National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for development based climate

  1. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  2. Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the components-based approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid development of an ice...

  3. Essays in climate and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero Compeán, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays on environmental policy and empirical development economics, unified in their underlying inquiry of the welfare effects of climate in Mexico. The first chapter presents ...

  4. Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change...

  5. UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

  6. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on...

  7. Climate-development-energy policy related seminars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Climate-development-energy policy related seminars Autumn term 2013 Date Time Location Speaker Paula Kivimaa (Finnish Environment Institute) From energy to climate policy in Finland Energy & climate. 13.00- 14.00 Jub G-31 Colin Nolden (SPRU) Governing community energy - Feed-in tariffs

  8. Climate change: comparative impact on developing and developed countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change: comparative impact on developing and developed countries PAUL CHINOWSKY1 , CAROLYN. In these projections, climate change is a global issue with potential impacts for every country. However, the relative levels to determine the relative impact of climate change in the context of a single infrastructure

  9. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make thethe world leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, haswill not occur. If not coal gasification, then perhaps fuel

  10. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make theworld leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, has beenexperimenting with "in situ" gasification, where the coal is

  11. Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change Robert Socolow Princeton University socolow should provide at least one wedge. #12;"The Wedge Model is the iPod of climate change: You fill

  12. Gambia-Support the Development of a National Climate Compatible...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name CDKN-Gambia-Support the Development of a National Climate Compatible Development Strategy AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN),...

  13. Uganda-Supporting Low Carbon Development and Climate Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development and Climate Resilient Strategies in Africa AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of Development (AFD) Partner ADETEF Sector Climate Focus Area People and...

  14. South Africa-Developing Climate Policy Capacity within the South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Africa-Developing Climate Policy Capacity within the South African Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) (Redirected from GIZ-Developing Climate Policy Capacity within...

  15. Thailand-Programme for Developing and Implementing a Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thailand-Programme for Developing and Implementing a Climate Protection Policy Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand - Programme for developing and implementing a climate...

  16. User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    comparative analysis of climate compatible development planning methodologies and tools Jump to: navigation, search Name User-orientated comparative analysis of climate...

  17. RMES-520: Climate Change: Science, Technology and Sustainable Development RMES-520: Climate Change: Science, Technology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    RMES-520: Climate Change: Science, Technology and Sustainable Development 1 RMES-520: Climate Change: Science, Technology and Sustainable Development Dr. Hisham Zerriffi (hisham/108 Enrolment: Graduate Students (or advanced undergraduates with instructor approval) Course Site: http://blogs

  18. UNEP Ris Centre Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNEP Risř Centre ­ Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development International and Danish research's energy and climate programmes. · Projects are mainly funded by bilateral or multilateral institutions energy projects and designing energy projects that impact better on the development process (MDGs

  19. Climate, Career Development, and Chairs: Some (Debatable) Thoughts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate, Career Development, and Chairs: Some (Debatable) Thoughts What Does "Climate" Mean and How Do We Recognize It? 1. Climate refers to those aspects of the professional working environment that enhance or detract from perceptions of "fit" and "appreciation" among colleagues. Climate shapes

  20. Agent Model Development for Assessing Climate-Induced Geopolitical Instability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.

    2005-12-01

    We present the initial stages of development of new agent-based computational methods to generate and test hypotheses about linkages between environmental change and international instability. This report summarizes the first year's effort of an originally proposed three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The preliminary work focused on a set of simple agent-based models and benefited from lessons learned in previous related projects and case studies of human response to climate change and environmental scarcity. Our approach was to define a qualitative model using extremely simple cellular agent models akin to Lovelock's Daisyworld and Schelling's segregation model. Such models do not require significant computing resources, and users can modify behavior rules to gain insights. One of the difficulties in agent-based modeling is finding the right balance between model simplicity and real-world representation. Our approach was to keep agent behaviors as simple as possible during the development stage (described herein) and to ground them with a realistic geospatial Earth system model in subsequent years. This work is directed toward incorporating projected climate data--including various C02 scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report--and ultimately toward coupling a useful agent-based model to a general circulation model.3

  1. Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

  2. RISNEWS JUNE 2007 NO Energy, climate and sustainable development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISŘNEWSNO 12007PAGE1 RISŘNEWS JUNE 2007 NO 1 Energy, climate and sustainable development .....................................................................................11 Energy to create development...........................................................................17 Sustainable energy for isolated communities in the Arctic

  3. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea...

  4. A Struggle for Reconciliation of Development and Climate Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2010-01-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate on the efforts of reducing CO2 emissions in order to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of CO2 reduction targets in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We show the existence of a positive and - time dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Based on this empirical relation and three population scenarios extracted from the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report, we calculate for the first time the cumulative CO2 emissions necessary for developing countries to achieve particular HDI thresholds. If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8) as defined in the United Nations Human Development Report. In particular, we estimate that at least 300Gt of cumulative CO2 emissions between 2000 and 2050 are ...

  5. Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperation Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Price, Lynn; Kumar, Satish; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Warfield, Corina; Padmanabhan, S.

    2006-01-01

    renewable energy, and climate technologies, barriers, andDevelopment and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperationof Technologies and Practices. Chapter in Climate Change

  6. Roadmap for the Development of a Climate Change Adaptation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    Roadmap for the Development of a Climate Change Adaptation Plan Prepared by the Smithsonian Climate of the Smithsonian This document sets out a Roadmap that will guide the Smithsonian Institution (Smithsonian Group to develop this initial roadmap. The Working Group includes representatives of the following

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH PERFORMANCE COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, W. Travis; Groll, Eckhard A.; Braun, James E.

    2014-06-01

    The primary goals of the proposed project were to develop, test, and evaluate a high performance and cost-effective vapor compression air-source heat pump for use in cold climate regions. Vapor compression heat pumps are a proven technology, and have been used for many years to meet heating requirements for buildings in residential, commercial, and industrial applications. However, in climate regions that experience very low outdoor ambient temperatures both the heating capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) of traditional air-source vapor compression heat pumps drops dramatically with a decrease in the outdoor air temperature. The efficiency of heat pumping equipment has improved substantially over the past 20 years; however, the efficiencies of the highest rated equipment on the market are approaching practical limits that cannot be surpassed without modifications to the basic cycle and possibly the use of additional hardware. In this report, three technologies to improve the efficiency of vapor compression systems are described. These are a) vapor injected compression, b) oil flooded compression and c) hybrid flow control of the evaporator. Compressor prototypes for both, oil flooded and vapor injected compression were developed by Emerson Climate Technologies. For the oil flooded compressor, the oil injection port location was optimized and an internal oil separator was added using several design iterations. After initial testing at Emerson Climate Technologies, further testing was done at Purdue University, and compressor models were developed. These models were then integrated into a system model to determine the achievable improvement of seasonal energy efficiency (SEER) for Minneapolis (Minnesota) climate. For the oil flooded compression, a 34% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency was found while a 21% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency ratio was found for the vapor injected compression. It was found that one benefit of both tested compression technologies is a lower discharge temperature, which allows for continued operation at lower ambient temperatures. A bin analysis of the vapor injected prototype cold climate heat pump predicts a 6% improvement in HSPF for Minneapolis. This improvement is mainly a result of the increased capacity of the system for active vapor injection. For the oil flooded system, a slightly larger performance improvement is predicted, in this case mostly caused by an increase in heating COP. Based on an economic analysis of these results, the maximum additional cost of the system changes, for the Minneapolis location, are $430 for the vapor injected system and $391 for the oil flooded system. These estimates assume that a 3-year simple payback period is accepted by the customer. For the hybrid flow control of evaporators, a new type of balancing valve was developed together with Emerson Climate technologies to reduce the cost of the control scheme. In contrast to conventional stepper motor valves, this valve requires less cables and can be driven by a cheaper output circuit on the control board. The correct valve size was determined in a dedicated test stand in several design iterations. The performance benefits of the hybrid control of the evaporator coil were determined for clean coil conditions as well as with partial blockage of the air inlet grille and under frosting conditions. For clean coil conditions, the benefits in terms of COP and capacity are negligible. However, significant benefits were noted for severely air-maldistributed operating conditions. For the H2-test, the maximum COP improvement of 17% along with a capacity improvement of nearly 40% was observed. Overall, the hybrid control scheme leads to a significant amount of performance improvement, if the air inlet conditions to the evaporator are maldistributed.

  8. Assessing the Role of Energy in Development and Climate Policies in Large Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing the Role of Energy in Development and Climate Policies in Large Developing Countries Amit conceptual issues related to the role of energy in development and its potential synergies and tradeoffs with climate change. The relationship between economic development and energy over time is discussed

  9. Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

    2012-05-02

    The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an important practical conclusion of the study: the obtained results on NN ensembles as a stochastic physics parametrization show a realistic possibility of development of NN convection parametrization for climate (and NWP) models based on learning cloud physics from CRM/SAM simulated data.

  10. Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD Assistant Professor Civil of algae and other nonconventional feedstocks, are being developed. This talk will explore several systems priorities. This is an especially challenging problem for algae-based biofuels because production pathways

  11. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change and Low Carbon Development (Redirected from SSEE-Project to Develop a Rwandan National Strategy on Climate Change...

  12. Development of a simple groundwater model for use in climate models and evaluation with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Development of a simple groundwater model for use in climate models and evaluation with Gravity 7 April 2007. [1] Groundwater interacts with soil moisture through the exchanges of water between, groundwater is not explicitly represented in climate models. This paper developed a simple groundwater model

  13. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for International Development, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Smith School for Enterprise and Environment, University of Oxford Sector Climate, Energy,...

  14. NGOs & climate change campaigns : understanding variations in motivations and activities of environmental and development organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeve, Kara E

    2008-01-01

    The unequal distribution of climate change impacts exploits the existing vulnerabilities of developing nations. This inequity, coupled with an inadequate, climate mitigation-focused response, has prompted a growing movement ...

  15. Applications of Risk Assessment in the Development of Climate Change Adaptation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of present climate change risk assessment methods in terms1 Applications of Risk Assessment in the Development of Climate Change Adaptation Policy A future risks of climate change. Future impacts and the vulnerability of the impacted system are used

  16. Climate-development-energy policy related seminars Spring term 2013 (TB2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Max

    Climate-development-energy policy related seminars Spring term 2013 (TB2) Date Time Location) Electricity cost estimates - why do we get them wrong and does it matter? Climate change & Energy Thurs. 24th Resource Centre. Arts C Prof. Paul Palmer (Univ. Edinburgh) New insights into the carbon cycle Climate

  17. The Uses and Misuses of Technology Development as a Component of Climate Policy Henry D. Jacoby*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Uses and Misuses of Technology Development as a Component of Climate Policy Henry D. Jacoby* Abstract The current misplaced focus on short-term climate policies is a product both of domestic political the Framework Convention on Climate Change are using this study to justify the subsidy of existing energy

  18. The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change and Policy Program #12;#12;The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power

  19. Web-based Visual Analytics for Extreme Scale Climate Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Harney, John F [ORNL; Jewell, Brian C [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Web-based visual analytics framework for democratizing advanced visualization and analysis capabilities pertinent to large-scale earth system simulations. We address significant limitations of present climate data analysis tools such as tightly coupled dependencies, ineffi- cient data movements, complex user interfaces, and static visualizations. Our Web-based visual analytics framework removes critical barriers to the widespread accessibility and adoption of advanced scientific techniques. Using distributed connections to back-end diagnostics, we minimize data movements and leverage HPC platforms. We also mitigate system dependency issues by employing a RESTful interface. Our framework embraces the visual analytics paradigm via new visual navigation techniques for hierarchical parameter spaces, multi-scale representations, and interactive spatio-temporal data mining methods that retain details. Although generalizable to other science domains, the current work focuses on improving exploratory analysis of large-scale Community Land Model (CLM) and Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) simulations.

  20. Space based observations for monitoring extreme weather and climate events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, P.K.

    1996-12-31

    Observations are essential for monitoring, understanding, and predicting the potential for extreme weather and climate events. These events occur on all time and spatial scales. Current NOAA operational satellites have a unique capability of providing many of the observations that are critical for monitoring these events. These observations and derived geophysical quantities can also be used for diagnostics and prediction purposes. Extreme weather conditions such as severe thunderstorms and flash floods, occur very quickly, may last for a short time, and create a considerable amount of damage. Advance warnings of the order of a few minutes are needed to alert the public so they may take adequate precautions. Some extreme weather conditions such as tropical storms (hurricanes) may last for days, and in order to predict the exact track, intensity of the storm and forecast the land fall, frequent observations are critical. Examples of satellite data that are obtained from the NOAA satellites are presented to demonstrate their ability to monitor the extreme weather phenomena. Examples of extreme climate conditions are droughts over continents and the annual depletion of ozone over the Antarctic. Data derived from NOAA satellites were used to monitor the severe drought over Texas and Southwestern U.S.A. in early 1996. Similar data are being used by other countries to monitor the drought in their regions. The development of the ozone hole over the Antarctic during the last fifteen years has been a major scientific and environmental concern. Data from NOAA operational satellites have been extensively used to show the yearly development and dissipation of the ozone hole during the Southern Hemisphere springtime.

  1. A Climate Network Based Stability Index for El Ni\\~no Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Qing Yi

    2015-01-01

    Most of the existing prediction methods gave a false alarm regarding the El Ni\\~no event in 2014. A crucial aspect is currently limiting the success of such predictions, i.e. the stability of the slowly varying Pacific climate. This property determines whether sea surface temperature perturbations will be amplified by coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks or not. The so-called Bjerknes stability index has been developed for this purpose, but its evaluation is severely constrained by data availability. Here we present a new promising background stability index based on complex network theory. This index efficiently monitors the changes in spatial correlations in the Pacific climate and can be evaluated by using only sea surface temperature data.

  2. Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model and evolution of melt ponds. Melt ponds accumulate on the surface of sea ice from snow and sea ice melt, melt ponds cover up to 50% of the sea ice surface. We have developed a melt pond evolution theory. Here

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets Beyond Climate Neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for waste and energy reduction and the need for policies to assist UBC food outlets to move beyond climateUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets of a project/report". #12;AGSC 450 2008 Moving UBC Food Outlets Beyond Climate Neutral Group 30 Heather Allyn

  4. ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility six dual frequency cloud radar systems. These radars will be used by the Atmospheric Radiation on the effects of clouds and precipitation on the climate. Four cloud radar systems will be permanently installed

  5. Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate ZoneUK Climate and

  6. Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

    2010-01-01

    become still more advanced. The present paper deals with the development and construction of mechanically ventilated double skin facade with HVAC integration for hot and humid climate like UAE. A case study is presented, illustrating potential benefits...

  7. The impact of climate change on ski resort operations and development : opportunities and threats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGill, Daniel D. D. (Daniel Dulany deButts)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis serves as a pedagogical guide to the ski resort industry, and presents a broad overview of the unique issues that accompany climate change. The paper also provides recommendations to resort developers as to ...

  8. Google Earth as a geospatial tool for development organisations: mapping climate change vulnerability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, Janet Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Climate change is an increasingly important issue within the development sector, and yet actors within the sector are still unsure about how it will impact on their activities. Mapping offers a useful tool for presenting ...

  9. A Web Based Geographic Information Platform to Support Urban Adaptation to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Philip J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Parish, Esther S; Mei, Rui; Ernst, Kathleen M; Absar, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    The urban climate is changing rapidly. Therefore, climate change and its projected impacts on environmental conditions must be considered in assessing and comparing urban planning alternatives. In this paper, we present an integrated framework for urban climate adaptation tool (Urban-CAT) that will help cities to plan for, rather than react to, possible risks. Urban-CAT will be developed as a scenario planning tool that is locally relevant to existing urban decision-making processes.

  10. Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development in Bangladesh (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Sandor, D.; Butheau, M.

    2013-11-01

    Bangladesh is widely considered to be one of the nations most threatened by climate change. With two-thirds of the country less than 20 feet above sea level, the intrusion of salt into freshwater wells, frequent flooding, and the displacement of people from their homes is an ongoing threat. At the same time, the country's cities are rapidly growing, and the demand for energy is increasing at a corresponding rate.

  11. Promoting India's development: energy security and climate security are convergent goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajan, Gupta; Shankar, Harihar; Joshi, Sunjoy

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates three aspects of the energy-climate challenges faced by India. First, we examine energy security in light of anticipated growth in power generation in response to the national goal of maintaining close to 10% growth in GDP. Second, we examine possible options for mitigation and adaptation to climate change for India that it can take to the coming Copenhagen meeting on climate change. Lastly, we introduce an open web based tool for analyzing and planning global energy systems called the Global Energy Observatory (GEO).

  12. Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal Technologies Place:StandardsFinanceClimate

  13. Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal Technologies Place:StandardsFinanceClimate

  14. FAO-Capacity Development on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion FlumeEventFAO Climate-Smart

  15. Development of a High-Performance Office Building Simulation Model for a Hot and Humid Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

    2009-01-01

    applicable to office buildings in hot and humid climates and to develop a high-performance (maximum energy-efficient) building model that only uses technologies readily available in the contemporary market. The high-performance model showed 48% total... HIGH-PERFORMANCE OFFICE BUILDING SIMULATION MODEL FOR A HOT AND HUMID CLIMATE Soolyeon Cho1 and Jeff S. Haberl2 1The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., USA 2Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA ABSTRACT...

  16. FUTURE CLIMATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.M. Forester

    2000-03-14

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure l), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog.

  17. Preparing Low-emission and Climate-Resilient Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    development strategies (LECRDS). Working within relevant national, local, and regional planning and coordination frameworks, LECRDS are designed to build upon existing...

  18. Turkmenistan-Integrated Approaches to the Development of Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Access, - Energy Security, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http:www.diw-econ.deenexam Program Start...

  19. Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, a new tool has been...

  20. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21

    change management issues in local policy making have remained a research rhetoric and have not yet translated into planning action. This gap between planning research and practice is probably due to lack of evidence based research on this issue...

  1. GIS and Spatial Agent-Based Model Simulations for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Mason University

    1 GIS and Spatial Agent-Based Model Simulations for Sustainable Development Claudio Cioffi-Revilla1 and climate. This paper explains the needs and demand for GIS in these types of agent-based models with GIS for representing spatial features. Keywords: geographic information systems (GIS), spatial agent

  2. Develop a Web-Based Information System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop a Web-Based Information System Sam Jody Energy Systems Division DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review February 27, 2008 "This presentation does not contain...

