredge, Colorado Zip 80457 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal drilling solutions, subsidiary of Rocky Mountain GeoExploration Inc Website http://www.alpinegeothermal.co Coordinates 39.64888°, -105.2984842° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.64888,"lon":-105.2984842,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Navigation drilling technology progresses  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that navigation drilling - an approach that combines advanced drill bit, downhole motor, measurement-while-drilling, and well planning technology into an integrated, steerable drilling system - has reduced drilling time for operating companies worldwide. A major operating advantage of navigation drilling is the ability to drill both straight and directional intervals with a single assembly. In conventional directional drilling, a bent sub and downhole motor (or a bent housing motor) are used to initiate kick-offs and make course corrections. The bent sub is made-up above the motor, tilting the motor's axis 1 to 3 degrees compared to the axis of the drill string. The assembly toolface can be aligned in the desired direction with a single-shot, a steering tool or an MWD system.

Bayne, R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

Goranson, Colin

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Underbalanced drilling guidelines improve safety, efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In underbalanced drilling, the primary means of well control, the hydrostatic head of the drilling fluid, is lost either unavoidably because of hole problems (such as abnormally high pressure or lost circulation) or intentionally because of economics or to prevent formation damage. Because of complications with underbalanced drilling, however, several rigs have been destroyed by fire. Operational guidelines are being developed in close cooperation with industry. The final guidelines will be consistent with the existing standards of well control practices in Alberta, yet applicable for underbalanced drilling operations world-wide. Until formal guidelines are completed in Alberta, operators interested in underbalanced drilling should work closely with the Energy Resources Conservation Board in preparing site-specific programs. Although underbalanced drilling is often associated with horizontal wells, the majority of underbalanced drilling operations in Alberta are conducted on vertical wells. The paper describes underbalanced drilling, blowout prevention, surface BOP equipment (stripper, annular pack off, rotating head, rotating BOP, coiled tubing), subsurface BOP, drilling fluids, nitrified drilling fluids, surface equipment, well-site supervision, well control equipment, and the surface handling of fluids.

Eresman, D. (Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of exploration techniques applied to geothermal resource investigations in northern Nevada were evaluated and rated by seven investigators involved in the work. A quantitative rating scheme was used to obtain estimates of technique effectiveness. From survey cost information we also obtained and compared cost-effectiveness estimates for the various techniques. Effectiveness estimates were used to develop an exploration strategy for the area. However, because no deep confirmatory drilling has been done yet, the technique evaluations and exploration

216

Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

Fitch, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Strong growth projected for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of underbalanced drilling technology should grow steadily during the next decade. The projected growth is primarily driven by increased concern about formation damage, the potential for higher penetration rates, and the ability to reduce lost circulation in depleted reservoirs. The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center manages a portfolio of drilling-related research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) projects designed to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. The Department of Energy sponsored Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) to develop a user-friendly foam drilling model that can accurately predict pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocities, foam quality, and other foam drilling variables. A second objective of the project was to develop a light-weight drilling fluid that would allow underbalanced drilling in low-pressure reservoirs without the limitations commonly associated with existing light-weight fluids. Maurer performed a study to gauge the potential for light-weight drilling fluids and the extent of underbalanced drilling activity in the US. Data from many industry sources, including recent publications on the potential for air drilling, were evaluated and incorporated into this study. This paper discusses the findings from this survey.

Duda, J.R. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Medley, G.H. Jr.; Deskins, W.G. [Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General...

219

Mechanistic Modeling of an Underbalanced Drilling Operation Utilizing Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mechanistic modeling of an underbalanced drilling operation using carbon dioxide has been developed in this research. The use of carbon dioxide in an underbalanced drilling (more)

ALAdwani, Faisal Abdullah

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies to obtain thermal energy (and other benefits) from a large body of water #12;Microgrid Customer ENERGY : Underground Technologies #12;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Drilling Fluid Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart...Table 8 Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart Corrosion cause Primary source Identification Major corrosion forms Remedies Oxygen Atmosphere, mud conditioning, equipment, oxidizing

222

Horizontal well construction/completion process in a Gulf of Mexico unconsolidated sand: development of baseline correlations for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines, in detail, the procedures and practices undertaken in the drilling and completion phases of a Gulf of Mexico horizontal well in an unconsolidated sand. In particular, this thesis presents a detailed case history analysis of well planning, completion and cleanup operations. Our objectives are to present a complete examination of the openhole horizontal well construction/completion process using a new drill-in fluid (DIF). Further, we will establish data critical to development of new cleanup correlation techniques (the continuing goal of the CEA-73 industry consortium). Project results are intended to advance the technology progression of cleanup in horizontal welts by using a "Best Completion Practices'' well to establish a baseline analysis for development of rigsite DIF cleanup correlations. Presented in this thesis are: * Completion specifics of subject well * Audit of horizontal well design/well construction process * Documentation (on-location) of lignite practices * Laboratory analyses of DO cleanup * Well performance analysis Well audit results show that prudent DIF selection requires a thorough understanding of formation and reservoir specifics, along with completion and cleanup operations. Adequate pre-planning by lignite personnel for handling, weather problems, storage/mixing requirements and fluid property maintenance are very important for successful operations using DIF. Proper maintenance of solids control systems is essential for quality control of DIF properties. Detailed well planning by the operator (Vastar Resources), coupled with a conscientious mud service company (TBC-Brinadd, Houston), led to smooth execution of well completion/cleanup operations.aboratory analyses of field DIF samples taken during drilling show that entrained drill solids in DIF can greatly impact mudcaps removal during cleanup. However, well performance was roughly three times original expectations, achieving a stabilized gas flow rate of approximately 34 MMCF/D. Horizontal well decline type curve techniques and a proprietary analysis method developed by Conoco were used to estimate formation properties, using only wellhead production rates and pressures. Using these results, we estimated DIF cupcake removal for various reservoir permeability scenarios. Results suggest that a high percentage of DIF filtercake removal was achieved only if reservoir permeability was less than the permeability range (100-500 md) initially estimated by the operator.

Lacewell, Jason Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydromechanical drilling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydromechanical drilling tool which combines a high pressure water jet drill with a conventional roller cone type of drilling bit. The high pressure jet serves as a tap drill for cutting a relatively small diameter hole in advance of the conventional bit. Auxiliary laterally projecting jets also serve to partially cut rock and to remove debris from in front of the bit teeth thereby reducing significantly the thrust loading for driving the bit.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies Authors David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith and Maria C. Richards Conference Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; Stanford University, Stanford, California; 39083 Published Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering;, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies Citation David D. Blackwell,Richard P. Smith,Maria C. Richards. 2007. Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies. In:

225

Scientific drilling technologies for hostile environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews the current United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program for Thermal Regimes and the related technologies being developed for geothermal drilling. Plans for penetrating into a molten magma body at temperatures from 800 to 1000{degree}C are also reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Challenges of deep drilling  

SciTech Connect

Deep drilling poses major problems when high temperatures, high pressures, and acid gases are encountered. A combination of these items usually requires extensive planning, exotic materials, long drilling times, and heavy expenditures. Only 2 wells have been drilled below 30,000 ft in the US, the deeper a 31,441-ft hole in 1974. The deepest well in the world is reported to be in the Soviet Union, recently drilled below 34,895 ft, with a target depth of 15,000 m (49,212 ft). A review of current deep drilling technology and its capabilities is given.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

RECIPIENT:Potter Drilling Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potter Drilling Inc Potter Drilling Inc u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERG¥ EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DEIERl\IINATION PROJECr TITLE: Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Page 1 0[2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announ<:ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number OE·PS36-09G099016 OE· EE0002746 ~FO . 10 - [r,,~ G02746 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA ComplianC:f Offkrr (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

228

Development of a New Stratigraphic Trap Exploration Using Elastic-Wave Seismic Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vecta acquired 9 square miles of 9-C seismic data in Mountrail County, North Dakota with the Mission Canyon shoreline as a primary target. Vecta contracted the Institute Francais du Petrole in order to co-develop a more rigorous multicomponent seismic interpretation product. The final interpretation was very unique in that it utilized not only the 9-C seismic data but also the new jointly developed software. A Mission Canyon anomaly was developed in 2006; however, it was of insufficient size to be a commercial target at the time. Therefore, Vecta analyzed the shear data for anisotropy within the Bakken formation and successfully reentered an abandoned producer within the project area and drilled a horizontal leg through the anomalous zones of the middle member of the Bakken formation. The well was open hole completed, swab tested, sand fraced, and swab tested some more. No shows of oil were ever seen from the Bakken formation, but the well yielded considerable amounts of formation water. The well has been abandoned as non-commercial. From the swab tests, one may conclude considerable permeability exists in the formation, thus confirming the utility of the shear wave to detect fractures within the targeted formation.

Bryan DeVault

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analyzing the dynamic behavior of downhole equipment during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced geothermal drilling systems will require a bottom hole assembly (BHA) which utilizes sophisticated electronic and mechanical equipment to accomplish faster, more trouble free, smarter drilling. The bit-drill string/formation interaction during drilling imposes complex, intermittent dynamic loading on the downhole equipment. A finite element computer code, GEODYN, is being developed to allow analysis of the structural response of the downhole equipment during drilling and to simulate the drilling phenomena (i.e. penetration, direction, etc.). Phase 1 GEODYN, completed early in 1984, provides the capability to model the dynamic response of a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit interacting with a non-homogeneous formation. Succeeding development phases will allow inclusion of stabilizers and, eventually, the entire drill string in addition to facilitating drill ahead simulation.

