National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for developing li-ion cells

  1. Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) Vehicle Technologies Office ...

  2. Analysis of Heat Dissipation in Li-Ion Cells & Modules for Modeling of Thermal Runaway (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G.-H.; Pesaran, A.

    2007-05-15

    The objectives of this study are: (1) To develop 3D Li-Ion battery thermal abuse ''reaction'' models for cell and module analysis; (2) To understand the mechanisms and interactions between heat transfer and chemical reactions during thermal runaway for Li-Ion cells and modules; (3) To develop a tool and methodology to support the design of abuse-tolerant Li-Ion battery systems for PHEVs/HEVs; and (4) To help battery developers accelerate delivery of abuse-tolerant Li-Ion battery systems in support of the FreedomCAR's Energy Storage Program.

  3. Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing

  4. Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  5. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion ...

  6. Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt001_es_koo_2012_p.pdf (2.94 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing

  7. Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

    1999-09-17

    A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to <5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature.

  8. Development of a Novel Test Method for On-Demand Internal Short Circuit in a Li-Ion Cell (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, M.; Long, D.; Jung, Y. S.; Pesaran, A.; Darcy, E.; McCarthy, B.; Patrick, L.; Kruger, C.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes a cell-level test method that simulates an emergent internal short circuit, produces consistent and reproducible test results, can establish the locations and temperatures/power/SOC conditions where an internal short circuit will result in thermal runaway, and provides relevant data to validate internal short circuit models.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced high energy Li-ion cell for PHEV...

  10. Biphasic Electrode Suspensions for Li-Ion Semi-Solid Flow Cells with High

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Density, Fast Charge Transport, and Low-Dissipation Flow - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research June 5, 2015, Research Highlights Biphasic Electrode Suspensions for Li-Ion Semi-Solid Flow Cells with High Energy Density, Fast Charge Transport, and Low-Dissipation Flow Images for Biphasic Electrode Suspensions Scientific Achievement We created biphasic electrode suspensions composed of dispersed active particles and uniformly percolated conductive particles, different from the

  11. Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Electrolytes and Separators for High Voltage Li Ion Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Electrolytes and Separators for High Voltage Li Ion Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  15. Electrolytes and Separators for High Voltage Li Ion Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by EC Power at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about evelopment of cell/pack level models...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Farasis at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density Li-ion cells for...

  18. Investigation of Path Dependence in Commercial Li-ion Cells Chosen for PHEV Duty Cycle Protocols (paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Gering

    2011-04-01

    Path dependence is emerging as a premier issue of how electrochemical cells age in conditions that are diverse and variable in the time domain. For example, lithium-ion cells in a vehicle configuration will experience a variable combination of usage and rest periods over a range of temperature and state of charge (SOC). This is complicated by the fact that some aging can actually become worse (or better) when a lithium-ion cell is idle for extended periods under calendar-life (calL) aging, as opposed to cycle-life (cycL) conditions where the cell is used within a predictable schedule. The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap between highly idealized and controlled laboratory test conditions and actual field conditions regarding PHEV applications, so that field-type aging mechanisms can be mimicked and quantified in a repeatable laboratory setting. The main parameters are the magnitude and frequency of the thermal cycling, looking at isothermal, mild, and severe scenarios. To date, little is known about Li-ion aging effects caused by thermal cycling superimposed onto electrochemical cycling, and related path dependence. This scenario is representative of what Li-ion batteries will experience in vehicle service, where upon the typical start of a HEV/PHEV, the batteries will be cool or cold, will gradually warm up to normal temperature and operate there for a time, then will cool down after the vehicle is turned off. Such thermal cycling will occur thousands of times during the projected life of a HEV/PHEV battery pack. We propose to quantify the effects of thermal cycling on Li-ion batteries using a representative chemistry that is commercially available. The secondary Li-ion cells used in this study are of the 18650 configuration, have a nominal capacity rating of 1.9 Ah, and consist of a {LiMn2O4 + LiMn(1/3)Ni(1/3)Co(1/3)O2} cathode and a graphite anode. Electrochemical cycling is based on PHEV-relevant cycle-life protocols that are a combination of charge

  19. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotnikov, Yuri Karp, Jason Knobloch, Aaron Kapusta, Chris Lin, David

    2015-03-31

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation.

  20. Screening report on cell materials for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.; Kahaian, A.; Belharouak, I.; Kang, S.; Oliver, S.; Henriksen, S.; Amine, K.

    2003-04-24

    The Battery Technology Department at Argonne National Laboratory is a major participant in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) program. This multi-national laboratory program is dedicated to improving lithium-ion batteries for high-power HEV and FCEV applications. As part of the FreedomCAR Partnership, this program is addressing the three key barriers for high-power lithium-ion batteries: calendar life, abuse tolerance, and cost. All three of these barriers can be addressed by the choice of materials used in the cell chemistry. To date, the ATD program has developed two high-power cell chemistries, denoted our Gen 1 and Gen 2 cell chemistries. The selection of materials for use in the Gen 2 cell chemistry was based largely on reducing material cost and extending cell calendar life, relative to our Gen 1 cell chemistry. Table 1 provides a list of the materials used in our Gen 2 cell chemistry and their projected costs, when produced in large-scale quantities. In evaluating advanced materials, we have focused our efforts on materials that are lower cost than those listed in Table 1, while simultaneously offering enhanced chemical, structural, and thermal stability. Therefore, we have focused on natural graphite anode materials (having round-edge particle morphologies), cathode materials that contain more Mn and less Co and Ni (which can be produced via low-cost processes), lower cost electrode binders and/or binders that possess superior bonding properties at lower concentrations, and lower cost salts and solvents (with superior thermal and oxidation/reduction stability) for use in the electrolyte. The purpose of this report is to document the results of screening tests that were performed on a large number of advanced low-cost materials. These materials were screened for their potential to impact positively on the calendar life, safety, and/or cost of high-power lithium-ion cell chemistries, relative to our Gen 2 cell chemistry. As

  1. Experimental design and analysis for accelerated degradation tests with Li-ion cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Daniel Harvey; Thomas, Edward Victor; Jungst, Rudolph George; Roth, Emanuel Peter

    2003-08-01

    This document describes a general protocol (involving both experimental and data analytic aspects) that is designed to be a roadmap for rapidly obtaining a useful assessment of the average lifetime (at some specified use conditions) that might be expected from cells of a particular design. The proposed experimental protocol involves a series of accelerated degradation experiments. Through the acquisition of degradation data over time specified by the experimental protocol, an unambiguous assessment of the effects of accelerating factors (e.g., temperature and state of charge) on various measures of the health of a cell (e.g., power fade and capacity fade) will result. In order to assess cell lifetime, it is necessary to develop a model that accurately predicts degradation over a range of the experimental factors. In general, it is difficult to specify an appropriate model form without some preliminary analysis of the data. Nevertheless, assuming that the aging phenomenon relates to a chemical reaction with simple first-order rate kinetics, a data analysis protocol is also provided to construct a useful model that relates performance degradation to the levels of the accelerating factors. This model can then be used to make an accurate assessment of the average cell lifetime. The proposed experimental and data analysis protocols are illustrated with a case study involving the effects of accelerated aging on the power output from Gen-2 cells. For this case study, inadequacies of the simple first-order kinetics model were observed. However, a more complex model allowing for the effects of two concurrent mechanisms provided an accurate representation of the experimental data.

  2. Failure analysis of pinch-torsion tests as a thermal runaway risk evaluation method of Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Yuzhi; Li, Dr. Tianlei; Ren, Prof. Fei; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Recently a pinch-torsion test is developed for safety testing of Li-ion batteries (Ren et al., J. Power Source, 2013). It has been demonstrated that this test can generate small internal short-circuit spots in the separator in a controllable and repeatable manner. In the current research, the failure mechanism is examined by numerical simulations and comparisons to experimental observations. Finite element models are developed to evaluate the deformation of the separators under both pure pinch and pinch-torsion loading conditions. It is discovered that the addition of the torsion component significantly increased the maximum principal strain, which is believed to induce the internal short circuit. In addition, the applied load in the pinch-torsion test is significantly less than in the pure pinch test, thus dramatically improving the applicability of this method to ultra-thick batteries which otherwise require heavy load in excess of machine capability. It is further found that the separator failure is achieved in the early stage of torsion (within a few degree of rotation). Effect of coefficient of friction on the maximum principal strain is also examined.

  3. Material review of Li ion battery separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Christoph J. Geiger, Sigrid; Falusi, Sandra; Roth, Michael

    2014-06-16

    Separators for Li Ion batteries have a strong impact on cell production, cell performance, life, as well as reliability and safety. The separator market volume is about 500 million m{sup 2} mainly based on consumer applications. It is expected to grow strongly over the next decade for mobile and stationary applications using large cells. At present, the market is essentially served by polyolefine membranes. Such membranes have some technological limitations, such as wettability, porosity, penetration resistance, shrinkage and meltdown. The development of a cell failure due to internal short circuit is potentially closely related to separator material properties. Consequently, advanced separators became an intense area of worldwide research and development activity in academia and industry. New separator technologies are being developed especially to address safety and reliability related property improvements.

  4. Degradation Mechanisms in Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes Uncovered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation Mechanisms in Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes Uncovered by In-Situ Scanning ... to evaluate stability and degradation in battery electrolytes Developed a rapid method ...

  5. Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Internal Short Circuit in a Li-ion Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  7. The Relationship of the Nail Penetration Test to Safety of Li-Ion Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Li-Ion polymer cells thermal property changes as a function of cycle-life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maleki, Hossein; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Hallmark, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The impact of elevated temperature chargeedischarge cycling on thermal conductivity (K-value) of Lithium Ion Polymer (LIP) cells of various chemistries from three different manufacturers was investigated. These included high voltage (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.35 V), wide voltage (Si:C/LiCoO2:2.7e4.35 V) and conventional (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.2 V) chemistries. Investigation results show limited variability within the in-plane and through-plane K-values for the fresh cells with graphite-based anodes from all three suppliers. After 500 cycles at 45 C, in-plane and through-plane K-values of the high voltage cells reduced less vs. those for the wide voltage cells. Such results suggest that high temperature cycling could have a greater impact on thermal properties of Si:C cells than on the LIP cells with graphite (Gr) anode cells we tested. This difference is due to the excess swelling of Si:C-anode based cells vs. Gr-anode cells during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Thermal modeling is used to evaluate the impact of K-value changes, due to cycles at 45 C, on the cells internal heat propagation under internal short circuit condition that leads to localized meltdown of the separator.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: High Energy Anode Material Development for Li-Ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sinode Systems at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  10. Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer ... Office: 2008 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report ... Review 2015: Cell ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Anode Material Development for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sinode Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy anode material...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Tailoring Spinel Electrodes for High Capacity Li-Ion Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  13. Electrochemical and physical analysis of a Li-ion cell cycled at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Song, Xiangyun; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-06-21

    Laboratory-size LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2/graphite lithium-ion pouch cells were cycled over 100 percent DOD at room temperature and 60 degrees C in order to investigate high-temperature degradation mechanisms of this important technology. Capacity fade for the cell was correlated with that for the individual components, using electrochemical analysis of the electrodes and other diagnostic techniques. The high-temperature cell lost 65 percent of its initial capacity after 140 cycles at 60 degrees C compared to only 4 percent loss for the cell cycled at room temperature. Cell ohmic impedance increased significantly with the elevated temperature cycling, resulting in some of loss of capacity at the C/2 rate. However, as determined with slow rate testing of the individual electrodes, the anode retained most of its original capacity, while the cathode lost 65 percent, even when cycled with a fresh source of lithium. Diagnostic evaluation of cell components including XRD, Raman, CSAFM and suggest capacity loss occurs primarily due to a rise in the impedance of the cathode, especially at the end-of-charge. The impedance rise may be caused in part by a loss of the conductive carbon at the surface of the cathode and/or by an organic film on the surface of the cathode that becomes non-ionically conductive at low lithium content.

  14. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sicangu Lakota Oyate (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Project (Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Project) 30 MW Wind Energy Facility Phil Two Eagle, Director Ken Haukaas, Project Manager Resource Development Office Dale Osborn, President Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (DISGEN) www.disgenonline.com Sicangu Lakota Oyate (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Project (Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Project) Project Objectives 1. Complete all the development

  15. Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion ...

  16. A Novel In-situ Electrochemical Cell for Neutron Diffraction Studies of Phase Transitions in Small Volume Electrodes of Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadlamani, Bhaskar S; An, Ke; Jagannathan, M.; Ravi Chandran, K.

    2014-01-01

    The design and performance of a novel in-situ electrochemical cell that greatly facilitates the neutron diffraction study of complex phase transitions in small volume electrodes of Li-ion cells, is presented in this work. Diffraction patterns that are Rietveld-refinable could be obtained simultaneously for all the electrodes, which demonstrates that the cell is best suited to explore electrode phase transitions driven by the lithiation and delithiation processes. This has been facilitated by the use of single crystal (100) Si sheets as casing material and the planar cell configuration, giving improved signal-to-noise ratio relative to other casing materials. The in-situ cell has also been designed for easy assembly and to facilitate rapid experiments. The effectiveness of cell is demonstrated by tracking the neutron diffraction patterns during the charging of graphite/LiCoO2 and graphite/LiMn2O4 cells. It is shown that good quality neutron diffraction data can be obtained and that most of the finer details of the phase transitions, and the associated changes in crystallographic parameters in these electrodes, can be captured.

  17. Platform Li-Ion Battery Risk Assessment Tool: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-407

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.

    2012-01-01

    Creare was awarded a Phase 1 STTR contract from the US Office of Naval Research, with a seven month period of performance from 6/28/2010 to 1/28/2011. The objectives of the STTR were to determine the feasibility of developing a software package for estimating reliability of battery packs, and develop a user interface to allow the designer to assess the overall impact on battery packs and host platforms for cell-level faults. NREL served as sub-tier partner to Creare, providing battery modeling and battery thermal safety expertise.

  18. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Development of Si-Composite Anode for Large-Format Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Hydro Quebec at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  1. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es024_jow_2012_o.pdf (6.21 MB) More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Progress in Electrolyte Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013

  2. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es024_jow_2011_p.pdf (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes and electrolyte/electrode interfaces

  3. Platform Li-Ion Battery Risk Assessment Tool: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-01-406

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santhanagopalan, S.

    2012-07-01

    The pressure within a lithium-ion cell changes due to various chemical reactions. When a battery undergoes an unintended short circuit, the pressure changes are drastic - and often lead to uncontrolled failure of the cells. As part of work for others with Oceanit Laboratories Inc. for the NAVY STTR, NREL built Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations that can identify potential weak spots in the battery during such events, as well as propose designs to control violent failure of batteries.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Giga Life Cycle: Manufacture of Cells from Recycled EV Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OnTo Technology at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Giga Life Cycle: manufacture...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Efficient Safety and Degradation Modeling of Automotive Li-ion Cells and Pack

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by EC Power at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about efficient safety and degradation...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Efficient Safety and Degradation Modeling of Automotive Li-ion Cells and Pack

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by EC-Power at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about efficient safety and degradation...

  7. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  8. Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: a New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: a New Synthetic Approach ... multiple cycles which enables Li-ion batteries with exceptionally high-power.

    This ...

  9. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kandler; Wood, Eric; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Kim, Gi-heon; Shi, Ying; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-06-15

    It remains an open question how best to predict real-world battery lifetime based on accelerated calendar and cycle aging data from the laboratory. Multiple degradation mechanisms due to (electro)chemical, thermal, and mechanical coupled phenomena influence Li-ion battery lifetime, each with different dependence on time, cycling and thermal environment. The standardization of life predictive models would benefit the industry by reducing test time and streamlining development of system controls.

  10. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  11. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell for PHEV and EV Applications | Department of Energy Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications Presentation given by 3M at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries es210_singh_2016_o_web.pdf (1.96 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office

  13. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode ...

  14. Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vegas, Nevada Zip: 89110 Sector: Vehicles Product: Las Vegas - based manufacturer of lithium-powered plug-in vehicles. References: Li-ion Motors Corp (formerly EV Innovations...

  15. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A. 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION...

  16. Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: ...

  17. Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from the High...

  18. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Farasis at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Johnson Controls at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about significant cost improvement...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Applied Materials at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about modular process equipment...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Significant Cost Improvement of Li-ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Johnson Controls at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about significant cost improvement...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Farasis Energy, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density Li...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Enabling High-Energy, High-Voltage Li-Ion Cells for Transportation Applications: Project Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Enabling High-Energy, High-Voltage Li-Ion Cells for Transportation Applications: Materials Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Enabling High-Energy, High-Voltage Li-Ion Cells for Transportation Applications: Modeling and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  7. Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Title Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2015 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  8. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the...

  9. Enhanced autonomic shutdown of Li-ion batteries by polydopamine coated polyethylene microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baginska, Marta; Blaiszik, Benjamin J.; Rajh, Tijana; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.

    2014-07-17

    Thermally triggered autonomic shutdown of a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is demonstrated using polydopamine (PDA)-coated polyethylene microspheres applied onto a battery anode. The microspheres are dispersed in a buffered 10 mM dopamine salt solution and the pH is raised to initiate the polymerization and coat the microspheres. Coated microspheres are then mixed with an aqueous binder, applied onto a battery anode surface, dried, and incorporated into Li-ion coin cells. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy are used to verify the presence of the polydopamine on the surface of the microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy is used to examine microsphere surface morphology and resulting anode coating quality. Charge and discharge capacity, as well as impedance, are measured for Li-ion coin cells as a function of microsphere content. Autonomous shutdown is achieved by applying 1.7 mg cm–2 of PDA-coated microspheres to the electrode. Furthermore, the PDA coating significantly reduces the mass of microspheres for effective shutdown compared to our prior work with uncoated microspheres.

  10. Enhanced autonomic shutdown of Li-ion batteries by polydopamine coated polyethylene microspheres

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baginska, Marta; Blaiszik, Benjamin J.; Rajh, Tijana; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.

    2014-07-17

    Thermally triggered autonomic shutdown of a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is demonstrated using polydopamine (PDA)-coated polyethylene microspheres applied onto a battery anode. The microspheres are dispersed in a buffered 10 mM dopamine salt solution and the pH is raised to initiate the polymerization and coat the microspheres. Coated microspheres are then mixed with an aqueous binder, applied onto a battery anode surface, dried, and incorporated into Li-ion coin cells. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy are used to verify the presence of the polydopamine on the surface of the microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy is used to examine microsphere surface morphology and resulting anodemore » coating quality. Charge and discharge capacity, as well as impedance, are measured for Li-ion coin cells as a function of microsphere content. Autonomous shutdown is achieved by applying 1.7 mg cm–2 of PDA-coated microspheres to the electrode. Furthermore, the PDA coating significantly reduces the mass of microspheres for effective shutdown compared to our prior work with uncoated microspheres.« less

  11. Selected test results from the neosonic polymer Li-ion battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-07-01

    The performance of the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery was measured using a number of tests including capacity, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, hybrid pulsed power test, utility partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycle test, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the polymer Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery technology can provide power levels up to the 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h (1C) discharge rate. Two of the three cells used in the utility PSOC pulsed cycle test completed about 12,000 cycles with only a gradual loss in capacity of 10 and 13%. The third cell experienced a 40% loss in capacity at about 11,000 cycles. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were increases in impedance after cycling, especially for the third cell. Cell No.3 impedance Rs increased significantly along with extensive ballooning of the foil pouch. Finally, at a 1C (10 A) charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test with cell confinement similar to a multi cell string resulted in the cell venting hot gases at about 45 C 45 minutes into the test. At 104 minutes into the test the cell voltage spiked to the 12 volt limit and continued out to the end of the test at 151 minutes. In summary, the Neosonic cells performed as expected with good cycle-life and safety.

  12. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  13. Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for ... Title: Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for ...

  14. The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life-cycle energy and emissions and recycling's role in its reduction Title The significance of Li-ion batteries in...

  15. Influence of Li ions on the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum electrocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H; Xing, YC

    2011-06-01

    A Li-air battery can provide a much higher theoretical energy density than a Li-ion battery. The use of aqueous acidic electrolytes may prevent lithium oxide deposition from aprotic electrolytes and lithium carbonate precipitation from alkaline electrolytes. The present communication reports a study on the effect of Li ions on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulfuric acid electrolytes. It was found that the Li ions have negligible interactions with the active surface of Pt catalysts. However, significantly lower ORR activities were found when Li ions are present in the sulfuric acid. The intrinsic kinetic activities were found to decrease with the increase of Li ion concentrations, but level off when the Li ion concentrations are larger than 1.0 M. The low activities of Pt catalysts in Li ion containing electrolytes were attributed to a constraining effect of Li ions on the diffusion of oxygen in the electrolyte solution. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE US HEV/PHEV MANUFACTURING BASE: STABILIZED LITHIUM METAL POWDER, ENABLING MATERIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGY FOR HIGH ENERGY LI-ION BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovleva, Marina

    2012-12-31

    FMC Lithium Division has successfully completed the project “Establishing Sustainable US PHEV/EV Manufacturing Base: Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary Technology for High Energy Li-ion Batteries”. The project included design, acquisition and process development for the production scale units to 1) produce stabilized lithium dispersions in oil medium, 2) to produce dry stabilized lithium metal powders, 3) to evaluate, design and acquire pilot-scale unit for alternative production technology to further decrease the cost, and 4) to demonstrate concepts for integrating SLMP technology into the Li- ion batteries to increase energy density. It is very difficult to satisfy safety, cost and performance requirements for the PHEV and EV applications. As the initial step in SLMP Technology introduction, industry can use commercially available LiMn2O4 or LiFePO4, for example, that are the only proven safer and cheaper lithium providing cathodes available on the market. Unfortunately, these cathodes alone are inferior to the energy density of the conventional LiCoO2 cathode and, even when paired with the advanced anode materials, such as silicon composite material, the resulting cell will still not meet the energy density requirements. We have demonstrated, however, if SLMP Technology is used to compensate for the irreversible capacity in the anode, the efficiency of the cathode utilization will be improved and the cost of the cell, based on the materials, will decrease.