  3. Food Security Implication Of Climate Change In Developing Countries: Findings From A Case Study In Mali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    In Mali Tanveer A. Butt* Assistant Research Scientist, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: FINDINGS FROM A CASE STUDY IN MALI Abstract: We investigated the impact of climate findings from a case study conducted in Mali. A suite of biophysical models is used to project the impact

  4. Global Climate Change Policy A significant proportion of scientific opinion, based on both empirical data and large-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Climate Change Policy A significant proportion of scientific opinion, based on both of climate change are more uncertain. Global models seem to agree that Northwest temperatures will be higher of climate change on the hydropower system are discussed in Appendix N. Nationwide, the electric power system

  5. "Climate change in Massachusetts: What would Henry say?" A field trip-based course for Fall 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    1 Syllabus "Climate change in Massachusetts: What would Henry say?" A field trip-based course and animals of Massachusetts, and his records are now being used to document the reality of climate change. If Thoreau were alive today, he could readily observe the impacts of climate change and other human

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP USING TWO-STAGE COMPRESSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a well-regarded, hardware based heat pump system model to investigate a two-stage economizing cycle for cold climate heat pump applications. The two-stage compression cycle has two variable-speed compressors. The high stage compressor was modelled using a compressor map, and the low stage compressor was experimentally studied using calorimeter testing. A single-stage heat pump system was modelled as the baseline. The system performance predictions are compared between the two-stage and single-stage systems. Special considerations for designing a cold climate heat pump are addressed at both the system and component levels.

  7. Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect PulseSummary (Program Document)energiescomponents-based

  8. Sustainable urban development under climate change and resource scarcity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olazabal, Marta

    2015-06-09

    , urban land is estimated to occupy between 0.2 and 2.4 per cent3 Seto et al. 2011 of the earth’s surface ( ) and shelter more than 50 per cent of the world’s population (UN 2011). Half of this urban population is living in cities with less than 500... of resources, security to Cities as hubs of development: Employment generation, centralization of services Rural-urban migration: Cities occupy around 3 % of the Earth’s land, but house ~50% of the world population Rapid urbanisation is exerting...

  9. Thailand-Programme for Developing and Implementing a Climate Protection

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeterInformation Policy and Development Plan Jump to:

  10. Multidecadal climate variability in Brazil's Nordeste during the last 3000 years based on speleothem isotope records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Multidecadal climate variability in Brazil's Nordeste during the last 3000 years based, precipitation record from north- eastern Brazil (hereafter referred to as `Nordeste') covering the last $3000 variability in Brazil's Nordeste during the last 3000 years based on speleothem isotope records, Geophys. Res

  11. UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidston, Joseph

    CONSORTIUM UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE World-class excellence Internationally recognised Australia based www.monash.edu.au/climate-consortium CONSORTIUM An International Collaborative of the institutional leads within the UCC: The University Climate Consortium (UCC) comprises four research intensive

  12. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Energy Security, - Health Resource Type: Case studiesexamples, Lessons learnedbest practices, Publications...

  13. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, searchSoda

  14. Development of a criteria based strategic sourcing model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quińonez, Carlo G. (Carlo Gabriel)

    2013-01-01

    Strategic sourcing is a key factor in enhancing Nike's competitiveness and organizational and operational performances. As Nike faces increasing pressure to expand margins and reduce source base risk during a climate of ...

  15. Carbon dioxide and global climate change: The birth and arrested development of an idea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    G.S. Callendar (1897--1964) is regarded the originator of the modern theory of carbon dioxide and global climate change. However, this paper shows that the theory was developed and became well accepted during the nineteenth century. Carbon dioxide was discovered by Black in 1752. From 1820 to 1890 a steadily growing number of measurements of its atmospheric concentration were made using steadily improving techniques; the average results fell from around 500 ppm in 1820 to about 300 ppm in 1890. By the end of the following decade the greenhouse theory of global climate change seemed widely accepted. However in 1900 and 1901 Aangstroem appeared to demolish the theory when he reported that changes in the carbon dioxide level can have little effect because of the overlap of the water and carbon dioxide spectral bands. At a stroke, all interest in the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels seemed to disappear, although during the 1920s and 1930s a few workers resumed the work but for reasons unconnected to climate change. Over the next thirty years the writers of authoritative textbooks dismissed the theory of carbon dioxide and climate change as an example of misguided speculation. Then in 1938 Callendar`s first paper appeared, reviving the theory which had lain forgotten for nearly forty years.

  16. Evaluation of Potential Impacts on Great Lakes Water Resources Based on Climate Scenarios of Two GCMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Potential Impacts on Great Lakes Water Resources Based on Climate Scenarios of Two Mete- orological Office's Hadley Centre (model HadCM2) have been used to derive potential impacts in the satisfaction of the interests of commercial navigation, recreational boating, riparians, and hydropower due

  17. An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building of the effect on indoor climate, we verify that the controller achieves the energy efficiency improvements to heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems [1]. Energy-efficient control of HVAC systems

  18. Climate-based models of spatial patterns of species richness in Egypt's butterfly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obbard, Darren

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Climate-based models of spatial patterns of species richness in Egypt's butterfly, Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency, Maadi, Cairo and 3 Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt of butterfly and mammal species richness. Location Egypt. Methods Data on the occurrence of butterflies

  19. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  20. Future Climate Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Houseworth

    2001-10-12

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

  1. Estimating present climate in a warming world: a model-based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeisaenen, J.; Ruokolainen, L. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics

    2008-09-30

    Weather services base their operational definitions of 'present' climate on past observations, using a 30-year normal period such as 1961-1990 or 1971-2000. In a world with ongoing global warming, however, past data give a biased estimate of the actual present-day climate. Here we propose to correct this bias with a 'delta change' method, in which model-simulated climate changes and observed global mean temperature changes are used to extrapolate past observations forward in time, to make them representative of present or future climate conditions. In a hindcast test for the years 1991-2002, the method works well for temperature, with a clear improvement in verification statistics compared to the case in which the hindcast is formed directly from the observations for 1961-1990. However, no improvement is found for precipitation, for which the signal-to-noise ratio between expected anthropogenic changes and interannual variability is much lower than for temperature. An application of the method to the present (around the year 2007) climate suggests that, as a geographical average over land areas excluding Antarctica, 8-9 months per year and 8-9 years per decade can be expected to be warmer than the median for 1971-2000. Along with the overall warming, a substantial increase in the frequency of warm extremes at the expense of cold extremes of monthly-to-annual temperature is expected.

  2. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department of EnergyEmerging TechnologiesBuilding

  3. The Influence on Climate Change of Differing Scenarios for Future Development Analyzed Using the MIT Integrated Global System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    A wide variety of scenarios for future development have played significant roles in climate policy discussions. This paper presents projections of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, sea level rise due to thermal expansion ...

  4. Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy Patterson b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN, United Kingdom d Natural Resources Canada/Ressources naturelles Canada). Palaeohydrological reconstructions from ombrotrophic peat- lands agree well with other proxy climate data (Baker et

  5. A Net Energy-based Analysis for a Climate-constrained Sustainable Energy Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgouridis, Sgouris; Csala, Denes

    2015-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based energy economy to one based on renewable energy is driven by the double challenge of climate change and resource depletion. Building a renewable energy infrastructure requires an upfront energy investment that subtracts from the net energy available to society. This investment is determined by the need to transition to renewable energy fast enough to stave off the worst consequences of climate change and, at the same time, maintain a sufficient net energy flow to sustain the world's economy and population. We show that a feasible transition pathway requires that the rate of investment in renewable energy should accelerate approximately by an order of magnitude if we are to stay within the range of IPCC recommendations.

  6. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  7. Black Carbon and Kerosene Lighting: An Opportunity for Rapid Action on Climate Change and Clean Energy for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Arne; Bond, Tami C.; Lam, Nicholoas L.; Hultman, Nathan

    2013-04-15

    Replacing inefficient kerosene lighting with electric lighting or other clean alternatives can rapidly achieve development and energy access goals, save money and reduce climate warming. Many of the 250 million households that lack reliable access to electricity rely on inefficient and dangerous simple wick lamps and other kerosene-fueled light sources, using 4 to 25 billion liters of kerosene annually to meet basic lighting needs. Kerosene costs can be a significant household expense and subsidies are expensive. New information on kerosene lamp emissions reveals that their climate impacts are substantial. Eliminating current annual black carbon emissions would provide a climate benefit equivalent to 5 gigatons of carbon dioxide reductions over the next 20 years. Robust and low-cost technologies for supplanting simple wick and other kerosene-fueled lamps exist and are easily distributed and scalable. Improving household lighting offers a low-cost opportunity to improve development, cool the climate and reduce costs.

  8. Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict...

  9. Russian naval bases due commercial development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-27

    Tecnogrid Group, New York, has signed a joint venture with the Russian Navy for commercial development of a wide range of sea dn land based assets owned by the former Soviet Navy. This paper reports that among other things, the venture aims for projects that will allow greater volumes of oil exports by revamping several naval bases. Tecnogrid's partner in the joint venture is AO Navicon, A Russian stock holding company that is the commercial arm of the Navy. Navicon has the sole right to commercially develop and deploy the Navy's assets. The Navy can no longer depend on the state for support, and Adm. Ig. Malhonin. With that in mind, the Navy is looking to become the leading force in moving toward a free market economy. Mahonin is Russia's second ranking naval official.

  10. Probabilistic Forecast for 21st Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (without Policy) and Climate Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model's first projections were published in 2003 substantial improvements have been made to ...

  11. Probabilistic Forecast for Twenty-First-Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (Without Policy) and Climate Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model’s first projections were published in 2003, ...

  12. Weather-based yield forecasts developed for 12 California crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobell, David; Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Field, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Weather-based yield forecasts developed fordepend largely on the weather, measurements from existingpredictions. We developed weather-based models of statewide

  13. MEMS-based chemical analysis systems development at Sandia National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: MEMS-based chemical analysis systems development at Sandia National Labs. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MEMS-based chemical analysis systems development at...

  14. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01

    This study evaluates the simulation of tropical precipitation by the Community Climate Model, Version 3, developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. For an evaluation of the annual cycle of precipitation, ...

  15. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, D. C; Collatz, G. J; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change science program and the subcommittee on global change research, Department of commerce, Noaa’s National Climatic Data Center,

  16. Negotiating future climates for public policy: a critical assessment of the development of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    ) or of seasonal forecasting (a few months): Earth system models aim to simulate future climatic evolution over

  17. Savannah River Site generic data base development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard , A.

    2000-01-04

    This report describes the results of a project to improve the generic component failure database for the Savannah River Site (SRS). Additionally, guidelines were developed further for more advanced applications of database values. A representative list of components and failure modes for SRS risk models was generated by reviewing existing safety analyses and component failure data bases and from suggestions from SRS safety analysts. Then sources of data or failure rate estimates were identified and reviewed for applicability. A major source of information was the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability, or NUCLARR. This source includes an extensive collection of failure data and failure rate estimates for commercial nuclear power plants. A recent Idaho National Engineering Laboratory report on failure data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was also reviewed. From these and other recent sources, failure data and failure rate estimates were collected for the components and failure modes of interest. For each component failure mode, this information was aggregated to obtain a recommended generic failure rate distribution (mean and error factor based on a lognormal distribution). Results are presented in a table in this report. A major difference between generic database and previous efforts is that this effort estimates failure rates based on actual data (failure events) rather than on existing failure rate estimates. This effort was successful in that over 75% of the results are now based on actual data. Also included is a section on guidelines for more advanced applications of failure rate data. This report describes the results of a project to improve the generic component failure database for the Savannah River site (SRS). Additionally, guidelines were developed further for more advanced applications of database values.

  18. Future Climate Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. G. Cambell

    2004-09-03

    This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

  19. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J.

    1997-10-01

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  20. A late Quaternary climate reconstruction based on borehole heat flux data, borehole temperature data, and the instrumental record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    A late Quaternary climate reconstruction based on borehole heat flux data, borehole temperature,000 year reconstructions that integrate three types of geothermal information: a global database reconstruction based on borehole heat flux data, borehole temperature data, and the instrumental record, Geophys

  1. Development of an Outdoor Temperature-Based Control Algorithm...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of an Outdoor Temperature-Based Control Algorithm for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of an Outdoor...

  2. A Tool for Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) Based Design of Residential Air Source Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park

    2014-01-01

    A tool for the design of air source heat pumps (ASHP) based on their life cycle climate performance (LCCP) analysis is presented. The LCCP model includes direct and indirect emissions of the ASHP. The annual energy consumption of the ASHP is determined based on AHRI Standard 210/240. The tool can be used as an evaluation tool when the user inputs the required performance data based on the ASHP type selected. In addition, this tool has system design capability where the user inputs the design parameters of the different components of the heat pump and the tool runs the system simulation software to calculate the performance data. Additional features available in the tool include the capability to perform parametric analysis and sensitivity study on the system. The tool has 14 refrigerants, and 47 cities built-in with the option for the user to add more refrigerants, based on NIST REFPROP, and cities, using TMY-3 database. The underlying LCCP calculation framework is open source and can be easily customized for various applications. The tool can be used with any system simulation software, load calculation tool, and weather and emissions data type.

  3. The uses and misuses of technology development as a component of climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    The current misplaced focus on short-term climate policies is a product both of domestic political exigencies and badly flawed technical analyses. A prime example of the latter is a recent U.S. Department of Energy study, ...

  4. Mainstreaming climate change adaptation into urban development : lessons from two South African cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Leanne A. (Leanne Andrea)

    2010-01-01

    There is a risk that urban climate change adaptation planning - often led by city environmental agencies - will remain isolated from ongoing city decision-making processes, and thus irrelevant, unless adaptation is ...

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between Climate Change, Food Systems and UBC Campus..........5 Global Warming and Livestock Production products and there exist very few suggestions to reduce green house gas emissions (GHGE) other than

  6. The potential for a nuclear renaissance : the development of nuclear power under climate change mitigation policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osouf, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are very likely to have already changed the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power, a nearly carbon-free source of ...

  7. Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedlitz, Arnold; Alston, Letitia T.; Wood, B. Dan; North, Gerald R.; Lindquist, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase I Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy The Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University Institute... for Science, Technology and Public Policy ? The Bush School ? Texas A&M University 1 Acknowledgements Research Support...

  8. Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand...

  9. Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate and Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to...

  10. Water Poverty in Sub-Saharan African nation: GIS based index for assessing vulnerability in relation to climate change data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trakosa, Anastasia

    2008-08-13

    Access to safe water is currently a privilege for the citizens of many developing countries in Asia and Africa. In the last few decades changes in climate have increased concentrations of greenhouse gasses. The results of global warming have had a...

  11. Developing fundamentally based models for autoignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijaya, Catherina D. (Catherina Dewi)

    2005-01-01

    There is renewed interest in autoignition, especially due to the recent development of the homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, highly promising with its low Nox and particulate emissions and high efficiency. ...

  12. A Web-Based Development Environment for Collaborative Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    A Web-Based Development Environment for Collaborative Data Analysis M Erdmann, R Fischer, C Glaser@lists.rwth-aachen.de Abstract. Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) is a web-based development environment addressing high energy the most recent developments of our web application concerning technical, state-of-the-art approaches

  13. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  14. Develop a Web-Based Information System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Web-Based Information System Develop a Web-Based Information System Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in...

  15. Understanding the mechanism of base development of HSQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jihoon

    2010-01-01

    6964 (1994). Fig 1. a) Proposed mechanism for H evolution,b) Proposed dissolution mechanism of HSQ in base with salts.Understanding the Mechanism of Base Development of HSQ

  16. A platform based approach for embedded systems software development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Deepak

    2006-01-01

    A platform based approach for product development allows companies to eliminate redundancies, efficiently utilize its resources and provide products for a wider market. The basic idea is to develop and share key components ...

  17. The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan....

  18. Methodology to Develop and Test an Easy-to-use Procedure for the Preliminary Selection of High-performance Systems for Office Buildings in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Sool Yeon

    2010-10-12

    A procedure has been developed for the preliminary selection of high-performance systems for office buildings in hot and humid climates. High-performance building systems and components were surveyed for buildings in the ...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A MEVVA BASED BERYLLIUM7 PLASMA SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    DEVELOPMENT OF A MEVVA BASED BERYLLIUM­7 PLASMA SOURCE by David K. Olson A thesis submitted Dean College of Mathematics and Physical Sciences #12;ABSTRACT DEVELOPMENT OF A MEVVA BASED BERYLLIUM­7 source designs. Our pri- mary intent with this MeVVA­type source is to create a confinable beryllium-7 (7

  20. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Software Development: Applications, Infrastructure, and Middleware/Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-30

    The status of and future plans for the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) hinge on software that PCMDI is either currently distributing or plans to distribute to the climate community in the near future. These software products include standard conventions, national and international federated infrastructures, and community analysis and visualization tools. This report also mentions other secondary software not necessarily led by or developed at PCMDI to provide a complete picture of the overarching applications, infrastructures, and middleware/networks. Much of the software described anticipates the use of future technologies envisioned over the span of next year to 10 years. These technologies, together with the software, will be the catalyst required to address extreme-scale data warehousing, scalability issues, and service-level requirements for a diverse set of well-known projects essential for predicting climate change. These tools, unlike the previous static analysis tools of the past, will support the co-existence of many users in a productive, shared virtual environment. This advanced technological world driven by extreme-scale computing and the data it generates will increase scientists’ productivity, exploit national and international relationships, and push research to new levels of understanding.

  1. Massachusetts Takes On Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmell, Ken; Laurie, Burt

    2009-01-01

    to promote new technologies to fight climate change as theON CLIMATE CHANGE dard is a market-based, technology-neutraland technologies. 9. Facilities will calculate emissions using The Climate

  2. Regional calibration of coral-based climate reconstructions from Palau, West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Michael C; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Druffel, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    of the western Paci?c Warm Pool. Climate Dynamics 33, 565–of the Paci?c warm pool: implications for ENSO. Sciencein the western Paci?c warm pool. Coral Reefs 29, 413–418.