Baird, J.A.; Caskey, B.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

232

Energy (Oil and Gas) Exploration (and Development) on the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy (Oil and Gas) Exploration (and Development) on the U.S. Arctic Continental Shelf Jeff Walker of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Exploratory Activities Arctic nations will pursue oil and gas. Offshore;#12;Beaufort Sea Oil and Gas Lease Status #12;Chukchi Sea Oil and Gas Leasing Status #12;Alaska OCS Lease Sales

Kuligowski, Bob

233

Progress Toward an Advanced Geothermal Deep-Drilling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previously developed concept for an advanced geothermal drilling system (AGDS) has been extended toward a feasibility design stage. Hardware projects for two percussion, air and hydraulic, hammer drills are underway. Two drill string options and an unique nitrogen supply system are described.

Rowley, J.; Saito, S.; Long, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

An Intelligent System for Petroleum Well Drilling Cutting Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cutting analysis is a important and crucial task task to detect and prevent problems during the petroleum well drilling process. Several studies have been developed for drilling inspection, but none of them takes care about analysing the generated cutting ... Keywords: Cutting analysis, petroleum well drilling monitoring, optimum-path forest

Aparecido N. Marana; Giovani Chiachia; Ivan R. Guilherme; Joo P. Papa

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Suggested drilling research tasks for the Federal Government  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary discussion of drilling, drilling research and the role of the government in drilling research is presented. Specific research and development areas recommended for federal consideration are listed. The technical nature of the identified tasks is emphasized. The Appendices present the factual basis for the discussion and recommendations. Numerous references are noted in the Appendices.

Carson, C.C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Exploration for deep coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

NONE

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

GRR/Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process GRR/Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-WA-a - State Exploration Process 4-WA-a State Exploration Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Geothermal Act 78.60 RCW Geothermal Rules 332-17 WAC Triggers None specified Geothermal exploration in Washington requires a Geothermal Exploration Permit from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR) for invasive exploration or drilling. Operations that require an exploration or drilling permit will also require the developer to initiate the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). In Washington geothermal resources are regulated under Chapter 78.60 RCW

238

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

EM Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report discusses the successful development and testing of a deep operational electromagnetic (EM) telemetry system, produced under a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. This new electromagnetic telemetry system provides a wireless communication link between sensors deployed deep within oil and gas wells and data acquisition equipment located on the earth's surface. EM based wireless telemetry is a highly appropriate technology for oil and gas exploration in that it avoids the need for thousands of feet of wired connections. In order to achieve the project performance objectives, significant improvements over existing EM telemetry systems were made. These improvements included the development of new technologies that have improved the reliability of the communications link while extending operational depth. A key element of the new design is the incorporation of a data-fusion methodology which enhances the communication receiver's ability to extract very weak signals from large amounts of ambient environmental noise. This innovative data-fusion receiver based system adapts advanced technologies, not normally associated with low-frequency communications, and makes them work within the harsh drilling environments associated with the energy exploration market. Every element of a traditional EM telemetry system design, from power efficiency to reliability, has been addressed. The data fusion based EM telemetry system developed during this project is anticipated to provide an EM tool capability that will impact both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration operations, for conventional and underbalanced drilling applications.

Jeffrey M. Gabelmann

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Remote drill bit loader  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. In typical remote drilling operations, whether in hot cells or water pits, drill bits have been held using a collet or end mill type holder with set screws. In either case, to load or change a drill bit required the use master-slave manipulators to position the bits and tighten the collet or set screws. This requirement eliminated many otherwise useful work areas because they were not equipped with slaves, particularly in water pits.

Dokos, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Drilling in the Rockies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rugged drilling conditions and high drilling costs, rig employment and drilling operations in the Rocky Mountain region of the Overthrust Belt have increased significantly since 1979. Rate of rig employment, well depths, and number of operating companies and contractors in the area are reported. By October 1980, more than 500 active rigs were working in the region, 30% more than were working during the entirety of 1979. (3 photos)

Peacock, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

High Temperature 300C Directional Drilling System Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Directional Drilling Systems Project Description The development plan...

243

Drill Press Speed Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 116" - 316" 14" - 38" 716"- 58" 11...

244

Drilling motor deviation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension for a down hole drilling motor is described, which adapts the motor for selective configuration for straight hole drilling or directional drilling, selectively. It consists of: an elongated generally tubular body, adapted at a first end to rigidly attach to the lower end of a down hole drilling motor housing, the body having an opening extending along the general centerline of the body; fluid channel means situated in the opening to conduct drilling fluid from the motor fluid output means to a downwardly continuing drill string element; output shaft means situated in the body and extending from a second end of the body, the output shaft adapted at the extended extreme for attachment to a downwardly continuing drill string element; selector valve means situated in the body, operatively associated with drilling fluid channels in the body, responsive to drilling fluid flow to produce a first output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a first characteristic and to produce a second output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a second characteristic; and driveshaft connector means in the opening, operatively associated with the output shaft of the motor and the output shaft means to connect the two for sympathetic rotation.

Falgout, T.E.; Schoeffler, W.N.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, twenty-eighth of an annual series, describes mineral, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada in 2006: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of orebodies, new mines opened, and expansion and other activities of existing mines. Statistics of known gold and silver deposits, and directories of mines

Mark Alden; Stavros Anthony; Cedric Crear; Thalia M. Dondero; Dorothy Sewell Gallagher; Jason Geddes; Ron Knecht; James D. Leavitt; Howard Rosenberg; Jack L. Schofield; Steve Sisolak; James E. Rogers; Milton D. Glick; Jeffrey Thompson; Interim Dean; James V. Taranik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hydraulic Pulse Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE 0 4/13/2004 Final Report Author: J. Kolle Hunter/Theimer 4/13/2004 Document No.: TR- 053 HydroPulse(tm) Drilling Final Report Prepared by J.J. Kolle April 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Development Agreement No. DE-FC26-FT34367 Tempress Technologies, Inc. 18858 - 72 ND Ave S. Kent, WA 98032 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

247

Exploration and exploitation alliances in biotechnology: A system of new product development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We link the explorationexploitation framework of organizational learning to a technology ventures strategic alliances and argue that the causal relationship between the ventures alliances and its new product development depends on the type of the alliance. In particular, we propose a product development path beginning with exploration alliances predicting products in development, which in turn predict exploitation alliances, and that concludes with exploitation alliances leading to products on the market. Moreover, we argue that this integrated product development path is moderated negatively by firm size. As a technology venture grows, it tends to withdraw from this product development path to discover, develop, and commercialize promising projects through vertical integration. We test our model on a sample of 325 biotechnology firms that entered 2565 alliances over a 25-year period. We find broad support for the hypothesized product development system and the moderating effect of firm size. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Strategic alliances are a ubiquitous phenomenon, especially in high-technology industries (Hagedoorn, 1993). Parallel to the rise in interfirm cooperation, research on strategic alliances has burgeoned, with one strand focusing on the performance impact of alliances on the focal firm (Gulati, 1998). In this line of inquiry, several scholars have studied the relationship between a firms strategic alliances and its innovative performance or new product development (Shan, Walker, and

Frank T. Rothaermel; David L. Deeds

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Horizontal flow drilling requires focus on well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells drilled underbalanced or while flowing must have surface equipment and a blow-out preventer stack specially designed for circulating operations. Functional well control methods for drilling horizontal wells have been developed in specific regions worldwide. Special safety equipment and procedures, however, are still required in most horizontal development applications. The challenge for horizontal drilling development and underbalanced drilling is to overcome the obstacles of government regulation, reduce pollution dangers, and improve personnel and equipment safety. Well control techniques tailored to the demands of each field can help overcome these challenges. Several well control elements must be addressed carefully on each horizontal well: drilling fluid requirements, well control procedures and equipment, and surface equipment and special considerations for handling hydrocarbons produced while drilling. The paper discusses each of these elements for underbalanced horizontal drilling.

Tangedahl, M.J. (RBOP Oil Tools International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than that of slim holes. As a result, the research team decided to complete the project, document the tested designs and seek further support for the concept outside of the DOE.

Kent Perry

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Exploration and development of natural gas, Pattani basin, Gulf of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The geology of the Gulf of Thailand features a series of north-south-trending ridges and linear, fault-bounded basins with a sedimentary section predominantly of upper Tertiary sediments. The Pattani basin, located near the geographic center of the Gulf of Thailand, contains up to 8 km of almost entirely nonmarine fluvial-deltaic sediments. The gas/condensate fields described in this paper are on the west flank of the Pattani basin. Gas reservoirs are thin, randomly distributed sandstone beds occurring between 1200 and 3000 m below sea level. At greater depths, very high temperatures cause a degradation of reservoir properties. The gas fields occur on intensely faulted structures. The high fault density superimposed on the stratigraphic model limits the size of individual gas accumulations. Extensive three-dimensional seismic surveys were essential for delineating and developing these complex fields. An interactive computer system was used to interpret the 23,000 line-km of three-dimensional data. A new era in Thailand began when gas production commenced from Erawan field in August 1981. Baanpot, Satun, and Platong fields came on production between October 1983 and March 1985. In these four fields, 238 development wells have been drilled from 22 platforms. The wells can presently produce 475 MMCFGD, considerably in excess of Thailand's current requirements. The condensate ratios average 40 bbl/mmcf of gas. The commercial limits of each field have yet to be established. The advent of gas production has created a new industry in Thailand, with significant social and economic benefits to the country.