  18. A three-dimensional meso-macroscopic model for Li-Ion intercalation batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allu, S.; Kalnaus, S.; Simunovic, S.; Nanda, J.; Turner, J. A.; Pannala, S.

    2016-06-09

    Through this study, we present a three-dimensional computational formulation for electrode-electrolyte-electrode system of Li-Ion batteries. The physical consistency between electrical, thermal and chemical equations is enforced at each time increment by driving the residual of the resulting coupled system of nonlinear equations to zero. The formulation utilizes a rigorous volume averaging approach typical of multiphase formulations used in other fields and recently extended to modeling of supercapacitors [1]. Unlike existing battery modeling methods which use segregated solution of conservation equations and idealized geometries, our unified approach can model arbitrary battery and electrode configurations. The consistency of multi-physics solution also allowsmore » for consideration of a wide array of initial conditions and load cases. The formulation accounts for spatio-temporal variations of material and state properties such as electrode/void volume fractions and anisotropic conductivities. The governing differential equations are discretized using the finite element method and solved using a nonlinearly consistent approach that provides robust stability and convergence. The new formulation was validated for standard Li-ion cells and compared against experiments. Finally, its scope and ability to capture spatio-temporal variations of potential and lithium distribution is demonstrated on a prototypical three-dimensional electrode problem.« less

  19. Atomistic Modeling of the Electrode-Electrolyte Interface in Li-Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Systems: Electrolyte Structuring | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Atomistic Modeling of the Electrode-Electrolyte Interface in Li-Ion Energy Storage Systems: Electrolyte Structuring Authors: Ryan Jorn, Revati Kumar, Daniel P. Abraham, Gregory A. Voth The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) forms as a result of side reactions between the electrolyte and electrode surfaces in Li-ion batteries and can adversely impact performance by impeding Li-ion transport and diminishing

  20. Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of...

  1. Miniature All-solid-state Heterostructure Nanowire Li-ion Batteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All-solid-state Heterostructure Nanowire Li-ion Batteries as a Toll for Engineering and Structural Diagnostics of Nanoscale Electrochemical Processes Citation Details In-Document...

  2. PHEV/EV Li-Ion Battery Second-Use Project (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-04-01

    Accelerated development and market penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (Evs) are restricted at present by the high cost of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. One way to address this problem is to recover a fraction of the battery cost via reuse in other applications after the battery is retired from service in the vehicle, if the battery can still meet the performance requirements of other energy storage applications. In several current and emerging applications, the secondary use of PHEV and EV batteries may be beneficial; these applications range from utility peak load reduction to home energy storage appliances. However, neither the full scope of possible opportunities nor the feasibility or profitability of secondary use battery opportunities have been quantified. Therefore, with support from the Energy Storage activity of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is addressing this issue. NREL will bring to bear its expertise and capabilities in energy storage for transportation and in distributed grids, advanced vehicles, utilities, solar energy, wind energy, and grid interfaces as well as its understanding of stakeholder dynamics. This presentation introduces NREL's PHEV/EV Li-ion Battery Secondary-Use project.

  3. Selected test results from the LiFeBatt iron phosphate Li-ion battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper the performance of the LiFeBatt Li-ion cell was measured using a number of tests including capacity measurements, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, high power partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycling, pulse power measurements, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the iron phosphate Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, and wind farm energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the LiFeBatt battery technology can function up to a 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h discharge rate (1C). The utility PSOC cycle test at up to the 4C{sub 1} pulse rate completed 8,394 PSOC pulsed cycles with a gradual loss in capacity of 10 to 15% depending on how the capacity loss is calculated. The majority of the capacity loss occurred during the initial 2,000 cycles, so it is projected that the LiFeBatt should PSOC cycle well beyond 8,394 cycles with less than 20% capacity loss. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were only very small changes after cycling. Finally, at a 1C charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test resulted in the cell venting electrolyte at 110 C after 30 minutes and then open-circuiting at 120 C with no sparks, fire, or voltage across the cell.

  4. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for Li-ion Batteries by In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Mehdi, Beata L.; Parent, Lucas R.; Gu, Meng; Park, Chiwoo; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Yaohui; Arslan, Ilke; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-21

    One of the goals in the development of new battery technologies is to find new electrolytes with increased electrochemical stability. In-situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) using an electrochemical fluid cell provides the ability to rapidly and directly characterize electrode/electrolyte interfacial reactions under battery relevant electrochemical conditions. Furthermore, as the electron beam itself causes a localized electrochemical reaction when it interacts with the electrolyte, the breakdown products that occur during the first stages of battery operation can potentially be simulated and characterized using a straightforward in-situ liquid stage (without electrochemical biasing capabilities). In this paper, we have studied the breakdown of a range of inorganic/salt complexes that are used in state-of-the-art Li-ion battery systems. The results of the in-situ (S)TEM experiments matches with previous stability tests performed during battery operation and the breakdown products and mechanisms are also consistent with known mechanisms. This analysis indicates that in-situ liquid stage (S)TEM observations can be used to directly test new electrolyte designs and provide structural insights into the origin of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation mechanism.

  5. Use of phosphoranimines to reduce organic carbonate content in Li-ion battery electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dufek, Eric J.; Klaehn, John R.; McNally, Joshua S.; Rollins, Harry W.; Jamison, David K.

    2016-05-09

    In this study, the use of phosphoranimines (PAs), a class of linear, monomeric phosphazenes, as electrolytes for Li-ion battery applications has been investigated as a route to improve safety and stability for Li-ion batteries. Of the potential PAs for use in battery applications, this work focuses on the initial synthetic preparation and analysis of N-trimethylsilyl-P,P-bis((2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)-P-ethylphosphoranimine (PA-5). PA-5 has high LiPF6 solubility in excess of 2 M, high thermal stability with a melting point below -80°C and high thermal stability as a neat compound to at least 250°C. As part of electrolyte blends, the inclusion of PA-5 shifts the onset ofmore » thermal degradation by close to 40°C at 35% loading and by 20°C at a 10% loading, improves the low temperature performance of the electrolyte, and when used as a primary solvent leads to increases in the flash point (by 20°C) when compared to more traditional EC:EMC blends. Cycling capabilities of full-coin cells with graphite negative electrodes and Li1+w[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]1-wO2 positive electrodes using PA-5:EC:EMC electrolyte blends are comparable with the performance seen for traditional EC:EMC blends. Analysis of the impact of the use of additives such as vinylene carbonate in PA-5:EC:EMC blended electrolyte results in enhanced capacity retention and improved coulombic efficiency.« less

  6. A Combustion Chemistry Analysis of Carbonate Solvents in Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S J; Timmons, A; Pitz, W J

    2008-11-13

    Under abusive conditions Li-ion batteries can rupture, ejecting electrolyte and other flammable gases. In this paper we consider some of the thermochemical properties of these gases that will determine whether they ignite and how energetically they burn. We show that flames of carbonate solvents are fundamentally less energetic than those of conventional hydrocarbons. An example of this difference is given using a recently developed mechanism for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) combustion, where we show that a diffusion flame burning DMC has only half the peak energy release rate of an analogous propane flame. We find a significant variation among the carbonate solvents in the factors that are important to determining flammability, such as combustion enthalpy and vaporization enthalpy. This result suggests that thermochemical and kinetic factors might well be considered when choosing solvent mixtures.

  7. Understanding Li-ion battery processes at the atomic- to nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding Li-ion battery processes at the atomic- to nano-scale Authors: Sullivan, J P ; Huang, Jianyu ; Shaw, M J ; Subramanian, A ; ...

  8. Effect of an Ultrathin Coating on Stabilizing Li-ion Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect of an Ultrathin Coating on Stabilizing Li-ion Battery Cathodes Sunday, January 31, 2016 Improvements in the high-voltage cycling stability of lithium ion battery cathode ...

  9. Second-Use Li-Ion Batteries to Aid Automotive and Utility Industries (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing Li-ion batteries at the end of useful life in electric drive vehicles could eliminate owners' disposal concerns and offer low-cost energy storage for certain applications.

  10. Insights into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion all-solid-state...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Insights into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion all-solid-state batteries with Al anodes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Insights into capacity loss mechanisms in...

  11. Development of High Energy Cathode for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  12. Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  13. Thermally Stable Electrolyte For Li-ion Cells. (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference held November 9-10, 2011 in Las Vegas, NV.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the The Knowledge Foundation's 2nd Annual International Conference held ...

  14. 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  15. Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Level 1 Charging at the Workplace (1.89 MB) More Documents & Publications Workplace Charging Presentation Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Outreach Presentation Template Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan Department of Energy

    Karl Fraiser, a member of the Savannah River Special Emphasis Planning Committee, meets with Dot Harris at the site’s Women’s Equality Day Celebration. | Photo by Rob Davis, Savannah River Site. Karl Fraiser, a

  16. Improved layered mixed transition metal oxides for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Conry, Thomas; Wilcox, James

    2010-03-05

    Recent work in our laboratory has been directed towards development of mixed layered transition metal oxides with general composition Li[Ni, Co, M, Mn]O2 (M=Al, Ti) for Li ion battery cathodes. Compounds such as Li[Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3]O2 (often called NMCs) are currently being commercialized for use in consumer electronic batteries, but the high cobalt content makes them too expensive for vehicular applications such as electric vehicles (EV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). To reduce materials costs, we have explored partial or full substitution of Co with Al, Ti, and Fe. Fe substitution generally decreases capacity and results in poorer rate and cycling behavior. Interestingly, low levels of substitution with Al or Ti improve aspects of performance with minimal impact on energy densities, for some formulations. High levels of Al substitution compromise specific capacity, however, so further improvements require that the Ni and Mn content be increased and Co correspondingly decreased. Low levels of Al or Ti substitution can then be used offset negative effects induced by the higher Ni content. The structural and electrochemical characterization of substituted NMCs is presented in this paper.

  17. Polymer electrolytes for a rechargeable li-Ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argade, S.D.; Saraswat, A.K.; Rao, B.M.L.; Lee, H.S.; Xiang, C.L.; McBreen, J.

    1996-10-01

    Lithium-ion polymer electrolyte battery technology is attractive for many consumer and military applications. A Li{sub x}C/Li{sub y}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} battery system incorporating a polymer electrolyte separator base on novel Li-imide salts is being developed under sponsorship of US Army Research Laboratory (Fort Monmouth NJ). This paper reports on work currently in progress on synthesis of Li-imide salts, polymer electrolyte films incorporating these salts, and development of electrodes and cells. A number of Li salts have been synthesized and characterized. These salts appear to have good voltaic stability. PVDF polymer gel electrolytes based on these salts have exhibited conductivities in the range 10{sup -4} to 10{sub -3} S/cm.

  18. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es056_zhang_2011_o.pdf (841.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Development of High Energy Cathode for Li-ion Batteries Phase Behavior and Solid State Chemistry in Olivines Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials

  19. Investigation of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  20. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  1. Composit, Nanoparticle-Based Anode material for Li-ion Batteries Applied in Hybrid Electric (HEV's)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Malgorzata Gulbinska

    2009-08-24

    Lithium-ion batteries are promising energy storage devices in hybrid and electric vehicles with high specific energy values ({approx}150 Wh/kg), energy density ({approx}400 Wh/L), and long cycle life (>15 years). However, applications in hybrid and electric vehicles require increased energy density and improved low-temperature (<-10 C) performance. Silicon-based anodes are inexpensive, environmentally benign, and offer excellent theoretical capacity values ({approx}4000 mAh/g), leading to significantly less anode material and thus increasing the overall energy density value for the complete battery (>500 Wh/L). However, tremendous volume changes occur during cycling of pure silicon-based anodes. The expansion and contraction of these silicon particles causes them to fracture and lose electrical contact to the current collector ultimately severely limiting their cycle life. In Phase I of this project Yardney Technical Products, Inc. proposed development of a carbon/nano-silicon composite anode material with improved energy density and silicon's cycleability. In the carbon/nano-Si composite, silicon nanoparticles were embedded in a partially-graphitized carbonaceous matrix. The cycle life of anode material would be extended by decreasing the average particle size of active material (silicon) and by encapsulation of silicon nanoparticles in a ductile carbonaceous matrix. Decreasing the average particle size to a nano-region would also shorten Li-ion diffusion path and thus improve rate capability of the silicon-based anodes. Improved chemical inertness towards PC-based, low-temperature electrolytes was expected as an additional benefit of a thin, partially graphitized coating around the active electrode material.

  2. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDES FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Au, M.

    2009-12-04

    The aligned nanorods of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and nanoporous hollow spheres (NHS) of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated as the anodes for Li-ion rechargeable batteries. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods demonstrated 1433 mAh/g reversible capacity. The NHS of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} delivered 400 mAh/g and 250 mAh/g capacities respectively in multiple galvonastatic discharge-charge cycles. It was found that high capacity of NHS of metal oxides is sustainable attributed to their unique structure that maintains material integrity during cycling. The nanostructured metal oxides exhibit great potential as the new anode materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, low cost and inherent safety.

  3. A β-VOPO4/ε-VOPO4 composite Li-ion battery cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zehua; Chen, Qiyuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Ruibo; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Liquan; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2014-09-01

    VOPO4 is an example of a Li-ion battery cathode that can achieve over 300 Ah/kg when two Li-ions are intercalated. A two phase β-VOPO4/ε-VOPO4 composite was found to improve the cycling capacity of ε-VOPO4 from tetragonal H2VOPO4, particularly as the rate is increased. In the potential range of 2.0–4.5 V, this composite showed an initial electrochemical capacity of 208 mAh/g at 0.08 mA/cm2, 190 mAh/g at 0.16 mA/cm2, and 160 mAh/g at 0.41 mA/cm2.

  4. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt005_es_trumm_2011_p.pdf (783.35 KB

  5. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt007esconner2012p.pdf (11.41 MB) More Documents & ...

  6. Investigation of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es070cabana2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  7. Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries.pdf (2,324 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are a promising candidate for energy storage of electric drive vehicles due to their high power and energy density. The total electric

  8. Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lü, Xujie; Howard, John W.; Chen, Aiping; Zhu, Jinlong; Li, Shuai; Wu, Gang; Dowden, Paul; Xu, Hongwu; Zhao, Yusheng; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-02-02

    We prepared antiperovskite Li3OCl superionic conductor films via pulsed laser deposition using a composite target. A significantly enhanced ionic conductivity of 2.0 × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature is achieved, and this value is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of its bulk counterpart. Moreover, the applicability of Li3OCl as a solid electrolyte for Li-ion batteries is demonstrated.

  9. Effect of an Ultrathin Coating on Stabilizing Li-ion Battery Cathodes |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Effect of an Ultrathin Coating on Stabilizing Li-ion Battery Cathodes Sunday, January 31, 2016 Improvements in the high-voltage cycling stability of lithium ion battery cathode materials are needed to enable the wide-spread adoption of renewable energy technologies such as electric vehicles. One cathode material which exhibits significant advantages over the commonly-used commercial material LiCoO2 in terms of higher capacity, increased thermal

  10. Degradation Mechanisms in Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes Uncovered by In-Situ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 27, 2014, Research Highlights Degradation Mechanisms in Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes Uncovered by In-Situ Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Top) e- beam-induced breakdown of electrolyte mixture. (Bottom Left) Two distinct degradation processes observed in the LiAsF6 in DMC electrolyte. Plots of particle diameter evolution using multitarget particle tracking for two electron doses. Once primary growth

  11. Degradation Reactions in SONY-Type Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Roth, E. Peter

    1999-05-04

    Thermal instabilities were identified in SONY-type lithium-ion cells and correlated with interactions of cell constituents and reaction products. Three temperature regions of interaction were identified and associated with the state of charge (degree of Li intercalation) of the cell. Anodes were shown to undergo exothermic reactions as low as 100°C involving the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer and the LiPF6 salt in the electrolyte (EC: PC: DEC/LiPF6). These reactions could account for the thermal runaway observed in these cells beginning at 100°C. Exothermic reactions were also observed in the 200°C-300°C region between the intercalated lithium anodes, the LiPF6 salt and the PVDF. These reactions were followed by a high- temperature reaction region, 300°C-400°C, also involving the PVDF binder and the intercalated lithium anodes. The solvent was not directly involved in these reactions but served as a moderator and transport medhun. Cathode exotherrnic reactions with the PVDF binder were observed above 200oC and increased with the state of charge (decreasing Li content). This offers an explanation for the observed lower thermal runaway temperatures for charged cells.

  12. Semi-Solid Flowable Battery Electrodes: Semi-Solid Flow Cells for Automotive and Grid-Level Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    BEEST Project: Scientists at 24M are crossing a Li-Ion battery with a fuel cell to develop a semi-solid flow battery. This system relies on some of the same basic chemistry as a standard Li-Ion battery, but in a flow battery the energy storage material is held in external tanks, so storage capacity is not limited by the size of the battery itself. The design makes it easier to add storage capacity by simply increasing the size of the tanks and adding more paste. In addition, 24M's design also is able to extract more energy from the semi-solid paste than conventional Li-Ion batteries. This creates a cost-effective, energy-dense battery that can improve the driving range of EVs or be used to store energy on the electric grid.

  13. ALD of Al2O3 for Highly Improved Performance in Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A.; Jung, Y. S.; Ban, C.; Riley, L.; Cavanagh, A.; Yan, Y.; George, S.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in energy density, rate capability and safety will be required for the implementation of Li-ion batteries in next generation electric vehicles. We have demonstrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a promising method to enable superior cycling performance for a vast variety of battery electrodes. The electrodes range from already demonstrated commercial technologies (cycled under extreme conditions) to new materials that could eventually lead to batteries with higher energy densities. For example, an Al2O3 ALD coating with a thickness of ~ 8 A was able to stabilize the cycling of unexplored MoO3 nanoparticle anodes with a high volume expansion. The ALD coating enabled stable cycling at C/2 with a capacity of ~ 900 mAh/g. Furthermore, rate capability studies showed the ALD-coated electrode maintained a capacity of 600 mAh/g at 5C. For uncoated electrodes it was only possible to observe stable cycling at C/10. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al2O3 coating with a thickness of ~5 A can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 degrees C. The ALD-coated NG electrodes displayed a 98% capacity retention after 200 charge-discharge cycles. In contrast, bare NG showed a rapid decay. Additionally, Al2O3 ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 A have been shown to allow LiCoO2 to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs Li/Li+. Bare LiCoO2 rapidly deteriorated in the first few cycles. The capacity fade is likely caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte at higher potentials or perhaps cobalt dissolution. Interestingly, we have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO2 where we coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. We have also recently coated a binder free LiNi0.04Mn0

  14. High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2

  15. Anode Materials for Rechargeable Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fultz, B.

    2001-01-12

    This research is on materials for anodes and cathodes in electrochemical cells. The work is a mix of electrochemical measurements and analysis of the materials by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry. At present, our experimental work involves only materials for Li storage, but we have been writing papers from our previous work on hydrogen-storage materials.

  16. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the macrohomogeneous model of Newman and co-workers, predicting degradation and failure remains a challenge. It may be that, like most materials, failure depends on local imperfections and inhomogeneities. We use tomographic data to evaluate the homogeneity of the tortuosity of the

  17. NREL/NASA Internal Short-Circuit Instigator in Lithium Ion Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Dirk; Ireland, John; Pesaran, Ahmad; Darcy, Eric; Shoesmith, Mark; McCarthy, Ben

    2013-11-14

    NREL has developed a device to test one of the most challenging failure mechanisms of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries -- a battery internal short circuit. Many members of the technical community believe that this type of failure is caused by a latent flaw that results in a short circuit between electrodes during use. As electric car manufacturers turn to Li-ion batteries for energy storage, solving the short circuit problem becomes more important. To date, no reliable and practical method exists to create on-demand internal shorts in Li-ion cells that produce a response that is relevant to the ones produced by field failures. NREL and NASA have worked to establish an improved ISC cell-level test method that simulates an emergent internal short circuit, is capable of triggering the four types of cell internal shorts, and produces consistent and reproducible results. Internal short circuit device design is small, low-profile and implantable into Li-ion cells, preferably during assembly. The key component is an electrolyte-compatible phase change material (PCM). The ISC is triggered by heating the cell above PCM melting temperature (presently 40 degrees C – 60 degrees C). In laboratory testing, the activated device can handle currents in excess of 300 A to simulate hard shorts (< 2 mohms). Phase change from non-conducting to conducting has been 100% successful during trigger tests.