  3. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, D. C; Collatz, G. J; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    C. S. : The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,evidence of smoke from forest fires inhibiting rainfall,change on Canadian forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 31,

  4. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, D. C; Collatz, G. J; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    C. S. : The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,change on Canadian forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 31,evidence of smoke from forest fires inhibiting rainfall,

  5. Climate Change Adaptation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is adapting to climate change by applying a risk-based resiliency approach to identify and minimize climate-related vulnerabilities across all DOE policies, programs and activities.

  6. Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperation Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Price, Lynn; Kumar, Satish; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Warfield, Corina; Padmanabhan, S.

    2006-01-01

    on renewable energy and clean coal development, is a coreentrepreneurs in India. The Clean Coal Business Development

  7. Analysis of Cooling Regression Models for Hot and Humid Climates Based on "Operational Effective Enthalpy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Baltazar, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    determination for energy efficiency projects is based on procedures established in the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP, 2012), specifically Option C. Energy use baseline models are developed from a regression analysis... constitute a smaller fraction of total cooling load show a more modest improvement using OEE instead of OAT. INTRODUCTION The International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP, 2012) Option C provides procedures to determine...

  8. CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: Energy ResourcesCRED: A New Model of Climate and

  9. Physically-Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2006-05-01

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to the high-resolution of topography in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate lead to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region. In most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  10. Physically-Based Global Downscaling Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2005-04-15

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to a high-resolution elevation dataset in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate leads to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region; in most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  11. Developing a Web-based GIS Application for Earthquake Mapping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boermel, Christian

    2012-11-29

    The fast technical progress of web-based GIS has enabled visualising complex geographical phenomena for the interested public. This research paper analyses the development of a global earthquake web map which allows the visualisation of significant...

  12. Development of a cell-based stream flow routing model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Rajeev

    2005-08-29

    This study presents the development of a cell-based routing model. The model developed is a two parameter hydrological routing model that uses a coarse resolution stream network to route runoff from each cell in the watershed to the outlet...

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System:To Infinity and Beyond Climate Neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :To Infinity and Beyond Climate Neutral Rachel Yeh, Yasaman Arbabian, Neda Rahimi-Aliabadi, Jacob Siegel, Jing Action Partnership ­ Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral Group 23 Rachel Yeh,Yasaman Arbabian, Neda Rahimi

  14. To develop a conceptual framework and assess the regional variability of climate change adaptive capacity in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saumya, Mathur

    2011-11-24

    Vulnerability to climate change has been defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as being a function of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. Besides the first two components of vulnerability, ...

  15. The Role of Plate Tectonic-Climate Coupling and Exposed Land Area in the Development of Habitable Climates on Rocky Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Bradford J

    2015-01-01

    The long-term carbon cycle is vital for maintaining liquid water oceans on rocky planets due to the negative climate feedbacks involved in silicate weathering. Plate tectonics plays a crucial role in driving the long-term carbon cycle because it is responsible for CO$_2$ degassing at ridges and arcs, the return of CO$_2$ to the mantle through subduction, and supplying fresh, weatherable rock to the surface via uplift and orogeny. However, the presence of plate tectonics itself may depend on climate according to recent geodynamical studies showing that cool surface temperatures are important for maintaining vigorous plate tectonics. Using a simple carbon cycle model, I show that the negative climate feedbacks inherent in the long-term carbon cycle are uninhibited by climate's effect on plate tectonics. Furthermore, initial atmospheric CO$_2$ conditions do not impact the final climate state reached when the carbon cycle comes to equilibrium, as long as liquid water is present and silicate weathering can occur. ...

  16. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, William C.; Long, Michael S.

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

  17. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  18. CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;This development of these materials was supported under.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble/BlueMarble_history.php © 2014 University of Western Australia ISBN 978-0-646-93241-5 Title: Climate change and the greenhouse OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction to climate change resources 5 Alternative conceptions 6 References

  19. Developing a knowledge base for the management of severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was given to the development of procedures for the management of severe accidents, that is, accidents in which the reactor core is damaged. Since TMI, however, significant effort has been devoted to developing strategies for severe accident management. At the same time, the potential application of artificial intelligence techniques, particularly expert systems, to complex decision-making tasks such as accident diagnosis and response has received considerable attention. The need to develop strategies for accident management suggests that a computerized knowledge base such as used by an expert system could be developed to collect and organize knowledge for severe accident management. This paper suggests a general method which could be used to develop such a knowledge base, and how it could be used to enhance accident management capabilities.

  20. Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedlitz, Arnold; Lindquist, Eric; Liu, Xinsheng; Zahran, Sammy; Wood, B. Dan; Alston, Letitia T.; North, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    -1 Utilization of Science-Based Information on Climate Change in Decision Making and the Public Policy Process - Phase 2 Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy The Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University Dr. Arnold... Vedlitz, Director & Bob Bullock Chair in Government and Public Policy Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy The Bush School of Government and Public Service Texas A&M University College Station, Texas 77843-4350 Phone 979.862.8855 avedlitz...

  1. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Ding, A.; Wang, H.; Zhang, K.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, T.; et al

    2015-09-02

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (?500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascendmore »(?500 ?1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm d?1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.« less

  2. Editors Kirsten Halsns & Amit Garg ENERGY, CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors Kirsten Halsnćs & Amit Garg ENERGY, CLIMATE Sustainable Development, Energy and Climate Development, Energy and Climate Exploring Synergies and Tradeoffs Methodological Issues and Case Studies from Brazil, China, India, South Africa, Bangladesh and Senegal Editors Kirsten Halsnćs & Amit Garg ENERGY

  3. Future Climate Variability and Watershed Response in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Sonya Rita

    2012-01-01

    2004. Guidelines for use of climate scenarios developed fromIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, available fromNearing MA .2005. Impact of climate change on soil erosion,

  4. Climate Science and Climate Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate ImpactResearch and Climate Analytics.of carbon under non-linear climate response. ESRI working

  5. Climate-Change Problem Solving: Structured Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Climate-Change Problem Solving: Structured Approaches Based on Real-World Experiences Richard B of knowledge system · Structured problem solving · How to express problem solving in information technology problem solving · Key to development of successful strategies: iterative process or co- development

  6. Development of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments ­Path to low cost (sensor) at 500k qty ­Develop test rig for sensor evaluation · Program Evaluation ­ UTRC Benchmark Sensor Test ­ IIT Sensor Test & Refinement ­ UTRC Program Lead And Evaluation UTCDevelopment of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells DOE Agreement DE-FC04-02AL67616 Brian

  7. Long-Term Climate Change Assessment Task for the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program: Status through FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.L.; Chatters, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program (Barrier Development Program) was organized (Adams and Wing 1986) to develop the technology needed to provide an in-place disposal capability for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The goals of the Barrier Development Program are to provide defensible evidence that final barrier design(s) will adequately control water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion for a minimum of 1,000 years; to isolate wastes from the accessible environment; and to use markers to warn inadvertent human intruders. Evidence for barrier performance will be obtained by conducting laboratory experiments, field tests, computer modeling, and other studies that establish confidence in the barrier`s ability to meet its 1,000-year design life. The performance and stability of natural barrier analogs that have existed for several millennia and the reconstruction of climate changes during the past 10,000 to 125,000 years also will provide insight into bounding conditions of possible future changes and increase confidence in the barriers design. In the following discussion the term {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} references periods of time up to 1000`s of years, distinguishing it from {open_quotes}short-term{close_quotes} weather patterns covering a decade or less. Specific activities focus on planning and conducting a series of studies and tests required to confirm key aspects of the barrier design. The effort is a collaborative one between scientists and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to design barriers to limit movement of radionuclides and other contaminants to the accessible environment for at least 1,000 years. These activities have been divided into 14 groups of tasks that aid in the complete development of protective barrier and warning marker system.

  8. Development of a Residential Code-Compliant Calculator for the Texas Climate Vision Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Marshall, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D. R.; Stackhouse, R.; Cordes, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Morgan, R.; Montgomery, C.; Liu, Z.

    2007-01-01

    , December 17-18, 2007 Hot & Humid Symposium ? San Antonio Texas ? December 2007 8/18 students; and Mr. Felix Lopez, P.E., the project manager with SECO. 7 - REFERENCES City of Austin, Energy Code based in IECC2006 with local amendments, passed...

  9. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  10. State energy price system. Volume II: data base development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This volume documents the entire data development process in sufficient detail to permit critical assessment of the data base. However, since a methodological discussion is included in Chapter 3 of Volume I, it is not repeated here. The data base development process was conducted in a fuel-by-fuel fashion, following the general sequence of electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. For each of the fuels, a detailed data source review was conducted, which included a preliminary screening against criteria set up for this purpose. After this first screening, the data sources that met most of the review criteria were evaluated in more detail. If one data source met all the criteria, that data source was recommended for use, with minimal change or imputation. If there were substantial gaps in the available data series, then alternative imputation procedures were developed and compared, and recommendations were formulated. This entire procedure was then documented in a draft working paper for review and discussion. To the extent reasonable and practical, comments from the formal EIA reviews were then incorporated into the final recommendations and the data base was developed.

  11. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

  12. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change and Low

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbon Development | Open Energy Information

  13. Climate Change and Place Roundtable Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    of Urban Development and Climate Change,” 2007. The fullThink about what runaway climate change would mean where youWorld Changing Seattle, WA Climate change is global in scale

  14. Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: Observing, Understanding Observing System for Climate #12;Performance 4 Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: A coordinated multi-national effort to develop and sustain moored buoy observing systems for climate research

  15. CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY: Possible Roles for the U.N. Security Council in Addressing Climate Change By Dane Warren July 2015 #12;© 2015 Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School The Sabin Center for Climate Change Law develops legal techniques to fight climate change

  16. Weather vs. Climate What is the difference between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Consul7ng #12;Weather Consul6ng Using Climate Data · A weather consultant helps people or businesses make decisions based on knowledge of weather or climateWeather vs. Climate #12;What is the difference between weather and climate

  17. CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE Scenarios of what the climate will be like 50 to 100 years from now associated with climate change demand these efforts continue. However, the long time horizons have led many decision makers to regard climate change as a problem of the distant future. But is it? I n many regions

  18. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  19. Recent Developments in Mems-Based Micro Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichonat, T

    2007-01-01

    Micro fuel cells ($\\mu$-FC) represent promising power sources for portable applications. Today, one of the technological ways to make $\\mu$-FC is to have recourse to standard microfabrication techniques used in the fabrication of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS). This paper shows an overview on the applications of MEMS techniques on miniature FC by presenting several solutions developed throughout the world. It also describes the latest developments of a new porous silicon-based miniature fuel cell. Using a silane grafted on an inorganic porous media as the proton-exchange membrane instead of a common ionomer such as Nafion, the fuel cell achieved a maximum power density of 58 mW cm-2 at room temperature with hydrogen as fuel.

  20. White paper on "Speleothem-based climate proxy records" Dominik Fleitmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2002). 2. Oxygen (!18 O) isotope ratio: interpreted as variations in cave temperature and properties downstream of the source caused by equilibration of aqueous CO2 with cave air is also recognised, and in some in speleothem-based research. This has led to focused and high-quality research that has utilised many

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  2. Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2013-02-01

    The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversary's task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    similar to the Land and Food Systems (LFS) Orchard Garden, 0.019 tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions an external source. This study attempts to quantify the GHG emissions from the transportation of the food Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral

  4. Holocene blanket peat development in south west Scotland : the roles of human activity, climate change and vegetation change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flitcroft, Catherine Esther

    2006-11-29

    involved in the formation of blanket peat have been defined in the literature, in particular the roles of climate change, soil processes and anthropogenic effects, tested in this thesis from a typical peat-covered upland in south west Scotland. Tests...

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership Contribution of Food GHG Emissions Reduction: Moving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    target: Ensure that 90% of UBC's food system waste can be composted or recycled by 2015. We reviewed Waste Management, UBC Food Services and the AMS Food and Beverage Partnership Contribution of Food GHG Emissions Reduction: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral Jennifer Baum

  6. AutoMoDe Notations, Methods, and Tools for Model-Based Development of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Peter

    05AE-268 AutoMoDe ­ Notations, Methods, and Tools for Model-Based Development of Automotive describes the first results from the AutoMoDe project (Automotive Model-based Development), where an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software is being developed

  7. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  8. Climate Change Policies for the XXIst Century: Mechanisms, Predictions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khmelinskii, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental works demonstrated that the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) hypothesis, embodied in a series of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) global climate models, is erroneous. These works prove that atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes only very moderately to the observed warming, and that there is no climatic catastrophe in the making, independent on whether or not carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced. In view of these developments, we discuss climate predictions for the XXIst century. Based on the solar activity tendencies, a new Little Ice Age is predicted by the middle of this century, with significantly lower global temperatures. We also show that IPCC climate models can't produce any information regarding future climate, due to essential physical phenomena lacking in those, and that the current budget deficit in many EU countries is mainly caused by the policies promoting renewable energies and other AGW-motivated measures. In absence of any predictable adverse climate...

  9. Glass composition development for stabilization of lead based paints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    Exposure to lead can lead to adverse health affects including permanent damage to the central nervous system. Common means of exposure to lead are from ingestion of lead paint chips or breathing of dust from deteriorating painted surfaces. The U.S. Army has over 101 million square feet of buildings dating to World War II or earlier. Many of these structures were built before the 1978 ban on lead based paints. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CERL is developing technologies to remove and stabilize lead containing organic coatings. Promising results have been achieved using a patented flame spray process that utilizes a glass frit to stabilize the hazardous constituents. When the glass frit is sprayed onto the paint containing substrate, differences in thermal expansion coefficients between the frit and the paint results in spalling of the paint from the substrate surface. The removed fragments are then collected and remelted to stabilize the hazardous constituents and allow for disposal as non-hazardous waste. Similar successful results using a patented process involving microwave technology for paint removal have also been achieved. In this process, the painted surface is coated with a microwave coupling compound that when exposed to microwave energy results in the spalling of the hazardous paint from the surface. The fragments can again be accumulated and remelted for stabilization and disposal.

  10. A MULTISCALE, CELL-BASED FRAMEWORK FOR MODELING CANCER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JIANG, YI

    2007-01-16

    Cancer remains to be one of the leading causes of death due to diseases. We use a systems approach that combines mathematical modeling, numerical simulation, in vivo and in vitro experiments, to develop a predictive model that medical researchers can use to study and treat cancerous tumors. The multiscale, cell-based model includes intracellular regulations, cellular level dynamics and intercellular interactions, and extracellular level chemical dynamics. The intracellular level protein regulations and signaling pathways are described by Boolean networks. The cellular level growth and division dynamics, cellular adhesion and interaction with the extracellular matrix is described by a lattice Monte Carlo model (the Cellular Potts Model). The extracellular dynamics of the signaling molecules and metabolites are described by a system of reaction-diffusion equations. All three levels of the model are integrated through a hybrid parallel scheme into a high-performance simulation tool. The simulation results reproduce experimental data in both avasular tumors and tumor angiogenesis. By combining the model with experimental data to construct biologically accurate simulations of tumors and their vascular systems, this model will enable medical researchers to gain a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular interactions associated with cancer progression and treatment.

  11. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01

    Energy Policy  and Project Development Support (pp.  2–3).  and  implement projects, development institutions collect, and implement projects, development institutions collect, 

  12. AutoMoDe - Model-Based Development of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegenbein, Dirk; Freund, Ulrich; Bauer, Andreas; Romberg, Jan; Schatz, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes first results from the AutoMoDe (Automotive Model-Based Development) project. The overall goal of the project is to develop an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software, based on problem-specific design notations with an explicit formal foundation. Based on the existing AutoFOCUS framework, a tool prototype is being developed in order to illustrate and validate the key elements of our approach.

  13. Offshore wind energy climate projection using UPSCALE climate data under the RCP8.5 emission scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated how climate data can be utilized to estimate regional wind power densities. In particular it was shown that the quality of the global scale estimate compared well with regional high resolution studies and a link between surface temperature and moist density in the estimate was presented. In the present paper the methodology is tested further, to ensure that the results using one climate data set are reliable. This is achieved by extending the study to include four ensemble members. With the confidence that one instantiation is sufficient a climate change data set, which was also a result of the UPSCALE experiment, is analyzed. This, for the first time, provides a projection of future changes in wind power resources using this data set. This climate change data set is based on the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 climate change scenario. This provides guidance for developers and policy makers to mitigate and adapt.

  14. Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Chapter 9 Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a John McGregorb , and Kendal McGuffiec a Climate of Dynamical Downscaling 235 9.3.1.6. Future Development in Dynamical Downscaling 235 9.3.2. Statistical' Future Climate and Its Probability 242 9.5. Achieving Regional Climate Predictions 243 9.5.1. Water

  15. Risk Management in Component-based Development: A Separation of Concerns Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management in Component-based Development: A Separation of Concerns Perspective Awais Rashid development stages. We propose a risk management mechanism based on identifying risk management techniques of the risks involved and their management. In fact component-based development poses significant risks

  16. A model-based systems engineering framework for concept development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    London, Brian (Brian N.)

    2012-01-01

    The development of increasingly complex, innovative systems under greater constraints has been the trend over the past several decades. In order to be successful, organizations must develop products that meet customer needs ...

  17. Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger gmauger@uw.edu Climate Impacts Group University of Washington Outline: · Climate Change 101 · Why do we care? · Climate models: · About, UncertainDes, Performance, and Projec

  18. New Developments in Titania-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SCR Application Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis...

  19. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The software that the utility industry currently uses may be insufficient to analyze the distribution grid as it rapidly modernizes to include active resources such as distributed generation, switch and voltage control, automation, and increasingly complex loads. Although planners and operators have traditionally viewed the distribution grid as a passive load, utilities and consultants increasingly need enhanced analysis that incorporates active distribution grid loads in order to ensure grid reliability. Numerous commercial and open-source tools are available for analyzing distribution grid systems. These tools vary in complexity from providing basic load-flow and capacity analysis under steady-state conditions to time-series analysis and even geographical representations of dynamic and transient events. The need for each type of analysis is not well understood in the industry, nor are the reasons that distribution analysis requires different techniques and tools both from those now available and from those used for transmission analysis. In addition, there is limited understanding of basic capability of the tools and how they should be practically applied to the evolving distribution system. The study reviews the features and state of the art capability of current tools, including usability and visualization, basic analysis functionality, advanced analysis including inverters, and renewable generation and load modeling. We also discuss the need for each type of distribution grid system analysis. In addition to reviewing basic functionality current models, we discuss dynamics and transient simulation in detail and draw conclusions about existing software?s ability to address the needs of the future distribution grid as well as the barriers to modernization of the distribution grid that are posed by the current state of software and model development. Among our conclusions are that accuracy, data transfer, and data processing abilities are key to future distribution grid modeling, and measured data sources are a key missing element . Modeling tools need to be calibrated based on measured grid data to validate their output in varied conditions such as high renewables penetration and rapidly changing topology. In addition, establishing a standardized data modeling format would enable users to transfer data among tools to take advantage of different analysis features. ?