Lian, H.M.; Bradley, K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Investigate Smart Drilling Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 20, 2004 February 20, 2004 New Projects to Investigate "Smart Drilling" Options Promise Lower Cost, More Reliable Gas Drilling Two additional projects have been selected under a Department of Energy solicitation designed to advance performance when drilling for natural gas. The projects are a key component of the Department's gas exploration and production research program, and support the President's National Energy Policy, which calls for boosting domestic production of natural gas to ensure an adequate future supply at reasonable prices. With shallow and conventional natural gas resources in the United States being depleted, drillers must reach for gas miles below the earth's surface, where temperatures run up to 450 EF and pressures are hundreds of times greater than atmospheric pressure. "Smart drilling" options can increase productivity, improve drilling safety, and lower costs when drilling for these hard-to-reach deep gas supplies.

252

Advanced drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.

Pierce, K.G.; Finger, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Computers aid drilling planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that computers are rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the drilling engineer both in town and at the wellsite. Two factors have contributed to the sudden increase in their use. The first is the need to cut drilling costs. Engineers have been forced to take a more critical look at plans and past experience. The second is the falling price (and increased portability) of hardware and software. Several major operators have demonstrated that careful planning of drilling operations based on local knowledge and data from offset wells can reduce the drilling learning curve substantially. Computers make it possible to retrieve and process offset well data rapidly and efficiently. They also offer powerful mathematical models which describe complicated aspects of drilling.

Burgess, T.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep...

256

High pressure drilling system triples ROPS, stymies bit wear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent West Texas field tests of an experiental high-pressure drilling system have nearly tripled typical penetration rates in hard dolomite while putting virtually no visible wear on the bits, even those designed for much softer formations. With this drilling system, developed by FlowDril Corp. of Kent, Wash., and their joint-venture partner Grace Drilling Co., clarified drilling fluids (minimum solids) are pressurized to nearly 30,000 psi and directed to the bottom of the hole through a special nozzle attached to the drill bit. The action of this high pressure stream augments the bit's job, resulting in higher ROPs and decreased bit wear.

Killalea, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview GRR/Section 5 - Drilling Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5 - Drilling Overview 05DrillingPermittingOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 30 USC § 1001 Triggers None specified On top of acquiring the correct drilling permits a developer needs to consider issues such as land and mineral ownership and right of way access. 05DrillingPermittingOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 5.1 - Review Potential Construction Permits In addition to drilling permits, the developer may require other

258

Drill drive mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

Dressel, Michael O. (Englewood, CO)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

260

Drilling Waste Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Drilling Waste Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information on practices for managing drilling muds and cuttings, including...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Noble Drilling DRILLING, COMPLETION AND STIMULATION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friendly Drilling Systems" Environmental issues are a significant part of every energy industry endeavor challenges facing the energy industry but also the considerable resources of the University and industry Petroleum and other industry sponsors from the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI) to identify

262

State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect

The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Drilling Practices That Minimize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Practices Drilling Practices Fact Sheet - Drilling Practices That Minimize Generation of Drilling Wastes How Are Wells Typically Drilled? The conventional process of drilling oil and gas wells uses a rotary drill bit that is lubricated by drilling fluids or muds. As the drill bit grinds downward through the rock layers, it generates large amounts of ground-up rock known as drill cuttings. This section of the Drilling Waste Management Information System website discusses several alternative drilling practices that result in a lower volume of waste being generated. Oil and gas wells are constructed with multiple layers of pipe known as casing. Traditional wells are not drilled from top to bottom at the same diameter but rather in a series of progressively smaller-diameter intervals. The top interval is drilled starting at the surface and has the largest diameter hole. Drill bits are available in many sizes to drill different diameter holes. The hole diameter can be 20" or larger for the uppermost sections of the well, followed by different combinations of progressively smaller diameters. Some of the common hole diameters are: 17.5", 14.75", 12.25", 8.5", 7.875", and 6.5".

264

Report on phase I on the development of improved seals and bearings for downhole drilling motors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New bearing and seal designs are outlined, as well as the progress made on developing test facilities for full-size bearing and seal assemblies. (MHR)

Black, A.D.; Green, S.J.; Matson, L.W.; Maurer, W.C.; Nielsen, R.R.; Nixon, J.D.; Wilson, J.G.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Laser Drilling of a Superalloy Coated with Ceramic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser drilling has been developed in advanced aircraft industry in particular to achieve the intricate hole network of the combustion chamber because of several .

266

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen and Gene Polik Organization Sandia National Laboratories Published Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Report Number SAND99-1976 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Citation

267

Subsurface drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

269

Workshop on magma/hydrothermal drilling and instrumentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussions, conclusions, and recommendations of the Magma/Hydrothermal Drilling and Instrumentation Workshop, Albuquerque, NM, May 31--June 2, 1978 are summarized. Three working groups were organized as follows: Drilling Location and Environment, Drilling and Completion Technology, and Logging and Instrumentation Technology. The first group discussed potential drilling sites and the environment that could be expected in drilling to magma depth at each site. Sites suggested for early detailed evaluation as candidate drilling sites were The Geysers-Clear Lake, CA, Kilauea, HI, Long Valley-Mono Craters, CA, and Yellowstone, WY. Magma at these sites is expected to range from 3 to 10 km deep with temperatures of 800 to 1100{sup 0}C. Detailed discussions of the characteristics of each site are given. In addition, a list of geophysical measurements desired for the hole is presented. The Drilling and Completion Group discussed limitations on current rotary drilling technology as a function of depth and temperature. The group concluded that present drilling systems can be routinely used to temperatures of 200{sup 0}C and depths to 10 km; drilling to 350{sup 0}C can be accomplished with modifications of present techniques, drilling at temperatures from 350{sup 0}C to 1100{sup 0}C will require the development of new drilling techniques. A summary of the limiting factors in drilling systems is presented, and recommendations for a program directed at correcting these limitations is described. The third group discussed requirements for instrumentation and established priorities for the development of the required instruments. Of highest priority for development were high resolution temperature tools, sampling techniques (core, formation fluids), chemical probes, and communications techniques. A description of instrumentation requirements for the postulated hole is given, and the tasks necessary to develop the required devices are delineated.

Varnado, S.G.; Colp, J.L. (eds.)

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Review of the Drilling R and D Program at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling projects conducted for the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) and the Office of Energy Research (OER), both of the Department of Energy (DOE), are described. The DGE Well Technology Program includes drilling, well completion, and high temperature logging instrumentation R and D for geothermal applications. Accomplishments to date include successful laboratory testing of the continuous chain drill and development of temperature, pressure, and flow sondes capable of operation at 275/sup 0/C. Efforts are also under way to develop high-temperature, high-performance bits, high-temperature drilling fluids, and high-temperature downhole motors. Bearings, seals, and lubricants for use in high-temperature bits and motors are also being developed and tested. Recent results are presented. An OER drilling experiment into a lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, is being conducted. Materials and techniques for drilling into an active magma/hydrothermal system are in a preliminary phase of study.

Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal development in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kampaeng and Fang geothermal areas are considered areas of interest for exploitation of geothermal energy. The technologies of exploration and development have been studied by Thai scientists and engineers during the past four years. The first geothermal deep exploration well was drilled, in cooperation with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in the San Kampaeng geothermal area. In 1985, supplementary work is planned to define the deep structural setting in greater detail before starting to drill the next deep exploration well. In Fang geothermal area some shallow exploitation wells have been drilled to obtain fluid to feed a demonstration binary system of 120 kWe, with the technical cooperation of BRGM and GEOWATT, France.

Praserdvigai, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

273

A Proposal for an Advanced Drilling System with Real-Time Diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) and describe its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. We outline a Program Plan for DOE, university, and industry to cooperate in the development of DWD technology.

Finger, J.T.; Mansure, A.J.; Prairie, M.R.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

From individual development accounts to community asset building : an exploration in bridging people-and place-based strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) are matched saving accounts for low-income individuals to save for the purchase of an asset. As one of many national initiatives that encourage homeownership, this thesis explores how ...

Rice, Solana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Proper planning improves flow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced operations reduce formation damage, especially in horizontal wells where zones are exposed to mud for longer time periods. Benefits, risks, well control concerns, equipment and issues associated with these operations are addressed in this paper. Flow drilling raises many concerns, but little has been published on horizontal well control and flow drilling operations. This article covers planning considerations for flow drilling, but does not address horizontal ''overbalanced'' drilling because considerations and equipment are the same as in vertical overbalanced drilling and many references address that subject. The difference in well control between vertical and horizontal overbalanced drilling is fluid influx behavior and how that behavior affects kill operations.

Collins, G.J. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and Controversies Kyle J Ferrar;UNITED STATES SHALE BASINS Modern Shale Gas Development in the U.S.: A Primer, (2009) U.S. Dept of Energy Development http://www.secinfo.com/DB/SEC/2007 #12;Where to Drill? Harper, John A. (2008). The Marcellus Shale

Sibille, Etienne

279

File:Geothermal Exploration and Development on National Forests.pdf | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Development on National Forests.pdf and Development on National Forests.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Geothermal Exploration and Development on National Forests.pdf Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 449 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,120 × 1,495 pixels, file size: 885 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 15 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:47, 5 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:47, 5 November 2012 1,120 × 1,495, 15 pages (885 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

280

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mechanical drill string jar  

SciTech Connect

An improved mechanical drill string jar is described that allows uninhibited telescoping movement to the normal drilling condition. The drill string jar consists of: (a) an elongated, generally cylindrical, body usable as a drill string element; (b) axial motion resistance means situated in the annular opening; (c) bias means operatively associated with at least one element of the splined pair to rotate the pair out of alignment when the splined pair is rotationally disengaged; (d) opposed cooperating surfaces on at least two of the spline teeth situated such that forced axial relative motion of the splined pair will produce opposed radial forces on the teeth; (e) means intrinsic to at least one element of the splined pair to permit resisted radial displacement of the spline teeth when forced axial relative motion occurs, to permit one element to move axially through the other; (f) cam surfaces on at least one of the teeth situated to force rotational alignment of the splined pair when telescoping movement is from a jarring condition toward the normal drilling condition; (g) relative rotation resistance means situated in the annular opening, structurally engaged with the pair of telescoping members such that relative rotation therebetween will be resisted; (h) striker and anvil means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of elements, such that axial relative movement therebetween will be solidly stopped at the axial extreme condition; (i) a flow-through fluid channel means extending between the means to attach to the continuing drill string; and (j) seal means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of members, to provide fluid tightness therebetween.