  18. Predicted Structure, Thermo-Mechanical Properties and Li Ion Transport in LiAlF4 Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechert, T. R.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Grimes, R. W.; Dillon, A. C.

    2012-08-15

    Materials with the LiAlF{sub 4} composition are of interest as protective electrode coatings in Li ion battery applications due to their high cationic conductivity. Here classical molecular dynamics calculations are used to produce amorphous model structures by simulating a quench from the molten state. These are analysed in terms of their individual pair correlation functions and atomic coordination environments. This indicates that amorphous LiAlF{sub 4} is formed of a network of corner sharing AlF{sub 6} octahedra. Li ions are distributed within this network, primarily associated with non-bridging fluorine atoms. The nature of the octahedral network is further analysed through intra- and interpolyhedral bond angle distributions and the relative populations of bridging and non-bridging fluorine ions are calculated. Network topology is considered through the use of ring statistics, which indicates that, although topologically well connected, LiAlF{sub 4} contains an appreciable number of corner-linked branch-like AlF{sub 6} chains. Thermal expansion values are determined above and below the predicted glass transition temperature of 1340 K. Finally, movement of Li ions within the network is examined with predictions of the mean squared displacements, diffusion coefficients and Li ion activation energy. Different regimes for lithium ion movement are identified, with both diffusive and sessile Li ions observed. For migrating ions, a typical trajectory is illustrated and discussed in terms of a hopping mechanism for Li transport.

  19. Novel Energy Sources -Material Architecture and Charge Transport in Solid State Ionic Materials for Rechargeable Li ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katiyar, Ram S; Gómez, M; Majumder, S B; Morell, G; Tomar, M S; Smotkin, E; Bhattacharya, P; Ishikawa, Y

    2009-01-19

    Since its introduction in the consumer market at the beginning of 1990s by Sony Corporation ‘Li-ion rechargeable battery’ and ‘LiCoO2 cathode’ is an inseparable couple for highly reliable practical applications. However, a separation is inevitable as Li-ion rechargeable battery industry demand more and more from this well serving cathode. Spinel-type lithium manganate (e.g., LiMn2O4), lithium-based layered oxide materials (e.g., LiNiO2) and lithium-based olivine-type compounds (e.g., LiFePO4) are nowadays being extensively studied for application as alternate cathode materials in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Primary goal of this project was the advancement of Li-ion rechargeable battery to meet the future demands of the energy sector. Major part of the research emphasized on the investigation of electrodes and solid electrolyte materials for improving the charge transport properties in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Theoretical computational methods were used to select electrodes and electrolyte material with enhanced structural and physical properties. The effect of nano-particles on enhancing the battery performance was also examined. Satisfactory progress has been made in the bulk form and our efforts on realizing micro-battery based on thin films is close to give dividend and work is progressing well in this direction.

  20. Sphere-Shaped Hierarchical Cathode with Enhanced Growth of Nanocrystal Planes for High-Rate and Cycling-Stable Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Linjing; Li, Ning; Wu, Borong; Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Feng

    2015-01-14

    High-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries have been intensively pursued as power sources in electronic vehicles and renewable energy storage systems in smart grids. With this purpose, developing high-performance cathode materials is urgently needed. Here we report an easy and versatile strategy to fabricate high-rate and cycling-stable hierarchical sphered cathode Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2, by using an ionic interfusion method. The sphere-shaped hierarchical cathode is assembled with primary nanoplates with enhanced growth of nanocrystal planes in favor of Li+ intercalation/deintercalation, such as (010), (100), and (110) planes. This material with such unique structural features exhibits outstanding rate capability, cyclability, and high discharge capacities, achieving around 70% (175 mAhg–1) of the capacity at 0.1 C rate within about 2.1 min of ultrafast charging. Such cathode is feasible to construct high-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries.

  1. Sphere-Shaped Hierarchical Cathode with Enhanced Growth of Nanocrystal Planes for High-Rate and Cycling-Stable Li-Ion Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Linjing; Li, Ning; Wu, Borong; Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Feng

    2015-01-14

    High-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries have been intensively pursued as power sources in electronic vehicles and renewable energy storage systems in smart grids. With this purpose, developing high-performance cathode materials is urgently needed. Here we report an easy and versatile strategy to fabricate high-rate and cycling-stable hierarchical sphered cathode Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2, by using an ionic interfusion method. The sphere-shaped hierarchical cathode is assembled with primary nanoplates with enhanced growth of nanocrystal planes in favor of Li+ intercalation/deintercalation, such as (010), (100), and (110) planes. This material with such unique structural features exhibits outstanding rate capability, cyclability, and high discharge capacities, achievingmore » around 70% (175 mAhg–1) of the capacity at 0.1 C rate within about 2.1 min of ultrafast charging. Such cathode is feasible to construct high-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries.« less

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigations of functionalized boron nitride as electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fan; Nemeth, Karoly; Bareño, Javier; Dogan, Fulya; Bloom, Ira D.; Shaw, Leon L.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of synthesizing functionalized h-BN (FBN) via the reaction between molten LiOH and solid h-BN is studied for the first time and its first ever application as an electrode material in Li-ion batteries is evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to provide mechanistic understanding of the possible electrochemical reactions derived from the FBN. Various materials characterizations reveal that the melt-solid reaction can lead to exfoliation and functionalization of h-BN simultaneously, while electrochemical analysis proves that the FBN can reversibly store charges through surface redox reactions with good cycle stability and coulombic efficiency. DFT calculations have provided physical insights into the observed electrochemical properties derived from the FBN.

  3. Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells for PHEVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sriramulu, Suresh; Stringfellow, Richard

    2013-05-25

    Development of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) has recently become a high national priority because of their potential to enable significantly reduced petroleum consumption by the domestic transportation sector in the relatively near term. Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are a critical enabling technology for PHEVs. Among battery technologies with suitable operating characteristics for use in vehicles, Li-ion batteries offer the best combination of energy, power, life and cost. Consequently, worldwide, leading corporations and government agencies are supporting the development of Li-ion batteries for PHEVs, as well as the full spectrum of vehicular applications ranging from mild hybrid to all-electric. In this project, using a combination of well-defined experiments, custom designed cells and simulations, we have improved the understanding of the process by which a Li-ion cell that develops an internal short progresses to thermal runaway. Using a validated model for thermal runaway, we have explored the influence of environmental factors and cell design on the propensity for thermal runaway in full-sized PHEV cells. We have also gained important perspectives about internal short development and progression; specifically that initial internal shorts may be augmented by secondary shorts related to separator melting. Even though the nature of these shorts is very stochastic, we have shown the critical and insufficiently appreciated role of heat transfer in influencing whether a developing internal short results in a thermal runaway. This work should lead to enhanced perspectives on separator design, the role of active materials and especially cathode materials with respect to safety and the design of automotive cooling systems to enhance battery safety in PHEVs.

  4. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid-electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Jiang, Deen; Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF6 at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  5. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, P.; Jiang, D.; Kent, P.R.C.

    2011-03-31

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF6 at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  6. Green synthesis of boron doped graphene and its application as high performance anode material in Li ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahoo, Madhumita; Sreena, K.P.; Vinayan, B.P.; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Boron doped graphene (B-G), synthesized by simple hydrogen induced reduction technique using boric acid as boron precursor, have more uneven surface as a result of smaller bonding distance of boron compared to carbon, showed high capacity and high rate capability compared to pristine graphene as an anode material for Li ion battery application. - Abstract: The present work demonstrates a facile route for the large-scale, catalyst free, and green synthesis approach of boron doped graphene (B-G) and its use as high performance anode material for Li ion battery (LIB) application. Boron atoms were doped into graphene framework with an atomic percentage of 5.93% via hydrogen induced thermal reduction technique using graphite oxide and boric acid as precursors. Various characterization techniques were used to confirm the boron doping in graphene sheets. B-G as anode material shows a discharge capacity of 548 mAh g{sup ?1} at 100 mA g{sup ?1} after 30th cycles. At high current density value of 1 A g{sup ?1}, B-G as anode material enhances the specific capacity by about 1.7 times compared to pristine graphene. The present study shows a simplistic way of boron doping in graphene leading to an enhanced Li ion adsorption due to the change in electronic states.

  7. NETL: SOFC Cell Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cell Development Cell Development-Research is focused on the cell-related technologies critical to the commercialization of SOFC technology. The components of the SOFC - the anode, cathode and electrolyte - are the primary research emphasis of this key technology. The electrochemical performance, durability, and reliability of the solid oxide fuel cell are key determinants in establishing the technical and economic viability of SOFC Power Systems. Thus the SOFC Program maintains a diversified

  8. Crystal chemical modeling of the Li ion distribution in Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, C.L.; Rohrer, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Monte Carlo bond valence method was used to model the local atomic structure of Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.25 and x = 1.0). The results predict that Mn{sup +3} and Mn{sup +4} are randomly distributed at the octahedral positions and that the Mn{sup +3}-O bond distance is 2.02 {Angstrom} while the Mn{sup +4}-O distance is 1.91 {Angstrom}. As the Li content decreases, the cell contracts due to the higher concentration of shorter bonds. Based on maps that show the distribution of crystal chemically equivalent sites, we conclude that the Li ion diffusion paths go through 48f sites, that Li might be more mobile for the case of x = 1.0 than for x = 0.25 (due to the expanded cell volume), and that for x > 1, the 16c position is the most likely Li site.

  9. Oxidation Potentials of Functionalized Sulfone Solvents for High-Voltage Li-Ion Batteries: A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Nan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, Deen

    2012-01-01

    New electrolytes with large electrochemical windows are needed to meet the challenge for high-voltage Li-ion batteries. Sulfone as an electrolyte solvent boasts of high oxidation potentials. Here we examine the effect of multiple functionalization on sulfone's oxidation potential. We compute oxidation potentials for a series of sulfone-based molecules functionalized with fluorine, cyano, ester, and carbonate groups by using a quantum chemistry method within a continuum solvation model. We find that multifunctionalization is a key to achieving high oxidation potentials. This can be realized through either a fluorether group on a sulfone molecule or sulfonyl fluoride with a cyano or ester group.

  10. Biphasic Electrode Suspensions for Li-Ion Semi-Solid Flow Cells...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Details By using a steric stabilizer Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and proper colloidal suspension processing steps (milling, filtration, consolidation, mixing), biphasic ...

  11. Biphasic Electrode Suspensions for Li-Ion Semi-solid Flow Cells...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Low-Dissipation Flow Authors: Wei, Teng-Sing ; Fan, Frank Y. ; Helal, Ahmed ; Smith, Kyle C. ; McKinley, Gareth H. ; Chiang, Yet-Ming ; Lewis, Jennifer A. 1 ; MIT) 2...

  12. Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters using

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sates across the nation celebrated Weatherization Day on October 30 with guided tours and Gubernatorial proclamations. In this photo, A team of weatherization technicians perform a site demonstration in Minnesota on Weatherization Day in 2012. | Photo courtesy of WAPTAC. Sates across the nation celebrated Weatherization Day on October 30 with guided tours and Gubernatorial proclamations. In this photo, A team of weatherization technicians perform a site demonstration in Minnesota on

  13. Connecting the irreversible capacity loss in Li-ion batteries with the electronic insulating properties of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Kevin; Lin, Yu -Xiao; Liu, Zhe; Chen, Long -Qing; Lu, Peng; Qi, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The formation and continuous growth of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss of batteries in the initial and subsequent cycles, respectively. In this article, the electron tunneling barriers from Li metal through three insulating SEI components, namely Li2CO3, LiF and Li3PO4, are computed by density function theory (DFT) approaches. Based on electron tunneling theory, it is estimated that sufficient to block electron tunneling. It is also found that the band gap decreases under tension while the work function remains the same, and thus the tunneling barrier decreases under tension and increases under compression. A new parameter, η, characterizing the average distances between anions, is proposed to unify the variation of band gap with strain under different loading conditions into a single linear function of η. An analytical model based on the tunneling results is developed to connect the irreversible capacity loss, due to the Li ions consumed in forming these SEI component layers on the surface of negative electrodes. As a result, the agreement between the model predictions and experimental results suggests that only the initial irreversible capacity loss is due to the self-limiting electron tunneling property of the SEI.

  14. Connecting the irreversible capacity loss in Li-ion batteries with the electronic insulating properties of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leung, Kevin; Lin, Yu -Xiao; Liu, Zhe; Chen, Long -Qing; Lu, Peng; Qi, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The formation and continuous growth of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss of batteries in the initial and subsequent cycles, respectively. In this article, the electron tunneling barriers from Li metal through three insulating SEI components, namely Li2CO3, LiF and Li3PO4, are computed by density function theory (DFT) approaches. Based on electron tunneling theory, it is estimated that sufficient to block electron tunneling. It is also found that the band gap decreases under tension while the work function remains the same, and thus the tunneling barrier decreases under tension and increases under compression.more » A new parameter, η, characterizing the average distances between anions, is proposed to unify the variation of band gap with strain under different loading conditions into a single linear function of η. An analytical model based on the tunneling results is developed to connect the irreversible capacity loss, due to the Li ions consumed in forming these SEI component layers on the surface of negative electrodes. As a result, the agreement between the model predictions and experimental results suggests that only the initial irreversible capacity loss is due to the self-limiting electron tunneling property of the SEI.« less

  15. New Electrode Manufacturing Process Equipment: Novel High Energy Density Lithium-Ion Cell Designs via Innovative Manufacturing Process Modules for Cathode and Integrated Separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Applied Materials is developing new tools for manufacturing Li-Ion batteries that could dramatically increase their performance. Traditionally, the positive and negative terminals of Li-Ion batteries are mixed with glue-like materials called binders, pressed onto electrodes, and then physically kept apart by winding a polymer mesh material between them called a separator. With the Applied Materials system, many of these manually intensive processes will be replaced by next generation coating technology to apply each component. This process will improve product reliability and performance of the cells at a fraction of the current cost. These novel manufacturing techniques will also increase the energy density of the battery and reduce the size of several of the batterys components to free up more space within the cell for storage.

  16. Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

    2003-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be

  17. Multi-physics Modeling for Improving Li-Ion Battery Safety; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Yang, C.

    2015-04-21

    Battery performance, cost, and safety must be further improved for larger market share of HEVs/PEVs and penetration into the grid. Significant investment is being made to develop new materials, fine tune existing ones, improve cell and pack designs, and enhance manufacturing processes to increase performance, reduce cost, and make batteries safer. Modeling, simulation, and design tools can play an important role by providing insight on how to address issues, reducing the number of build-test-break prototypes, and accelerating the development cycle of generating products.

  18. Fuel Cell Development Status

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and

  19. Effect of entropy of lithium intercalation in cathodes and anodes on Li-ion battery thermal management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Xu, Wu; Towne, Silas A; Williford, Ralph E; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2010-06-01

    The entropy changes (ΔS) in various cathode and anode materials, as well as complete Li-ion batteries, were measured using an electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system (ETMS). LiCoO2 has a much larger entropy change than electrodes based on LiNixCoyMnzO2 and LiFePO4, while lithium titanate based anode has lower entropy change compared to graphite anodes. Reversible heat generation rate was found to be a significant portion of the total heat generation rate. The appropriate combinations of cathode and anode were investigated to minimize reversible heat.

  20. Low-cost flexible packaging for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, A. N.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G. L.

    2004-06-18

    Batteries with various types of chemistries are typically sold in rigid hermetically sealed containers that, at the simplest level, must contain the electrolyte while keeping out the exterior atmosphere. However, such rigid containers can have limitations in packaging situations where the form of the battery is important, such as in hand-held electronics like personal digital assistants (PDAs), laptops, and cell phones. Other limitations exist as well. At least one of the electrode leads must be insulated from the metal can, which necessitates the inclusion of an insulated metal feed-through in the containment hardware. Another limitation may be in hardware and assembly cost, such as exists for the lithium-ion batteries that are being developed for use in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The large size (typically 10-100 Ah) of these batteries usually results in electric beam or laser welding of the metal cap to the metal can. The non-aqueous electrolyte used in these batteries are usually based on flammable solvents and therefore require the incorporation of a safety rupture vent to relieve pressure in the event of overcharging or overheating. Both of these features add cost to the battery. Flexible packaging provides an alternative to the rigid container. A common example of this is the multi-layered laminates used in the food packaging industry, such as for vacuum-sealed coffee bags. However, flexible packaging for batteries does not come without concerns. One of the main concerns is the slow egress of the electrolyte solvent through the face of the inner laminate layer and at the sealant edge. Also, moisture and air could enter from the outside via the same method. These exchanges may be acceptable for brief periods of time, but for the long lifetimes required for batteries in electric/hybrid electric vehicles, batteries in remote locations, and those in satellites, these exchanges are unacceptable. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL

  1. Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

  2. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  3. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  5. Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  6. Diagnostic Studies to Improve Abuse Tolerance and Life of Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  7. Diagnostic Studies to Improve Abuse Tolerance and Life of Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  8. Diagnostic Studies to Improve Abuse Tolerance and Life of Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fluorinated...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fluorinated...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Metal-Based High Capacity Li-Ion Anodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Binghamton University-SUNY at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about metal-based high...

  12. Thermal/Electrical Modeling for Abuse-Tolerant Design of Li-Ion Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Kim, G.-H.; Pesaran, A.; Darcy, E.

    2008-11-01

    To help design safe, high-performing batteries, NREL and NASA created and verified a new multicell math model capturing electrical-thermal interactions of cells with PTC devices during thermal abuse.

  13. Recent advances on the understanding of structural and composition evolution of LMR cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-rich, magnesium-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as one of the very promising cathodes for Li-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several challenges, especially by their limited electrochemical stability rate capability. In this work, we present recent progresses on the understanding of the structural and composition evolution of LMR cathode materials with emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li [Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of the pristine materials and their dependence on the materials processing history, cycling induced structural degradation/chemical partition and their correlation with degradation of electrochemical performance. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on ternary system of transitional metal oxide.

  14. Recent advances on the understanding of structural and composition evolution of LMR cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-rich, magnesium-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as one of the very promising cathodes for Li-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several challenges, especially by their limited electrochemical stability rate capability. In this work, we present recent progresses on the understanding of the structural and composition evolution of LMR cathode materials with emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li [Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of the pristine materials and their dependence on the materials processing history, cycling induced structuralmore » degradation/chemical partition and their correlation with degradation of electrochemical performance. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on ternary system of transitional metal oxide.« less

  15. Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional Li-Ion Battery Model for Better Design and Management (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G.-H.; Smith, K.

    2008-10-01

    The developed model used is to provide a better understanding and help answer engineering questions about improving the design, operational strategy, management, and safety of cells.

  16. First-principles investigation of the electronic and Li-ion diffusion properties of LiFePO{sub 4} by sulfur surface modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Guigui E-mail: zghuang@fjnu.edu.cn; Zhong, Kehua; Zhang, Jian-Min; Huang, Zhigao E-mail: zghuang@fjnu.edu.cn

    2014-08-14

    We present a first-principles calculation for the electronic and Li-ion diffusion properties of the LiFePO{sub 4} (010) surface modified by sulfur. The calculated formation energy indicates that the sulfur adsorption on the (010) surface of the LiFePO{sub 4} is energetically favored. Sulfur is found to form Fe-S bond with iron. A much narrower band gap (0.67 eV) of the sulfur surface-modified LiFePO{sub 4} [S-LiFePO{sub 4} (010)] is obtained, indicating the better electronic conductive properties. By the nudged elastic band method, our calculations show that the activation energy of Li ions diffusion along the one-dimensional channel on the surface can be effectively reduced by sulfur surface modification. In addition, the surface diffusion coefficient of S-LiFePO{sub 4} (010) is estimated to be about 10{sup −11} (cm{sup 2}/s) at room temperature, which implies that sulfur modification will give rise to a higher Li ion carrier mobility and enhanced electrochemical performance.

  17. Modeling of Nonuniform Degradation in Large-Format Li-ion Batteries (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-06-01

    Shows results of an empirical model capturing effects of both storage and cycling and developed the lithium ion nickel cobalt aluminum advanced battery chemistry.

  18. Model-Based Design and Integration of Large Li-ion Battery Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kandler; Kim, Gi-Heon; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Shi, Ying; Pesaran, Ahmad; Mukherjee, Partha; Barai, Pallab; Maute, Kurt; Behrou, Reza; Patil, Chinmaya

    2015-11-17

    This presentation introduces physics-based models of batteries and software toolsets, including those developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric-Drive Vehicle Batteries Program (CAEBAT). The presentation highlights achievements and gaps in model-based tools for materials-to-systems design, lifetime prediction and control.