  20. Development of MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvesters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a new type of high efficiency thermal waste heat energy converter that can be used to actively cool electronic devices, concentrated...

  1. An Interactive Software Development Workbench based on Biomimetic Robert Feldt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldt, Robert

    and removing faults is thus important. One of the most expensive phases of software development is testing. Since testing does not directly add any functionality to the software there is a risk that software affect the search. In section 2 we give a background to software development and testing and present

  2. Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Adaptation to Climate...

  3. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the...

  4. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  5. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and...

  6. Development of GEM-Based Digital Hadron Calorimetry Using the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the SiD detector Concept for the International Linear Collider is described. The jet energy requirements of the ILC physics program are discussed. The concept of GEM-based...

  7. A Web-Based Curriculum Development on Nontraditional Manufacturing with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    and drilling. Recent developments in MEMS and rapid prototyping manufacturing (RPM) would be impossible without and diversity of NTM has posed more challenges than education in conventional manufacturing processes. Teaching

  8. Development and Testing of an Acoustic Based Underwater Positioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and inaccurate coordinates compound the difficulty of this task. The work contained in this thesis develops to absolute GPS coordinates. A surface buoy uses super-short baseline navigation and positioning technology Table of Contents List of Figures

  9. Clean energy for development and economic growth: Biomass and other renewable options to meet energy and development needs in poor nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilley, Art; Pandey, Bikash; Karstad, Elsen; Owen, Matthew; Bailis, Robert; Ribot, Jesse; Masera, Omar; Diaz, Rodolpho; Benallou, Abdelahanine; Lahbabi, Abdelmourhit

    2012-10-01

    The document explores the linkages between renewable energy, poverty alleviation, sustainable development, and climate change in developing countries. In particular, the paper places emphasis on biomass-based energy systems. Biomass energy has a number of unique attributes that make it particularly suitable to climate change mitigation and community development applications.

  10. Parameterization of Urban Characteristics for Global Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-10-31

    The data presented here are part of a global dataset developed specifically for use in climate models to simulate urban climates for specific regions of the globe. Article abstract: To help understand potential effects of urbanization on climates...

  11. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate models). The modeling framework revolves around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change Erwan Monier, Xiang Gao, Jeffery processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving

  12. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  13. A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

  14. Planning for Climate Change in Low-Impact Development Projects: A Case Study of the Sunset Swales Parking Lot Retrofit in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Esther

    2011-01-01

    A Report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and theA Report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and theA Report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the

  15. DEPARTMENT OF SPACE AND CLIMATE PHYSICS PhD Position in the analysis of intensive care medicine data and development of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Mark

    UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE AND CLIMATE PHYSICS PhD Position in the analysis of intensive care medicine-Space and Climate Physics Applications are invited for a PhD position at UCL to study the evolution of critically or medicine. Applications should be made to UCL-Space and Climate Physics at http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/www_phd

  16. Climate Change and Water Resources in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

  17. Development of a CAN Based Electric Vehicle Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Stephen Andrew

    2014-08-31

    the bus featured an unreliable control system to manage load control and drive enable functions. As a result this thesis presents the design of a Controller Area Network (CAN) based control system to be used as a replacement for the existing system...

  18. CAM: Automating Paper-based Processes in the Developing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Tapan S.

    . A mobile phone is the perfect bridging device. Long battery life, connectivity, solid-state memory, low, application and infrastructure constraints. Keywords mobile computing, mobile phones, paper user interface, mobile software platforms are difficult to use, difficult to develop for, and make the assumption

  19. Developing research capacity in the social sciences: a professionality-based model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Linda

    2009-01-01

    professionality based model Dr Linda Evans Reader in Education School of Education University of Leeds Leeds, LS2 9JT UK E:mail: Linda.Evans@education.leeds.ac.uk Introduction With so many layers of research leadership why isn’t every university bulging... in HE, without necessarily labelling it as such, incorporates reference to and examination of what may, according to some conceptions, be categorised as research culture (e.g. Fox and Mohapatra’s (2007, p. 545) reference to ‘work climate’, and Louis et...

  20. Road Infrastructure and Climate Change in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinowsky, Paul

    Climate change is a potential threat to Vietnam’s development as current and future infrastructure will be vulnerable to climate change impacts. This paper focuses on the physical asset of road infrastructure in Vietnam ...

  1. Development of a Bio-Based, Inexpensive, Noncorrosive, Nonflammable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel

  2. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01

    CCE     Cost of Conserved Energy  CDM    Clean Development Clean Energy and Water Project  demonstrates that there are many available opportunities for rapidly and cost 

  3. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  4. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  5. Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Fricke, Brian A; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2012-01-01

    Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

  6. Fullerene-based materials research and development. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, P A; Henderson, C C; Rohlfing, C M; Loy, D A; Assink, R A; Gillen, K T; Jacobs, S J; Dugger, M T

    1995-05-01

    The chemistry and physical properties of fullerenes, the third, molecular allotrope of carbon, have been studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Early computational work investigated the stability of fullerene isomers and oxides, which was followed by extensive work on hydrogenated fullerenes. Our work led to the first synthesis of a polymer containing C{sub 60} and the synthesis of the simplest hydrocarbon derivatives of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment ({plus_minus} 0.1 kcal/mol in the relative stability of isomers) has provided insight into the chemical nature of fullerenes and has yielded a sound basis for prediction of the structure of derivatized fullerenes. Such derivatives are the key to the preparation of fullerene-based materials.

  7. Cr{sub 2}Nb-based alloy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper summarizes recent progress in developing Cr{sub 2}Nb/Cr(Nb) alloys for structural use in advanced fossil energy conversion systems. Alloy additions were added to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. Two beneficial elements have been identified among all alloying additions added to the alloys. One element is effective in refining the coarse eutectic structure and thus substantially improves the compressive strength and ductility of the alloys. The other element enhances oxidation resistance without sacrificing the ductility. The tensile properties are sensitive to cast defects, which can not be effectively reduced by HIPping at 1450-1580{degrees}C and/or directionally solidifying via a floating zone remelting method.

  8. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-15

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  9. Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN MEMS-BASED MICRO FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN MEMS-BASED MICRO FUEL CELLS Tristan Pichonat ABSTRACT Micro fuel cells (µ-FC) represent promising power sources for portable applications. Today, one describes the latest developments of a new porous silicon- based miniature fuel cell. Using a silane grafted

  10. X-MAN: An MDE Tool for Component-based System Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Kung-Kiu

    the complete life cycle for component-based system development [10]. The X-MAN tool has been successfully, and prior to system V&V. A. The W Model The life cycle for component-based system development is thus to this system, and are therefore not repository com- ponents. Thus the V model defines only a system life cycle

  11. Experiential Lighting Development and Validation of Perception-based Lighting Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiential Lighting Development and Validation of Perception-based Lighting Controls BY MATTHEW Lighting Development and Validation of Perception-based Lighting Controls by Matthew Aldrich Submitted Lighting, and its emergence as a digital and networked medium, represents an ideal platform for conducting

  12. The Role of Logic Programming in NextGeneration ComponentBased Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Kung-Kiu

    ) lies in the so­called Industrial Revolution for Information Technology --- Component­based Software Development (CBD). 2 CBD --- ``The Next Industrial Revolution'' Component­based Software Development (CBD) has been hailed as the ``Industrial Revolution for IT''! This ``rev­ olution'' aims at delivering Software

  13. Developing a market-based utility duct sealing program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.; Baylon, D.; Houseknecht, A.

    1998-07-01

    In recent years, residential energy conservation research has focused attention on heating system distribution efficiency. Several field studies in the Pacific Northwest have found forced-air heating systems which have a majority of ducts located in unheated buffer spaces can lose as much as 30% of the equipment's heating output to duct air leakage and conduction loss. The magnitude of loss can be equivalent to the combined improvements in building shell insulation levels due to updated energy codes. Field review of forced-air heating systems often uncovers other problems with duct layout and equipment performance. Several challenges face utilities planning to undertake a large-scale duct-sealing program. Most notable of these challenges are finding suitable homes; working with field protocols which encourage consistent, successful work; and measuring the effects of the work through field quality control and impact analysis. This paper describes the response rate for duct sealing services based on one marketing approach and describes bill and field test screening criteria used to narrow the list of retrofit candidates. Results form the screening are presented, along with preliminary retrofit results and important operations and maintenance findings.

  14. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  15. On Analyzing and Developing Data Contracts in Cloud-based Data Marketplaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    On Analyzing and Developing Data Contracts in Cloud-based Data Marketplaces Hong-Linh Truong, G model for data contracts. Based on the abstract model, we propose several techniques for evaluating data our approach with some real- world scenarios. I. INTRODUCTION Recently, delivering data based

  16. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  17. PLC-Based Safety Critical Software Development for Nuclear Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLC-Based Safety Critical Software Development for Nuclear Power Plants Junbeom Yoo1 , Sungdeok Cha development technique for nuclear power plants'I&C soft- ware controllers. To improve software safety, we in developing safety-critical control software for a Korean nuclear power plant, and experience to date has been

  18. An assessment of possible climate change in the Australian region based on intercomparison of general circulation modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetton, P.H.; Pittock, A.B.; Haylock, M.R. ); Rayner, P.J. )

    1994-03-01

    To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The results examined were the most recent available at the time of study from various research centers in North America and Europe, as well as those of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The approach used is, first, to assess the quality of the control (1 x CO[sub 2]) simulations from each of the models of mean sea level (MSL) pressure and precipitation in the Australian region by comparing these with the corresponding observed patterns; and, second, to then analyze the 2 x CO[sub 2] results of only those model experiments with the best control simulations. Of the models examined two are chosen on the basis of their simulation of current climate in the region: the CSIRO four-level model (CSIRO4) and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) model. For conditions of equivalent doubling of CO[sub 2], both models show substantial increases in surface air temperature of around 4[degrees]-6[degrees] inland and 2[degrees]-4[degrees]C in coastal regions. Both models show decreased MSL pressure over the Australian continent and increases in rainfall over northern, central, and eastern Australia, particularly in the summer half of the year. The CSIRO4 model, but not the UKMO model, also shows increased pressure to the south of the continent and decreased winter rainfall in southwest and southern Australia. Generally, field significance tests show the pattern and magnitude of the changes to be significant of CSIRO4 (for which the necessary monthly simulated data were available). 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

    1992-05-01

    There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

  20. Development of a Simplified Simulation Tool for High Performance K-5 Schools in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    hourly building energy usage: The great energy predictor shootout-overview and discussion of results. ASHRAE Transactions 100(2):1104-1118. Perkins, B. 2001. Building type basics for elementary and secondary schools, John Wiley & Sons, INC. New York... are developed, this tool is intended to be used to estimate building energy consumption with limited information about the school building. This paper reports on the classification scheme and automatic building shape generator, as well as preliminary results...

  1. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009 SANDY DEJOHN PHYSICAL FACILITIES DEPARTMENT #12;~ i ~ TABLE the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, I believe strongly in working to achieve its helped shape and develop the information contained in this Climate Action Plan: (Names listed

  2. WP1 Climate services for road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    WP1 Climate services for road authorities Janette Bessembinder et al. #12;2 A1: review, analysis and assessment of existing climate change projections regarding TEN-T needs A2: Development of a common methodology for the production of regional climate projections to provide consistent input data for risk

  3. Frank Selten, Global Climate Dept, KNMI Understanding climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selten, Frank

    (solar, volcano's) climate models simulate the response T P + + + + ++ ++ + + + these numbers form using satellite MSU (microwave sounding unit)derived deep layer temperatures in the tropical upper of temperature differences between tropical upper and lowermiddle troposphere based on satellite microwave

  4. Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    decisionmaking, especially with regard to issues such as coastal erosion and geology, marine biodiversity Health In a Changing Climate Lesley Ewing Coastal Engineer USC &California Coastal Commission March 12 recommendations are necessary for many coastal planning, conservation, and development decisions

  5. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Climate Measurements Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Arctic Climate Measurementscwdd2015-05-08T01:51:20+00:00 A...

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Empowering eaters to make climate-friendly choices: A public education initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SYSTEM PROJECT 2009 Scenario 3b: Empowering eaters to make climate-friendly choices: A public education choices on climate change. We designed a carbon-friendly food guide with six key recommendations at UBC's farmer's market. We have also created a website which complements the brochure and further

  7. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  8. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  9. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  10. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES Stephen E. Schwartz http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html December 4, 2001 Updated, March 4, 2002 #12;OUTLINE · Overview of the Earth climate system · Increased concentrations of "greenhouse gases" · Radiative forcing of climate change · Climate system response

  11. A Web-based Method for Exploring Early Child Development Trends in British Columbia, Canada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trafford, Katherine L E

    2007-11-27

    British Columbian policy-makers, researchers and community organizations make use of maps describing trends in Early Child Development (ECD) to make program decisions and funding allocation based upon the geography of need. ...

  12. Development of CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal Processing of Oil ShaleSands None 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS In our research, we are taking the novel approach of developing and...

  13. Development and Characterization of Novel Alumina Based Ceramic Matrix Composites for Energy Efficient Sliding Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluri, Rajeshwari S. Lakshmi

    2012-10-19

    where high wear resistance is required, such as pump bearings, seal rings, valve seats, piston components, gears, cutting tool inserts and artificial joints. We propose to develop a novel alumina based ceramic composite to enhance its surface...

  14. Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's research and development on sorbents and carbon-based materials for hydrogen storage targets breakthrough concepts for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents...

  15. Towards a Model-Based and Incremental Development Process for Service-Based Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    - tronics account for 90 percent of all innovations in mod- ern cars. Already today cost for software is getting a leading role in automotive develop- ment and innovation. It is stated that software and elec and electronics in current premium cars make up 40 percent of the over- all cost. The next generation of premium

  16. NuDE 2.0: A Model-based Software Development Environment for the PLC & FPGA based Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as RPS (Reactor Protection System) and ESF-CCS (Engineered Safety Features - Components Control System in Nuclear Power Plants Junbeom Yoo , Eui-Sub Kim , Dong-Ah Lee Computer Science and Enginering Konkuk426, jslee}@kaeri.re.kr Abstract--NuDE 2.0 (Nuclear Development Environment) is a model-based software

  17. Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, John B; Worley, Patrick H; Hoffman, Forrest M; Jones, Phil

    2009-01-01

    This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

  18. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  19. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  20. A Novel Industry Grade Dataset for Fault Prediction based on Model-Driven Developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Novel Industry Grade Dataset for Fault Prediction based on Model-Driven Developed Automotive a novel industry dataset on static software and change metrics for Matlab/Simulink models and their corresponding auto-generated C source code. The data set comprises data of three automotive projects developed

  1. Development of a Digital Shearlet Transform Based on Pseudo-Polar FFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutyniok, Gitta

    Development of a Digital Shearlet Transform Based on Pseudo-Polar FFT Gitta Kutynioka, Morteza is a Matlab toolbox for digital shearlet transformation of two-D (image) data we developed following transform and allows us to translate Shearlet ideas naturally into a digital framework. However

  2. Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled approximations based on molecular similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaron, David

    Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well- controlled approximations based Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation #12;1 Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled on molecular similarity Journal: Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation Manuscript ID: Draft Manuscript

  3. Development of PZT and PZN-PT Based Unimorph Actuators for Micromechanical Flapping Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    mechanisms, Cox et al. [7] developed four-bar and five-bar flexure mechanisms inte- grated with unimorphDevelopment of PZT and PZN-PT Based Unimorph Actuators for Micromechanical Flapping Mechanisms- terization of unimorph actuators for a microaerial flap- ping mechanism. PZT-5H and PZN-PT are investigated

  4. Hy-Sim: Model based Hybrid Simulation framework for WSN application development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hy-Sim: Model based Hybrid Simulation framework for WSN application development Zhen Yu Song a hybrid simulation framework for WSN application development that interconnects a virtual network WSN applications by using high level abstractions which could be used for multi-platform automatic

  5. An Integrated Development Environment for Building Predictable Component-Based Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Steffen

    Save-IDE An Integrated Development Environment for Building Predictable Component-Based Embedded-- In this paper we present an Integrated Development Environment Save-IDE, a toolset that embraces several tools-time properties, such as timing properties, and transforming the components to real-time execution elements. Save

  6. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  7. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  8. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Discusses comfort model enhancement/validation, climate system efficiency parameters and system trade off, and powertrain mode operation changes to further vehicle energy saving while preserving occupant comfort.

  9. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  10. Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirin, A A

    2007-02-05

    The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

  11. Evaluating climate models: Should we use weather or climate observations?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Robert J [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

  12. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  13. Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

  14. Use of Climate Data in Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Use of Climate Data in Climate Research A Random Walk Through the MPI Hans von Storch Max and Technical Committee of the Global Climate Observing System in Hamburg, Germany September 19 - 22, 1994 #12;For which- Purposes do we Use 0bserved Data · Climate modelling - Design of parameterisations

  15. RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE Stephen E. Schwartz Upton NY USA Bern, Switzerland change are tightly correlated. Forcing by GHGs only leads to extremely low climate sensitivity, well to rapid changes in forcings by stratospheric volcanic aerosols. Climate sensitivity is quite low, probably

  16. Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    1 Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience A Summary Prepared for the Town of Germantown and decision-making as requested by the Town of Germantown. It identifies historic climate trends and introduces future projections and strategies to address the climate hazards most likely to affect Hudson

  17. CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    CHAPTER 13 CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN WILDFIRE WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE URBAN­WILDLAND INTERFACE William S. Keeton, Philip W. Mote and Jerry F. Franklin ABSTRACT Climate change hazards by the warmer, drier summers projected for much of the western U.S. by climate models would

  18. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND FOR INFORMED DECISION-MAKING Stephen E. Schwartz Climate Research Unit, East Anglia UK #12;INDICATIONS OF SYSTEMATIC WARMING IN RECENT YEARS The 1990s were call the anthropocene climate regime. Over the 20th century, human population quadrupled and energy

  19. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water. Disease,predation,pollution, accidents and climatic conditions are among other limiting factors which can affect an animal's ability to meet its needs. This section will look further into the impact of Climate

  20. Warm Humid Climate: Methodology to Study Air Temperature Distribution: Mobile Phones Base Stations as Viable Alternative for Fixed Points 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, V.; Costa, A.; Labaki, L.