Buck, D.A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

282

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

New surface equipment for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perhaps the single most exciting development in the area of new drilling technology in this decade is underbalanced drilling (UBD). This category includes both jointed pipe and coiled tubing applications. Each has advantages and disadvantages in UBD operations. Regardless of the method selected for a particular UBD application, equipment similarities exist. The surface control and production equipment must be correctly sized and designed for the overall total UBD engineering solution. This article describes the various types, applications and purposes of special surface equipment needed in underbalanced operations. This is the second in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development is this field.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.; Kinder, J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

8. annual international energy week conference and exhibition: Conference papers. Book 3: Drilling and production operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three volumes within this book are subdivided as follows: (1) Drilling Technology -- underbalanced drilling; field and laboratory testing; drilling systems and dynamics; advances in drill bits; coiled tubing and tubulars; advances in drilling fluids; novel/scientific drilling; and drillstrings; (2) Petroleum Production Technology -- environmental health and safety issues; production technology for deepwater; disposal methods for production waste; and offshore facility abandonment; and (3) Offshore Engineering and Operations -- floating production systems; strategic service alliance; offshore facility abandonment; offshore development economics; heavy construction, transportation, and installation for offshore fields; and subsea technology. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Horizontal drilling method and apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for drilling a highly deviated well into a petroleum formation the apparatus comprising a drill pipe extending from a surface location to a down-hole drilling assembly through a curved wellbore. It comprises a down-hole motor attached to a bit at a first end, the down-hole motor having a bent housing; a bent sub in the down-hole drilling assembly located above the motor; and a pony collar located between the motor and the bent sub, the pony collar having sufficient mass to substantially hold the motor against a wellbore wall during drilling operations.

Rehm, W.A.; Trunk, T.D.; Baseflug, T.D.; Cromwell, S.L.; Hickman, G.A.; Nickel, R.D.; Lyons, M.S.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of legged, wheeled, and hybrid rover mobility models to facilitate planetary surface exploration mission analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work discusses the Mars Surface Exploration (MSE) tool and its adaptation to model rovers featuring legged, wheeled, and hybrid mobility. MSE is a MATLAB based systems engineering tool that is capable of rapidly ...

McCloskey, Scott H. (Scott Haddon)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Drilling in 2000 taps technology explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While major oil and gas companies all but ended research and development programs, the burden for technological advancement fell to service companies. And service companies allotted their R and D investment to activities whose return they could fairly predict. But even as cost-cutting measured devastated engineering staffs, a profit-growth strategy was forming that understood that profit could be enhanced by not just cutting the per barrel cost to producers but by producing more barrels per investment dollar. In other words, get more oil and gas from the same well through applied drilling and production technology. In the drilling industry all things technical revolve around six areas of expertise: bits, rotation systems, tripping systems, control systems, information systems and direction drilling systems. The paper discusses these six technologies.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dynamic Decision Making for Graphical Models Applied to Oil Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a framework for sequential decision making in problems described by graphical models. The setting is given by dependent discrete random variables with associated costs or revenues. In our examples, the dependent variables are the potential outcomes (oil, gas or dry) when drilling a petroleum well. The goal is to develop an optimal selection strategy that incorporates a chosen utility function within an approximated dynamic programming scheme. We propose and compare different approximations, from simple heuristics to more complex iterative schemes, and we discuss their computational properties. We apply our strategies to oil exploration over multiple prospects modeled by a directed acyclic graph, and to a reservoir drilling decision problem modeled by a Markov random field. The results show that the suggested strategies clearly improve the simpler intuitive constructions, and this is useful when selecting exploration policies.

Martinelli, Gabriele; Hauge, Ragnar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement and test a series of innovative geothermal exploration strategies in two phases. Phase 1 studies will comprise surface mapping, shallow seismic surveys, potential field surveys (gravity and magnetics), compilation of existing well data, and the construction of three dimension structure sections. Phase 2 will comprise two intermediate depth (1.5-1.6 km) slim-hole exploration wells with a full suite of geophysical borehole logs and a vertical seismic profile to extrapolate stratigraphy encountered in the well into the surrounding terrain. Both of the exploration wells will be fully cored to preserve a complete record of the volcanic stratigraphy that can be used in complementary science projects. This project will function in tandem with Project Hotspot, a continental scientific drilling project that focuses on the origin and evolution of the Yellowstone hotspot.

295

DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology June 13, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology Directional drilling - the drilling of non-vertical wells that helped make the development of shale gas possible -- will continue to play a key role in energy development, and so will the technologies that make it possible. The benefits of directional drilling are tremendous. Think cleaner, cheaper electricity; local economy booms; and decreased dependence on foreign energy. The unconventional oil and gas resources that can be tapped through directional drilling benefit consumers, businesses, and even the transportation sector. So being recognized as an innovator in this area is

296

Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

Dillon, J.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings  

SciTech Connect

The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Feasibility of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide as a Drilling Fluid for Deep Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide to serve the needs of deep underbalanced drilling operations has been analyzed. A case study involving underbalanced drilling (more)

Gupta, Anamika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

Larry Stolarczyk

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pioneering work, economic factors provide insights into Russian drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Russia and America, individual ingenuity and economic forces have produced a variety of drilling technologies, resulting in the development of disparate drilling systems. Endeavors by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Sandia Laboratories, and private industry have promoted exchanges of knowledge since the 1980s, and now that the barriers to technology transfer are being lifted, engineers from both countries have the opportunity to exchange knowledge and incorporate the best of both. The Russian drilling industry, like the Russian space program, has achieved tremendous success in implementing product and process innovations including the first directional (1940s), horizontal (1950s), and multilateral (1950s) wells. In addition, Russian engineers built the first turbodrills, electrodrills, novel drills (lasers, explosives), aluminum drill pipe, downhole electric submersible pumps, and mud hammers. This first part of a two-part series describes the achievements of Russian engineers in horizontal and multilateral drilling technologies followed by a discussion of the economic differences that led Russian and American drillers to develop dissimilar drilling systems. The second part describes a variety of innovative Russian technologies and provides details on the technical advantages they offer for the drilling process.

Gaddy, D.E.

1998-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

Glowka, David A. (Austin, TX); Raymond, David W. (Edgewood, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U.S. Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) has been conducting geothermal exploration activities in the Camp Wilson area of Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twenty-nine Palms, CA, for almost two years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For several decades the GPO has worked

304

Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Abstract Exploration in a blind prospect has led to the confirmation of a geothermal resource at Blue Mt.Nevada. The latest results include drilling of three production wells into Piedmont faults. These wells produce from a 185 to 190°C dilute benign brine reservoir. Short flow tests have shown prolific flow rates and indications of reservoir continuity.Well entries have shown that system permeability is fault-dominated. This is confirmed by the results of seismic reflection imaging. Young faulting in the area includes intersecting range front faults that strike NW, NS, and NE. Exposure of

305

Investigation of the feasibility of deep microborehole drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in sensor technology, microelectronics, and telemetry technology make it feasible to produce miniature wellbore logging tools and instrumentation. Microboreholes are proposed for subterranean telemetry installations, exploration, reservoir definition, and reservoir monitoring this assumes that very small diameter bores can be produced for significantly lower cost using very small rigs. A microborehole production concept based on small diameter hydraulic or pneumatic powered mechanical drilling, assemblies deployed on coiled tubing is introduced. The concept is evaluated using, basic mechanics and hydraulics, published theories on rock drilling, and commercial simulations. Small commercial drill bits and hydraulic motors were selected for laboratory scale demonstrations. The feasibility of drilling deep, directional, one to two-inch diameter microboreholes has not been challenged by the results to date. Shallow field testing of prototype systems is needed to continue the feasibility investigation.

Dreesen, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced geothermal foam drilling systems (AFS) -- Phase 1 final report, Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced coiled-tubing foam drilling system is being developed where two concentric strings of coiled tubing are used to convey water and air to the hole bottom where they are mixed together to produce foam for underbalanced drilling. This system has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs by increasing drilling rates (due to the motor being powered by water), and reducing compressor and nitrogen costs (due to lower gas pressures and volumes).

W. C. Maurer

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Oil and gas developments in Europe in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Europe showed signs of recovering in 1987 from the downturn in oil- and gas-related activities following the 1986 oil price collapse. Statistics showed a lessening decrease, compared with 1986, in licensed acreage (down 19%), seismic exploration (down 14%), exploratory drilling (down 32%), and development drilling (down 10%). Crude oil production rose 2% and natural gas production was up 4%. Better news was a 20% increase in new-field wildcat discoveries, which numbered 85 in 1987 compared to 79 in 1986. The North Sea produced 34 discoveries, with 20 coming from the British sector. Italy reported 23 finds, an increase of 1 from 1986, despite drilling 18% fewer wells, and France bested its 1986 record with 7 discoveries from 51% fewer wells. Development drilling was emphasized over exploratory drilling in 1987 by 492 wells to 428 wells. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Yarbrough, S.C.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pad drilling and rig mobility lead to more efficient drilling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Pad drilling allows producers to target a significant area of underground resources while minimizing impact on the surface.