  19. Streamlining the Optimization of Li-Ion Battery Electrodes | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Optimized EGR and boost pressure under transient conditions lowers in-cylinder NOx for diesels and reduces pumping losses and improves knock resistance for gasoline engines. p-03_czarnowski.pdf (311.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Can Future Emissions Limits be Met with a Hybrid EGR System Alone? Control Strategy for a Dual Loop EGR System to Meet Euro 6 and Beyond Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC

    A new filter system technology

  20. Computer model for electrochemical cell performance loss over time in terms of capacity, power, and conductance (CPC)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    Available capacity, power, and cell conductance figure centrally into performance characterization of electrochemical cells (such as Li-ion cells) over their service life. For example, capacity loss in Li-ion cells is due to a combination of mechanisms, including loss of free available lithium, loss of active host sites, shifts in the potential-capacity curve, etc. Further distinctions can be made regarding irreversible and reversible capacity loss mechanisms. There are tandem needs for accurate interpretation of capacity atmore » characterization conditions (cycling rate, temperature, etc.) and for robust self-consistent modeling techniques that can be used for diagnostic analysis of cell data as well as forecasting of future performance. Analogous issues exist for aging effects on cell conductance and available power. To address these needs, a modeling capability was developed that provides a systematic analysis of the contributing factors to battery performance loss over aging and to act as a regression/prediction platform for cell performance. The modeling basis is a summation of self-consistent chemical kinetics rate expressions, which as individual expressions each covers a distinct mechanism (e.g., loss of active host sites, lithium loss), but collectively account for the net loss of premier metrics (e.g., capacity) over time for a particular characterization condition. Specifically, sigmoid-based rate expressions are utilized to describe each contribution to performance loss. Through additional mathematical development another tier of expressions is derived and used to perform differential analyses and segregate irreversible versus reversible contributions, as well as to determine concentration profiles over cell aging for affected Li+ ion inventory and fraction of active sites that remain at each time step. Reversible fade components are surmised by comparing fade rates at fast versus slow cycling conditions. The model is easily utilized for predictive

  1. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternative power sources for transportation and stationary applications. The degradation of commonly used electrode catalysts (e.g. Pt, Ag, and others) and corrosion of carbon substrates are making commercialization of fuel cells incorporating present day technologies economically problematic. Furthermore, due to the instability of the Pt catalyst, the performance of fuel cells declines on long-term operation. When methanol is used as the fuel, a voltage drop, as well as significant thermal management problems can be encountered, the later being due to chemical oxidation of methanol at the platinized carbon at the cathode. Though extensive work was conducted on platinized electrodes for both the oxidation and reduction reactions, due to the problems mentioned above, fuel cells have not been fully developed for widespread commercial use. Several investigators have previously evaluated metal macrocyclic complexes as alternative catalysts to Pt and Pt/Ru in fuel cells. Unfortunately, though they have demonstrated catalytic activity, these materials were found to be unstable on long term use in the fuel cell environment. In order to improve the long-term stability of metal macrocyclic complexes, we have chemically bonded these complexes to the carbon substrate, thereby enhancing their catalytic activity as well as their chemical stability in the fuel cell environment. We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated these catalysts for O{sub 2} reduction, H{sub 2} oxidation, and direct methanol oxidation in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) and aqueous carbonate fuel cells. These catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity and long-term stability. In this paper we confine our discussion to the initial performance results of some of these catalysts in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells, including their long-term performance characteristics as well as CO poisoning effects on these catalysts.

  2. Systems, methods and computer readable media for estimating capacity loss in rechargeable electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gering, Kevin L.

    2013-06-18

    A system includes an electrochemical cell, monitoring hardware, and a computing system. The monitoring hardware periodically samples charge characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system periodically determines cell information from the charge characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system also periodically adds a first degradation characteristic from the cell information to a first sigmoid expression, periodically adds a second degradation characteristic from the cell information to a second sigmoid expression and combines the first sigmoid expression and the second sigmoid expression to develop or augment a multiple sigmoid model (MSM) of the electrochemical cell. The MSM may be used to estimate a capacity loss of the electrochemical cell at a desired point in time and analyze other characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The first and second degradation characteristics may be loss of active host sites and loss of free lithium for Li-ion cells.

  3. The role of electronic and ionic conductivities in the rate performance of tunnel structured manganese oxides in Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Byles, B. W.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.; Pomerantseva, E.

    2016-04-29

    Single nanowires of two manganese oxide polymorphs (α-MnO2 and todorokite manganese oxide), which display a controlled size variation in terms of their square structural tunnels, were isolated onto nanofabricated platforms using dielectrophoresis. This platform allowed for the measurement of the electronic conductivity of these manganese oxides, which was found to be higher in α-MnO2 as compared to that of the todorokite phase by a factor of similar to 46. Despite this observation of substantially higher electronic conductivity in α-MnO2, the todorokite manganese oxide exhibited better electrochemical rate performance as a Li-ion battery cathode. The relationship between this electrochemical performance, themore » electronic conductivities of the manganese oxides, and their reported ionic conductivities is discussed for the first time, clearly revealing that the rate performance of these materials is limited by their Li+ diffusivity, and not by their electronic conductivity. This result reveals important new insights relevant for improving the power density of manganese oxides, which have shown promise as a low-cost, abundant, and safe alternative for next-generation cathode materials. Moreover, the presented experimental approach is suitable for assessing a broader family of one-dimensional electrode active materials (in terms of their electronic and ionic conductivities) for both Li-ion batteries and for electrochemical systems utilizing charge-carrying ions beyond Li+.« less

  4. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: Development of High Energy Lithium-Sulfur Cells for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    BEEST Project: Sion Power is developing a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery, a potentially cost-effective alternative to the Li-Ion battery that could store 400% more energy per pound. All batteries have 3 key partsa positive and negative electrode and an electrolytethat exchange ions to store and release electricity. Using different materials for these components changes a batterys chemistry and its ability to power a vehicle. Traditional Li-S batteries experience adverse reactions between the electrolyte and lithium-based negative electrode that ultimately limit the battery to less than 50 charge cycles. Sion Power will sandwich the lithium- and sulfur-based electrode films around a separator that protects the negative electrode and increases the number of charges the battery can complete in its lifetime. The design could eventually allow for a battery with 400% greater storage capacity per pound than Li-Ion batteries and the ability to complete more than 500 recharge cycles.

  5. Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

  6. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  7. Development of concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

  8. Development of portable fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakatou, K.; Sumi, S.; Nishizawa, N.

    1996-12-31

    Sanyo Electric has been concentrating on developing a marketable portable fuel cell using phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC). Due to the fact that this power source uses PAFC that operate at low temperature around 100{degrees} C, they are easier to handle compared to conventional fuel cells that operate at around 200{degrees} C , they can also be expected to provide extended reliable operation because corrosion of the electrode material and deterioration of the electrode catalyst are almost completely nonexistent. This power source is meant to be used independently and stored at room temperature. When it is started up, it generates electricity itself using its internal load to raise the temperature. As a result, the phosphoric acid (the electolyte) absorbs the reaction water when the temperature starts to be raised (around room temperature). At the same time the concentration and volume of the phosphoric acid changes, which may adversely affect the life time of the cell. We have studied means for starting, operating PAFC stack using methods that can simply evaluate changes in the concentration of the electrolyte in the stack with the aim of improving and extending cell life and report on them in this paper.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Li-Ion Battery Anodes from Electrospun Nanoparticle/Conducting Polymer Nanofibers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Vanderbilt at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced Polyolefin Separators for Li-Ion Batteries Used in Vehicle Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Entek at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Low-cost, High Energy Si/Graphene Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XG Sciences at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Real-time Metrology for Li-ion Battery R&D and Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Applied Spectra at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about real-time metrology for Li...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low-cost, High Energy Si/Graphene Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by XG Sciences at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low-cost, high energy Si/graphene...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Real-time Metrology for Li-ion Battery R&D and Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Applied Spectra, Inc at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about real-time metrology for...

  16. First-Principles Study of Novel Conversion Reactions for High-Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes in the Li-Mg-B-N-H System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, T.H.; Graetz, J.; Liu, X.; Hong, J.; Majzoub, E.H.

    2011-07-28

    Anodes for Li-ion batteries are primarily carbon-based due to their low cost and long cycle life. However, improvements to the Li capacity of carbon anodes, LiC{sub 6} in particular, are necessary to obtain a larger energy density. State-of-the-art light-metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications often contain Li and involve reactions requiring Li transport, and light-metal ionic hydrides are candidates for novel conversion materials. Given a set of known solid-state and gas-phase reactants, we have determined the phase diagram in the Li-Mg-B-N-H system in the grand canonical ensemble, as a function of lithium chemical potential. We present computational results for several new conversion reactions with capacities between 2400 and 4000 mAh g{sup -1} that are thermodynamically favorable and that do not involve gas evolution. We provide experimental evidence for the reaction pathway on delithiation for the compound Li{sub 4}BN{sub 3}H{sub 10}. While the predicted reactions involve multiple steps, the maximum volume increase for these materials on lithium insertion is significantly smaller than that for Si.

  17. Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

    2009-08-04

    The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

  18. Porous Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Carbide (MXene) Flakes for High-Performance Li-Ion Storage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ren, Chang E.; Zhao, M-Q; Makaryan, Taron; Halim, Joseph; Boota, M.; Kota, Sankalp; Anasori, Babak; Barsoum, M W; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-16

    Herein we develop a chemical etching method to produce porous two-dimensional (2D) Ti3C2Tx MXenes at room temperature in aqueous solutions. The as-produced porous Ti3C2Tx (p-Ti3C2Tx) have larger specific surface areas and more open structures than their pristine counterparts, and can be fabricated into flexible films with, or without, the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The as-fabricated p-Ti3C2Tx/CNT films showed significantly improved lithium ion storage capabilities compared to pristine Ti3C2Tx based films, with a very high capacity of ≈1250 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C, excellent cycling stability, and good rate performance (330 mAh g-1 at 10 C). Using the same chemicalmore » etching method, we also made porous Nb2CTx and V2CTx MXenes. Therefore, this study provides a simple, yet effective, procedure to introduce pores into MXenes and possibly other 2D sheets that in turn, can enhance their electrochemical properties.« less

  19. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratton, R.J.; Singh, P.

    1995-08-01

    An overview of the tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development at Westinghouse is presented in this paper. The basic operating principles of SOFCs, evolution in tubular cell design and performance improvement, selection criteria for cell component materials, and cell processing techniques are discussed. The commercial goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 5 to 10 years. Results of cell test operated for more than 50,000 hours are presented. Since 1986, significant progress has been made in the evolution of cells with higher power, lower cost and improved thermal cyclic capability. Also in this period, successively larger multi-kilowatt electrical generators systems have been built and successfully operated for more than 7000 hours.

  20. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, E.R.; Cracraft, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  1. Accelerating Development of EV Batteries Through Computer-Aided Engineering (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Santhanagopalan, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Vehicle Technology Program has launched the Computer-Aided Engineering for Automotive Batteries (CAEBAT) project to work with national labs, industry and software venders to develop sophisticated software. As coordinator, NREL has teamed with a number of companies to help improve and accelerate battery design and production. This presentation provides an overview of CAEBAT, including its predictive computer simulation of Li-ion batteries known as the Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional (MSMD) model framework. MSMD's modular, flexible architecture connects the physics of battery charge/discharge processes, thermal control, safety and reliability in a computationally efficient manner. This allows independent development of submodels at the cell and pack levels.

  2. Celgard and Entek - Battery Separator Development | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. es_08_tataria.pdf (2.24 MB) More Documents & Publications USABC Battery Separator Development Overview and Progress of United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) Activity Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries

  3. High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es131_choi_2012_p.pdf (1.19 MB) More Documents & Publications High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications

  4. Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility &

  5. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy Everett Anderson NRELDOE Reversible Fuel Cell Workshop 19 April 2011 Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy ...

  6. Second-Use Li-Ion Batteries to Aid Automotive and Utility Industries (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced Second Round of American Energy Data Challenge Winners Announced April 29, 2014 - 10:39am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability What are the key facts? The American Energy Data Challenge is year long, four part initiative designed to amplify open data and encourage innovation I am pleased to announce the winners of the

  7. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell power system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Rick; Wall, Mark; Sullivan, Neal

    2015-06-26

    This report summarizes the progress made during this contractual period in achieving the goal of developing the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cell and stack technology to be suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive, commercially deployed electrical power systems. Progress was made in further understanding cell and stack degradation mechanisms in order to increase stack reliability toward achieving a 4+ year lifetime, in cost reduction developments to meet the SECA stack cost target of $175/kW (in 2007 dollars), and in operating the SOFC technology in a multi-stack system in a real-world environment to understand the requirements for reliably designing and operating a large, stationary power system.

  9. Artificial Photosynthesis: An Alternative to Fuel Cell Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Artificial Photosynthesis: An Alternative to Fuel Cell Development December 15, 2015 Artificial Photosynthesis: An Alternative to Fuel Cell Development Photosynthesis research at ...

  10. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations December 11, 2015 - ...

  11. Design and Development of High-Performance Polymer Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design and Development of High-Performance Polymer Fuel Cell Membranes Design and Development of High-Performance Polymer Fuel Cell Membranes A presentation to the High Temperature ...

  12. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update This report outlines the role ...

  13. Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment Authors: ...

  14. Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment You are ...

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan The ...

  16. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling ...

  17. Silicon concentrator cell-assembly development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop an improved cell assembly design for photovoltaic concentrator receivers. Efforts were concentrated on a study of adhesive/separator systems that might be applied between cell and substrate, because this area holds the key to improved heat transfer, electrical isolation and adhesion. It is also the area in which simpler construction methods offer the greatest benefits for economy and reliability in the manufacturing process. Of the ten most promising designs subjected to rigorous environmental testing, eight designs featuring acrylic and silicon adhesives and fiberglass and polyester separators performed very well.

  18. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  19. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth; Chen, Fanglin; Popov, Branko; Chao, Yuh; Xue, Xingjian

    2012-09-15

    This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2011-07-31

    This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

  1. A Phenomenological Model of Bulk Force in a Li-Ion Battery Pack and Its Application to State of Charge Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, S; Kim, Y; Siegel, JB; Samad, NA; Stefanopoulou, AG

    2014-09-19

    A phenomenological model of the bulk force exerted by a lithium ion cell during various charge, discharge, and temperature operating conditions is developed. The measured and modeled force resembles the carbon expansion behavior associated with the phase changes during intercalation, as there are ranges of state of charge (SOC) with a gradual force increase and ranges of SOC with very small change in force. The model includes the influence of temperature on the observed force capturing the underlying thermal expansion phenomena. Moreover the model is capable of describing the changes in force during thermal transients, when internal battery heating due to high C-rates or rapid changes in the ambient temperature, which create a mismatch in the temperature of the cell and the holding fixture. It is finally shown that the bulk force model can be very useful for a more accurate and robust SOC estimation based on fusing information from voltage and force (or pressure) measurements. (C) The Author(s) 2014. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email oa@electrochem.org. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Overview of Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations" ...

  3. Development of a New Generation, High Efficiency PEM Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a New Generation, High Efficiency PEM Fuel Cell Based, CHP System Development of a New Generation, High Efficiency PEM Fuel Cell Based, CHP System Part of a 100 million fuel cell ...

  4. Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs Presentation by USCAR FreedomCARFuel Cell Tech Team Industry for DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - March 16, 2010 Golden, CO fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_gittleman.pdf (235.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Automotive Perspective on Membrane Evaluation Transportation Fuel Cell R&D Needs (Presentation) DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 2: MEAs,

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Testing | Department of Energy Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing To develop better lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries for plug-in electric vehicles, researchers must integrate the advances made in exploratory battery materials and applied battery research into full battery systems. The Vehicle Technologies Office's (VTO) Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing

  6. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: A Closed Loop Process for the End-of-Life Electric Vehicle Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by WPI at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Next-Generation Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries: Fundamental Studies of Si-C Model Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  9. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power S t D l t t PNNL S t D l t t PNNL System Development at PNNL System Development at PNNL Larry Chick Energy Materials ...

  10. Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Research and Development | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Research and Development Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Research and Development Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Research and Development Within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), the Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) supports manufacturing research and development (R&D) activities to improve processes and reduce the cost of components and systems for hydrogen production, delivery, and storage over the

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Preface Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page i Preface The Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan (MYRD&D ...

  12. Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap AgencyCompany Organization:...

  13. Nanoscale Phase Separation, Cation Ordering, and Surface Oxygen Chemistry in Pristine Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Genc, Arda; Belharouak, Ilias; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-05-14

    Li-rich layered material Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 possesses high voltage and high specific capacity, which makes it an attractive candidate for the transportation industry and sustainable energy storage systems. The rechargeable capacity of the Li-ion battery is linked largely to the structural stability of the cathode materials during the charge-discharge cycles. However, the structure and cation distribution in pristine (un-cycled) Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 have not yet been fully characterized. Using a combination of aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (XEDS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and complementary multislice image simulation, we have probed the crystal structure, cation/anion distribution, and electronic structure of Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 nanoparticle. We discovered that the electronic structure and valence state of transition metal ions show significant variations, which have been identified to be attributed to the oxygen deficiency near the particle surfaces. Characterization of the nanoscale phase separation and cation ordering in the pristine material are critical for understanding the capacity and voltage fading of this material for battery application.

  14. Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USCAR / FreedomCAR Fuel Cell Tech Team Industry Members Craig Gittleman, David Masten and Scott Jorgensen General Motors James Waldecker, Shinichi Hirano and Mark Mehall Ford Motor Company Tarek Abdel-Baset Chrysler LLC Automotive Fuel Cell R&D Needs DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop March 16, 2010 Golden, CO General Motors - Ford - Chrysler Overview * Purpose: To provide automotive OEM perspective on topics recommended for study in the DOE Fuel Cell Subprogram * Categories described

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Plan | Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan The Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration (MYRD&D) Plan describes the goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for all activities within the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office, which is part of the U.S. Department

  16. Pennsylvania Company Develops Solar Cell Printing Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The technology uses Plextronics’ conductive inks that can be printed by manufacturers worldwide to make solar cells, potentially as easily as they might print a newspaper.

  17. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE ...

  18. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Presented at the DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on March 29, 2011. apu2011_6_roychoudhury.pdf (4.83 MB) More Documents & Publications System Design - Lessons Learned, Generic Concepts, Characteristics & Impacts Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team Fuel Cell Systems Annual Progress Report

  19. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update This report outlines the role hydrogen and fuel cells can play in a portfolio of technology options available to address the energy-related challenges faced by nations around the world. It offers examples of real-world hydrogen and fuel cell applications and the progress of the technologies, including government policies

  20. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Marcinek, M.; Hardwick, L.J.; Richardson, T.J.; Song, X.; Kostecki, R.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin-film composite Sn/C anodes for lithium batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon decorated with uniformly distributed Sn nanoparticles were synthesized from a solid organic precursor Sn(IV) tert-butoxide by a one step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The thin-film Sn/C electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half cells and produced a reversible capacity of 440 and 297 mAhg{sup -1} at C/25 and 5C discharge rates, respectively. A long term cycling of the Sn/C nanocomposite anodes showed 40% capacity loss after 500 cycles at 1C rate.

  1. Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Presentation by Michael Veenstra, Ford Motor Company, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Polymer and ...

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Planned program activities for 2011-2020 Fuel Cell Technologies Office NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work ...

  3. Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Focus Area:...

  4. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001412: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations includes up to $35 million in funding across four areas of interest: research and development (R&D) for hydrogen fuel technologies; demonstration and deployment for manufacturing technologies and Climate Action Champions; R&D within consortia for fuel cell performance and durability and hydrogen storage materials; and cost and performance analyses for hydrogen production and delivery, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

  5. Development of Advanced High Temperature Fuel Cell Membranes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Advanced High Temperature Fuel Cell Membranes Development of Advanced High Temperature Fuel Cell Membranes Presentation on Development of Advanced High Temperature Fuel Cell Membranes to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005. htmwg05_irvin_doe_review.pdf (108.37 KB) More Documents & Publications 2006 DOE Hydrogen Program Poly (p-phenylene Sulfonic Acid)s with Frozen-in Free Volume for use in High Temperature Fuel Cells

  6. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  7. Process development for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.M.; Basore, P.A.; Buck, M.E.; Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Silva, B.L.; Tingley, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells in an industrial environment requires a different optimization than in a laboratory environment. Strategies are presented for process development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells, with a goal of simplifying technology transfer into an industrial setting. The strategies emphasize the use of statistical experimental design for process optimization, and the use of baseline processes and cells for process monitoring and quality control. 8 refs.

  8. CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ager, Joel W

    2011-02-14

    TCF funding of a CRADA between LBNL and RSLE leveraged RSLE's original $1M investment in LBNL research and led to development of a solar cell fabrication process that will bring the high efficiency, high voltage hybrid tandem solar cell closer to commercialization. RSLE has already built a pilot line at its Phoenix, Arizona site.

  9. Carbonate fuel cell powerplant development and commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    CFC powerplants offer the potential for ultrahigh efficiency energy conversion and the enhancement of the quality of our environment. Since combustion is not utilized, CFCs generate very low amounts of NOx. CFC powerplants have been exempt from air permitting requirements in California, Massachusetts. CFC is attractive for both polluted urban areas and remote applications. It is ideal as a distributed generator (sited at or near the electricity user). The US CFC developers enjoy the support of user groups (utility, other end-user members). DOE cooperates with GRI and EPRI in funding the US CFC program.

  10. High power density fuel cell stack development for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pow, R.; Reindl, M.; Tilmetz, W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the joint development by Daimler-Benz and Ballard Power Systems of a high power-density fuel cell stack and its demonstration in a 6-passenger Minivan.