    2006-01-01

    . The summer period, from October to March is characterized by higher temperatures, lower relative humidity and relatively low wind speeds with southeast predominance, presenting small variations in the direction east - northeast. 2 METHODOLOGY...: METHODOLOGY TO STUDY AIR TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION: MOBILE PHONES BASE STATIONS AS VIABLE ALTERNATIVE FOR FIXED POINTS Angelina Dias Leăo Costa (1); Lucila Labaki (2); Virgínia Araújo (3) (1) and (2) School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urban...

  1. UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing Options to Support Green, Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  2. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R.; Dixon, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

  3. Climate Action Plan 2013 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Climate Action Plan 2013 Update #12;CLIMATE ACTION PLAN - 2013 UPDATE 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS CLIMATE PROTECTION GOALS...............................................................18 OPPORTUNITIES-2050 CLIMATE NEUTRALITY.........................................................29 MEDICALCENTER IMPLEMENTATION

  4. Climate Update Nolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Update Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Presented to Water Availability Task Force precip #12;Mtd ppt #12;Mtd ppt PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University #12;Climate divisions defined by Dr. Klaus Wolter of NOAA's Climate Diagnostic Center in Boulder, CO #12;#12;Division 1 ­ Grand Lake 1

  5. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  6. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  7. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  8. Predictive models of safety based on audit findings: Part 1: Model development and reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Changxu (Sean)

    tools to carry out an ergonomic evaluation of maintenance and inspection operations. It was validated, we developed a Human Factors/Ergonomics classifi- cation framework based on HFACS model (Shappell to proceed with prediction validity testing in Part 2. Ó 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All

  9. Developing Grid-based Systems for Microbial Genome Comparisons: The Microbase Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Developing Grid-based Systems for Microbial Genome Comparisons: The Microbase Project Anil Wipat, University of Newcastle upon Tyne Abstract Comparative analysis of genomes allows the rich source of biological genome sequence data to be most efficiently exploited. However, the rate at which microbial

  10. A Performance-Based Approach to the Development of a Recycled Plastic/Composite Crosstie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the specification in item I. · Conduct laboratory tests to confirm the properties of the plastic/composite tieA Performance-Based Approach to the Development of a Recycled Plastic/Composite Crosstie Thomas Nosker, Ph.D., Richard Renfree Ph.D., and Jennifer Lynch Plastics & Composites Group, Rutgers University

  11. Activity based End-User-Development for Smart Homes: Relevance and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Activity based End-User-Development for Smart Homes: Relevance and Challenges Alexandre Demeurea to unleash the potential of Smart Homes. The obstacle is no more about hardware concerns but lies in how inhabitants can build, configure and control their Smart Home. In this paper, we defend the idea that End

  12. A Model-Based Framework for Developing and Deploying Data Aggregation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    A Model-Based Framework for Developing and Deploying Data Aggregation Services Ramakrishna Soma1 , Amol Bakshi2 , V.K.Prasanna2 , Will Da Sie3 1 Dept of Computer Science, USC, Los Angeles, CA 2 Dept of Electrical Engineering, USC, Los Angeles, CA {rsoma, amol, prasanna}@usc.edu 3 Chevron Corporation, San Ramon

  13. GIS-based Multi-Criteria Analysis of Wind Farm Development Henning Sten Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    GIS-based Multi-Criteria Analysis of Wind Farm Development Henning Sten Hansen National on the environment of traditional power- generating methods, especially coal and oil-fired power stations wind power. A project ­ Wind Energy in the Baltic Sea Region - financed by EU / INTERREG III B was initiated in order

  14. Interplay between faulting and base level in the development of Himalayan frontal fold topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interplay between faulting and base level in the development of Himalayan frontal fold topography] Fold topography preserves a potentially accessible record of the structure and evolution of an underlying thrust fault system, provided we understand the factors that shape that topography. Here we

  15. A Market Based Strategy for Rural Development In Northwest Louisiana: Maximizing Opportunities Through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in rural communities. The nature of the analysis methodology is such that during implementation phases, rural residents may be more likely to find suitable employment in their community. As is the caseA Market Based Strategy for Rural Development In Northwest Louisiana: Maximizing Opportunities

  16. Figure I.-Offshore bases in Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Foreign Fishery Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure I.-Offshore bases in Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico's Marine Fisheries Enforcement Gulf Coast Enforcement The Gulf of Mexico is especially rich in shrimp resources. Mexico has had major problems with illegal foreign fishing on the Campeche Bank, espe

  17. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Development of a Hexapod Laser-based Metrology System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Development of a Hexapod Laser-based Metrology Center (SRDC) of Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), a hexapod with voice coil actuators is equipped and orientation information of the hexapod top platform. A laser metrology system, composed of three pairs

  18. Development and Field Testing of a DSP-Based Dual-Frequency Software GPS Receiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    Development and Field Testing of a DSP-Based Dual-Frequency Software GPS Receiver Brady W. O'Hanlon, Mark L. Psiaki, Paul M. Kintner, Jr., Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Todd E. Humphreys, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX BIOGRAPHY Brady W. O'Hanlon is a graduate student in the School

  19. Development of Educational System for Automotive Engineering based on Augmented Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    Development of Educational System for Automotive Engineering based on Augmented Reality Ildar for automotive engineering education is introduced. Main objective of the system is teaching disassemble/assemble procedure of automatic transmission of a vehicle to students, who study automotive engineering. System

  20. Model based methodology development for energy recovery in flash heat exchange systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, John E.

    Model based methodology development for energy recovery in flash heat exchange systems Problem with a condensing heat exchanger can be used when heat exchange is required between two streams and where at leastH, consistency etc.). To increase the efficiency of heat exchange, a cascade of these units in series can be used

  1. Project Profile: Commercial Development of an Advanced Linear-Fresnel-Based CSP Concept

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SkyFuel, under the CSP R&D FOA, is developing a commercial linear-Fresnel-based advanced CSP system called Linear Power Tower (LPT). The company aims to make significant improvements in the cost and viability of utility-scale dispatchable solar power.

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Empowering Eaters to Make Climate Friendly Choices Carbon Smart Food Guide: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Friendly Choices Carbon Smart Food Guide: A Public Education Initiative Rose Hsu, Lindsay Jang, Katherine Jassmann, Shaheen Jivanjee, Pavan Johal, Meline Johan, Cherie Kao University of British Columbia status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report

  3. Idaho National Laboratory/Nuclear Power Industry Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development An Industry-Government Partnership to Address Climate Change and Energy Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Power Research

    2007-11-01

    The dual issues of energy security and climate change mitigation are driving a renewed debate over how to best provide safe, secure, reliable and environmentally responsible electricity to our nation. The combination of growing energy demand and aging electricity generation infrastructure suggests major new capacity additions will be required in the years ahead.

  4. Mexico Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and...

  5. A tropical grammar : an architectural grammar for hot humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beamish, Anne, 1954-

    1993-01-01

    This thesis considers the viability of an architectural grammar based on traditional Caribbean architecture as an aid to designing climatically responsive architecture in hot humid climates. It argues that since traditional ...

  6. Quantifying the Likelihood of Regional Climate Change: A Hybridized Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    The growing need for risk-based assessments of impacts and adaptation to climate change calls for increased capability in climate projections: specifically, the quantification of the likelihood of regional outcomes and the ...

  7. Effectiveness of External Window Attachments Based on Daylight Utilization and Cooling Load Reduction for Small Office Buildings in Hot Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V. I.; Degelman, L. O.

    1994-01-01

    This study explored the effectiveness of selected external shading devices and glazing treatments used to minimize the total annual energy consumption in small office buildings in hot humid climates. The external shading devices included a permanent...

  8. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  9. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  10. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  11. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  12. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    with data) mean. Jun-Jul-Aug (Northern Hemisphere summer) surface temperature anomalies relative to the base the notorious variability of local weather and climate from day to day and year to year? This question assumes-year base period. Below we will show

  13. A Sensitivity Model (SM) approach to analyze urban development in Taiwan based on sustainability indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Shuli Yeh Chiatsung Budd, William W. Chen Liling

    2009-02-15

    Sustainability indicators have been widely developed to monitor and assess sustainable development. They are expected to guide political decision-making based on their capability to represent states and trends of development. However, using indicators to assess the sustainability of urban strategies and policies has limitations - as they neither reflect the systemic interactions among them, nor provide normative indications in what direction they should be developed. This paper uses a semi-quantitative systematic model tool (Sensitivity Model Tools, SM) to analyze the role of urban development in Taiwan's sustainability. The results indicate that the natural environment in urban area is one of the most critical components and the urban economic production plays a highly active role in affecting Taiwan's sustainable development. The semi-quantitative simulation model integrates sustainability indicators and urban development policy to provide decision-makers with information about the impacts of their decisions on urban development. The system approach incorporated by this paper can be seen as a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for a sustainability assessment. The participatory process of expert participants for providing judgments on the relations between indicator variables is also discussed.

  14. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  16. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baynes, P.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies.

  17. Development of a 5 kW Prototype Coal-Based Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.; Mirzababaei, Jelvehnaz; Rismanchian, Azadeh

    2014-01-20

    The University of Akron Fuel Cell Laboratory pioneered the development of a laboratory scale coal-based fuel cell, which allows the direct use of high sulfur content coal as fuel. The initial research and coal fuel cell technology development (“Coal-based Fuel Cell,” S. S. C. Chuang, PCT Int. Appl. 2006, i.e., European Patent Application, 35 pp. CODEN: PIXXD2 WO 2006028502 A2 20060316) have demonstrated that it is feasible to electrochemically oxidize carbon to CO2, producing electricity. The key innovative concept of this coal-based fuel cell technology is that carbon in coal can be converted through an electrochemical oxidation reaction into manageable carbon dioxide, efficiently generating electricity without involving coal gasification, reforming, and water-gas shift reaction. This study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reaction. A carbon injection system was developed to inject the solid fuel without bringing air into the anode chamber; a fuel cell stack was developed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the fuel cell stack. Further improvement of anode catalyst activity and durability is needed to bring this novel coal fuel cell to a highly efficient, super clean, multi-use electric generation technology, which promises to provide low cost electricity by expanding the utilization of U.S. coal supplies and relieving our dependence on foreign oil.

  18. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  19. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  20. Chapter 20 Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 20 Climate This chapter describes existing climate conditions in the project area, and how the...

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Sarma V. Pisupati; Chunshan Song; Ronald S. Wasco; Ronald T. Wincek; Xiaochun Xu; Alan W. Scaroni; Richard Hogg; Subhash Chander; M. Thaddeus Ityokumbul; Mark S. Klima; Peter T. Luckie; Adam Rose; Richard L. Gordon; Jeffrey Lazo; A. Michael Schaal

    2004-01-30

    The third phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for US Department of Defense (DOD) facilities was completed. The objectives of the project were to: decrease DOD's dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase III activities were focused on evaluating deeply-cleaned coals as fuels for industrial boilers and investigating emissions control strategies for providing ultra-low emissions when firing coal-based fuels. This was addressed by performing coal beneficiation and preparation studies, and bench- to demonstration-scale emissions reduction studies. In addition, economic studies were conducted focused on determining cost and market penetration, selection of incentives, and regional economic impacts of coal-based technologies.

  2. Climatic Data Center Climatic Data Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center 2008 Annual Report 2008NerS 12-16 DAtA ceNter iNFrAStrUctUre 16-20 USer eNGAGemeNt 21-24 eDUcAtioN/oUtreAch/WorKShoPS 26-31 em) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) served the Nation as an authoritative resource for climate information

  3. Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Montain Using Analogue Meteororological Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-09-11

    At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes.

  4. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  5. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  6. Development of an Fe efficiency screening procedure for sorghum based on realistic soil parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Francisco

    1987-01-01

    , are considered to be good indicators of Fe use efficiency in plants, and thus were the basis determining Fe-efficiency of the sorghum cultivars. Rodriguez de Cianzio et al. (1979) reported that visual chlorosis ratings weze highly correlated (r=0. 90...DEVELOPMENT OF AN FE EFFICIENCY SCREENING PROCEDURE FOR SORGHUH BASED ON REAl ISTIC SOIL PARAHETERS A Thesis by FRANCISCO HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  7. Development of simplified design aids based on the results of simulation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Load Ratio method for estimating the performance of passive solar heating systems is described. It is a simplified technique which is based on correlating the monthly solar savings fraction in terms of the ratio of monthly solar radiation absorbed by the building to total monthly building thermal load. The effect of differences between actual design parameters and those used to develop the correlations is estimated afterwards using sensitivity curves. The technique is fast and simple and sufficiently accurate for design purposes.

  8. Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

  9. ORIGAMIX, a CdTe-based spectro-imager development for nuclear applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubos, S; Schanne, S; Limousin, O; Carrel, F; Schoepff, V; Blondel, C

    2015-01-01

    The Astrophysics Division of CEA Saclay has a long history in the development of CdTe based pixelated detection planes for X and gamma-ray astronomy, with time-resolved imaging and spectrometric capabilities. The last generation, named Caliste HD, is an all-in-one modular instrument that fulfills requirements for space applications. Its full-custom front-end electronics is designed to work over a large energy range from 2 keV to 1 MeV with excellent spectroscopic performances, in particular between 10 and 100 keV (0.56 keV FWHM and 0.67 keV FWHM at 13.9 and 59.5 keV). In the frame of the ORIGAMIX project, a consortium based on research laboratories and industrials has been settled in order to develop a new generation of gamma camera. The aim is to develop a system based on the Caliste architecture for post-accidental interventions or homeland security, but integrating new properties (advanced spectrometry, hybrid working mode) and suitable for industry. A first prototype was designed and tested to acquire fee...

  10. Climate Change Policies for the XXIst Century: Mechanisms, Predictions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Khmelinskii; Peter Stallinga

    2014-05-15

    Recent experimental works demonstrated that the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) hypothesis, embodied in a series of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) global climate models, is erroneous. These works prove that atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes only very moderately to the observed warming, and that there is no climatic catastrophe in the making, independent on whether or not carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced. In view of these developments, we discuss climate predictions for the XXIst century. Based on the solar activity tendencies, a new Little Ice Age is predicted by the middle of this century, with significantly lower global temperatures. We also show that IPCC climate models can't produce any information regarding future climate, due to essential physical phenomena lacking in those, and that the current budget deficit in many EU countries is mainly caused by the policies promoting renewable energies and other AGW-motivated measures. In absence of any predictable adverse climate consequences of carbon dioxide emissions, and with no predictable shortage of fossil fuels, we argue for recalling of all policies aimed at reducing carbon dioxide emissions and usage of expensive renewable energy sources. The concepts of carbon credits, green energy and green fuels should be abandoned in favor of productive, economically viable and morally acceptable solutions.

  11. Study and Development of Anti-Islanding Control for Synchronous Machine-Based Distributed Generators: November 2001--March 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the study and development of new active anti-islanding control schemes for synchronous machine-based distributed generators, including engine generators and gas turbines.

  12. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  13. Effect of Scale on the Modeling of Hydrologic Effects of Climate Change on the Niger River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    infrastructural investments for irrigation and hydroelectricity development. Climate change is a potential threat

  14. Global climate change and international security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  15. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, Marco

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 107 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2011) 107:247-265 DOI available until 12 months after publication. #12;Climatic Change (2011) 107:247­265 DOI 10.1007/s10584

  16. CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral the computer or a telephone system Data are collected by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), where) The original observations relate to WEATHER, not CLIMATE. But if we look at this information over a much longer

  17. Climate Science Andreas Schmittner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    Climate Science Andreas Schmittner Associate Professor College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University Climate Change: A Workshop for Oregon Educators, Aug. 11, 2015 #12;Outline Past Present Future #12;Past Paleoclimate · How can we reconstruct past climate? · How did climate

  18. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  19. Energy, Climate, & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    the development of a nuclear powered moon base. While current concepts focus on Stirling engine power systems. For the current program, Sandia has developed a reactor simulator to drive Stirling engines under moon

  20. The Development of a Rebust Accelerometer-Based Start of Combustion Sensing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Huang; David Mumford

    2009-01-31

    The development of modern combustion systems increasingly relies on detailed knowledge of the combustion event. As the limits of combustion are approached, tight control of combustion leads to improved emissions and higher efficiencies, while retaining and even improving engine reliability and durability. While developing a novel HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) technology for large natural gas engines, Westport found that there was no reliable cost-effective technology to monitor the combustion event. As a result, Westport began working on developing a solution based on commercially available knock sensors. While initially developed around HCCI, Westport has identified that numerous other forms of combustion (high EGR systems, Homogeneous Charge Direct Injection, etc) will require combustion sensors. This requirement is also reflected in the development of other technologies in this field. However, the potential low system cost and the lack of intrusion into the cylinder head area are significant benefits for the Westport approach. Previous work by Westport has proven the method on two different large compression ignition gas engines. The objective of the current work is to improve the robustness of this technology; particularly, to identify and reduce the sensor-to-sensor and engine-to-engine variations.