312

Supporting technology for enhanced recovery, Annex V: evaluate application of recently developed techniques in the areas of drilling, coring, and telemetry. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report V-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex V - Drilling, Coring, and Telemetry as supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery projects in the United States and Venezuela. Annex V consists of 18 tasks to perform these three projects. This report completes the work for Annex V. Energy research and development in the area of Enhanced Oil Recovery has as its goal the more efficient and complete production of the third crop of oil. Methods and techniques must be developed to assist in the implementation of EOR projects. Technology development that reduces costs and provides better reservoir information often has a direct impact on the economic viability of EOR projects and Annex V addresses these areas. Each of the three areas covered by Annex V are separate entities and are presented in this report as different sections. Each has its own Abstract. The drilling and coring tests were highly successful but only a limited amount of work was necessary in the Telemetry area because a field test was not feasible.

Williams, C.R.; Lichaa, P.; Van Domselaar, H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable spirally welded metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Alpine, UT); Hall, Jr., Tracy H. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Lehi, UT); Pixton, David S. (Provo, UT)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Planetary Rover Developments Supporting Mars Exploration, Sample Return and Future Human-Robotic Colonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We overview our recent research on planetary mobility. Products of this effort include the Field Integrated Design & Operations rover (FIDO), Sample Return Rover (SRR), reconfigurable rover units that function as an All Terrain Explorer (ATE), and ... Keywords: all terrain mobility, cooperating robots, mobile robots, reconfigurable robots, robot architecture, robotic colonies

Paul S. Schenker; Terry L. Huntsberger; Paolo Pirjanian; Eric T. Baumgartner; Eddie Tunstel

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Drilling, Completing, and Maintaining Geothermal Wells in Baca, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 55-MWe power plant is planned for development in the Baca location in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Union Geothermal has contracted to provide the steam for the power plant. This paper uses Baca Well No. 13 as a case history to describe the drilling methods, casing program, cementing program, and completion methods used by Union. The discussion includes aerated-water drilling and the methods of solving corrosion problems in aerated water. lost circulation control in mud drilling and its effect on the subsequent casing cementing program are discussed. The paper also includes a case history of scale removal methods used in Baca Well No. 11, including drilling the scale out with a turbo-drill and attempts at chemical inhibition.

Pye, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Drill string gas data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

Siciliano, E.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

318

Managing pressure during underbalanced drilling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? AbstractUnderbalanced drilling has received more and more attention in recent years. The reason for that may be because many oil fields, especially on the (more)

Ren, Jostein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

An innovative drilling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal project objectives were the following: To demonstrate the capability of the Ultrashort Radius Radial System to drill and complete multiple horizontal radials in a heavy oil formation which had a production history of thermal operations. To study the effects that horizontal radials have on steam placement at specific elevations and on reducing gravity override. To demonstrate that horizontal radials could be utilized for cyclic production, i.e. for purposes of oil production as well as for steam injection. Each of these objectives was successfully achieved in the project. Early production results indicate that radials positively influenced cyclic performance. This report documents those results. 15 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Nees, J.; Dickinson, E.; Dickinson, W.; Dykstra, H.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Laser-Mechanical Drilling for Geothermal Energy: Low-Contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical EGS Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Foro Energy is developing a unique capability and hardware system to transmit high power lasers over long distances via fiber optic cables. This laser power is integrated with a mechanical drilling bit to enable rapid and sustained penetration of hard rock formations too costly to drill with mechanical drilling bits alone. The laser energy that is directed at the rock basically softens the rock, allowing the mechanical bit to more easily remove it. Foro Energys laser-assisted drill bits have the potential to be up to 10 times more economical than conventional hard-rock drilling technologies, making them an effective way to access the U.S. energy resources currently locked under hard rock formations.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (27) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Acoustic Logs At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999)

323

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and side tracking applications. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report has been prepared in two parts and each part may be treated as a stand-alone document. Part 1 (High Energy Laser Drilling) includes the general description of the concept and focuses on results from experiments under the ambient lab conditions. Part 2 (High Energy Laser Perforation and Completion Techniques) discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Underbalanced drilling solves difficult drilling problems and enhances production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternate approach to drilling, completing and working over new and existing wells has dramatically improved the efficiency of these operations. This method is called underbalanced drilling (UBD). Improvements in both the equipment and technique during the past 5 years have made this process economical and necessary to solve many difficult drilling problems. Additionally, by reducing drilling or workover damage, dramatic improvements in oil and gas production rates and ultimate reserves are realized, resulting in extra profits for today`s operators. This article will detail the advantages of UBD and give specific examples of its applications, A series of related articles will follow, including: new UBD equipment, land and off-shore case histories, coiled tubing drilling, underbalanced workovers, software technology and subsea applications to examine the reality and future of this technology.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The geography of strategy : an exploration of alternative frameworks for transportation infrastructure strategy development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces the notion of a strategy development framework for transportation infrastructure systems. A strategy development framework has several dimensions: the organizations that own.infrastructure, the ...

Dunn, Travis P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alaska drilling/production  

SciTech Connect

The icy waters of the Beaufort Sea continue to hold the focus for Alaska's offshore wildcatters. A federal Outer Continental Shelf sale that drew high bids totalling more than $2 billion set the stage for this exploration of a huge structure that conceivably could yield another megagiant like Prudhoe Bay. Elsewhere in Beaufort waters, 2 groups of companies unveiled a preliminary design proposal for the first commercial development of an oil field in U.S. Arctic waters. At Prudhoe Bay, an operator announced the North Slope's first tertiary enhanced oil recovery project even as work continued for a massive waterflood of the giant field's principal producing horizon. At Kuparuk River, drillers continued to develop a reservoir that is expected to ultimately yield more than one billion barrels of oil. Alaska's present production of ca 1.7 million bpd puts the state in a solid second place in the ranks of oil-producing states, runnerup only to Texas with an output of 2.5 million bpd.

Rintoul, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microhole Wireless Steering While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A background to Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies (CT-BHA) is given, and the development of a bi-directional communications and power module (BCPM)component is described. The successful operation of this component in both the laboratory and field environment is described. The primary conclusion of this development is that the BCPM component operates as anticipated within the CT-BHA, and significantly extends the possibility of drilling with coiled tubing in the microhole environment.

John Macpherson; Thomas Gregg

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Attitudes toward offshore oil development: A summary of current evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years, offshore exploration and production have spreadthe sea [11]. As the exploration and production continued tothe initial exploration, drilling, and production occurred

Gramling, R; Freudenburg, Wm R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Maximizing Drilling Efficiency Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the United States by increasing supply, reducing cost, and increasing efficiency of exploration and production while minimizing environmental impacts. Growth in supply of...

331

Electric drill-string telemetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics ... Keywords: drill string, low frequency, simulation, transmission line, voltage

Jos M. Carcione; Flavio Poletto

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration 5: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.'s (Ormat's) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on

333

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.'s (Ormat's) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on

334

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using a section of drill-in casing connected to a free-fall reentry cone. This hole was drilled to 95

335

Design Planning in End-User Web Development: Gender, Feature Exploration and Feelings of Success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report an empirical study of nonprogrammers who built a database-centered web application using an end-user web development tool. Half of the users spent time planning their project by creating a concept map before starting the programming; across ... Keywords: End-user programming, Gender HCI, web development

Mary Beth Rosson; Hansa Sinha; Tisha Edor

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

337

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

The process of resort second home development demand quantification : exploration of methodologies and case study application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prevalent methodologies utilized by resort second home development professionals to quantify demand for future projects are identified and critiqued. The strengths of each model are synthesized in order to formulate an ...

Wholey, Christopher J. (Christoper John)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities and velocities during air drilling has been developed. The basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressures in typical air and mist drilling situations. 8 refs.

Mitchell, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-2012 Exploration Drilling Development Drilling Exploration and Development Drilling Year Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the California Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Public Opinion on Offshore Oil Development in California.and Economics 005 "Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drillingdirectly. Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among

Smith, Eric R.A.N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Black...

346

National forecast for geothermal resource exploration and development with techniques for policy analysis and resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The backgrund, structure and use of modern forecasting methods for estimating the future development of geothermal energy in the United States are documented. The forecasting instrument may be divided into two sequential submodels. The first predicts the timing and quality of future geothermal resource discoveries from an underlying resource base. This resource base represents an expansion of the widely-publicized USGS Circular 790. The second submodel forecasts the rate and extent of utilization of geothermal resource discoveries. It is based on the joint investment behavior of resource developers and potential users as statistically determined from extensive industry interviews. It is concluded that geothermal resource development, especially for electric power development, will play an increasingly significant role in meeting US energy demands over the next 2 decades. Depending on the extent of R and D achievements in related areas of geosciences and technology, expected geothermal power development will reach between 7700 and 17300 Mwe by the year 2000. This represents between 8 and 18% of the expected electric energy demand (GWh) in western and northwestern states.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Shimamoto, G.T.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.; Finan, W.F.; Smith, M.R.; Edeistein, R.H.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

348

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

349

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

350

Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

PAO lubricant inhibits bit balling, speeds drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For drilling operations, a new polyalphaolefin (PAO) lubricant improves penetration rates by reducing bit balling tendencies in water-based mud. The additive also reduces drillstring drag. This enables the effective transmission of weight to the bit and thereby increases drilling efficiency in such applications as directional and horizontal drilling. The paper describes drilling advances, bit balling, laboratory testing, and test analysis.