  11. Fuel Cells for Transportation - Research and Development: Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Remarkable progress has been achieved in the development of proton-exchange-membrane(PEM) fuel cell technology since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a significant ...

  12. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program Management and Operations are covered in Chapter 6. Page 3 - 2 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan 2012 Technical Plan Figure 3.0.1. Fuel Cell ...

  13. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and com

  14. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-11-01

    This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and commercialization.

  15. High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Pierre

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

  16. PEM fuel cell applications and their development at International Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, T.F.; Gorman, M.E.; Van Dine, L.L.

    1996-12-31

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) is involved with the full spectrum of fuel cell power plants including the development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. The extensive background in systems, design, materials and manufacturing technologies has been brought to bear on the development of highly competitive PEM power plants. IFC is aggressively pursuing these opportunities and is developing low-cost designs for a wide variety of PEM fuel cell applications with special emphasis on portable power and transportation. Experimental PEM power plants for each of these applications have been successfully tested.

  17. An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Hardwick, Laurence J.; Marcinek, Marek; Beer, Leanne; Kerr, John B.; Kostecki, Robert

    2008-03-03

    The effect of surface structural damage on graphitic anodes, commonly observed in tested Li-ion cells, was investigated. Similar surface structural disorder was artificially induced in Mag-10 synthetic graphite anodes using argon-ion sputtering. Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) measurements confirmed that Ar-ion sputtered Mag-10 electrodes display similar degree of surface degradation as the anodes from tested Li-ion cells. Artificially modified Mag-10 anodes showed double the irreversible charge capacity during the first formation cycle, compared to fresh un-altered anodes. Impedance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on surface modified graphite anodes indicated the formation of a thicker and slightly more resistive SEI layer. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis of solvent extracts from the electrodes detected the presence of new compounds with M{sub w} on the order of 1600 g mol{sup -1} for the surface modified electrode with no evidence of elevated M{sub w} species for the unmodified electrode. The structural disorder induced in the graphite during long-term cycling maybe responsible for the slow and continuous SEI layer reformation, and consequently, the loss of reversible capacity due to the shift of lithium inventory in cycled Li-ion cells.

  18. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberman, Ben; Martinez-Baca, Carlos; Rush, Greg

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  19. Fuel Cells for Transportation- Research and Development: Program Abstracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Remarkable progress has been achieved in the development of proton-exchange-membrane(PEM) fuel cell technology since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a significant developmental program in the early 1990s. This progress has stimulated enormous interest worldwide in developing fuel cell products for transportation as well as for stationary and portable power applications. The potential markets are huge, but so are the R&D risks. Given the potential for PEM fuel cells to deliver large economic and environmental benefits to the Nation, DOE continues to take a leadership role in developing and validating this technology. DOE’s strategy to implement its Fuel Cells for Transportation program has three components: an R&D strategy, a fuels strategy, and a management strategy.

  20. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  1. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor

  2. Three-Dimensional Thermal-Electrochemical Coupled Model for Spirally Wound Large-Format Lithium-Ion Batteries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. J.; Smith K.; Kim, G. H.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses the behavior of spirally wound large-format Li-ion batteries with respect to their design. The objectives of the study include developing thermal and electrochemical models resolving 3-dimensional spirally wound structures of cylindrical cells, understanding the mechanisms and interactions between local electrochemical reactions and macroscopic heat and electron transfers, and developing a tool and methodology to support macroscopic designs of cylindrical Li-ion battery cells.

  3. Innovation Meets Performance Demands of Advanced Lithium-ion Batteries (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advancements in high capacity and high density battery technologies have led to a growing need for battery materials with greater charge capacity and therefore stability. NREL's developments in ALD and MLD allow for thin film coatings to battery composite electrodes, which can improve battery lifespan, high charge capacity, and stability. Key Result Silicon, one of the best high-energy anode materials for Li-ion batteries, can experience capacity fade from volumetric expansion. Using ALD and MLD

  4. Development and perspectives of fuel cell technology in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vellone, R.

    1997-07-01

    In Italy, most of the energy is derived from fossil fuel and the energy system is heavily dependent on imported fuel, consequently there is a growing need to diversity energy sources and to optimize the efficient utilization of energy. The Italian government is demonstrating a certain commitment towards the promotion of renewable energy sources and innovative technologies, with limited impact on the environment and possibly with improved energy efficiency. In this context, fuel cells could lead various benefits for the country. The purpose of the paper is to review the Italian interest for the development and application of the fuel cell technology and to provide information about the current status of the Italian fuel cell program.

  5. Layered Nickel Oxide-Based Cathodes for Lithium Cells: Analysis ofPerformance Loss Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlau, Marie; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Cairns, Elton J.

    2004-10-01

    Spectroscopic and electrochemical diagnostic measurements are reported for the cell components of a Generation 2 (Gen 2) Li-Ion cell from the US Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) project. The cells are composed of LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} positive electrodes (cathode), carbon graphite anodes and electrolyte consisting of 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6} in EC:EMC 3:7. Fluorophosphates were observed by {sup 19}F and {sup 31}P NMR in the electrolyte obtained from a Gen 2 cell aged 72 weeks at 45 C and presenting 50% power fade. These electrolyte decomposition products were also observed by {sup 31}P solid-state NMR on the surface of the cathode of the same cell. Samples were cut from the aged cathode from the original cell, subjected to different treatments (ultrasonic washing in anhydrous DMC, pressing, ultrasonic washing and pressing), and subsequently reassembled into small lab cells for electrochemical characterization. These treatments recovered the capacity of the electrodes to within a few percent of the original value, with the most improvement being obtained with the washed and pressed cathode. The impedance of the cathodes was also lowered after the ultrasonic washing and pressing treatments. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrasonic washing of the aged Gen 2 cathode material resulted in the removal of small particles covering the surface of the active cathode. These findings are interpreted in terms of a model whereby capacity loss, and thus power capability, is restored by removing the fluorophosphate deposit and restoring electronic contact to the active cathode material.

  6. PEM fuel cell stack development for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Presently, the major challenges to the introduction of fuel cell power systems for automotive applications are to maximize the effective system power density and minimize cost. The material cost, especially for Platinum, had been a significant factor until recent advances by Los Alamos National Laboratory and others in low Platinum loading electrode design has brought these costs within control. Since the initiation of its PEM stack development efforts, MTI has focused on applying its system and mechanical engineering heritage on both increasing power density and reducing cost. In May of 1995, MTI was selected (along with four other companies) as a subcontractor by the Ford Motor Company to participate in Phase I of the DOE Office of Transportation Technology sponsored PNGV Program entitled: {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}. This Program was instituted to: (1) Advance the performance and economic viability of a direct-hydrogen-fueled PEM fuel cell system, (2) Identify the critical problems that must be resolved before system scale-up and vehicle integration, and (3) Integrate the fuel cell power system into a sub-scale vehicle propulsion system. The Phase I objective was to develop and demonstrate a nominal 10 kW stack meeting specific criteria. Figure I is a photograph of the stack used for these demonstrations. After completion of Phase I, MTI was one of only two companies selected to continue into Phase II of the Program. This paper summarizes Phase I stack development and results.

  7. A Bioinformatic Analysis of NAC Genes for Plant Cell Wall Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Cell Wall Development in Relation to Lignocellulosic Bioenergy Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Bioinformatic Analysis of NAC Genes for Plant Cell Wall ...

  8. Initial Comparisons between the Advanced Technology Development Gen 2 Baseline Cells and Variant C Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christophersen, Jon Petter; Motloch, Chester George; Wright, Randy Ben; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Belt, Jeffrey R; Ho, Chinh Dac; Bloom, Ira D.; Jones, S. A.; Battaglia, Vincent S.; Jungst, Rudy G.; Case, Herb L.; Sutula, Raymond A.; Barnes, James A.; Duong, Tien Q.

    2002-06-01

    The Advanced Technology Development Program is testing a second generation of lithium-ion cells, consisting of a baseline and three variant chemistries. The cathode composition of the Variant C chemistry was altered with an increase to the aluminum dopant and a decrease to the cobalt dopant to explore the impact on performance. However, it resulted in a 20% drop in rated capacity. Also, the Variant C average power fade is higher, but capacity fade is higher for the Baseline cell chemistry. Initial results indicate that the Variant C chemistry will reach end of life sooner than the Baseline chemistry.

  9. Lithium Ion Cell Development for Photovoltaic Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babinec, Susan

    2012-02-08

    The overall project goal is to reduce the cost of home and neighborhood photovoltaic storage systems by reducing the single largest cost component the energy storage cells. Solar power is accepted as an environmentally advantaged renewable power source. Its deployment in small communities and integrated into the grid, requires a safe, reliable and low cost energy storage system. The incumbent technology of lead acid cells is large, toxic to produce and dispose of, and offer limited life even with significant maintenance. The ideal PV storage battery would have the safety and low cost of lead acid but the performance of lithium ion chemistry. Present lithium ion batteries have the desired performance but cost and safety remain the two key implementation barriers. The purpose of this project is to develop new lithium ion cells that can meet PVES cost and safety requirements using A123Systems phosphate-based cathode chemistries in commercial PHEV cell formats. The cost target is a cell design for a home or neighborhood scale at <$25/kWh. This DOE program is the continuation and expansion of an initial MPSC (Michigan Public Service Commission) program towards this goal. This program further pushes the initial limits of some aspects of the original program even lower cost anode and cathode actives implemented at even higher electrode loadings, and as well explores new avenues of cost reduction via new materials specifically our higher voltage cathode. The challenge in our materials development is to achieve parity in the performance metrics of cycle life and high temperature storage, and to produce quality materials at the production scale. Our new cathode material, M1X, has a higher voltage and so requires electrolyte reformulation to meet the high temperature storage requirements. The challenge of thick electrode systems is to maintain adequate adhesion and cycle life. The composite separator has been proven in systems having standard loading electrodes; the challenge

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Dramatically Improve the Safety Performance of Li Ion Battery Separators and Reduce the Manufacturing Cost Using UV Curing and High Precision Coating Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Miltec UV International at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Dramatically Improve the Safety Performance of Li Ion Battery Separators and Reduce the Manufacturing Cost using Ultraviolet Curing and High Precision Coating Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Miltec UV International at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about dramatically improve...

  12. Development of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakker, W.T.; Goldstein, R.

    1996-12-31

    The historical focus of the electric utility industry has been central station power plants. These plants are usually sited outside urban areas and electricity was delivered via high voltage transmission lines. Several things are beginning to change this historical precedent One is the popular concern with EMF as a health hazard. This has rendered the construction of new lines as well as upgrading old ones very difficult. Installation of power generating equipment near the customer enables the utility to better utilize existing transmission and distribution networks and defer investments. Power quality and lark of disturbances and interruptions is also becoming increasingly more important to many customers. Grid connected, but dedicated small power plants can greatly improve power quality. Finally the development of high efficiency, low emission, modular fuel cells promises near pollution free localized power generation with an efficiency equal to or exceeding that of even the most efficient central power stations.

  13. Internal configuration of prismatic lithium-ion cells at the onset of mechanically induced short circuit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hsin; Simunovic, Srdjan; Maleki, Hosein; Howard, Jason N.; Hallmark, Jerald A.

    2016-01-01

    The response of Li-ion cells to mechanically induced internal electrical shorts is an important safety performance metric design. We assume that the battery internal configuration at the onset of electrical short influences the subsequent response and can be used to gauge the safety risk. We subjected a series of prismatic Li-ion cells to lateral pinching using 0.25", 0.5", 1", 2" and 3" diameter steel balls until the onset of internal short. The external aluminum enclosure froze the internal cell configuration at the onset of short and enabled us to cross-section the cells, and take the cross-section images. The images indicatemore » that an internal electric short is preceded by extensive strain partitioning in the cells, fracturing and tearing of the current collectors, and cracking and slipping of the electrode layers with multiple fault lines across multiple layers. These observations are at odds with a common notion of homogeneous deformation across the layers and strain hardening of electrodes that eventually punch through the separator and short the cell. The faults are akin to tectonic movements of multiple layers that are characteristic of granular materials and bonded aggregates. As a result, the short circuits occur after extensive internal faulting, which implies significant stretching and tearing of separators.« less

  14. Internal configuration of prismatic lithium-ion cells at the onset of mechanically induced short circuit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; Simunovic, Srdjan; Maleki, Hosein; Howard, Jason N.; Hallmark, Jerald A.

    2016-01-01

    The response of Li-ion cells to mechanically induced internal electrical shorts is an important safety performance metric design. We assume that the battery internal configuration at the onset of electrical short influences the subsequent response and can be used to gauge the safety risk. We subjected a series of prismatic Li-ion cells to lateral pinching using 0.25", 0.5", 1", 2" and 3" diameter steel balls until the onset of internal short. The external aluminum enclosure froze the internal cell configuration at the onset of short and enabled us to cross-section the cells, and take the cross-section images. The images indicate that an internal electric short is preceded by extensive strain partitioning in the cells, fracturing and tearing of the current collectors, and cracking and slipping of the electrode layers with multiple fault lines across multiple layers. These observations are at odds with a common notion of homogeneous deformation across the layers and strain hardening of electrodes that eventually punch through the separator and short the cell. The faults are akin to tectonic movements of multiple layers that are characteristic of granular materials and bonded aggregates. As a result, the short circuits occur after extensive internal faulting, which implies significant stretching and tearing of separators.

  15. CIBS Solar Cell Development Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Exstrom, Christopher L.; Soukup, Rodney J.; Ianno, Natale J.

    2011-09-28

    Efforts to fabricate and study a new photovoltaic material, copper indium boron diselenide (CuInxB1-xSe2 or CIBS), were undertaken. Attempts to prepare CIBS using sputtering deposition techniques resulted in segregation of boron from the rest of elements in the material. CIBS nanocrystals were prepared from the reaction of elemental Se with CuCl, InCl3, and boric acid in solution, but the product material quickly decomposed upon heating that was required in attempts to convert the nanocrystals into a thin film. The investigation of the reasons for the lack of CIBS material stability led to new structure-property studies of closely-related photovoltaic systems as well as studies of new solar cell materials and processing methods that could enhance the development of next-generation solar technologies. A detailed compositional study of CuIn1-xAlxSe2 (CIAS, a system closely related to CIBS) revealed a non-linear correlation between crystal lattice size and the Al/(In+Al) ratios with dual-phase formation being observed. A new nanocrystal-to-thin-film processing method was developed for the preparation of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) thin films in which colloidal Se particles are sprayed in contact with CuIn1-xGaxS2 nanoparticles and heated in an argon atmosphere with no other Se source in the system. The process is non-vacuum and does not require toxic gases such as Se vapor or H2Se. Expertise gained from these studies was applied to new research in the preparation of thin-film pyrite FeS2, an attractive earth-abundant candidate material for next-generation photovoltaics. Three methods successfully produced pure pyrite FeS2 films: sulfurization of sputtered Fe films, chemical bath deposition, and sulfurization of Fe2O3 sol-gel precursors. The last method produced pinhole-free films that may be viable for device development. Nickel, platinum, and possibly carbon would appear to serve as good ohmic contact materials. While CdS has a reasonable conduction band energy match to

  16. Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Polymer and Composite Materials R&D Gaps for Hydrogen Systems Michael ... SAE J2594 Design for recycling PEM fuel cell system 09-2003 Perf. ...

  17. Development of High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Development of High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Everett Anderson, PROTON ON SITE, at the NREL Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop, April 19, 2011

  20. Energy storage research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, US consumers experienced the highest sustained gasoline prices in recent history, in real terms, including those seen in the early 1980s1. Partially as a result of the $3/gallon gasoline prices, sales of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) increased almost 60% in 20072, and several automakers announced plans to develop plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs)3. However, total sales of HEVs remained in the 2-3 percent range of all vehicle sales. An important step for continued HEV market penetration, as well as electrifying the nation's personal transportation, is the development of cost effective, long lasting, and abuse tolerant Li-ion batteries.

  1. A MULTISCALE, CELL-BASED FRAMEWORK FOR MODELING CANCER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JIANG, YI

    2007-01-16

    Cancer remains to be one of the leading causes of death due to diseases. We use a systems approach that combines mathematical modeling, numerical simulation, in vivo and in vitro experiments, to develop a predictive model that medical researchers can use to study and treat cancerous tumors. The multiscale, cell-based model includes intracellular regulations, cellular level dynamics and intercellular interactions, and extracellular level chemical dynamics. The intracellular level protein regulations and signaling pathways are described by Boolean networks. The cellular level growth and division dynamics, cellular adhesion and interaction with the extracellular matrix is described by a lattice Monte Carlo model (the Cellular Potts Model). The extracellular dynamics of the signaling molecules and metabolites are described by a system of reaction-diffusion equations. All three levels of the model are integrated through a hybrid parallel scheme into a high-performance simulation tool. The simulation results reproduce experimental data in both avasular tumors and tumor angiogenesis. By combining the model with experimental data to construct biologically accurate simulations of tumors and their vascular systems, this model will enable medical researchers to gain a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular interactions associated with cancer progression and treatment.

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page B - 1 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page B - 2 Multi-Year Research, Development and ...

  3. National labs team to develop better, cheaper fuel cells | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the proton and electrons combine with the oxygen. Thursday, Oct. 8, was National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day, dedicated to increasing awareness of this renewable energy technology. ...

  4. STATUS AND TEST RESULTS OF HIGH CURRENT 5-CELL SRF CAVITIES DEVELOPED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STATUS AND TEST RESULTS OF HIGH CURRENT 5-CELL SRF CAVITIES DEVELOPED AT JLAB Citation Details In-Document Search Title: STATUS AND TEST RESULTS OF HIGH CURRENT 5-CELL SRF CAVITIES ...

  5. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar Slides

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Overview of Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations" held on March 10, 2015.

  6. Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 7_usc_popov.pdf (1.59 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities 2006 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - 3.4 Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20, develop a 60% peak-efficient, 5,000 hour durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $40/kW with an ultimate cost target of $30/kW. * By 2020, develop distributed generation and micro-CHP fuel cell systems (5 kW) operating on natural gas or LPG that achieve 45% electrical efficiency and 60,000 hours durability at an equipment cost of $1500/kW. * By 2020, develop medium-scale CHP fuel cell systems (100 kW-3 MW) that achieve 50% electrical efficiency, 90%

  8. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - 3.4 Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    17, develop a 60% peak-efficient, 5,000 hour durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $30/kW. * By 2020, develop distributed generation and micro-CHP fuel cell systems (5 kW) operating on natural gas or LPG that achieve 45% electrical efficiency and 60,000 hours durability at an equipment cost of $1500/kW. * By 2020, develop medium-scale CHP fuel cell systems (100 kW-3 MW) that achieve 50% electrical efficiency, 90% CHP efficiency, and 80,000 hours

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.4 Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FUEL CELLS SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.4 - 1 3.4 Fuel Cells Fuel cells efficiently convert diverse fuels directly into electricity without combustion, and they are key elements of a broad portfolio for building a competitive, secure, and sustainable clean energy economy. They offer a broad range of benefits, including reduced greenhouse gas emissions; reduced oil consumption; expanded use of renewable power (through the use of hydrogen derived from

  10. Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles | Department of Energy Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles January 31, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to use pressure swing adsorption to remove impurities from gaseous hydrogen for use in fuel cells. This is done at the point of production. Other technologies include membrane and...

  12. Recent developments in high-efficiency PV cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb, S.

    2000-05-22

    Enormous progress has been made in recent years on a number of photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices in terms of conversion efficiencies. Ultrahigh-efficiency (>30{percent}) PV cells have been fabricated from gallium arsenide (GaAs) and its ternary alloys such as gallium indium phosphide (GaInP{sub 2}). The high-efficiency GaAs-based solar cells are being produced on a commercial scale, particularly for space applications. Efficiencies in the range of 18{percent} to 24{percent} have been achieved in traditional silicon-based devices fabricated from both multicrystalline and single-crystal materials. Major advances in efficiency have also been made on various thin-film solar cells based on amorphous silicon (aSi:H), copper gallium indium diselenide (CIGS), and cadmium telluride materials. This paper gives a brief overview of the recent progress in PV cell efficiencies based on these materials and devices.

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presented at the DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on March 29, 2011. apu20119chick.pdf (1.77 MB) More Documents & Publications Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener ...

  14. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appendix D - Project Evaluation Form Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration ... Page D - 2 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan 2012 Appendix D - ...

  15. Inverted Metamorphic Cell Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-156

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.

    2012-05-01

    This CRADA targeted technology transfer of the inverted metamorphic multi-junction (IMM) solar cell innovation from NREL to Emcore Photovoltaics. The technology transfer was successfully completed. Additionally, NREL provided materials characterization of solar cell structures produced at Emcore.

  16. Toward developing a computational capability for PEM fuel cell design and optimization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chao Yang; Luo, Gang; Jiang, Fangming; Carnes, Brian; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress made in our project recently funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) toward developing a computational capability, which includes a two-phase, three-dimensional PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) fuel cell model and its coupling with DAKOTA (a design and optimization toolkit developed and being enhanced by Sandia National Laboratories). We first present a brief literature survey in which the prominent/notable PEM fuel cell models developed by various researchers or groups are reviewed. Next, we describe the two-phase, three-dimensional PEM fuel cell model being developed, tested, and later validated by experimental data. Results from case studies are presented to illustrate the utility of our comprehensive, integrated cell model. The coupling between the PEM fuel cell model and DAKOTA is briefly discussed. Our efforts in this DOE-funded project are focused on developing a validated computational capability that can be employed for PEM fuel cell design and optimization.