  1. MODEL-BASED HYDROACOUSTIC BLOCKAGE ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXPLOSIVE SOURCE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzel, E; Ramirez, A; Harben, P

    2005-07-11

    We are continuing the development of the Hydroacoustic Blockage Assessment Tool (HABAT) which is designed for use by analysts to predict which hydroacoustic monitoring stations can be used in discrimination analysis for any particular event. The research involves two approaches (1) model-based assessment of blockage, and (2) ground-truth data-based assessment of blockage. The tool presents the analyst with a map of the world, and plots raypath blockages from stations to sources. The analyst inputs source locations and blockage criteria, and the tool returns a list of blockage status from all source locations to all hydroacoustic stations. We are currently using the tool in an assessment of blockage criteria for simple direct-path arrivals. Hydroacoustic data, predominantly from earthquake sources, are read in and assessed for blockage at all available stations. Several measures are taken. First, can the event be observed at a station above background noise? Second, can we establish backazimuth from the station to the source. Third, how large is the decibel drop at one station relative to other stations. These observational results are then compared with model estimates to identify the best set of blockage criteria and used to create a set of blockage maps for each station. The model-based estimates are currently limited by the coarse bathymetry of existing databases and by the limitations inherent in the raytrace method. In collaboration with BBN Inc., the Hydroacoustic Coverage Assessment Model (HydroCAM) that generates the blockage files that serve as input to HABAT, is being extended to include high-resolution bathymetry databases in key areas that increase model-based blockage assessment reliability. An important aspect of this capability is to eventually include reflected T-phases where they reliably occur and to identify the associated reflectors. To assess how well any given hydroacoustic discriminant works in separating earthquake and in-water explosion populations it is necessary to have both a database of reference earthquake events and of reference in-water explosive events. Although reference earthquake events are readily available, explosive reference events are not. Consequently, building an in-water explosion reference database requires the compilation of events from many sources spanning a long period of time. We have developed a database of small implosive and explosive reference events from the 2003 Indian Ocean Cruise data. These events were recorded at some or all of the IMS Indian Ocean hydroacoustic stations: Diego Garcia, Cape Leeuwin, and Crozet Island. We have also reviewed many historical large in-water explosions and identified five that have adequate source information and can be positively associated to the hydrophone recordings. The five events are: Cannekin, Longshot, CHASE-3, CHASE-5, and IITRI-1. Of these, the first two are nuclear tests on land but near water. The latter three are in-water conventional explosive events with yields from ten to hundreds of tons TNT equivalent. The objective of this research is to enhance discrimination capabilities for events located in the world's oceans. Two research and development efforts are needed to achieve this: (1) improvement in discrimination algorithms and their joint statistical application to events, and (2) development of an automated and accurate blockage prediction capability that will identify all stations and phases (direct and reflected) from a given event that will have adequate signal to be used in a discrimination analysis. The strategy for improving blockage prediction in the world's oceans is to improve model-based prediction of blockage and to develop a ground-truth database of reference events to assess blockage. Currently, research is focused on the development of a blockage assessment software tool. The tool is envisioned to develop into a sophisticated and unifying package that optimally and automatically assesses both model and data based blockage predictions in all ocean basins, for all NDC stations, and accounting for refle

  2. The Role of "Citizen Science" in Weather and Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    stations to help document Climate resources of the country And provide science-based weather forecasts by volunteers to see their data put to use. #12;Weather reports began on Pikes Peak in 1873 Credit: NOAA Photo weather and climate data were simple ­ Determining the "climate resource" of our country -- specifically

  3. Keywords Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) Project Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kossin, James P.

    was developed by NOAA's National Climatic Data Center under the auspices of the World Data Center.H. Levinson (), K.R. Knapp, H. J. Diamond, and J.P. Kossin NOAA National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC Cyclones and Climate Change, DOI 10.1007/978-90-481-3109-9_26, © Springer Science + Business Media B

  4. Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    climate- related physical or regulatory water shortage risks for power generation · Technology development : ­ Improved and Advanced Cooling Technologies project Our focus here EDF-EPRI "Water-Climate" partnership #12Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water and Energy Sustainability Denis AELBRECHT

  5. Climate Change Lecture (ID:180) This lecture will give an overview of climate changes that have occurred in the past and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Climate Change Lecture (ID:180) Outline This lecture will give an overview of climate changes to understand climate changes that have occurred in the past. This is a lecture based activity with opportunities to ask questions. Further details Students will learn: 1. Different time-scales of climate changes

  6. Development of AlGaN-based graded-index-separate-confinement-heterostructure deep UV emitters by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paiella, Roberto

    Development of AlGaN-based graded-index-separate-confinement- heterostructure deep UV emitters://avspublications.org/jvstb/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Development of AlGaN-based graded-index-separate-confinement- heterostructure deep UV emitters. Nikiforov, Luca Dal Negro, and Roberto Paiella Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  7. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    climate adaptation, ocean and coastal planning, and youth internships. SpeakersSean Hart, BIA Climate Change Coordinator, andRachael Novak, BIA Climate Science Coordinator,...

  8. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...

  9. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

  10. Physics development of web-based tools for use in hardware clusters doing lattice physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Dreher; W. Akers; J. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Watson

    2001-11-08

    Jefferson Lab and MIT are developing a set of web-based tools within the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to allow lattice QCD theorists to treat the computational facilities located at the two sites as a single meta-facility. The prototype Lattice Portal provides researchers the ability to submit jobs to the cluster, browse data caches, and transfer files between cache and off-line storage. The user can view the configuration of the PBS servers and to monitor both the status of all batch queues as well as the jobs in each queue. Work is starting on expanding the present system to include job submissions at the meta-facility level (shared queue), as well as multi-site file transfers and enhanced policy-based data management capabilities.

  11. Application and development of technologies for engine-condition-based maintenance of emergency diesel generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. H.; Sang, G.; Choi, L. Y. S.; Lee, B. O. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Central Research Institue, 70, 1312 -gil Yuseong-daero Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The emergency diesel generator (EDG) of a nuclear power plant has the role of supplying emergency electric power to protect the reactor core system in the event of the loss of offsite power supply. Therefore, EDGs should be subject to periodic surveillance testing to verify their ability to supply specified frequencies and voltages at design power levels within a limited time. To maintain optimal reliability of EDGs, condition monitoring/diagnosis technologies must be developed. Changing from periodic disassemble maintenance to condition-based maintenance (CBM) according to predictions of equipment condition is recommended. In this paper, the development of diagnosis technology for CBM and the application of a diesel engine condition-analysis system are described. (authors)

  12. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  13. Long-Term Regional Climate Simulations Driven by Two Global Reanalyses and a GCM for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Bian, Xindi; Qian, Yun

    2002-01-01

    To take advantage of recent development in the NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5), an effort has been organized to develop and evaluate an MM5-based community regional climate model. Several modifications such as the implementation of the PNNL subgrid parameterization of orographic precipitation, representation of cloud-radiation interaction, and additional output capabilities have been made to the recently released MM5 Version 3.4. To evaluate the model, several long-term simulations have been performed over the western U.S. These simulations were driven by the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses respectively for 20 and 13 years beginning at 1980. The western U.S. is marked by diverse topographic features and varied climate conditions such as the maritime climate in the coastal area and the semi-arid climate in the southwest. We will present results based on two domain configurations: a nested domain with a fine domain covering the western U.S. at 40 km resolution, and a single domain at 60 km resolution with the subgrid orographic precipitation scheme applied in the western U.S. Analyses are being performed to evaluate the simulations of the averaged climate and interannual variability and examine the model sensitivity to different boundary conditions. Our analyses focus on the relationships between large-scale circulation and regional climate features, surface energy and water budgets, orographic precipitation, and hydrologic conditions within selected river basins. Regional simulations are also being performed using large-scale conditions simulated by the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The regional model was used to downscale the ensemble PCM climate change scenarios for periods of 10-20 years in the current and future climate. Results will be analyzed to study the impacts of greenhouse warming on regional water resources in the western U.S.

  14. PERSPECTIVE Climate change, adaptation, and phenotypic plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendry, Andrew

    PERSPECTIVE Climate change, adaptation, and phenotypic plasticity: the problem and the evidence plasticity, natural selection Correspondence Juha Merila, Ecological Genetics Research Unit, Department distinguish whether phenotypic changes are genetically based or the result of phenotypic plasticity. Second

  15. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  16. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  17. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  18. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Inshore Squid:Fifth Annual California Climate Change Research Conference,Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation.

  19. Review: Preparing for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

  20. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

  1. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  2. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability? Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come? This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. ORIGAMIX, a CdTe-based spectro-imager development for nuclear applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dubos; H. Lemaire; S. Schanne; O. Limousin; F. Carrel; V. Schoepff; C. Blondel

    2015-02-05

    The Astrophysics Division of CEA Saclay has a long history in the development of CdTe based pixelated detection planes for X and gamma-ray astronomy, with time-resolved imaging and spectrometric capabilities. The last generation, named Caliste HD, is an all-in-one modular instrument that fulfills requirements for space applications. Its full-custom front-end electronics is designed to work over a large energy range from 2 keV to 1 MeV with excellent spectroscopic performances, in particular between 10 and 100 keV (0.56 keV FWHM and 0.67 keV FWHM at 13.9 and 59.5 keV). In the frame of the ORIGAMIX project, a consortium based on research laboratories and industrials has been settled in order to develop a new generation of gamma camera. The aim is to develop a system based on the Caliste architecture for post-accidental interventions or homeland security, but integrating new properties (advanced spectrometry, hybrid working mode) and suitable for industry. A first prototype was designed and tested to acquire feedback for further developments. In this study, we particularly focused on spectrometric performances with high energies and high fluxes. Therefore, our device was exposed to energies up to 700 keV (133Ba, 137Cs) and we measured the evolution of energy resolution (0.96 keV at 80 keV, 2.18 keV at 356 keV, 3.33 keV at 662 keV). Detection efficiency decreases after 150 keV, as Compton effect becomes dominant. However, CALISTE is also designed to handle multiple events, enabling Compton scattering reconstruction, which can drastically improve detection efficiencies and dynamic range for higher energies up to 1408 keV (22Na, 60Co, 152Eu) within a 1-mm thick detector. In particular, such spectrometric performances obtained with 152Eu and 60Co were never measured before with this kind of detector.

  5. Climate and Climate Change COURSE: .............................................................................. EAS B8800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Climate and Climate Change COURSE with a focus on energy transport. Finally, we tackle natural and anthropogenic climate change. This course. Synthesize and apply theory of the various natural and anthropogenic climate change mechanisms to explain

  6. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and responding to climate change. Projections based on population growth and food consumption patterns indicate that agricultural production will need to increase by at...

  7. Development of highly porous scaffolds based on bioactive silicates for dental tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudouri, O.M.; Theodosoglou, E.; Kontonasaki, E.; Will, J.; Chrissafis, K.; Koidis, P.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic via the sol–gel technique. • The heat treatment of the glass-ceramic promoted the crystallization of akermanite. • Akermanite scaffolds coated with gelatin were successfully fabricated. • An HCAp layer was developed on the surface of all scaffolds after 9 days in SBF. - Abstract: Various scaffolding materials, ceramics and especially Mg-based ceramic materials, including akermanite (Ca{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), have attracted interest for dental tissue regeneration because of their improved mechanical properties and controllable biodegradation. The aim of the present work was the synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic, which would be used for the construction of workable akermanite scaffolds. The characterization of the synthesized material was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Finally, the apatite forming ability of the scaffolds was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid. The scaffolds were fabricated by the foam replica technique and were subsequently coated with gelatin to provide a functional surface for increased cell attachment. Finally, SEM microphotographs and FTIR spectra of the scaffolds after immersion in SBF solution indicated the inorganic bioactive character of the scaffolds suitable for the intended applications in dental tissue engineering.

  8. Development of a Mechanistic-Based Healing Model for Self-Healing Glass Seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2012-10-01

    Self-healing glass, a recent development of hermetic sealant materials, has the ability to effectively repair damage when heated to elevated temperatures; thus, able to extend its service life. Since crack healing morphological changes in the glass material are usually temperature and stress dependent, quantitative studies to determine the effects of thermo-mechanical conditions on the healing behavior of the self-healing glass sealants are extremely useful to accommodate the design and optimization of the sealing systems within SOFCs. The goal of this task is to develop a mechanistic-based healing model to quantify the stress and temperature dependent healing behavior. A two-step healing mechanism was developed and implemented into finite element (FE) models through user-subroutines. Integrated experimental/kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulation methodology was taken to calibrate the model parameters. The crack healing model is able to investigate the effects of various thermo-mechanical factors; therefore, able to determine the critical conditions under which the healing mechanism will be activated. Furthermore, the predicted results can be used to formulate the continuum damage-healing model and to assist the SOFC stack level simulations in predicting and evaluating the effectiveness and the performance of various engineering seal designs.

  9. Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisneros, Roberto R; Huang, Jian; Ostrouchov, George; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2011-01-01

    Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

  10. Methods for Climate Change Technology Transfer Needs Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods for Climate Change Technology Transfer Needs Assessments and Implementing Activities: Experiences of Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  11. Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics...

  12. Low Carbon Green Growth: Integrated Policy Approach to Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Carbon Green Growth: Integrated Policy Approach to Climate Change for Asia-Pacific Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Carbon...

  13. Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  14. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  15. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  16. Workshop on the preparation of climate change action plans. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-24

    Over 130 participants from more than 27 countries shared experiences of developing and transition countries in preparation and development of their climate change national action plans. International experts guided countries in preparation of their climate change national action plans.

  17. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  18. Climate in China ! Climate is weather over time.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Climate in China #12;! Climate is weather over time. ! Climatology is the study of climate. ! Climatic regions are areas with similar weather statistics. ! Climate influences ecosystems. ! On land, the location of climatic regions determines the location of ecosystems (e.g., forest, grassland, savanna

  19. ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauve, Cedric

    ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN CLIMATE CHANGE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CANADIAN CLIMATE POLICY Roundtable Dialogue AND SELECTED THE FOLLOWING CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY AREAS FOR DETAILED DISCUSSION. PARTICIPANTS THEN WORKED Dilemmas in Climate Change roundtable dialogue, convened by Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue

  20. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  1. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  2. Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium brings together Native speakers who are working to keep fossil fuels in the ground, by stopping coals terminals, oil trains and fracking, and protecting treaty resources from the threat of climate change.

  3. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  4. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  5. Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2014-09-04

    This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

  6. Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-14

    The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

  7. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  8. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    data needed to construct effective climate change models and forecasts. Academic “Centers of Excellence” that focus on climate change

  9. Electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauvergne, J.

    1994-04-01

    EVs have insufficient energy sources for a climatic comfort system. The heat rejection of the drivetrain is dispersed in the vehicle (electric motor, batteries, electronic unit for power control). Its level is generally low (no more than 2-kW peaks) and variable according to the trip profile, with no heat rejection at rest and a maximum during regenerative braking. Nevertheless, it must be used for heating. It is not realistic to have the A/C compressor driven by the electric traction motor: the motor does not operate when the vehicle is at rest, precisely when maximum cooling power is required. The same is true for hybrid vehicles during electric operation. It is necessary to develop solutions that use stored onboard energy either from the traction batteries or specific storage source. In either case, it is necessary to design the climate control system to use the energy efficiently to maximize range and save weight. Heat loss through passenger compartment seals and the walls of the passenger compartment must be limited. Plastic body panes help to reduce heat transfer, and heat gain is minimized with insulating glazing. This article describes technical solutions to solve the problem of passenger thermal comfort. However, the heating and A/C systems of electrically operated vehicles may have marginal performance at extreme outside temperatures.

  10. Climate change is not "a problem" wait-ing for "a solution". It is an environ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    41 Climate change is not "a problem" wait- ing for "a solution". It is an environ- mental, cultural humanity's place on Earth. My new book, Why We Disagree About Climate Change, dissects this idea of climate about it. It also develops a different way of approaching the idea of climate change and of working

  11. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  12. CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY #12;At, the origin of which is mainly related to human activities. For the first time climate change sends a strong of climate change and that will fully find material expression in the debates. What will the world we shape

  13. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  14. Climate change vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    Climate change vulnerability assessment of the Verde Island Passage, Philippines #12;ii This document should be cited as: R. Boquiren, G. Di Carlo, and M.C. Quibilan (Eds). 2010. Climate Change, Marine Climate Change Program Conservation International­Global Marine Division epidgeon

  15. Environment and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  16. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  17. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  18. Development of a PCI Based Data Acquisition Platform for High Intensity Accelerator Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Higuchi; H. Fujii; M. Ikeno; Y. Igarashi; E. Inoue; R. Itoh; H. Kodama; T. Murakami; M. Nakao; K. Nakayoshi; M. Saitoh; S. Shimazaki; S. Y. Suzuki; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; M. Yamauchi; Y. Yasu; G. Varner; Y. Nagasaka; T. Katayama; K. Watanabe; M. Ishizuka; S. Onozawa; C. J. Li

    2003-05-28

    Data logging at an upgraded KEKB accelerator or the J-PARC facility, currently under commission, requires a high density data acquisition platform with integrated data reduction CPUs. To follow market trends, we have developed a DAQ platform based on the PCI bus, a choice which permits a fast DAQ and a long expected lifetime of the system. The platform is a 9U-VME motherboard consisting of four slots for signal digitization modules, readout FIFOs for data buffering, and three PMC slots, on one of which resides a data reduction CPU. We have performed long term and thermal stability tests. The readout speed on the platform has been measured up to 125 MB/s in DMA mode.

  19. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    climate vulnerability and resilience into national policies and plans consistent with poverty reduction and sustainable development goals." Bangladesh Supporting Documentation...

  20. Climate2012 State of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Climate2012 State of the #12;2 State of the Climate 2012 Climate2012 State of the The previous State of the Climate, released in March 2010 (www.csiro.au/Outcomes/Climate/Understanding/State-of-the- Climate.aspx) highlighted a multi-decadal warming trend over Australia's land and oceans, an increase

  1. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  2. Generic vehicle speed models based on traffic simulation: Development and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margiotta, R.; Cohen, H.; Elkins, G.; Rathi, A.; Venigalla, M.

    1994-12-15

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research project to develop new methods of estimating speeds for inclusion in the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) Analytical Process. The paper focuses on the effects of traffic conditions excluding incidents (recurring congestion) on daily average ed and excess fuel consumption. A review of the literature revealed that many techniques have been used to predict speeds as a function of congestion but most fail to address the effects of queuing. However, the method of Dowling and Skabardonis avoids this limitation and was adapted to the research. The methodology used the FRESIM and NETSIM microscopic traffic simulation models to develop uncongested speed functions and as a calibration base for the congested flow functions. The chief contributions of the new speed models are the simplicity of application and their explicit accounting for the effects of queuing. Specific enhancements include: (1) the inclusion of a queue discharge rate for freeways; (2) use of newly defined uncongested flow speed functions; (3) use of generic temporal distributions that account for peak spreading; and (4) a final model form that allows incorporation of other factors that influence speed, such as grades and curves. The main limitation of the new speed models is the fact that they are based on simulation results and not on field observations. They also do not account for the effect of incidents on speed. While appropriate for estimating average national conditions, the use of fixed temporal distributions may not be suitable for analyzing specific facilities, depending on observed traffic patterns. Finally, it is recommended that these and all future speed models be validated against field data where incidents can be adequately identified in the data.