Mensa-Wilmot, G. [GeoDiamond, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, R.L. [Garrett Fluid Technology, The Woodlands, TX (United States); Stokes, R.S. [Coastal Superior Solutions Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

353

Global software development: Exploring socialization and face-to-face meetings in distributed strategic projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Socialization is one means through which globally distributed teams (GDTs) can improve collaboration. However, harnessing socializing processes to support globally distributed collaboration is not easy. In particular, infrequent and limited face-to-face ... Keywords: Face-to-face meetings, Globally distributed teams, Socialization, Strategic software development projects

Ilan Oshri; Julia Kotlarsky; Leslie P. Willcocks

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Infill drilling enhances waterflood recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of west Texas carbonate reservoir and waterflood data were studied to evaluate the impact of infill drilling on waterflood recovery. Results show that infill drilling enhanced the current and projected waterflood recovery from most of the reservoirs. The estimated ultimate and incremental infill-drilling waterflood recovery was correlated with well spacing and other reservoir and process parameters. Results of the correlation indicate that reducing well spacing from 40 to 20 acres (16 to 8 ha) per well would increase the oil recovery by 8 to 9% of the original oil in place (OOIP). Because of the limited data base and regressional nature of the correlation models, the infill-drilling recovery estimate must be used with caution.

Wu, C.H.; Jardon, M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Laughlin, B.A. (Union Pacific Research Co. (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by

356

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

How borehole ballooning alters drilling responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From field observations of drilling and hole instability problems over a 30-year period, a new and more complete understanding of plastic well-bore behavior - under certain pressure imbalance conditions - is being developed and verified with detailed well histories. Rock mechanics theory, thus far primarily concerned with plastic behavior and borehole collapse on the underbalanced side, is in at least partial agreement with these observations. This article further elaborates on the pressure-responsive plastic behavior of shales under tremendous downhole stresses, particularly in the overbalanced, ballooning mode. The primary subject matter of the article is divided into the following areas: Stable operating margin; Plastic behavior region; Wellbore wall yields; Brittle sloughings; Loss of mud; Gain of mud; Shut-in pressure; Reflex gas; Charged RFT's; Preexisting balloon; Drilling rate.

Gill, J.A.

1989-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling technology. If we can solve these problems, the economics of drilling the wells will improve, thus enabling the industry to drill wells that were previously uneconomical. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) is a new technology that enables a driller to more precisely control annular pressures in the wellbore to prevent these drillingrelated problems. This paper traces the history of MPD, showing how different techniques can reduce drilling problems. MPD improves the economics of drilling wells by reducing drilling problems. Further economic studies are necessary to determine exactly how much cost savings MPD can provide in certain situation. Furter research is also necessary on the various MPD techniques to increase their effectiveness.

Martin, Matthew Daniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies April 6, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor Der, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Energy and Environment. Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) perspective on research and development (R&D) to improve oil and gas drilling in ever-deeper waters with greater margins of safety, reduced risk of spills, and better mitigation approaches should there be a spill. As you know, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) leads DOE's efforts to

360

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies April 6, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor Der, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Energy and Environment. Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) perspective on research and development (R&D) to improve oil and gas drilling in ever-deeper waters with greater margins of safety, reduced risk of spills, and better mitigation approaches should there be a spill. As you know, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) leads DOE's efforts to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field application of lightweight, hollow-glass-sphere drilling fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new class of underbalanced drilling fluids being developed under US Dept. of Energy (US DOE) sponsorship was recently successfully field tested. The fluid uses hollow glass spheres (HGS`s) to decrease the fluid density to less than that of the base mud while maintaining incompressibility. Concentrations of up to 20 vol% were used to decrease the fluid density to 0.8 lbm/gal less than normally used in the field. Potential benefits of using these fluids include higher penetration rates, decreased formation damage, and lost-circulation mitigation. When used in place of aerated fluid, they can eliminate compressor usage and allow the use of mud-pulse measurement-while-drilling tools. These and other recent advances in technology have spurred interest in underbalanced drilling to the highest level in 30 years. Industry-wide surveys indicate that more than 12% of wells drilled in the US in 1997 will intentionally use underbalanced techniques.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

Turner, William E. (Durham, CT); Perry, Carl A. (Middletown, CT); Wassell, Mark E. (Kingwood, TX); Barbely, Jason R. (Middletown, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Cobern, Martin E. (Cheshire, CT)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component  

SciTech Connect

The author critiques the Exploration component of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Program Review X. The comments focus principally on the hydrothermal portion of the DOE program, but he also makes some commentary on the Long Valley Exploratory Well and Geopressured-Geothermal components of the program, as well as some general comments. Before I do that, I would like to review the current state of geothermal exploration in the United States. According to Koenig (1989, 1990) who critiqued the DOE Geothermal Program in those years, geothermal exploration in the western U.S. has been conducted in virtually all of the apparent geothermal resource areas. Many of these areas which were under exploration in the 1960s and 1970s, and were explored in part under the U.S. DOE Industry Coupled Program have progressed to commercial status in the 80s. The DOE March (1992) Draft Multi-Year Program Plan for FY 1993-1997 states that 8 out of the 14 geothermal resource areas explored under this Industry Coupled Program in the late 1970s are currently under production. I do not think we will find anyone in this room, in the geothermal industry, or in the United States that will argue with the clear and outstanding success of that government program. When the prices of oil dropped in the 1980s, many geothermal operators left the industry, and with the dramatic decrease in activity, many of the service companies went by the wayside also. By and large, the domestic geothermal industry today is emaciated. As a result of the capital intensive nature of geothermal development, the historical long lead times to go from exploration to production, the highly entrepreneurial nature of the industry, and the lack of an economic market, virtually no new exploration has been conducted in the U.S. in about 10 years. The consequence of this lack of activity is an almost nonexistent geothermal reserve base, outside of known producing fields and their immediate surrounds. The U.S. DOE Deep Thermal Gradient Drilling Program in the Cascade Range is a notable exception to this stagnant condition. Like it's predecessor, the industry coupled program, the Thermal Gradient Drilling Program identified at least, one potentially viable geothermal resource: Newberry Volcano.

Iovanetti, J.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description This project proposes to develop a cost-effective microhole drilling and completion technology with the Flash Abrasive Slurry Jet (ASJ) system and optimize it to maximize the efficiency of fluid circulation and heat removal for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The proposed approach is expected to address the key obstacles that currently prevent EGS from becoming a technically feasible, commercially viable major contributor for electricity generation, namely: (1) reduce costs for drilling and well completion and (2) increase the volume of hot rock from which heat can be extracted.

365

Recommendations of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories convened a group of drilling experts in Berkeley, CA, on April 15-16, 1997, to discuss advanced geothermal drilling systems. The objective of the workshop was to develop one or more conceptual designs for an advanced geothermal drilling system that meets all of the criteria necessary to drill a model geothermal well. The drilling process was divided into ten essential functions. Each function was examined, and discussions were held on the conventional methods used to accomplish each function and the problems commonly encountered. Alternative methods of performing each function were then listed and evaluated by the group. Alternative methods considered feasible or at least worth further investigation were identified, while methods considered impractical or not potentially cost-saving were eliminated from further discussion. This report summarizes the recommendations of the workshop participants. For each of the ten functions, the conventional methods, common problems, and recommended alternative technologies and methods are listed. Each recommended alternative is discussed, and a description is given of the process by which this information will be used by the U.S. DOE to develop an advanced geothermal drilling research program.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Survey of environmental regulations applying to geothermal exploration, development, and use.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations that apply to geothermal energy development are summarized. Most attention is given to those regulations which deal with air pollution, water pollution, solid wastes and impact assessments. Analyses are made of the regulations with respect to resource definition, pollutants currently not controlled, duplicity and overlap in permit and impact assessment requirements, the lack of uniformity of regulations between states, and the probable future approaches to the regulatory problems. This project updates a similar document (EPA/600/7-78-014) dated February 1978.

Beeland, G.V.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Existing geologic data show that the basalt has been broken by complex intersecting fault zones at the hot springs. Natural state hot water flow patterns in the fracture network will be interpreted from temperature gradient wells and then tested with moderate depth core holes. Production and injection well tests of the core holes will be monitored with an innovative combination of Flowing Differential Self-Potential (FDSP) and resistivity tomography surveys. The cointerpretation of all these highly detailed geophysical methods sensitive to fracture permeability patterns and water flow during the well tests will provide unprecedented details on the structures and flow in a shallow geothermal aquifer and support effective development of the low temperature reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets.

368

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect

A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Exploring the Business Link Opportunity: Transmission & Clean Energy Development in the West  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGENDA TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7 MEETING ROOM-WINDOWS ROOM 8:30am - 8:50am WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS AND OPENING REMARKS CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST WILL BE SERVED Tracey A. LeBeau, Director, DOE Office of Indian Energy Lamont Jackson, Representative, DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Introductions 8:50am - 9:10am FEDERAL TRANSMISSION DISCUSSION: TRANSMISSION EXPANSION IN THE WEST Timothy Meeks, Administrator, Western Area Power Administration 9:10am - 9:30am TRANSMISSION DEVELOPMENT IN THE PACIFIC: PERSPECTIVES FROM BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION Bill Drummond, Deputy Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration 9:30am - 10:45am TRANSMISSION POLICY AND REGULATION PRIMER: OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONAL AUTHORITIES & CURRENT POLICY TRENDS

370

Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

Eichelberger, J.C.