  17. DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders to assist in the development of topics for a potential funding opportunity announcement in 2015 for fuel cells and fuel cell systems designed for transportation, as well as stationary and early market applications, including cross-cutting stack and balance of plant component technology.

  18. Process Development for High Voc CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferekides, C. S.; Morel, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    This is a cumulative and final report for Phases I, II and III of this NREL funded project (subcontract # XXL-5-44205-10). The main research activities of this project focused on the open-circuit voltage of the CdTe thin film solar cells. Although, thin film CdTe continues to be one of the leading materials for large-scale cost-effective production of photovoltaics, the efficiency of the CdTe solar cells have been stagnant for the last few years. This report describes and summarizes the results for this 3-year research project.

  19. Study of C-coated LiFe{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 0.67}PO{sub 4} as positive electrode material for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perea, A.; Castro, L.; Aldon, L.; Stievano, L.; Dedryvere, R.; Gonbeau, D.; Tran, N.; Nuspl, G.; Breger, J.; Tessier, C.

    2012-08-15

    Commercial C-LiFe{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 0.67}PO{sub 4} positive electrode material has been investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy (MS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The combined use of these experimental techniques provides a better understanding of the electrochemical reaction involved during cycling. {sup 57}Fe MS is very efficient to directly follow oxidation state of Fe in the electrode, and gives surprisingly indirect information on the oxidation state of Mn as observed by XAS and XPS. The electrochemical mechanism is proposed based from in situ and operando investigations using both MS and XAS, and is consistent with XPS surface studies. XPS analysis of the electrodes at the end of charge (4.4 V) reveals enhanced electrode/electrolyte interface reactivity at this high potential. Aging of C-LiFe{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 0.67}PO{sub 4}/Li cells after 50 cycles at 60 Degree-Sign C indicates a rather good electrochemical behavior (low capacity fading) of the electrode material. Both {sup 57}Fe MS and XPS (Mn 2p and Fe 2p) clearly show no modification on Fe and Mn oxidation state compared to fresh electrode confirming the good electrochemical performances. - Graphical abstrct: Quantitative evaluation of the Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 3+} content during the first charge/discharge cycle obtained from K-edge XANES spectra of C-LiFe{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 0.67}PO{sub 4} recorded upon cell operation at RT with C/10 rate. During the charge co-existence of Fe and Mn oxidation is observed between points 2 and 4 of the potential curve. At the end of the charge the cut-off voltage limits the oxidation at about 93%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-LiFe{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 0.67}PO{sub 4} electrode material upon cycling vs. metallic lithium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy is a (in)direct probe for Fe(Mn) oxidation state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both K-Fe and K-Mn edges XAS show a simultaneous

  20. Solar Junction Develops World Record Setting Concentrated Photovoltaic Solar Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE supported the development of Solar Junction's concentrated photovoltaic technology that set a world record for conversion efficiency.

  1. GeOx/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Anode for Li-ion Batteries: Enhanced Capacity via Reversible Utilization of Li2O along with Improved Rate Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Dongping; Gordin, Mikhail; Yi, Ran; Xu, Terrence (Tianren); Song, Jiangxuan; Jiang, Yingbing; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    A self-assembled GeOx/reduced graphene oxide (GeOx/RGO) composite, where GeOx nanoparticles were grown directly on reduced graphene oxide sheets, was synthesized via a facile one-step reduction approach and studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental mapping, and other techniques. Electrochemical evaluation indicates that incorporation of reduced graphene oxide enhances both the rate capability and reversible capacity of GeOx, with the latter being due to the RGO enabling reversible utilization of Li2O. The composite delivers a high reversible capacity of 1600 mAhg-1 at a current density of 100 mAg-1, and still maintains a capacity of 410 mAhg-1 at a high current density of 20 Ag-1. Owing to the flexible reduced graphene oxide sheets enwrapping the GeOx particles, the cycling stability of the composite was also improved significantly. To further demonstrate its feasibility in practical applications, the synthesized GeOx/RGO composite anode was successfully paired with a high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode to form a full cell, which showed good cycling and rate performance.

  2. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  3. Development of a New Generation, High Efficiency PEM Fuel Cell Based, CHP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System | Department of Energy a New Generation, High Efficiency PEM Fuel Cell Based, CHP System Development of a New Generation, High Efficiency PEM Fuel Cell Based, CHP System Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. 7_intelligent.pdf (22.28 KB) More Documents & Publications 2012 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program 2011 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and

  4. NREL Develops High-Speed Scanner to Monitor Fuel Cell Material Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    This highlight describes results of recent work in which polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell electrodes with intentionally introduced known defects were imaged and analyzed using a fuel cell scanner recently developed at NREL. The highlight is being developed for the September 2015 Alliance S&T Board meeting.

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A - Budgetary Information Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page A - 1 Appendix A -Budgetary Information The schedule for completing the milestones and ...

  6. Berkeley Lab Startup Brings Fuel Cells to the Developing World...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary In some parts of the developing world, people may live in homes without ... to provide electricity to the 2.5 billion people in the world who don't get it reliably. ...

  7. DOE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research, Development, and Demonstration FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) intends to issue, on behalf of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstration" on or about December 10, 2015. The FOA will offer up to $35 million, subject to appropriations, for hydrogen production, delivery, and storage research and development; demonstration and deployment of infrastructure components; consortia topics for fuel cell performance and durability and advanced hydrogen storage materials research; and cost and performance analysis for hydrogen production, storage, and fuel cells.

  8. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  9. DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development December 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced it is accepting applications for a total of up to $74 million to support the research and development of clean, reliable fuel cells for stationary and transportation applications. The solicitations include up to $65 million over three years to fund

  10. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy DOE Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review 2010_gtp_peer_review_report_final.pdf (2.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fielding of HT-seismic Tools and Evaluation of HT-FPGA Module - Development of a HT-seismic Tool; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir

  11. Automotive Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presents thermal management of lithium-ion battery packs for electric vehicles cunningham.pdf (691.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity Overview of Battery R&D Activities

  12. GM Li-Ion Battery Pack Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy A guide to providing input to GETEM, the Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model. GETEM is designed to help the Geothermal Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy in estimating some of the technical and economic values of its rese geothermal_electricity_technology_evaluation_model_2012.pdf (665.87 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. DOE Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Webinar Presentation GETEM -Geothermal Electricity

  13. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored. Authors: Smith, K. ; Wood, E. ; Santhanagopalan, S. ; Kim, G. ; Shi, Y. ; Pesaran, A. ...

  14. Batteries - Next-generation Li-ion batteries Breakout session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to enable Li-metal * Inter-digitated electrodes for improved fast-charge capability * Nano-engineered electrode films to allow for thicker films Research Suggestions * See above ...

  15. Electrolytes in Support of 5 V Li-ion Chemistries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  16. Li-ion Batteries and Beyond George Crabtree

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low-Level Radiation Research Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) transmitted a letter to the Department regarding its perspective on how DOE should pursue research on low-level radiation. SEAB recommends DOE continue to sponsor a small, sustained, high quality research program primarily in DOE laboratories as well as centers of excellence within universities, medical schools, and hospitals. SEAB Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research (73.09 KB)

  17. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  18. 3D Printing of Interdigitated Li-Ion Microbattery Architectures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: solar (photovoltaic), solid state lighting, phonons, thermal conductivity, electrodes - solar, materials and chemistry...

  19. Searching for Sustainable and "Greener" Li-ion Batteries

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tarascon, Jean-Marie [University of Picardie at Aimens, France

    2010-01-08

    Lithium-ion batteries are strong candidates for powering upcoming generations of hybrid electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. But improvements in safety must be achieved while keeping track of materials resources and abundances, as well as materials synthesis and recycling processes, all of which could inflict a heavy energy cost. Thus, electrode materials that have a minimum footprint in nature and are made via eco-efficient processes are sorely needed. The arrival of electrode materials based on minerals such as LiFePO4 (tryphilite) is a significant, but not sufficient, step toward the long-term demand for materials sustainability. The eco-efficient synthesis of LiFePO4 nanopowders via hydrothermal/ solvo-thermal processes using latent bases, structure directing templates, or other bio-related approaches will be presented in this talk. However, to secure sustainability and greeness, organic electrodes appear to be ideal candidates.... We took a fresh look at organic based electrodes; the results of this research into sequentially metal-organic-framework electrodes and Li-based organic electrodes (LixCyOz) will be reported and discussed.

  20. First-Principles Calculations, Electrochemical and X-ray Absorption Studies of Li-Ni-PO4 Surface-Treated xLi2MnO3 (1 x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co) Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolverton, Christopher; Croy, J R; Balasubramanian, M; Kang, Sun-Ho; Lopez-Rivera, C. M.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously hypothesized that the enhanced rate capability of Li-Ni-PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} positive electrodes (M = Mn, Ni, Co) in Li-ion batteries might be associated with a defect Ni-doped Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} surface structure [i.e., Li{sub 3-2y}Ni{sub y}PO{sub 4} (0 < y < 1)], thereby promoting fast Li{sup +}-ion conduction at the xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} particle surface. In this paper, the solubility of divalent metals (Fe, Mn, Ni, Mg) in {gamma}-Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is predicted with the first-principles GGA+U method in an effort to understand the enhanced rate capability. The predicted solubility (x) is extremely small; this finding is consistent with experimental evidence: 1) X-ray diffraction data obtained from Li-Ni-PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} electrodes that show that, after annealing at 550 C, a Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-like structure forms as a second phase at the electrode particle surface, and 2) X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which indicate that the nickel ions are accommodated in the transition metal layers of the Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} component during the annealing process. However, electrochemical studies of Li{sub 3-2y}Ni{sub y}PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} electrodes indicate that their rate capability increases as a function of y over the range y = 0 (Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) to y = 1 (LiNiPO{sub 4}), strongly suggesting that, at some level, the nickel ions play a role in reducing electrochemical impedance and increasing electrode stability at the electrode particle surface.

  1. Development of a 5 kW Prototype Coal-Based Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.; Mirzababaei, Jelvehnaz; Rismanchian, Azadeh

    2014-01-20

    The University of Akron Fuel Cell Laboratory pioneered the development of a laboratory scale coal-based fuel cell, which allows the direct use of high sulfur content coal as fuel. The initial research and coal fuel cell technology development (“Coal-based Fuel Cell,” S. S. C. Chuang, PCT Int. Appl. 2006, i.e., European Patent Application, 35 pp. CODEN: PIXXD2 WO 2006028502 A2 20060316) have demonstrated that it is feasible to electrochemically oxidize carbon to CO2, producing electricity. The key innovative concept of this coal-based fuel cell technology is that carbon in coal can be converted through an electrochemical oxidation reaction into manageable carbon dioxide, efficiently generating electricity without involving coal gasification, reforming, and water-gas shift reaction. This study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reaction. A carbon injection system was developed to inject the solid fuel without bringing air into the anode chamber; a fuel cell stack was developed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the fuel cell stack. Further improvement of anode catalyst activity and durability is needed to bring this novel coal fuel cell to a highly efficient, super clean, multi-use electric generation technology, which promises to provide low cost electricity by expanding the utilization of U.S. coal supplies and relieving our dependence on foreign oil.

  2. Performance and degradation evaluation of five different commercial lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Shim, Joongpyo

    2004-04-20

    The initial performance of five different types of Li-ion rechargeable batteries, from Quallion Corp, UltraLife Battery and Toshiba, was measured and compared. Cell characterization included variable-rate constant-current cycling, various USDOE pulse-test protocols and full-spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Changes in impedance and capacity were monitored during electrochemical cycling under various conditions, including constant-current cycling over 100 percent DOD at a range of temperature and pulse profile cycling over a very narrow range of DOD at room temperature. All cells were found to maintain more than 80 percent of their rated capacity for more than 400 constant current 100 percent DOD cycles. The power fade (or impedance rise) of the cells varied considerably. New methods for interpreting the pulse resistance data were evaluated for their usefulness in interpreting performance mechanism as a function of test protocol and cell design.

  3. Development of a 10 kW PEM fuel cell for stationary applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barthels, H.; Mergel, J.; Oetjen, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    A 10 kW Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is being developed as part of a long-term energy storage path for electricity in the photovoltaic demonstration plant called PHOEBUS at the Forschungszentrum Julich.

  4. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical paper on the development of a hydrogen reformer, vehicle refueling facility, and PEM fuel cell for Las Vegas, NV presented at the 2002 Annual Hydrogen Review held May 6-8, 2002 in Golden, CO.

  5. DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES OF THE SINGLE CELL TEST SYSTEM FOR SO2 DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J

    2007-01-15

    The single cell test system development for the SRNL sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer has been completed. Operating experience and improved operating procedures were developed during test operations in FY06 and the first quarter of FY07. Eight different cell configurations, using various MEA designs, have been tested. The single cell test electrolyzer has been modified to overcome difficulties experienced during testing, including modifications to the inlet connection to eliminate minute acid leaks that caused short circuits. The test facility was modified by adding a water bath for cell heating, thus permitting operation over a wider range of flowrates and cell temperatures. Modifications were also identified to permit continuous water flushing of the cathode to remove sulfur, thus extending operating time between required shutdowns. This is also expected to permit a means of independently measuring the rate of sulfur formation, and the corresponding SO{sub 2} flux through the membrane. This report contains a discussion of the design issues being addressed by the single cell test program, a test matrix being conducted to address these issues, and a summary of the performance objectives for the single cell test system. The current primary objective of single cell test system is to characterize and qualify electrolyzer configurations for the following 100-hour longevity tests. Although the single cell test system development is considered complete, SRNL will continue to utilize the test facility and the single cell electrolyzer to measure the operability and performance of various cell design configurations, including new MEA's produced by the component development tasks.

  6. Design and Development of High-Performance Polymer Fuel Cell Membranes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Design and Development of High-Performance Polymer Fuel Cell Membranes Design and Development of High-Performance Polymer Fuel Cell Membranes A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19, 2006. hung.pdf (532.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 2 (Day 2): SBIR Projects Higher Temperature PEM Composite Systems for

  7. A possible role for the canonical Wnt pathway in endocrine cell development in chicks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, Anna Hauntoft; Heller, R. Scott . E-mail: shll@hagedorn.dk

    2005-08-05

    Wnt signalling is involved in many developmental processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell fate decisions, and morphogenesis. However, little is known about Wnt signalling during pancreas development. Multiple Wnt ligands and Frizzled receptors are expressed in the embryonic mouse pancreas, the surrounding mesenchyme, and have also been detected in the chicken endoderm during development. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of canonical Wnt signalling on endocrine cell development by use of the in ovo electroporation of the chicken endoderm. Overexpression with a constitutive active form of {beta}-catenin in combination with Ngn3 resulted in reduced numbers of glucagon cells. dnLEF-1 or naked-1 did not alter endocrine cell differentiation when co-expressed with Ngn3, but dnLEF-1 appeared to have some potential for inhibiting delamination of Ngn3 cells. In addition, neuronal {beta}-III-tubulin, which had previously been considered a specific marker for neuronal cells, was observed in the pancreas and was upregulated in the electroporated Ngn3 cells and thus may be a new endocrine marker in the chicken.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Research Partner Requests Proposals for Battery Cell Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The US Advanced Battery Consortium is accepting proposals for projects that will develop advanced battery cells using active materials from recycled, end-of-vehicle life lithium-ion batteries. USABC collaborates with the Vehicle Technologies Office to conduct research and development on batteries for vehicles.

  9. Phase Boundary Propagation in Li-Alloying Battery Electrodes Revealed by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leenheer, Andrew J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Harris, Charles T.

    2016-05-31

    Battery cycle life is directly influenced by the microstructural changes occurring in the electrodes during charge and discharge cycles. In this study, we image in situ the nanoscale phase evolution in negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries using a fully enclosed liquid cell in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to reveal early degradation that is not evident in the charge–discharge curves. To compare the electrochemical phase transformation behavior between three model materials, thin films of amorphous Si, crystalline Al, and crystalline Au were lithiated and delithiated at controlled rates while immersed in a commercial liquid electrolyte. This method allowed formore » the direct observation of lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale negative electrodes, revealing that a simplistic model of a surface-to-interior lithiation front is insufficient. For the crystalline films, a lithiation front spread laterally from a few initial nucleation points, with continued grain nucleation along the growing interface. The intermediate lithiated phases were identified using electron diffraction, and high-resolution postmortem imaging revealed the details of the final microstructure. Lastly, our results show that electrochemically induced solid–solid phase transformations can lead to highly concentrated stresses at the laterally propagating phase boundary which should be considered for future designs of nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries.« less

  10. Development of Commercial Technology for Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells on Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-209

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2013-03-01

    NREL has conducted basic research relating to high efficiency, low cost, thin film silicon solar cell design and the method of making solar cells. Two patents have been issued to NREL in the above field. In addition, specific process and metrology tools have been developed by NREL. Applied Optical Sciences Corp. (AOS) has expertise in the manufacture of solar cells and has developed its own unique concentrator technology. AOS wants to complement its solar cell expertise and its concentrator technology by manufacturing flat panel thin film silicon solar cell panels. AOS wants to take NREL's research to the next level, using it to develop commercially viable flat pane, thin film silicon solar cell panels. Such a development in equipment, process, and metrology will likely produce the lowest cost solar cell technology for both commercial and residential use. NREL's fundamental research capability and AOS's technology and industrial background are complementary to achieve this product development.

  11. Final Technical Report for the Martin County Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eshraghi, Ray

    2011-03-09

    In September 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy and Martin County Economic Development Corporation entered into an agreement to further the advancement of a microtubular PEM fuel cell developed by Microcell Corporation. The overall focus of this project was on research and development related to high volume manufacturing of fuel cells and cost reduction in the fuel cell manufacturing process. The extrusion process used for the microfiber fuel cells in this project is inherently a low cost, high volume, high speed manufacturing process. In order to take advantage of the capabilities that the extrusion process provides, all subsequent manufacturing processes must be enhanced to meet the extrusion line’s speed and output. Significant research and development was completed on these subsequent processes to ensure that power output and performance were not negatively impacted by the higher speeds, design changes and process improvements developed in this project. All tasks were successfully completed resulting in cost reductions, performance improvements and process enhancements in the areas of speed and quality. These results support the Department of Energy’s goal of fuel cell commercialization.

  12. Development and validation of a two-phase, three-dimensional model for PEM fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To develop and validate a two-phase, three-dimensional transport modelfor simulating PEM fuel cell performance under a wide range of operating conditions; (2) To apply the validated PEM fuel cell model to improve fundamental understanding of key phenomena involved and to identify rate-limiting steps and develop recommendations for improvements so as to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell technology; (3) The validated PEMFC model can be employed to improve and optimize PEM fuel cell operation. Consequently, the project helps: (i) address the technical barriers on performance, cost, and durability; and (ii) achieve DOE's near-term technical targets on performance, cost, and durability in automotive and stationary applications.

  13. Development of molten-carbonate fuel-cell technology. Final report, February-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the work was to focus on the basic technology for producing molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) components. This included the development and fabrication of stable anode structures, preparation of lithiated nickel oxide cathodes, synthesis and characterization of a high surface area (gamma-lithium-aluminate) electrolyte support, pressurized cell testing and modeling of the overall electrolyte distribution within a cell to aid performance optimization of the different cell components. The electrode development program is highlighted by two successful 5000 hour bench-scale tests using stabilized anode structures. One of these provided better performance than in any previous state-of-the-art, bench-scale cell (865 mV at 115 mA/cm/sup 2/ under standard conditions). Pressurized testing at 10 atmosphere of a similar stabilized, high surface area, Ni/Co anode structure in a 300 cm/sup 2/ cell showed that the 160 mA/cm/sup 2/ performance goal of 850 mV on low Btu fuel (80% conversion) can be readily met. A study of the H/sub 2/S-effects on molten carbonate fuel cells showed that ERC's Ni/Co anode provided better tolerance than a Ni/Cr anode. Prelithiated nickel oxide plaques were prepared from materials made by a low temperature and a high temperature powder-production process. The methods for fabricating handleable cathodes of various thicknesses were also investigated. In electrolyte matrix development, accelerated out-of-cell and in-cell tests have confirmed the superior stability of ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/.