  3. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  4. Promoting young adolescents򠨹pothesis-development performance in a computer-supported and problem-based learning environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hye Jeong

    2009-05-15

    In the study, young adolescents’ hypothesis development in a computer-supported and problem-based learning environment was examined in terms of two empirical studies. The first study examined the effect of metacognitive scaffolds to strengthening...

  5. Three Non-Technical Challenges in the Development of Biomass-based Energy (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Savage, Steve

    2011-04-25

    Steve Savage from Cirrus Partners on "Three Non-Technical Challenges in the Development of Biomass-based Energy" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  6. Developing a circumstance-based innovation strategy for a midsized aerospace manufacturer : fostering intrapreneurship, opening boundaries, and seeding disruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brylawski, Michael M. (Michael Mills), 1972-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis derives a seven-stage methodology and presents a case study for developing an actionable innovation strategy for manufacturing firms. The methodology is based around a careful examination of their firm's ...

  7. Feedback loops in educational environments using web-based survey tools : new technology development and three implementation case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spead, Benjamin, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents lessons from the development of an on-line, web-based feedback system and preliminary analysis of the socio-technical interactions associated with the specification, design and use of this system. The ...

  8. Development and commercialization status of Fe{sub 3}Al-based intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-06-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-based intermetallic alloys offer unique benefits of excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance, limited by poor room-temperature (RT) ductility and low high-temperature strength. Recent understanding of environmental effects on RT ductility of these alloys has led to progress toward taking commercial advantage of Fe{sub 3}Al-based materials. Cause of low ductility appears to be related to hydrogen formed from reaction with moisture. The environmental effect has been reduced in these intermetallic alloys by two methods. The first deals with producing a more hydrogen-resistant microstructure through thermomechanical processing, and the second dealed with compositional modification. The alloys showing reduced environmental effect have been melted and processed by many different methods. Laboratory and commercial heats have been characterized. Tests have been conducted in both air and controlled environments to quantify environmental effects on these properties. These materials were also tested for aqueous corrosion and resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Oxidation and sulfidation data were generated and effects of minor alloying elements on were also investigated. Several applications have been identified for the newly developed iron aluminides. Commercialization status of these alloys is described.

  9. Development of the Ultra-Clean Dry Cleanup Process for Coal-Based Syngases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, R.A.; Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Jain, S.C.

    2002-09-20

    The Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) has proposed a novel scheme for polishing sulfur species, halides, and particulate from syngas to meet stringent cleaning requirements, the ''Ultra-Clean syngas polishing process.'' The overall development objective for this syngas polishing process is to economically achieve the most stringent cleanup requirements for sulfur species, halide species and particulate expected for chemical and fuel synthesis applications (total sulfur species < 60 ppbv, halides < 10 ppbv, and particulate < 0.1 ppmw). A Base Program was conducted to produce ground-work, laboratory test data and process evaluations for a conceptual feasibility assessment of this novel syngas cleaning process. Laboratory testing focused on the identification of suitable sulfur and halide sorbents and operating temperatures for the process. This small-scale laboratory testing was also performed to provide evidence of the capability of the process to reach its stringent syngas cleaning goals. Process evaluations were performed in the Base Program to identify process alternatives, to devise process flow schemes, and to estimate process material & energy balances, process performance, and process costs. While the work has focused on sulfur, halide, and particulate control, considerations of ammonia, and mercury control have also been included.

  10. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, S. N. Khan, M. O. Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-15

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  11. New Generation of MoSx Based Solid Lubricant Coatings: Recent Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haider, Julfikar; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2011-01-17

    In recent times, there is a growing interest in applying Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub x}) solid lubricant coatings on components to improve the tribological performance (i.e. lower friction coefficient and wear rate). The tribological performance of MoS{sub x} coating is strongly dependent on coating properties and tribological environment. MoS{sub x} coatings are highly successful in certain applications such as in space/vacuum technology, but its effectiveness is questioned in other terrestrial applications such as in cutting tool industry due to its lower hardness and poor oxidation resistance leading to shorter life. In order to circumvent this drawback, the paper identifies that current research is being concentrated on developing MoS{sub x} based coatings using three different approaches: (1) Metal or compound addition in MoS{sub x} coating (2)MoS{sub x} layer on hard coating and (3)MoS{sub x} addition in hard coating matrix. Although the primary objective is same in all three cases, the third approach is considered to be more effective in improving the tribological properties of the coating. Finally, the potential applications of MoS{sub x} based coatings in different industrial sectors have been briefly outlined.

  12. Development of a Dry Sorbent-based Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Thomas; Coleman, Luke; Anderson, Matthew; Gupta, Raghubir; Herr, Joshua; Kalluri, Ranjeeth; Pavani, Maruthi

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this research and development (R&D) project was to further the development of a solid sorbent-based CO2 capture process based on sodium carbonate (i.e. the Dry Carbonate Process) that is capable of capturing>90% of the CO2 as a nearly pure stream from coal-fired power plant flue gas with <35% increase in the cost of electrictiy (ICOE).

  13. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  14. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  15. The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Focusing Technologies on Climate Datasets and Resource Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-09-26

    This report discusses a project that used prototyping technology to access and analyze climate data. This project was initially funded under the DOE’s Next Generation Internet (NGI) program, with follow-on support from BER and the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) office. In this prototype, we developed Data Grid technologies for managing the movement and replication of large datasets, and applied these technologies in a practical setting (i.e., an ESG-enabled data browser based on current climate data analysis tools), achieving cross-country transfer rates of more than 500 Mb/s. Having demonstrated the potential for remotely accessing and analyzing climate data located at sites across the U.S., we won the “Hottest Infrastructure” award in the Network Challenge event. While the ESG I prototype project substantiated a proof of concept (“Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources”), the SciDAC Earth System Grid (ESG) II project made this a reality. Our efforts targeted the development of metadata technologies (standard schema, XML metadata extraction based on netCDF, and a Metadata Catalog Service), security technologies (Web-based user registration and authentication, and community authorization), data transport technologies (GridFTPenabled OPeNDAP-G for high-performance access, robust multiple file transport and integration with mass storage systems, and support for dataset aggregation and subsetting), as well as web portal technologies to provide interactive access to climate data holdings. At this point, the technology was in place and assembled, and ESG II was poised to make a substantial impact on the climate modelling community.

  16. Developer Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Library EPA: Developer Resources EPA: Data Finder EPA: eGrid Electricity Generation Environmental Impact Data Labor: Developer Tools NOAA: Climate Data Energy Department EIA:...

  17. Development of Fuzzy Logic-Based Lead Acid Battery Management Techniques with Applications to 42V Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Pritpal

    on changing battery conditions. Finally, the fuzzy logic methodology lends itself well to rapid system designDevelopment of Fuzzy Logic-Based Lead Acid Battery Management Techniques with Applications to 42V volt systems is being phased into commercial vehicles, the battery technology is being developed

  18. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development of the cycle and have gained an in-depth understanding of the governing fundamental knowledge, based on the laws of physics and thermodynamics and verified with our testing results. Through this research, we are identifying optimal working fluid and operating conditions to eventually demonstrate the core technology for space cooling or other applications.

  19. Development of Novel Nanocrystal-based Solar Cell to Exploit Multiple Exciton Generation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00227

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, R.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the project was to develop new design and fabrication techniques for NC solar cells with the goal of demonstrating enhanced photocurrent and efficiency by exploiting multiple exciton generation and to investigate multiple exciton generation and charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor NC films used in NC-based solar cells.

  20. Development of high performance structure and ligand based virtual screening techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shave, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual Sreening (VS) is an in silico technique for drug discovery. An overview of VS methods is given and is seen to be approachable from two sides: structure based and ligand based. Structure based virtual screening ...

  1. Community-Based Electric Micro-Grids Can Contribute to Rural Development: Evidence from Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Arne

    -based electricity project in rural Ken- ya. Empirical research on group-based micro-grids is also rele- vant in view

  2. A Right to Enjoy Culture in Face of Climate Change: Implications for “Climate Migrants”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wewerinke, Margaretha

    sustainability while allowing for global economic development. This includes strategies for carbon emissions reduction, sequestration of carbon in vegetation and improved resilience of the built environment, economies and social institutions to climate impacts...

  3. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  4. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loui, A; McCall, S K

    2011-10-24

    The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and distinguished from other chemical species that may be simultaneously present, is particularly challenging. Aside from the laboratory-based method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), where samples may be collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or cryofocusing, the other major approaches for gas-phase detection employ lasers typically operating in the mid-infrared wavelength region. While mass spectrometry can readily detect noble gases - the helium leak detector is an obvious example - laser-based methods such as infrared (IR) or Raman spectroscopy are completely insensitive to them as their monatomic nature precludes a non-zero dipole moment or changes in polarizability upon excitation. Therefore, noble gases can only be detected by one of two methods: (1) atomic emission spectroscopies which require the generation of plasmas through laser-induced breakdown, electrical arcing, or similar means; (2) non-spectroscopic methods which measure one or more physical properties (e.g., mass, thermal conductivity, density). In this report, we present our progress during Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) in the research and development of a non-spectroscopic method for noble gas detection. During Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), we demonstrated via proof-of-concept experiments that the combination of thermal conductivity detection (TCD) and coating-free damped resonance detection (CFDRD) using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could provide selective sensing of these inert species. Since the MEMS-based TCD technology was directly adapted from a brassboard prototype commissioned by a previous chemical sensing project, FY11 efforts focused on advancing the state of the newer CFDRD method. This work, guided by observations previously reported in the open literature, has not only resulted in a substantially measureable increase in selectivity but has also revealed a potential method for mitigating or eliminating thermal drift that does not require a secondary reference sensor. The design of an apparatus to test this drift compensation scheme will be described. We will conclude this report with a discussion of planned efforts in Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12).

  5. Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.

    2014-02-01

    Background - The goal of this project, with a focus on commercial buildings in California, was to develop a new framework for evidence-based minimum ventilation rate (MVR) standards that protect occupants in buildings while also considering energy use and cost. This was motivated by research findings suggesting that current prescriptive MVRs in commercial buildings do not provide occupants with fully safe and satisfactory indoor environments. Methods - The project began with a broad review in several areas ? the diverse strategies now used for standards or guidelines for MVRs or for environmental contaminant exposures, current knowledge about adverse human effects associated with VRs, and current knowledge about contaminants in commercial buildings, including their their presence, their adverse human effects, and their relationships with VRs. Based on a synthesis of the reviewed information, new principles and approaches are proposed for setting evidence-based VRs standards for commercial buildings, considering a range of human effects including health, performance, and acceptability of air. Results ? A review and evaluation is first presented of current approaches to setting prescriptive building ventilation standards and setting acceptable limits for human contaminant exposures in outdoor air and occupational settings. Recent research on approaches to setting acceptable levels of environmental exposures in evidence-based MVR standards is also described. From a synthesis and critique of these materials, a set of principles for setting MVRs is presented, along with an example approach based on these principles. The approach combines two sequential strategies. In a first step, an acceptable threshold is set for each adverse outcome that has a demonstrated relationship to VRs, as an increase from a (low) outcome level at a high reference ventilation rate (RVR, the VR needed to attain the best achievable levels of the adverse outcome); MVRs required to meet each specific outcome threshold are estimated; and the highest of these MVRs, which would then meet all outcome thresholds, is selected as the target MVR. In a second step, implemented only if the target MVR from step 1 is judged impractically high, costs and benefits are estimated and this information is used in a risk management process. Four human outcomes with substantial quantitative evidence of relationships to VRs are identified for initial consideration in setting MVR standards. These are: building-related symptoms (sometimes called sick building syndrome symptoms), poor perceived indoor air quality, and diminished work performance, all with data relating them directly to VRs; and cancer and non-cancer chronic outcomes, related indirectly to VRs through specific VR-influenced indoor contaminants. In an application of step 1 for offices using a set of example outcome thresholds, a target MVR of 9 L/s (19 cfm) per person was needed. Because this target MVR was close to MVRs in current standards, use of a cost/benefit process seemed unnecessary. Selection of more stringent thresholds for one or more human outcomes, however, could raise the target MVR to 14 L/s (30 cfm) per person or higher, triggering the step 2 risk management process. Consideration of outdoor air pollutant effects would add further complexity to the framework. For balancing the objective and subjective factors involved in setting MVRs in a cost-benefit process, it is suggested that a diverse group of stakeholders make the determination after assembling as much quantitative data as possible.

  6. A fair compromise to break the climate impasse. A major economies forum approach to emissions reductions budgeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, Marco; J. Roberts, Timmons

    2013-04-15

    Key messages of the study are: Given the stalemate in U.N. climate negotiations, the best arena to strike a workable deal is among the members the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF); The 13 MEF members—including the EU-27 (but not double-counting the four EU countries that are also individual members of the MEF)—account for 81.3 percent of all global emissions; This proposal devises a fair compromise to break the impasse to develop a science-based approach for fairly sharing the carbon budget in order to have a 75 percent chance of avoiding dangerous climate change; To increase the likelihood of a future climate agreement, carbon accounting must shift from production-based inventories to consumption-based ones; The shares of a carbon budget to stay below 2 deg C through 2050 are calculated by cumulative emissions since 1990, i.e. according to a short-horizon polluter pays principle, and national capability (income), and allocated to MEF members through emission rights. This proposed fair compromise addresses key concerns of major emitters; According to this accounting, no countries have negative carbon budgets, there is substantial time for greening major developing economies, and some developed countries need to institute very rapid reductions in emissions; and, To provide a 'green ladder' to developing countries and to ensure a fair global deal, it will be crucial to agree how to extend sufficient and predictable financial support and the rapid transfer of technology.

  7. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  8. Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

  9. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 C. M. Bitz 1 , K.M. Shell 2 , P. Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20 C for 1 version (CCSM3). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 1 resolution is 1.72 C, which is about 0

  10. Climate Change: One, or Many? Professor of Climate and Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: One, or Many? Mike Hulme Professor of Climate and Culture Department of Geography Presidential Session: `Geographies of Climate Change' AAG Annual Conference, Tampa, Florida, 7-11 April 2014 climate system' 2 `The Plan' #12;One Climate? "... a complex, interactive system consisting

  11. Climate closure: Game over for climate skep4cs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Climate closure: Game over for climate skep4cs S. Lovejoy, McGill, Physics McGill, Macdonald College Campus 4 November, 2014 #12;What is the climate climate is what you expect... "Climate is what you expect, weather is what you get." -Lazarus Long

  12. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

  13. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

  14. Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2009-02-14

    Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

  15. Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and NCAR in the development of a comprehensive, earth systems model. This model incorporates the most-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well. Our collaborators in climate research include the National Center

  16. Effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest water-related resources: Summary of preliminary findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Sands, R.D.; Vail, L.W.; Chatters, J.C.; Neitzel, D.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Case Study is a multi-agency analysis of atmospheric/climatic change impacts on the Pacific Northwest (which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and portions of the Columbia River Basin in Western Montana). The purpose of the case study, which began in fiscal year 1991, was to develop and test analytical tools, as well as to develop an assessment of the effects of climate change on climate-sensitive natural resources of the Pacific Northwest and economic sectors dependent on them. The overall study, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, was a broad-based, reconnaissance-level study to identify potential climate impacts on agriculture, coastal resources, forest resources, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. DOE participated in the reconnaissance study, with responsibility for hydroelectric and water supply issues. While this report briefly discusses a broader array of water issues, attention is mainly focused on three aspects of the water study: (1) the effects of the region`s higher temperatures on the demand for electric power (which in turn puts additional demand on hydroelectric resources of the region); (2) the effects of higher temperatures and changes, both in precipitation amounts and seasonality, on river flows and hydroelectric supply; and (3) the effect of higher temperatures and changed precipitation amounts and seasonality on salmonid resources -- particularly the rearing conditions in tributaries of the Columbia River Basin. Because the meaning of regional climate forecasts is still quite uncertain, most of the preliminary findings are based on sensitivity analyses and historical analog climate scenarios.

  17. Biofuels: A Solution for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, S.

    1999-10-04

    Our lives are linked to weather and climate, and to energy use. Since the late 1970s, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested in research and technology related to global climate change. DOE's Office Fuels Development (OFD) manages the National Biofuels Program and is the lead technical advisor on the development of biofuels technologies in the United States. Together with industry and other stakeholders, the program seeks to establish a major biofuels industry. Its goals are to develop and commercialize technologies for producing sustainable, domestic, environmentally beneficial, and economically viable fuels from dedicated biomass feedstocks.

  18. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  19. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  20. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  1. Climate Change and Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change and Runoff Management in Wisconsin Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance May 10, 2011 David S of Engineering #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;What is climate? "Climate is properly the long average of weather in a single place

  2. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  3. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  4. Climate Change Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) and outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions as they relate to climate change and resilience for...

  5. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  6. Methodology to Develop and Test an Easy-To-Use Procedure for the Preliminary Selection of High-Performance Systems for Office Buildings in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.

    2009-01-01

    10: Efficient Hot Water Boiler (from 75% Thermal Efficiency to 95% Thermal Efficiency) ...................... 176? 7.4.11? High-performance Measure 11: Efficient Service Water Heater (from 80% Thermal Efficiency to 85% Thermal Efficiency... were implemented including the energy savings, while the comfort level was maintained based on the ASHRAE comfort zone. In addition to the 14 high-performance measures, solar thermal and solar PV system analysis were integrated with the SGDOE-2.1e...

  7. Bayesian Belief Network (BBN)-based advisory system development for steam generator replacement project management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dohyoung, 1970-

    2002-01-01

    The growing need for improved project management technique points to the usefulness of a knowledge-base advisory system to help project managers understand current and future project status and optimize decisions based ...