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Borehole measurements while drilling: systems and activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attention is focused on all potential methods of drilling safer and cheaper. Real time data from the bit offers the greatest potential for meeting these needs. As a result, numerous companies are actively competing to develop this oil field service capability and to capture a world wide market. Two basic categories of service are sought. The first, and highest priority, is drilling safety and efficiency; the second is real-time logging, or formation evaluation. This study addresses the types of systems being studied, describes company activity and projects underway, estimates the practical potential for success and considers the commercial market for successful systems. The need for research data on bit hydraulics and drill string dynamics, special deep, hot or sour gas situations and other relatively unusual requirements may become exceptions to the general conclusions that are drawn. Historical and present activity are documented through presenting the results of extensive literature and patent researches. A breakdown is presented of activity by company along with names and addresses for further contact.

McDonald, W.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology August 12, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Technology International Inc. has developed a breakthrough borehole imaging system that stands on the cusp of commercialization. By pushing the limits of seismic-while-drilling technology, the patent-pending SeismicPULSER system provides more accurate geo-steering for the discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves, facilitating new field development and improving well economics. Drill-bit seismic-while-drilling techniques use a downhole acoustic source and receivers at the surface to create real-time images that allow

374

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Rig scarcity prompts innovative drilling solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unable to locate a shallow-water offshore rig for its program in Indonesia, British Gas International developed an innovative pad/ballasted barge configuration to utilize a land rig, which was available. Many non-typical problems were encountered and solved to establish the drilling location 600 m (2,000 ft) from the shore in Bintuni Bay in Irian Jaya, eastern Indonesia. The final hybrid configuration has sparked interesting debate as to whether the operation should be designated as onshore or offshore. The paper discusses the project overview, concept development, construction, and operations.

Lattimore, G.M.; Gott, T.; Feagin, J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The role of R and D in geothermal drilling cost reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that drilling technology development can play in reducing the cost of geothermal power is examined. Factors contributing to the relatively high cost of geothermal drilling are discussed, and potential technology improvements that could reduce those costs are identified. Projects under way at Sandia National Laboratories to address these technology needs are summarized, and estimates are made of the potential drilling cost savings resulting from these projects.

Glowka, D.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geothermal Research Dept.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Low permeability filter cake limits damage from high-pH drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing the particle size distribution in high-pH drilling fluids and perforating underbalanced helped protect sensitive reservoirs from formation damage. In several wells drilled in a carboniferous reservoir system in China, invasion of the high-pH filtrate from the drilling and workover fluids seriously damaged the formation. An in-depth reservoir study determined the cause of the formation damage and led to the development of new field procedures to prevent damage in future wells. Details are described.

Wu, Z.; Hu, Y. [Southwest Petroleum Inst., Nanchong (China)

1997-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

Assembly for directional drilling of boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a drilling assembly for directional drilling of boreholes in subsurface formations. The assembly comprising a downhole drilling motor. The motor having an output shaft which is suitable to drive a rotary drill bit and a motor housing which is suitable to be arranged at the lower end of a drill string; stabilizing means for stabilizing the assembly; means in the assembly for permanently tilting the central axis of the output shaft with respect to the longitudinal axis of the drill string in the borehole. It is characterized in that the stabilizing means include a lower-most stabilizer which is secured to and rotates with the output shaft.

Steiginga, A.; Worrall, R.N.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-03NT15401 Final Report Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling Submitted by: TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company 1935 Fremont Drive Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 February 2010 Office of Fossil Energy Feasibility of Ultra-High Speed Diamond Drilling DE-FC26-03NT15401 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

380

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a revolutionary modification in recent history was the complete displacement of cable tool rigs by rotary drilling rigs in the late 1920s.

Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermoporoelastic Effects of Drilling Fluid Temperature on Rock Drillability at Bit/Formation Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A drilling operation leads to thermal disturbances in the near-wellbore stress, which is an important cause of many undesired incidents in well drilling. A major cause of this thermal disturbance is the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and the downhole formation. It is critical for drilling engineers to understand this thermal impact to optimize their drilling plans. This thesis develops a numerical model using partially coupled thermoporoelasticity to study the effects of the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation in a drilling operation. This study focuses on the thermal impacts at the bit/formation interface. The model applies the finite-difference method for the pore pressure and temperature solutions, and the finite-element method for the deformation and stress solutions. However, the model also provides the thermoporoelastic effects at the wellbore wall, which involves wellbore fractures and wellbore instability. The simulation results show pronounced effects of the drilling fluid temperature on near-wellbore stresses. At the bottomhole area, a cool drilling fluid reduces the radial and tangential effective stresses in formation, whereas the vertical effective stress increases. The outcome is a possible enhancement in the drilling rate of the drill bit. At the wellbore wall, the cool drilling fluid reduces the vertical and tangential effective stresses but raises the radial effective stress. The result is a lower wellbore fracture gradient; however, it benefits formation stability and prevents wellbore collapse. Conversely, the simulation gives opposite induced stress results to the cooling cases when the drilling fluid is hotter than the formation.

Thepchatri, Kritatee 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program  

SciTech Connect

This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these e?orts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these e?orts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and o?ers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate Science Challenges and linking them with Technical Challenges and potential field program locations.

Collett, Tim; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta; Myers, Greg; Divins, David; Morell, Margo

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

Robert Radtke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An air drilling model has been developed that accounts for cuttings and mist. Comparison of the model results with previous work shows this model to be more conservative. The equations developed are simple enough to be used in hand calculations, but the full capability of the model is more easily obtained with a computer program. Studies with the model show that volume requirements and standpipe pressures are significantly different for mist drilling compared with air drilling. An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities, and velocities during air drilling has been developed. Improvements on previous methods include the following. A fully transient thermal analysis of the wellbore and formation is used to determine the flowing temperatures. The effects of flow acceleration are included explicitly in the calculation. The slip velocity between the gas and the cuttings is determined by the use of a separate momentum equation for the cuttings. The possibility of critical flow in the wellbore is tested and appropriate changes in the volume flow rate and standpipe pressure are made automatically. The standpipe and flowing pressures are predicted. The analysis is conservative. The effect of the cuttings on the wellbore flow will tend to overpredict the required volume flow rates. In this paper, the basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressure in typical air and mist drilling situations.

Mitchell, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

U.S. Department of Energy, Geothermal Program Review VII, Critique of the Geothermal Exploration R&D Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exploration can be described as consisting of two components: finding something worth drilling and testing; and defining and constraining that system after it has been drilled and tested. To date, geothermal exploration in the United States has concentrated on the drilling and testing of rather obvious targets--places where steam and boiling water issue from the ground. Relatively little has been done in the exploration of concealed or blind systems, probably because there have been so many obvious targets. However, these largely have been drilled, tested and constrained by boundaries, and almost entirely are committed to development schemes. The need now is to develop an exploration methodology for the '90s and thereafter that will be effective in the search for blind geothermal systems. Such work is being done currently in Japan; my company was privileged to have served the New Energy Development Organization and the Electric Power Development Company, both Japanese government companies, in the design of a methodology to assess concealed heat sources in 4 different terrains: recent volcanic with abundant thermal manifestations; volcanic outflow; volcanic or non-volcanic with few surface manifestations; and non-volcanic with background-level heat flow. work was based on the application of existing exploration techniques. The Japanese agencies now are attempting to develop new techniques specifically for the task of applying the methodology. Two important observations can be made about this quest for a methodology to explore (and find) concealed geothermal systems: First, most geothermal systems are dominated by ground-water hydrology; and very little is done to systematically investigate or define the effects of hydrology. The Cascade ''rain curtain'' is an example of the importance of hydrologic effects in geothermal exploration. We at GeothermEx first encountered this effect in 1975-76, when we drilled a 2,000-foot-deep hole west of Klamath Lake for Weyerhauser Company. Very little has been done since then to utilize the knowledge of this ''rain curtain'' in exploration in the Cascades or elsewhere.

Koenig, James B.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Definition: Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Drilling Techniques There are a variety of drilling techniques which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well drilling is the process of drilling a hole in the ground for the extraction of a natural resource such as ground water, brine, natural gas, or petroleum, for the injection of a fluid from surface to a subsurface reservoir or for subsurface formations evaluation or monitoring.

387

Acoustic data transmission through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

389

Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The structural model is based on the role of subsurface igneous dikes providing a buttressing effect in a regional strain field such that permeability is greatly enhanced. The basic thermal anomaly at McCoy was defined by substantial U.S. Department of Energy-funded temperature gradient drilling and geophysical studies conducted during the period 1978 to 1982. This database will be augmented with modern magnetotelluric, controlled-source audio-magnetotelluric, and 2D/3D reflection seismic surveys to define likely fluid up-flow plumes that will be drilled with slant-hole technology. Two sites for production-capable wells will be drilled in geothermally prospective areas identified in this manner. The uniqueness of this proposal lies in the use of a full suite of modern geophysical tools, use of slant-hole drilling, and the extensive technical database from previous DOE funding.

390

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

391

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

392

Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

Hall; David R. (Provo, UT), Fox; Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Graphene Compositions And Drilling Fluids Derived Therefrom ...  

Drilling fluids comprising graphenes and nanoplatelet additives and methods for production thereof are disclosed. Graphene includes graphite oxide, graphene oxide ...