  14. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Appendix E: Acronyms

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E - Acronyms Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page E - 1 Appendix E - Acronyms AEI Advanced Energy Initiative AEO Annual Energy Outlook AFC Alkaline Fuel Cell AHJ Authorities Having Jurisdiction AMFC Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells AMR Annual Merit Review ANL (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory APU Auxiliary Power Unit ARRA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ASES American Solar Energy Society ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers AST Accelerated Stress Test

  15. Final Report: Development of a Thermal and Water Management System for PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zia Mirza, Program Manager

    2011-12-06

    This final program report is prepared to provide the status of program activities performed over the period of 9 years to develop a thermal and water management (TWM) system for an 80-kW PEM fuel cell power system. The technical information and data collected during this period are presented in chronological order by each calendar year. Balance of plant (BOP) components of a PEM fuel cell automotive system represents a significant portion of total cost based on the 2008 study by TIAX LLC, Cambridge, MA. The objectives of this TWM program were two-fold. The first objective was to develop an advanced cooling system (efficient radiator) to meet the fuel cell cooling requirements. The heat generated by the fuel cell stack is a low-quality heat (small difference between fuel cell stack operating temperature and ambient air temperature) that needs to be dissipated to the ambient air. To minimize size, weight, and cost of the radiator, advanced fin configurations were evaluated. The second objective was to evaluate air humidification systems which can meet the fuel cell stack inlet air humidity requirements. The moisture from the fuel cell outlet air is transferred to inlet air, thus eliminating the need for an outside water source. Two types of humidification devices were down-selected: one based on membrane and the other based on rotating enthalpy wheel. The sub-scale units for both of these devices have been successfully tested by the suppliers. This project addresses System Thermal and Water Management.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  17. Development of fuel processors for transportation and stationary fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, W.L.; Bentley, J.M.; Thijssen, J.H.J.

    1996-12-31

    Five years of development effort at Arthur D. Little have resulted in a family of low-cost, small-scale fuel processor designs which have been optimized for multiple fuels, applications, and fuel cell technologies. The development activities discussed in this paper involve Arthur D. Little`s proprietary catalytic partial oxidation fuel processor technology. This technology is inherently compact and fuel-flexible, and has been shown to have system efficiencies comparable to steam reformers when integrated properly with a wide range of fuel cell types.

  18. Fundamental understanding and development of low-cost, high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHATGI,A.; NARASIMHA,S.; MOSCHER,J.; EBONG,A.; KAMRA,S.; KRYGOWSKI,T.; DOSHI,P.; RISTOW,A.; YELUNDUR,V.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

    2000-05-01

    The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  19. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations FY15FCTOofficewideFOA@ee.doe.gov FOA Webinar DE-FOA-0001224 3/10/2015 2 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations FOA Issue Date: 3/2/2015 FOA Informational Webinar: 3/10/2015 Submission Deadline for Concept Papers: 4/2/2015 Submission Deadline for Full Applications: 6/4/2015 Submission Deadline for Replies to Reviewer Comments: 7/17/2015 Expected Date for EERE Selection

  20. Energy Department Announces $2 Million to Develop Supply Chain, Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced up to $2 million to develop the domestic supply chain for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and study the competitiveness of U.S. hydrogen and fuel cell system and component manufacturing.

  1. The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for Developing Durable Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Kou, Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-03

    Studying the corrosion behavior of catalyst support materials is of great significance for understanding the degradation of PEM fuel cell performance and developing durable catalysts. The oxidation of Vulcan carbon black (the most widely-used catalyst support for PEM fuel cells) was investigated using various electrochemical stressing methods (fixed-potential holding vs. potential step cycling), among which the potential step cycling was considered to mimic more closely the real drive cycle operation of vehicle PEM fuel cells. The oxidation of carbon was accelerated under potential step conditions as compared with the fixed-potential holding condition. Increasing potential step frequency or decreasing the lower potential limit in the potential step can further accelerate the corrosion of carbon. The accelerated corrosion of carbon black was attributed to the cycle of consumption/regeneration of some easily oxidized species. These findings are being employed to develop a test protocol for fast screening durable catalyst support.

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summary Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page ES - 1 Executive Summary The United States pioneered the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and we continue to lead the way as these technologies emerge from the laboratory and into commercial markets. A tremendous opportunity exists for the United States to capitalize on this leadership role and apply these technologies to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing our dependence on oil, and

  3. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-92MC28065, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test (PDT) during the period of October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. Information is presented on stack design, manufacturing, stack assembly, procurement, site preparation, and test plan.

  4. Fundamental stack and system issues in molten carbonate fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.; Mayfield, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    Stack research and system issues in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) technology development and commercialization are discussed within context of status of MCFC development and commercialization in US. Status of MCFC development is addressed. Major known fundamental stack research issues remaining for the MCFC technology are identified and discussed. The cathode remains a focal point of performance improvement and cost reduction. The various aspects of MCFC power plant network and systems issues are also addressed and discussed. These include cost, heat loss management, startup and shutdown modes, dynamic response, footprint, packaging and integration, parasitic power losses, pressurization and reforming. Potential of MCFC networks is discussed. With the initial demonstration of full-area, fullheight 250-kW to 2-MW MCFC power plants, the spatial configuration of the MCFC stacks into networks in the fuel cell power plant takes on importance for the first time.

  5. Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Development of Novel PEM Membrane and Multiphase CD Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Berry; Susanta Das

    2009-12-30

    To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance. To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well

  7. Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research and Development of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells for the Hydrogen Economy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed statement of work for the upcoming solicitation for Research and Development of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells for the Hydrogen Economy.

  8. High-performance porous silicon solar cell development. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruska, P.

    1996-09-01

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate use of porous silicon in new solar cell structures. Porous silicon technology has been developed at Spire for producing visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The major aspects that they have demonstrated are the following: porous silicon active layers have been made to show photovoltaic action; porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings to improve the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells; and porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings on polycrystalline silicon solar cells. One problem with the use of porous silicon is to achieve good lateral conduction of electrons and holes through the material. This shows up in terms of poor blue response and photocurrents which increase with increasing reverse bias applied to the diode.

  9. Stepwise renal lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells tracing in vivo development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishikawa, Masaki; Yanagawa, Naomi; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Yuri, Shunsuke; Hauser, Peter V.; Jo, Oak D.; Yanagawa, Norimoto

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced renal lineages from mESCs by following the in vivo developmental cues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm by stepwise addition of factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced two types of renal progenitor cells by reciprocal conditioned media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose the potential role of CD24 for the enrichment of renal lineage cells. -- Abstract: The in vitro derivation of renal lineage progenitor cells is essential for renal cell therapy and regeneration. Despite extensive studies in the past, a protocol for renal lineage induction from embryonic stem cells remains unestablished. In this study, we aimed to induce renal lineages from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) by following in vivo developmental stages, i.e., the induction of mesoderm (Stage I), intermediate mesoderm (Stage II) and renal lineages (Stage III). For stage I induction, in accordance with known signaling pathways involved in mesoderm development in vivo, i.e., Nodal, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and Wnt, we found that the sequential addition of three factors, i.e., Activin-A (A), a surrogate for Nodal signaling, during days 0-2, A plus BMP-4 (4) during days 2-4, and A4 plus lithium (L), a surrogate for Wnt signaling, during days 4-6, was most effective to induce the mesodermal marker, Brachyury. For stage II induction, the addition of retinoic acid (R) in the continuous presence of A4L during days 6-8 was most effective to induce nephrogenic intermediate mesodermal markers, such as Pax2 and Lim1. Under this condition, more than 30% of cells were stained positive for Pax2, and there was a concomitant decrease in the expression of non-mesodermal markers. For stage III induction, in resemblance to the reciprocal induction between ureteric bud (UB) and metanephric mesenchyme (MM) during kidney development, we found that the exposure to conditioned media derived from UB and MM cells was

  10. Rechargeable Lithium-Air Batteries: Development of Ultra High Specific Energy Rechargeable Lithium-Air Batteries Based on Protected Lithium Metal Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: PolyPlus is developing the worlds first commercially available rechargeable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery. Li-Air batteries are better than the Li-Ion batteries used in most EVs today because they breathe in air from the atmosphere for use as an active material in the battery, which greatly decreases its weight. Li-Air batteries also store nearly 700% as much energy as traditional Li-Ion batteries. A lighter battery would improve the range of EVs dramatically. Polyplus is on track to making a critical breakthrough: the first manufacturable protective membrane between its lithiumbased negative electrode and the reaction chamber where it reacts with oxygen from the air. This gives the battery the unique ability to recharge by moving lithium in and out of the batterys reaction chamber for storage until the battery needs to discharge once again. Until now, engineers had been unable to create the complex packaging and air-breathing components required to turn Li-Air batteries into rechargeable systems.

  11. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test environmental assessment/protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Objective of proposed action is to conduct a 250-kW product development test of M-C Power Corporation`s molten carbonate fuel cell concept, at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. Review of environmental impacts of this test indicate the following: no impact on solid waste disposal, water quality, noise levels, floodplains, wetlands, ecology, historic areas, or socioeconomic resources. Impact on air quality are expected to be positive.

  12. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test environmental assessment/protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, Jack; Furukawa, Vance; Frost, Grant; Danna, Mike; Figueroa, Al; Scroppo, Joseph

    1992-11-01

    Objective of proposed action is to conduct a 250-kW product development test of M-C Power Corporation's molten carbonate fuel cell concept, at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. Review of environmental impacts of this test indicate the following: no impact on solid waste disposal, water quality, noise levels, floodplains, wetlands, ecology, historic areas, or socioeconomic resources. Impact on air quality are expected to be positive.

  13. Lattice Mn3+ Behaviors in Li4Ti5O12/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Full Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-05-28

    High voltage spinels LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) with different contents of residual Mn3+ ions have been evaluated in full cells using Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as standard anode. Greatly improved cycling stability has been observed for all spinels in LTO-limited full cell, compared with those in LNMO-limited ones, while the underlying mechanisms are quite different. It has been discovered that the participation of active Mn3+ in the extended cycling and thus its observable contribution to Li+ diffusion kinetics depend on the limiting electrode and the sufficiency of Li+ ions. Potential Mn dissolution has also been discussed to identify the key factors that need to be considered to construct full cells employing high voltage spinel as the cathode.

  14. Summary Report on Solid-oxide Electrolysis Cell Testing and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R.C. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2012-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. From 2003 to 2009, this work was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, under the Office of Nuclear Energy. Starting in 2010, the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research program has been sponsored by the INL Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This report provides a summaryof program activities performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and the first quarter of FY-12, with a focus on small-scale testing and cell development activities. HTE research priorities during this period have included the development and testing of SOEC and stack designs that exhibit high-efficiency initial performance and low, long-term degradation rates. This report includes contributions from INL and five industry partners: Materials and Systems Research, Incorporated (MSRI); Versa Power Systems, Incorporated (VPS); Ceramatec, Incorporated; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Glenn Research Center (NASA - GRC); and the St. Gobain Advanced Materials Division. These industry partners have developed SOEC cells and stacks for in-house testing in the electrolysis mode and independent testing at INL. Additional fundamental research and post-test physical examinations have been performed at two university partners: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Connecticut. Summaries of these activities and test results are also presented in this report.

  15. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.'' This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft[sup 2] cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  16. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  17. Development of Novel Nanocrystal-based Solar Cell to Exploit Multiple Exciton Generation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00227

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, R.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the project was to develop new design and fabrication techniques for NC solar cells with the goal of demonstrating enhanced photocurrent and efficiency by exploiting multiple exciton generation and to investigate multiple exciton generation and charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor NC films used in NC-based solar cells.

  18. NREL Develops High Speed Scanner to Monitor Fuel Cell Material Defects (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel cell scanner could provide effective in-line quality control in a high-volume manufacturing facility. NREL scientists have developed and built a high-throughput, high-resolution, in-line fuel cell scanner to monitor quality and detect critical defects in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) materials. The fuel cell scanner uses a visible light diffuse reflectance imaging technique to gener- ate high-resolution images of PEMFC materials as they are transported along a roll-to-roll

  19. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  20. Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report, Appendix B-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.

    1995-07-01

    Directed Technologies, Inc. has previously submitted a detailed technical assessment and concept design for a mid-size, five-passenger fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), under contract to the Argonne National Laboratory. As a supplement to that contract, DTI has reviewed the literature and conducted a preliminary evaluation of two energy carriers for the FCEV: hydrogen and methanol. This report compares the estimated fuel efficiency, cost of producing and delivering the fuel, and the resultant life cycle costs of the FCEV when fueled directly by hydrogen and when fueled by methanol with on-board reforming to produce the required hydrogen-rich gas for the fuel cell. This work will be supplemented and expanded under the Ford contract with the Department of Energy to develop the FCEV and its fuel infrastructure.

  1. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  2. Development and characterization of PCDTBT:CdSe QDs hybrid solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, Shiv Kumar Bhatnagar, Chhavi Kumari, Anita Madhwal, Devinder Bhatnagar, P. K. Mathur, P. C.

    2014-10-15

    Solar cell consisting of low band gap polymer poly[N-900-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(40,70-di-2-thienyl-20,10, 30-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) as donor and cadmium selenide/zinc sulphide (CdSe/ZnS) core shell quantum dots (QDs) as an acceptor has been developed. The absorption measurements show that the absorption coefficient increases in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure covering broad absorption spectrum (200nm–700nm). Also, the photoluminescence (PL) of the PCDTBT:QDs film is found to decrease by an order of magnitude showing a significant transfer of electrons to the QDs. With this approach and under broadband white light with an irradiance of 8.19 mW/cm{sup 2}, we have been able to achieve a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.1 % with fill factor 0.42 for our typical solar cell.

  3. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  4. Development of a hydrogen generator for fuel cells based on the partial oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recupero, V.; Torre, T.; Saija, G.; Fiordano, N.

    1996-12-31

    As well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas (SRM). The reaction is endothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= 206 kJ/mole) and high H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratios are required in order to limit coke formation at T higher than 1000 K. Moreover, it is a common practice that the process`s fuel economy is highly sensitive to proper heat fluxes and reactor design (tubular type) and to operational conditions. Efficient heat recovery can be accomplished only on large scale units (> 40,000 Nm{sup 3}/h), far from the range of interest of {open_quotes}on-site{close_quotes} fuel cells. Even if, to fit the needs of the fuel cell technology, medium sized external reforming units (50-200 Nm{sup 3} H{sub 2}/h) have been developed and/or planned for integration with both the first and the second generation fuel cells, amelioration in their heat recovery and efficiency is at the expense of an increased sophistication and therefore at higher per unit costs. In all cases, SRM requires an extra {open_quotes}fuel{close_quotes} supply (to substain the endothermicity of the reaction) in addition to stoichiometric requirements ({open_quotes}feed{close_quotes} gas). A valid alternative could be a process based on catalytic partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} (CSPOM), since the process is mildly exothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= -35.6 kJ/mole) and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed.

  5. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the

  6. Development of Novel Front Contract Pastes for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Jellison, D. G.E. P.; Joshi, P.

    2012-04-05

    In order to improve the efficiencies of silicon solar cells, paste to silicon contact formation mechanisms must be more thoroughly understood as a function of paste chemistry, wafer properties and firing conditions. Ferro Corporation has been involved in paste development for over 30 years and has extensive expertise in glass and paste formulations. This project has focused on the characterization of the interface between the top contact material (silver paste) and the underlying silicon wafer. It is believed that the interface between the front contact silver and the silicon wafer plays a dominant role in the electrical performance of the solar cell. Development of an improved front contact microstructure depends on the paste chemistry, paste interaction with the SiNx, and silicon (“Si”) substrate, silicon sheet resistivity, and the firing profile. Typical front contact ink contains silver metal powders and flakes, glass powder and other inorganic additives suspended in an organic medium of resin and solvent. During fast firing cycles glass melts, wets, corrodes the SiNx layer, and then interacts with underlying Si. Glass chemistry is also a critical factor in the development of an optimum front contact microstructure. Over the course of this project, several fundamental characteristics of the Ag/Si interface were documented, including a higher-than-expected distribution of voids along the interface, which could significantly impact electrical conductivity. Several techniques were also investigated for the interfacial analysis, including STEM, EDS, FIB, EBSD, and ellipsometry.

  7. Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

  8. Development of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Birmingham; Crispin Debellis; Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula

    2008-02-28

    A 250 kW External Fuel Processor was developed and tested that will supply the gases needed by a pipeline natural gas fueled, solid oxide fuel cell during all modes of operation. The fuel processor consists of three major subsystems--a desulfurizer to remove fuel sulfur to an acceptable level, a synthesis gas generator to support plant heat-up and low load fuel cell operations, and a start gas generator to supply a non-flammable, reducing gas to the fuel cell during startup and shutdown operations. The desulfurization subsystem uses a selective catalytic sulfur oxidation process that was developed for operation at elevated pressure and removes the fuel sulfur to a total sulfur content of less than 80 ppbv. The synthesis gas generation subsystem uses a waterless, catalytic partial oxidation reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich mixture from the natural gas and air. An operating window was defined that allows carbon-free operation while maintaining catalyst temperatures that will ensure long-life of the reactor. The start gas subsystem generates an oxygen-free, reducing gas from the pipeline natural gas using a low-temperature combustion technique. These physically and thermally integrated subsystems comprise the 250 kW External Fuel Processor. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was tested at the Rolls-Royce facility in North Canton, Ohio to verify process performance and for comparison with design specifications. A step wise operation of the automatic controls through the startup, normal operation and shutdown sequences allowed the control system to be tuned and verified. A fully automated system was achieved that brings the fuel processor through its startup procedure, and then await commands from the fuel cell generator module for fuel supply and shutdown. The fuel processor performance met all design specifications. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was shipped to an American Electric Power site where it will be tested with a Rolls-Royce solid oxide fuel cell

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration (MYRDD) Plan - Section 2.0: Program Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 2 - 1 2.0 Program Benefits Fuel cells provide power and heat cleanly and efficiently, using diverse domestic fuels, including hydrogen produced from renewable resources and biomass-based fuels. Fuel cells can be used in a wide range of stationary, transportation, and portable-power applications. Hydrogen can also function as an energy storage medium for renewable electricity. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are being

  10. Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McTaggart, Paul

    2004-12-31

    In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

  11. Final Scientific Report : Development of Transition Metal/ Chalcogen Based Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Stephen, A.

    2008-02-29

    The aim of this project was to investigate the potential for using base metal sulfides and selenides as low cost replacements for precious metal catalysts, such as platinum, currently being used in PEM fuel cells. The approach was to deposit thin films of the materials to be evaluated onto inert electrodes and evaluate their activity for the cathode reaction (oxygen reduction) as well as ex-situ structural and compositional characterization. The most active materials identified are CoS2 and the 50:50 solid solution (Co,Ni)S2. However, the OCP of these materials is still considered too low, at 0.83V and 0.89V vs. RHE respectively, for testing in fuel cells. The methods employed here were necessary to compare with the activity of platinum as, when nano-dispersed on carbon supports, the active surface area of these materials is difficult to measure, making comparisons inaccurate. This research adds to the knowledge of potential candidates for platinum replacement in order to reduce the cost of PEM fuel cell technology and promote commercialization. Although the fabrication methods employed here are strictly experimental, methods were also developed to produce nano-dispersed catalysts with similar compositions, structure and activity. Cycling of these catalysts to highly oxidizing potentials resulted in an increase of the open circuit voltage to approach that of platinum, however, it proved difficult to determine why using these dispersed materials. The potential for non-precious, non-metallic, low cost, compound catalysts for PEM fuel cells has been investigated and demonstrated.

  12. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  13. Development of high-performance Na/NiCl{sub 2} cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redey, L.: Prakash, J.; Vissers, D.R.; Myles, K.M.

    1992-07-01

    The performance of the Ni/NiCl{sub 2} positive electrode for the Na/NiCl{sub 2} battery has been significantly improved by lowering the impedance and increasing the usable capacity through the use of chemical additives and a tailored electrode morphology. The improved electrode has excellent performance even below 200{degrees}C and can be recharged within one hour. The performance of this new electrode was measured by a conventional galvanostatic method and by a newly developed ``powerdynamic`` method. These measurements were used to project the performance of 40 to 60-kWh batteries built with this new electrode combined with already highly developed sodium/{beta} -- alumina negative electrode. These calculated results yielded a specific power of 150--400 W/kg and a specific energy of 110--200 Wh/kg for batteries with single-tube and bipolar cell designs. This high performance, along with the high cell voltage, mid-temperature operation, fast recharge capability, and short-circuited failure mode of the electrode couple, makes the NA/NiCl{sub 2} battery attractive for electric vehicle applications.

  14. Development of high-performance Na/NiCl sub 2 cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redey, L.: Prakash, J.; Vissers, D.R.; Myles, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the Ni/NiCl{sub 2} positive electrode for the Na/NiCl{sub 2} battery has been significantly improved by lowering the impedance and increasing the usable capacity through the use of chemical additives and a tailored electrode morphology. The improved electrode has excellent performance even below 200{degrees}C and can be recharged within one hour. The performance of this new electrode was measured by a conventional galvanostatic method and by a newly developed powerdynamic'' method. These measurements were used to project the performance of 40 to 60-kWh batteries built with this new electrode combined with already highly developed sodium/{beta} -- alumina negative electrode. These calculated results yielded a specific power of 150--400 W/kg and a specific energy of 110--200 Wh/kg for batteries with single-tube and bipolar cell designs. This high performance, along with the high cell voltage, mid-temperature operation, fast recharge capability, and short-circuited failure mode of the electrode couple, makes the NA/NiCl{sub 2} battery attractive for electric vehicle applications.

  15. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity Announcement "Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) intends to issue, on behalf of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations" on or about December 10, 2015.

  16. Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.

    2012-11-01

    The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

  17. Organic Based Nanocomposite Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-145

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, D.