  8. A Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Gutowski, William; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; McGinnis, Seth; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun

    2009-09-08

    There are two main uncertainties in determining future climate: the trajectories of future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the response of the global climate system to any given set of future emissions [Meehl et al., 2007]. These uncertainties normally are elucidated via application of global climate models, which provide information at relatively coarse spatial resolutions. Greater interest in, and concern about, the details of climate change at regional scales has provided the motivation for the application of regional climate models, which introduces additional uncertainty [Christensen et al., 2007a]. These uncertainties in fi ne- scale regional climate responses, in contrast to uncertainties of coarser spatial resolution global models in which regional models are nested, now have been documented in numerous contexts [Christensen et al., 2007a] and have been found to extend to uncertainties in climate impacts [Wood et al., 2004; Oleson et al., 2007]. While European research in future climate projections has moved forward systematically to examine combined uncertainties from global and regional models [Christensen et al., 2007b], North American climate programs have lagged behind. To fi ll this research gap, scientists developed the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (-NARCCAP). The fundamental scientifi c motivation of this international program is to explore separate and combined uncertainties in regional projections of future climate change resulting from the use of multiple atmosphere- ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to drive multiple regional climate models (RCMs). An equally important, and related, motivation for this program is to provide the climate impacts and adaptation community with high- resolution regional climate change scenarios that can be used for studies of the societal impacts of climate change and possible adaptation strategies.

  9. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin; Liu, Fang; Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-08-15

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550–600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 × 10{sup ?15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  10. SU-E-T-103: Development and Implementation of Web Based Quality Control Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studinski, R; Taylor, R; Angers, C; La Russa, D; Clark, B [The Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Ctr., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Historically many radiation medicine programs have maintained their Quality Control (QC) test results in paper records or Microsoft Excel worksheets. Both these approaches represent significant logistical challenges, and are not predisposed to data review and approval. It has been our group's aim to develop and implement web based software designed not just to record and store QC data in a centralized database, but to provide scheduling and data review tools to help manage a radiation therapy clinics Equipment Quality control program. Methods: The software was written in the Python programming language using the Django web framework. In order to promote collaboration and validation from other centres the code was made open source and is freely available to the public via an online source code repository. The code was written to provide a common user interface for data entry, formalize the review and approval process, and offer automated data trending and process control analysis of test results. Results: As of February 2014, our installation of QAtrack+ has 180 tests defined in its database and has collected ?22 000 test results, all of which have been reviewed and approved by a physicist via QATrack+'s review tools. These results include records for quality control of Elekta accelerators, CT simulators, our brachytherapy programme, TomoTherapy and Cyberknife units. Currently at least 5 other centres are known to be running QAtrack+ clinically, forming the start of an international user community. Conclusion: QAtrack+ has proven to be an effective tool for collecting radiation therapy QC data, allowing for rapid review and trending of data for a wide variety of treatment units. As free and open source software, all source code, documentation and a bug tracker are available to the public at https://bitbucket.org/tohccmedphys/qatrackplus/.

  11. Modernizing systems engineering : cognitive systems and model-based approaches for spacecraft architecture development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlow, Brandon (Brandon James)

    2014-01-01

    Systems engineering exists as a discipline to enable organizations to control and manage the development of complex hardware and software. These methods are particularly essential in the development of space systems, which ...

  12. The Faculty of Science and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Future Development of Climate and Earth System Models for Scientific and Policy Use Warren M. Washington of climate and Earth system models has been regarded primarily as the making of scientific tools to study, the development of climate and Earth system models became intimately linked to the need to not only improve our

  13. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  14. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  15. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  16. TSINGHUA -MIT China Energy & Climate Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable and CO2 emissions impact of renewable energy development in China Tianyu Qi a , Xiliang Zhang a energy development in China* Tianyu Qi, Xiliang Zhang and Valerie Karplus *Reprinted from Energy Policy

  17. Decadal climate predictions using sequential learning algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strobach, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Ensembles of climate models are commonly used to improve climate predictions and assess the uncertainties associated with them. Weighting the models according to their performances holds the promise of further improving their predictions. Here, we use an ensemble of decadal climate predictions to demonstrate the ability of sequential learning algorithms (SLAs) to reduce the forecast errors and reduce the uncertainties. Three different SLAs are considered, and their performances are compared with those of an equally weighted ensemble, a linear regression and the climatology. Predictions of four different variables--the surface temperature, the zonal and meridional wind, and pressure--are considered. The spatial distributions of the performances are presented, and the statistical significance of the improvements achieved by the SLAs is tested. Based on the performances of the SLAs, we propose one to be highly suitable for the improvement of decadal climate predictions.

  18. Transient climate change and potential croplands of the world in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Tian, Hanqin.; Pan, Yude.; Vörösmarty, Charles, J.; Yang, Zili.

    A cropland distribution model, which is based on climate, soil and topography, is applied to estimate the area and spatial distribution of global potential croplands under contemporary climate and to assess the effect of ...

  19. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  20. The Complexity of Adaptation to Climate Change. Exploring adaptation in Rio Grande, Ecuador 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argudo, Cristina

    2014-11-27

    Climate change has become one of the most challenging problems in terms of development, having adverse effects in populations that are already vulnerable to other stressors. At present, the importance of adaptation to climate change has been widely...

  1. CAREER: Climate Informed Uncertainty Analyses for Integrated Water Resources Sustainability Principal Investigator: Sankarasubramanian Arumugam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    CAREER: Climate Informed Uncertainty Analyses for Integrated Water Resources Sustainability the relative roles of climate variability in modulating seasonal streamflow and water quality variability over forecasts in improving water supply and water quality management and in developing adaptive water management

  2. Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    A recently developed technique for simulating large [O(10[superscript 4])] numbers of tropical cyclones in climate states described by global gridded data is applied to simulations of historical and future climate states ...

  3. Using climate policies and carbon markets to save tropical forests : the case of Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpels, Marisa (Marisa Carina)

    2008-01-01

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s, advocates for forest conservation thought that climate change could provide a lever to motivate developing countries to reduce deforestation. Fifteen years after the first climate change ...

  4. Spatial-temporal event detection in climate parameter imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenna, Sean Andrew; Gutierrez, Karen A.

    2011-10-01

    Previously developed techniques that comprise statistical parametric mapping, with applications focused on human brain imaging, are examined and tested here for new applications in anomaly detection within remotely-sensed imagery. Two approaches to analysis are developed: online, regression-based anomaly detection and conditional differences. These approaches are applied to two example spatial-temporal data sets: data simulated with a Gaussian field deformation approach and weekly NDVI images derived from global satellite coverage. Results indicate that anomalies can be identified in spatial temporal data with the regression-based approach. Additionally, la Nina and el Nino climatic conditions are used as different stimuli applied to the earth and this comparison shows that el Nino conditions lead to significant decreases in NDVI in both the Amazon Basin and in Southern India.

  5. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  6. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  7. Climate Change and Conceptual Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, David Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1.1.2 The Stark Reality of Climate Change . . . . . . . .1.2 Climate Change as a BehavioralEducation for Climate Change . . . . 1.4.1 The Numerically

  8. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    for the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threatand the Threat of Climate Change,” The CNA Corporation, 2007

  9. Climate Action Plan 2009 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Climate Action Plan September 2009 Sustainability Council This plan outlines methods by which. This document is publicly available at http://sustainability.uark.edu. #12;2 University of Arkansas Climate....................................................................................................................................7 Climate Action Plan Committee

  10. book review: Climate change mapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanahan, Mike

    2012-01-01

    of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

  11. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

  12. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  13. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to perform detailed hourly impact studies of building adaptation and mitigation strategies on energy use and electricity peak demand within the context of the entire grid and economy.

  14. Global Climate Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    conservation concern: mitigation - reduce emissions of green house gases Climate Change and Wildlife · Pattern house gases · Secondary concern: adaptation - how do we lessen ongoing impacts of climate change - protect these areas - facilitate animal movement to these areas (corridors) #12;11/30/14 4 Fordham et al

  15. Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Oran R

    2009-01-01

    ENV-02 Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate theof Ecosystem-Based Management Preparer Information: Juliaof Environmental Science & Management young@bren.ucsb.edu

  16. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  17. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  18. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  1. Climate change and climate variability affect all regions of the world. U.S. vulnerability to the changes and variations are not only dependent on changes within the U.S. but also on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERVIEW Climate change and climate variability affect all regions of the world. U.S. vulnerability, it is important to assess emerging threats to national security due to climate change far into the future. Having access to relevant weather and climate data is essential for developing appropriate planning, risk

  2. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Develop distributed HVAC components to supplement the central HVAC system to reduce the energy required by current compressed gas air conditioners by at least one-third.

  3. Math Play : growing and developing mathematics understanding in an emergent play-based environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeGroot, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    objects Playing games using math reasoning Recognizing andobjects Playing games using math reasoning Recognizing andOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Math Play: Growing and developing

  4. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change and Electricity Demand: Applying the NewClimate Change and Electricity Demand in California. ”Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California. ”

  5. Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is...

  6. International Journal of Web Services Research, Vol.2, No.2, 2005 Model-based development of Web service descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckel, Reiko

    International Journal of Web Services Research, Vol.2, No.2, 2005 1 Model-based development of Web, Web services promise to enable the formation of ad-hoc cooperations on a global scale. From the automated integration of Web services. A suitable technology for Web services has to mediate these needs

  7. Development of a personal computer-based secondary task procedure as a surrogate for a driving simulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrock, Steven Dale

    2009-05-15

    , Rodger Koppa James Matis Donald Woods Head of Department, David Rosowsky August 2007 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Development of a Personal Computer-Based Secondary Task Procedure as a Surrogate for a Driving Simulator... ............................................................................................................. 196 APPENDIX D ............................................................................................................. 212 VITA...

  8. Development of a Bio-inspired Structural Health Monitoring System Based on Multi-scale Sample Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Development of a Bio-inspired Structural Health Monitoring System Based on Multi-scale Sample electrocardiogram. As similar circumstance is also faced in the field of structural health monitoring, where health monitoring, Multi-scale entropy, Sample entropy INTRODUCTION The concept of structural health

  9. Toward a Process-Based Molecular Model of SiC Membranes. 1. Development of a Reactive Force Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ABSTRACT: A broad class of important materials, such as carbon molecular sieves, silicon carbide (Si of preceramic polymers. Examples include carbon molecular sieves, silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si3N4Toward a Process-Based Molecular Model of SiC Membranes. 1. Development of a Reactive Force Field

  10. Progress in the Development of a S-RETGEM-Based Detector for an Early Forest Fire Warning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ­ 1 ­ Progress in the Development of a S-RETGEM-Based Detector for an Early Forest Fire Warning for an early forest fire detection system. Tests show that it is one hundred times more sensitive than the best and smoke sensors will exceptionally increase the sensitivity of forest fire detection systems. Our future

  11. CAM: A Mobile Paper-based Information Services Architecture for Remote Rural Areas in the Developing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Tapan S.

    CAM: A Mobile Paper-based Information Services Architecture for Remote Rural Areas in developing nations. The growth of mobile phone use in China, India and Africa resembles the growth instructions to otherwise inert paper documents. 2. The CAM Architecture CAM unites a user interface

  12. Directed evolution has become a powerful tool for developing enzyme and whole cell based biocatalysts. Significant recent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    104 Directed evolution has become a powerful tool for developing enzyme and whole cell based sequence homology-independent protein recombination Introduction The use of enzymes and whole cells catalytic power (high selec- tivity and environmental friendliness) unmatched by conventional catalysts

  13. 40 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS, VOL. 31, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2015 Model-Based Development of Leaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Pei-Chun

    in a Hexapod Robot Ya-Cheng Chou, Ke-Jung Huang, Wei-Shun Yu, and Pei-Chun Lin, Member, IEEE Abstract--We report on the model-based development of leap- ing behavior in a RHex-style hexapod robot. A three, hexapod, leaping, three-leg model. I. INTRODUCTION LEAPING is one of the unique behaviors performed

  14. Development of a rules-based advisory system for detecting off-nominal behavior of spacecraft digital autopilots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Hee

    1998-01-01

    the space shuttle dynamic model, and the control torque required, by the phase plane switching logic and jet selection logic. Rules-based methods for detecting off-nominal behavior such as chattering, overshoot, and torque bias are developed. This advisory...

  15. Developing a Standard Method of Test for Packaged, Solid-Desiccant Based Dehumidification Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    components that may be included to complement a desiccant-based dehumidifier system. The MOT also does-based dehumidifier systems that incorporate a thermally-regenerated desiccant material for dehumidification. This MOT is intended to function as the "system" testing and rating compliment to the desiccant "component" (desiccant

  16. The Power of Rich Syntax for Model-based Development Ethan K. Jackson, Wolfram Schulte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgs, Christian

    this changes: Feature- oriented programming, domain specific languages, and platform-based design use rich, and present a series of examples from automotive embedded systems. 1. Introduction Research in model approaches include: model-driven architecture [45], platform-based design [54], domain- specific languages

  17. ESIDE: An Integrated Development Environment for Component-Based Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Fei

    engineering principles to facilitate efficient, scalable, and robust hard- ware/software co-design, coOS- based networked sensor systems into complete component- based designs that cover both hardware of both hardware and software. Due to stringent design constraints on embedded sys- tems

  18. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-03

    For the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the ESG-CET team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (e.g., Couple Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and so forth), and analysis and visualization tools, all of which serve a diverse community of users. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL) as well as at unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory. More recently, ESG-CET has been extending services beyond data-file access and delivery to develop more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis capabilities. These will allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. Continued ESGF progress will result in a production ultrascale data system for empowering scientists who attempt new and exciting data exchanges that could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate-science discoveries.

  19. Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K. [California State University, Fresno; Yeasmin, Dilruba [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

  20. Intents, Upgrades and Assurance in Model-Based Development Jonas Elmqvist, Simin Nadjm-Tehrani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    software is promoted as a means to achieve cost-efficient development of code, and platform independent that some element of assurance is present: a future car airbag system being developed at the Swedish to be computed predictably (and within 500Ps). In the Tiger XS communication platform the main requirement

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE WHAT IS CLIMATE CHANGE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    is the global power sector ˇ Generates around 40% of all global electricity from coal ˇ The power sector of Tons of Carbon Dioxide *an estimate from the World Resources Institute STEPS TAKEN TO COMBAT CLIMATE Kullen v. Wild by Nature ˇ WBN is an organic market also owned by King Kullen ˇ Prices nearly doubled

  2. Cogeneration and community design: performance based model for optimization of the design of U.S. residential communities utilizing cogeneration systems in cold climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashed Ali Atta, Hazem Mohamed

    2009-06-02

    typology, 5) envelope and building systems' efficiencies, 6) renewable energy utilization, 7) cogeneration system type, 8) size, and 9) operation strategy. Based on this, combinations of design characteristics achieving an optimum system performance were...

  3. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  4. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing Vegetation indicators #12;Indicators of a changing climate J. Magnuson Source: IPCC 2007 Potter, et al

  5. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley · Changes to surface and atmosphere by aerosols · Climate sensitivity to changes in aerosols and CO2 Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central

  6. Climate Research in Society 1 CLIMATE SCIENCE IN SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Climate Research in Society 1 CLIMATE SCIENCE IN SOCIETY The situation is post-normal The situation is as follows: Man-made climate change is real, but we are still arguing what it really consists in and how temperature. Restricting emissions will reduce or slow down future climate change. Although everybody agrees

  7. Climate and Sockeye Salmon Climate effects on growth, phenology, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Climate and Sockeye Salmon Climate effects on growth, phenology, and survival of sockeye salmon in peer-reviewed studies that link sockeye salmon growth, phenology, and survival to climate variables 2. State the known knowledge in regards to effects of climate variables on growth, phenology, and survival

  8. Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter

    Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

  9. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict and Security University of Sussex, 18-19 October 2012 1 #12;Weather and climate ... vulnerability and security

  10. The Use of Fragment-Based Lead Discovery Towards the Design and Development of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sardo, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    2 1. B. 1 Fragment Based Lead Discovery A Strategy for5 1. B. 3. Hit to Leadenzyme’s metal ion cofactor may lead to advancements in 5-LO

  11. Development of Screenable Wax Coatings and Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design new formulations and production processes for water-based adhesives and wax coatings that can be easily screened from recycling operations.

  12. Developing web based assessment and evaluation tools for middle school mathematics teachers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beser, Semsettin

    2002-01-01

    was the major instrumentation for classroom testing during the experimental procedure. Also, online pre- and post-surveys were administered in order to investigate change in students' attitudes, beliefs and reflections on web-based assessment and technology...

  13. Making local connections : the development of social capital through place-based virtual groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsman, Maryann (Maryann Madeline)

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, as computer-mediated communication (CMC) has become ubiquitous., place-based virtual groups have become increasingly common in the U.S. People are using various CMC tools, such as email lists, message ...

  14. Development of a performance-based approach for collision avoidance and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ji Hyun, 1978-

    2003-01-01

    Many threat assessment algorithms are based on a collection of threshold equations that predict when a collision is to occur. The fact that there are numerous algorithms suggests a need to understand the underlying principles ...

  15. Framework for developing and deploying location-based services in emerging economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katchy, Ifeanyi

    2008-01-01

    The general belief is that Location-Based Services (LBS) in emerging economies does not make much sense until there is widespread availability of geographic information system (GIS) data, broadband internet access, payment ...

  16. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  17. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling[Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses results from TE HVAC project to add detail to a human thermal comfort model and further allow load reduction in the climate control energy through a distributed TE network

  18. Development of Algorithms to Estimate Post-Disaster Population Dislocation--A Research-Based Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yi-Sz

    2010-10-12

    This study uses an empirical approach to develop algorithms to estimate population dislocation following a natural disaster. It starts with an empirical reexamination of the South Dade Population Impact Survey data, ...

  19. Technical, economic, and clinical challenges to the development of new biomaterials-based vaccines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huffman, Kathleen Renee

    2005-01-01

    Research into novel vaccine methods is becoming increasingly important for the potential treatment of widespread diseases such as cancer, HIV, and malaria. Members of the Irvine laboratory have developed a hydrogel and ...

  20. A decomposition-based approach for the integration of product development and manufacturing system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Suk, 1975-

    2002-01-01

    Using a structured approach to understand the interaction between product design decisions and manufacturing system design is critical to reflect manufacturing system issues early in the product development process. Early ...