394

Underbalanced drilling: Praises and perils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling (UBD) has been used with increasing frequency to minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduce the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, particularly in openhole horizontal well applications. UBD, when properly designed and executed, minimizes or eliminates problems associated with the invasion of particulate matter into the formation as well as a multitude of other problems such as adverse clay reactions, phase trapping, precipitation, and emulsification, which can be caused by the invasion of incompatible mud filtrates in an overbalanced condition. In many UBD operations, additional benefits are seen because of a reduction in drilling time, greater rates of penetration, increased bit life, a rapid indication of productive reservoir zones, and the potential for dynamic flow testing while drilling. Potential downsides and damage mechanisms associated with UBD will be discussed. These include the following: (1) Increased cost and safety concerns; (2) Difficulty in maintaining a continuously underbalanced condition; (3) Spontaneous inhibition and countercurrent inhibition effects; (4) Glazing, mashing, and mechanically induced wellbore damage; (5) Macroporosity gravity-induced invasion; (6) Difficulty of application in zones of extreme pressure and permeability; and (7) Political/career risk associated with championing a new and potentially risky technology. The authors discuss reservoir parameters required to design an effective underbalanced or overbalanced drilling program, laboratory screening procedures to ascertain the effectiveness of UBD in a specific application and review the types of reservoirs that often present good applications for UBD technology.

Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.W. [Hycal Energy Research Labs., Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system that applies a method of knowledge-intensive case-based reasoning, for repair and prevention of unwanted events in the domain of offshore oil well drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of "lost circulation", i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid into the geological formation, was picked out as a pilot problem. An extensive general knowledge model was developed for the domain of oil well drilling. About fifty different cases were created on the basis of information from one North Sea operator. When the completed CBR-system was tested against a new case, five cases with descending similarity were selected by the tool. In an informal evaluation, the two best fitting cases proved to give the operator valuable advise on how to go about solving the new case. Introduction Drilling of oil wells is an expensive operation, costing around 150 000 US $ pr. day, and any loss of time caused...

Paal Skalle; Jostein Sveen; Agnar Aamodt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Seal/lubricant systems for geothermal drilling equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development and testing of seals and lubricants for journal-type roller-cone rock bits for drilling into geothermal reservoirs at temperatures over 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) are described. The conditions experienced by seals and lubricants subjected to geothermal drilling are reviewed along with the basic design requirements for roller-cone bit seals and journal bearing lubricants. Two unique test facilities are described: a seal test machine which simulates pressures, temperatures, and mechanical eccentricities, and a lubricant tester capable of evaluating load-bearing ability at temperature and pressure. Three candidate elastomeric compounds demonstrated 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) capability and several others demonstrated 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) or greater capability. Successful elastomeric seal candidates were proprietary compounds based on EPDM, Kalrez, and/or Viton polymers. Three mechanical seals for reservoir temperatures over 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) are presented. Lubricant screening tests on more than 50 products are summarized, and several newly developed lubricants which meet both the compatibility and lubrication requirements are described. Several seal/lubricant systems are recommended for laboratory or field geothermal drilling tests in roller-cone drill bits. The future availability of drill bits for geothermal use is discussed, as well as the potential spinoffs of the program findings for nongeothermal roller-cone bits.

Hendrickson, R.R.; Winzenried, R.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement a multi-step combination that is believed to have not been used before. This includes: identifying the geometry and the electrical resistivity associated with the pluton; locating areas of fluid movement in and around the pluton; measuring heat associated with the pluton; and looking for geochemical indications for degassing of circulating geothermal fluid. This approach applies gravity and MT surveys, although at much higher density than typically used in exploration. The plan involves using innovative patent pending, 3-D seismic geophone measurement tools developed by HiPoint Reservoir, LLC, that have not previously been used in geothermal exploration. The project also includes strategies for detecting deep degassing of geothermal fluid and using special flux measurement equipment at the temperature gradient well sites to sample for CO2 outgassing. Secondary mineral samples collected from the temperature gradient well core will be analyzed for stable carbon, oxygen and sulfur isotopes at the Southern Methodist University geochemical laboratory. X-R diffraction analyses will be used to characterize the thermal history of the cored rock. The final step will use temperature gradient data to map out the thermal characteristics across the pluton. The resulting model will be used to identify hot areas associated with the pluton that has fluid moving through fractures. One additional innovation designed into this program is multiple-use of temperature gradient drilling. The upper portion of the wells will be used for the 3-D seismic array. CO2 flux measurements will be employed during drilling of these holes, and the completed wells will provide the very valuable temperature profiles.

399

Geothermal Energy for New Mexico: Assessment of Potential and Exploratory Drilling  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the drilling operations and subsequent interpretation of thermal and geochemical data from the New Mexico Tech NMT-2GT (OSE RG- 05276 POD) test well. This slim hole was drilled along an elongate heat-flow anomaly at the base of the Socorro Mountains to better assess the geothermal resource potential (Socorro Peak geothermal system) on the western side of the New Mexico Tech campus in Socorro, New Mexico. The reservoir depth, hydraulic properties, temperature and chemistry were unknown prior to drilling. The purpose of the NMT-2GT (OSE RG-05276 POD) well was to explore the feasibility of providing geothermal fluids for a proposed district space heating system on the New Mexico Tech campus. With DOE cost over runs funds we completed NMT-2GT to a depth of 1102 feet at the Woods Tunnel drill site. Temperatures were nearly constant (41 oC ) between a depth of 400???????????????????????????????¢????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????1102 feet. Above this isothermal zone, a strong temperature gradient was observed (210 oC /km) beneath the water table consistent with vertical convective heat transfer. The existence of a groundwater upflow zone was further supported by measured vertical hydraulic head measurements which varied between about 258 feet at the water table to 155 feet at a depth of 1102 feet yielding a vertical hydraulic a gradient of about 0.1. If the upflow zone is 1 km deep, then a vertical flow rate is about 0.6 m/yr could have produced the observed curvature in the thermal profile. This would suggest that the deep bedrock permeability is about 20 mD. This is much lower than the permeability measured in a specific capacity aquifer test completed in 2009 within fracture Paleozoic sandstones near the water table (3000 D). Flow rates measured during drilling were measured using a v-notch weir. Flow rates were consistently around 1000 gpm. While the temperatures are lower than we had anticipated, this geothermal resource can still be developed to heat the NM Tech campus using heat pump technology.

Mark Person, Lara Owens, James Witcher

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Report to Congress: management of wastes from the exploration, development, and production of crude oil, natural gas, and geothermal energy. Volume 3. Appendices. A. Summary of state oil and gas regulations. B. Glossary of terms for Volume 1. C. Damage case summaries  

SciTech Connect

Section 3001(b)(2)(A) of the 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) temporarily exempted several types of solid waste from regulation under the Federal hazardous-waste control program. These exempted wastes included drilling fluids, produced waters, and other wastes associated with the exploration, development, or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy. Section 8002(m) of the RCRA Amendments requires EPA to study these wastes and submit a final report to Congress. The report responds to those requirements. This is volume 3 of 3 reports to Congress. The volume contains the Appendices which include a summary of: (1) State oil and gas regulatory programs; and (2) the damage cases compiled for the oil and gas industry. A glossary of oil and gas industry terms is also included in the volume.

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development drilling exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation prototype tool. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing  

SciTech Connect

Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Developing an exploration model by investigating the geological controls on reservoir production within the Fort Scott limestone, Ness county, Kansas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ness County, Kansas is situated along the western flank of the Central Kansas uplift, and has been an active center of oil exploration since the (more)

Flenthrope, Christopher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT, January 2008, EMIGRANT SLIMHOLE DRILLING PROJECT, DOE GRED III (DE-FC36-04GO14339)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (ESDP) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327? F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

407

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling Using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mark Hunt; Mahlon Dennis

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Downhole mud properties complicate drilling hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains that wellsite parameters such as penetration rate, hole cleaning, hole erosion and overall wellbore stability are directly related to the hydraulic conditions occurring while drilling. Drilling hydraulics, in turn, are largely a function of the drilling mud's properties, primarily viscosity and density. Accurate pressure loss calculations are necessary to maximize bit horse-power and penetration rates. Also, annular pressure loss measurements are important to record equivalent circulating densities, particularly when drilling near balanced formation pressures or when approaching formation fracture pressures. Determination of the laminar, transitional or turbulent flow regimes will help ensure the mud will remove drill cuttings from the wellbore and minimize hole erosion.

Leyendecker, E.A.; Bruton, J.R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Exploration of the Mesozoic in the eastern part of Indonesia: Its reward and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern part of Indonesia principally comprises islands of Sulawesi, Halmahera, Maluku, Timor, and Irian Jaya. The region is structurally complex, encompassing an interaction of volcanic arcs, fold/thrust belts, micro-continents and deep ocean basins. Tertiary and Mesozoic offer dual reservoir targets for exploration in eastern Indonesia. The Tertiary section has been proven to produce hydrocarbons while the deeper Mesozoic section is still being examined. During the last seven years, 49 wildcat wells were drilled, 24 of them targeting Mesozoic objectives. The signs so far are encouraging with six wells penetrated Jurassic reservoirs on the Bird's Head Peninsula of Irian Jaya and one well on Seram Island, encountered significant oil and gas accumulations. These rewards and other Mesozoic exploration successes in the NW Australian Shelf and the Papuan basin have attracted more exploration drilling in the region. However, not all of them have been so successful as many geological and operational risks have yet to be overcome. Mesozoic stratigraphy and structural development in eastern Indonesia were controlled by continental breakup, collision and rapid uplift associated with folding and thrusting to arrive at the present geological framework. Severe environmental conditions, remote locations and less developed infrastructure have also made field operations difficult and expensive. To reduce these risks Pertamina is responding by granting exploration incentives and improving the pr