    2013-01-01

    This CRADA will focus on the development of organic-based solar cells. Key interfacial issues in these cells will be investigated. In this rapidly emerging technology, it is increasingly clear that cell architecture will need to be at the nanoscale and the interfacial issues between organic elements (small molecule and polymer), transparent conducting oxides, and contact metallizations are critical. Thus this work will focus on the development of high surface area and nanostructured nanocarpets of inorganic oxides, the development of appropriate surface binding/acceptor molecules for the inorganic/organic interface, and the development of next-generation organic materials. Work will be performed in all three areas jointly at NREL and Konarka (with their partner in the third area of the University of Delaware). Results should be more rapid progress toward cheap large-area photovoltaic cells.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XALT Energy LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of large format...

  19. Webinar: Overview of Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "Overview of Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations," originally presented on March 10, 2015.

  20. NREL Develops Technique to Measure Membrane Thickness and Defects in Polymer Electrode Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in fuel cell membrane electrode assembly research and development. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center and the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.6 Technology Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.6 - 1 3.6 Technology Validation The Technology Validation sub-program tests, demonstrates, and validates hydrogen (production, delivery, storage) and fuel cell systems and their integrated components in real- world environments. Feedback provided to the DOE hydrogen and fuel cell research and development (RD&D) projects, industry partners, and end users helps determine the additional RD&D

  2. Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on cathode supports for PEM fuel cells, was given by Yong Wang of PNNL at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

  3. Development of nanostructured and surface modified semiconductors for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Julia, W. P.

    2008-09-01

    Solar energy conversion is increasingly being recognized as one of the principal ways to meet future energy needs without causing detrimental environmental impact. Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells (SCs) are attracting particular interest due to the potential for low cost manufacturing and for use in new applications, such as consumer electronics, architectural integration and light-weight sensors. Key materials advantages of these next generation SCs over conventional semiconductor SCs are in design opportunities--since the different functions of the SCs are carried out by different materials, there are greater materials choices for producing optimized structures. In this project, we explore the hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell system that consists of oxide, primarily ZnO, nanostructures as the electron transporter and poly-(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the light-absorber and hole transporter. It builds on our capabilities in the solution synthesis of nanostructured semiconducting oxide arrays to this photovoltaic (PV) technology. The three challenges in this hybrid material system for solar applications are (1) achieving inorganic nanostructures with critical spacing that matches the exciton diffusion in the polymer, {approx} 10 nm, (2) infiltrating the polymer completely into the dense nanostructure arrays, and (3) optimizing the interfacial properties to facilitate efficient charge transfer. We have gained an understanding and control over growing oriented ZnO nanorods with sub-50 nm diameters and the required rod-to-rod spacing on various substrates. We have developed novel approaches to infiltrate commercially available P3HT in the narrow spacing between ZnO nanorods. Also, we have begun to explore ways to modify the interfacial properties. In addition, we have established device fabrication and testing capabilities at Sandia for prototype devices. Moreover, the control synthesis of ZnO nanorod arrays lead to the development of an efficient anti

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    M-C Power Corporation will design, fabricate, install, test and evaluate a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Power Plant. The plant is to be located at the Naval Air Station Miramar in San Diego, California. This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with this project in 1994. M-C Power has completed the tape casting and sintering of cathodes and is proceeding with the tape casting and sintering of anodes for the first 250 cell stack. M-C Power and San Diego Gas and Electric relocated the fuel cell demonstration project to an alternate site at the Naval Air Station Miramar. For the new project location at the Naval Air Station Miramar, an Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the Department of Energy in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Environmental Assessment resulted in a categorical exclusion of the proposed action from all environmental permit requirements. Bechtel Corporation has completed the reformer process design coordination, a Process Description, the Pipe and Instrumentation Diagrams, a Design Criteria Document and General Project Requirement Document. Bechtel developed the requirements for soils investigation report and issued the following equipment bid packages to the suppliers for bids: Inverter, Reformer, Desulfurization Vessels, Hot Gas Recycle Blower, Heat Recovery Steam Generator, and Recycle Gas Cooler. SDG and E has secured necessary site permits, conducted soils investigations, and is working on the construction plan. They are in final negotiations with the US Navy on a site agreement. Site drawings are required for finalization of the agreement.

  5. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wei

    2010-12-15

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  6. Development and Validation of a Slurry Model for Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Pires, Richard P.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2014-07-25

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) is developing models for hydrogen storage systems for fuel cell-based light duty vehicle applications for a variety of promising materials. These transient models simulate the performance of the storage system for comparison to the DOE’s Technical Targets and a set of four drive cycles. The purpose of this research is to describe the models developed for slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage materials. The storage systems of both a representative exothermic system based on ammonia borane and endothermic system based on alane were developed and modeled in Simulink®. Once complete the reactor and radiator components of the model were validated with experimental data. The model was then run using a highway cycle, an aggressive cycle, cold-start cycle and hot drive cycle. The system design was adjusted to meet these drive cycles. A sensitivity analysis was then performed to identify the range of material properties where these DOE targets and drive cycles could be met. Materials with a heat of reaction greater than 11 kJ/mol H2 generated and a slurry hydrogen capacity of greater than 11.4% will meet the on-board efficiency and gravimetric capacity targets, respectively.

  7. Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Zimbardi, Francesco

    2015-01-30

    As a result of the work within this project manufacturing ready devices were developed using 4 different promising Si material technologies with final efficiencies between 20.1% and 21.2%. The starting efficiencies for the FPACE I project were based on best manufactured p-type and n-type cells at the start of the project in 2011. Target efficiencies proposed for the project were 21% for p-type CZ, 20% for p-type cast Si, 21% for n-type and 20% for epi. All Target efficiencies were met or exceeded by the end of the project in 2014. The figure below list displays the 4 highest performing structures for each material with corresponding achieved efficiencies.

  8. Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie M. Stone

    2008-09-13

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan is designed to fill gaps in the knowledge about the role of SPL14 in plant growth and development. The work is being guided by three objectives aimed at determining the pathways in which SPL14 functions to modulate PCD and/or plant development: (1) determine how SPL14 functions in plant development, (2) identify target genes that are directly regulated by SPL14, and (3) identify SPL14 modifications and interacting proteins. We made significant progress during the funding period. Briefly, some major accomplishments are highlighted below: (1) To identify potential AtSPL14 target genes, we identified a consensus DNA binding site for the AtSPL14 SBP DNA-binding domain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential selection (SELEX) and site-directed mutagenesis (Liang et al., 2008). This consensus binding site was used to analyze Affymetrix microarray gene expression data obtained from wild-type and fbr6 mutant plants to find possible AtSPL14-regulated genes. These candidate AtSPL14-regulated genes are providing new information on the molecular mechanisms linking plant PCD and plant development through modulation of the 26S proteasome. (2) Transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged versions of AtSPL14 are being used to confirm the AtSPL14 targets (by ChIP-PCR) and further dissect the molecular interactions (Nazarenus, Liang

  9. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-...

  10. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Idaho National Laboratory Specific Manufacturing Plant Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho ... Li-Ion polymer cells thermal property changes as a function of cycle-life Maleki, Hossein ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion ... of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion ... of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for ...

  14. MATERIAL AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT LEADING TO ECONOMICAL HIGH-PERFORMANCE THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jie Guan; Atul Verma; Nguyen Minh

    2003-04-01

    This document summarizes the technical progress from September 2002 to March 2003 for the program, Material and Process Development Leading to Economical High-Performance Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, contract number DE-AC26-00NT40711. The causes have been identified for the unstable open circuit voltage (OCV) and low performance exhibited by the anode-supported lanthanum gallate based cells from the earlier development. Promising results have been obtained in the area of synthesis of electrolyte and cathode powders, which showed excellent sintering and densification at low temperatures. The fabrication of cells using tapecalendering process for anode-supported thin lanthanum gallate electrolyte cells and their performance optimization is in progress.

  15. RD&D Cooperation for the Development of Fuel Cell, Hybrid and Electric Vehicles within the International Energy Agency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telias, G.; Day, K.; Dietrich, P.

    2011-01-01

    Annex XIII on 'Fuel Cell Vehicles' of the Implementing Agreement Hybrid and Electric Vehicles of the International Energy Agency has been operating since 2006, complementing the ongoing activities on battery and hybrid electric vehicles within this group. This paper provides an overview of the Annex XIII final report for 2010, compiling an up-to-date, neutral, and comprehensive assessment of current trends in fuel cell vehicle technology and related policy. The technological description includes trends in system configuration as well as a review of the most relevant components including the fuel cell stack, batteries, and hydrogen storage. Results from fuel cell vehicle demonstration projects around the world and an overview of the successful implementation of fuel cells in specific transport niche markets will also be discussed. The final section of this report provides a detailed description of national research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts worldwide.

  16. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500Wh/L

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 – October 1, 2009

  19. Development and Validation of a Two-phase, Three-dimensional Model for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 – October 1, 2009

  20. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

  1. Improving the Performance of Lithium Ion Batteries at Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trung H. Nguyen; Peter Marren; Kevin Gering

    2007-04-20

    The ability for Li-ion batteries to operate at low temperatures is extremely critical for the development of energy storage for electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Currently, Li-ion cells have limited success in operating at temperature below –10 deg C. Electrolyte conductivity at low temperature is not the main cause of the poor performance of Li-ion cells. Rather the formation of a tight interfacial film between the electrolyte and the electrodes has often been an issue that resulted in a progressive capacity fading and limited discharge rate capability. The objective of our Phase I work is to develop novel electrolytes that can form low interfacial resistance solid electrolyte interface (SEI) films on carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes. From the results of our Phase I work, we found that the interfacial impedance of Fluoro Ethylene Carbonate (FEC) electrolyte at the low temperature of –20degC is astonishingly low, compared to the baseline 1.2M LiPFEMC:EC:PC:DMC (10:20:10:60) electrolyte. We found that electrolyte formulations with fluorinated carbonate co-solvent have excellent film forming properties and better de-solvation characteristics to decrease the interfacial SEI film resistance and facilitate the Li-ion diffusion across the SEI film. The very overwhelming low interfacial impedance for FEC electrolytes will translate into Li-ion cells with much higher power for cold cranking and high Regen/charge at the low temperature. Further, since the SEI film resistance is low, Li interaction kinetics into the electrode will remain very fast and thus Li plating during Regen/charge period be will less likely to happen.

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.2 - 1 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery Delivery is an essential component of any future hydrogen infrastructure. It encompasses those processes needed to transport hydrogen from a central or semi-central production facility to the final point of use and those required to load the energy carrier directly onto a given fuel cell system. Successful commercialization of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell systems, including those used in vehicles,

  3. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 4.0 Systems Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANALYSIS SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 4.0 - 1 4.0 Systems Analysis The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (The Office) conducts a coordinated, comprehensive effort in modeling and analysis to clarify where hydrogen and fuel cells can be most effective from an economic, environmental, and energy security standpoint, as well as to guide RD&D priorities and set program goals. These activities support the Office's decision-making process by evaluating

  4. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.8 Education and Outreach

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education and Outreach Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.8 - 1 3.8 Education and Outreach Expanding the role of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as an integral part of the Nation's energy portfolio requires sustained education and outreach efforts. Increased efforts are required to facilitate near-term demonstration projects and early market fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure installations, to increase public awareness and understanding, and to lower barriers

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 6.0 Program Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 6 - 1 6.0 Program Management and Operations The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) is composed of activities within the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); Fossil Energy (FE); Nuclear Energy (NE); and Science (SC). EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCT Program) represents the major component of this effort. The FCT Program Manager manages the

  6. Boosting Accuracy of Testing Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has developed a more precise technology for measuring efficiency of concentrating solar cells, enabling the industry to advance. Solar researchers have long been unable to reduce an error that occurs during efficiency measurements of triple-absorber, concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cells- one that is caused by too much spectral irradiance from unfiltered, pulsed xenon solar simulators entering into the bottom subcell during testing. This condition causes an artificial increase in the measured

  7. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  8. Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

  9. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  10. Development of inexpensive metal macrocyclic complexes for use in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.; Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; Hamdan, M.

    1998-01-01

    Several metal macrocyclic complexes were synthesized for use as catalysts in fuel cells. An initial evaluation of their ability to catalyze the fuel cell reactions were completed. Based on this initial evaluation, one metal macrocyclic catalyst was selected and long-term stability testing in a fuel cell was initiated. The fuel cell employing this catalyst was operated continuously for one year with little signs of catalyst degradation. The effect of synthetic reformates on the performance of the catalyst in the fuel cell environment also demonstrated high tolerance of this catalyst for common contaminants and poisons.

  11. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Y.; Tsusu, K.; Minami, K.; Nakanishi, Y.

    2014-06-15

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  12. Development of remote crane system for use inside small argon hot-cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yu, Seung-Nam; Kim, Kiho; Cho, Ilje

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a novel crane system for the use in a small argon hot-cell where only a pair of master-slave manipulators (MSM) is available for the remote maintenance of the crane. To increase the remote maintainability in the space-limited environment, we devised a remote actuation mechanism in which electrical parts consisting of a servo-motor, a position sensor, and two limit switches located inside the workspace of the MSM transmit power to the mechanical parts located in the ceiling. Even though the design concept does not provide thoroughly sufficient solution because the mechanical parts are placed out of the MSM's workspace, the durability of mechanical parts can be easily increased if they have a high safety margin. Therefore, the concept may be one of the best solutions for our special crane system. In addition, we developed a servo-control system based on absolute positioning technology; therefore, it is possible for us to perform the given tasks more safely through an automatic operation. (authors)

  13. Development of a tester for evaluation of prototype thermal cells and batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    A tester was developed to evaluate prototype thermal cells and batteries--especially high-voltage units--under a wide range of constant-current and constant-resistance discharge conditions. Programming of the steady-state and pulsing conditions was by software control or by hardware control via an external pulse generator. The tester was assembled from primarily Hewlett-Packard (H-P) instrumentation and was operated under H-P`s Rocky Mountain Basic (RMB). Constant-current electronic loads rated up to 4 kW (400 V at up to 100 A) were successfully used with the setup. For testing under constant-resistance conditions, power metal-oxide field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) controlled by a programmable pulse generator were used to switch between steady-state and pulse loads. The pulses were digitized at up to a 50 kHz rate (20 {mu} s/pt) using high-speed DVMs; steady-state voltages were monitored with standard DVMs. This paper describes several of the test configurations used and discusses the limitations of each. Representative data are presented for a number of the test conditions.

  14. Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

  15. Development of planar geometry solid oxide fuel cell technology. Phase II-C. Final report, May 1991-April 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandkar, A.; Elangovan, S.; Hartvigsen, J.; Prouse, D.; Milliken, C.

    1992-08-01

    The report describes the progress made in planar solid oxide fuel cell stack technology. The work builds on the technology developed in the earlier phases where the feasibility of low cost ceramics fabrication technology to fabricate stacks was established. The effort focused on three technology areas: qualification of the advanced interconnection material in stack tests, stack performance diagnostics, and manifold design and seal development. Long term testing of single cells and stacks were conducted. Additionally, progress was made in electrode optimization. This resulted in demonstration of high fuel utilization (80%) in single cells. A rigorous quality improvement approach was undertaken in all aspects of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development in recognition of the need to scale up technology for the eventual commercial manufacture of SOFC stacks and systems. Manufacturing tolerances were studied and, via a statistical design of experiments approach, methods defined to improve tolerances and process yields. Finally, as a result of the stack and module engineering design activity, advancements have been made to seal and module manifold development. Seal tests conducted on new manifold concepts have shown a 100 fold decrease in reactant gas leak rates at temperature, pointing to the possibility of developing high efficiency planar SOFC stacks.

  16. Development of Highly-Efficient GaInP/Si Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essig, Stephanie; Geisz, John F.; Steiner, Myles A.; Merkle, Agnes; Peibst, Robby; Schmidt, Jan; Brendel, Rolf; Ward, Scott; Friedman, Daniel J.; Stradins, Paul; Young, David L.

    2015-06-14

    Dual-junction solar cells consisting of rear-heterojunction GaInP top cells and back-junction, back-contacted crystalline Si bottom cells were fabricated and characterized. Our calculations show that theoretical efficiencies up to 38.9% can be achieved with Si-based tandem devices. In our experiments, the two subcells were fabricated separately and stacked with an index matching fluid. In contrast to conventional mechanically stacked solar cells, that contain two metal grids at the interface, our concept includes a fully back contacted bottom cell which reduces the shadow losses in the device. A 1-sun AM1.5g cumulative efficiency of (26.2 +/- 0.6)% has been achieved with this novel GaInP/Si 4-terminal tandem solar cell.

  17. Development of a 2.0 eV AlGaInP Solar Cell Grown by OMVPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Dippo, Pat; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2015-06-14

    AlGaInP solar cells with a bandgap (Eg) of ~2.0 eV are developed for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This material system is of great interest for both space and concentrator photovoltaics due to its high bandgap, which enables the development of high-efficiency five-junction and six-junction devices and is also useful for solar cells operated at elevated temperatures. In this work, we explore the conditions for the Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. A ~2.0 eV AlGaInP solar cell is demonstrated with an open circuit voltage (VOC) of 1.59V, a bandgap-voltage offset (WOC) of 420mV, a fill factor (FF) of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. These AlGaInP cells have attained a similar FF, WOC and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) to the best upright GaInP cells grown in our lab to date.

  18. DOE's Hydrogen Fuel Cell Activities: Developing Technology and Validating it through Real-World Evaluation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-05-12

    Presentation prepared for the May 12, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Conference that describes DOE's current hydrogen fuel cell technology validation projects.

  19. NREL Develops ZnSiP2 for Silicon-Based Tandem Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    Combining an Earth-abundant chalcopyrite with a silicon layer could significantly boost conversion efficiency above that of single-junction silicon solar cells.

  20. Development of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cell Using Inkjet Printed Silicon and Other Inkjet Processes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2012-04-01

    The cost of silicon photovoltaics (Si-PV) can be greatly lowered by developing thin-film crystalline Si solar cells on glass or an equally lower cost substrate. Typically, Si film is deposited by thermal evaporation, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering. NREL and Silexos have worked under a CRADA to develop technology to make very low cost solar cells using liquid organic precursors. Typically, cyclopentasilane (CPS) is deposited on a glass substrate and then converted into an a-Si film by UV polymerization followed by low-temperature optical process that crystallizes the amorphous layer. This technique promises to be a very low cost approach for making a Si film.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 5.0 Systems Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INTEGRATION SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 5.0 - 1 5.0 Systems Integration The Systems Integration function of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) provides independent, strategic, systems-level expertise and processes to enable system-level planning, data-driven decision-making, effective portfolio management, and program integration. System Integration ensures that system-level targets are developed, verified, and met and that the

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration (MYRDD) Plan - Section 1.0: Introduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Introduction Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 1 - 1 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 1 - 1 1.0 Introduction The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's or the Department's) hydrogen and fuel cell efforts are part of a broad portfolio of activities to build a competitive and sustainable clean energy economy to secure the nation's energy future. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050 1 and eliminating dependence on imported fuel

  3. US Advanced Battery Consortium Reissues Request for Proposal Information to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop Improved Thermal Management Systems for Li-Ion Batteries for Vehicles | Department of Energy US Advanced Battery Consortium Reissues Request for Proposal Information to Develop Improved Thermal Management Systems for Li-Ion Batteries for Vehicles US Advanced Battery Consortium Reissues Request for Proposal Information to Develop Improved Thermal Management Systems for Li-Ion Batteries for Vehicles July 7, 2016 - 2:39pm Addthis The U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), which

  4. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  5. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  6. Development of low cost contacts to silicon solar cells. Final report, 15 October 1978-30 April 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, D.P.; Iles, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of work done on the development of a copper based contact system for silicon solar cells is presented. The work has proceeded in three phases: (1) Development of a copper based contact system using plated Pd-Cr-Cu. Good cells were made but cells degraded under low temperature (300/sup 0/C) heat treatments. (2) The degradation in Phase I was identified as copper migration into the cells junction region. A paper study was conducted to find a proper barrier to the copper migration problem. Nickel was identified as the best candidate barrier and this was verified in a heat treatment study using evaporated metal layers. (3) An electroless nickel solution was substituted for the electroless chrominum solution in the original process. Efforts were made to replace the palladium bath with an appropriate nickel layer, but these were unsuccessful. 150 cells using the Pd-Ni-Cu contact system were delivered to JPL. Also a cost study was made on the plating process to assess the chance of reaching 5 cents/watt.

  7. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  8. Development and optimization of planar-geometry solid-oxide fuel cells. Annual report, December 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timper, M.; Parrish, M.; Milliken, C.; Elangovan, S.; Khandkar, A.

    1992-02-01

    The main focus of the work is to develop solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes that operate in the 600-800 C range. The first phase of the work focused on the development of composite Bi2O3-ZrO2 electrolytes which showed the promise of high conductivity and stability towards fuel. Kinetic stabilization of Bi2O3 compositions which resist phase transformation was also demonstrated. Work on two layer composite electrolytes with a thin ZrO2 protective layer was continued. Initial sputter coating trials on CeO2 electrolytes exhibited thin cracks in the ZrO2 layer due to mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients. Development of an EVD process for coating of a thin layer appears to be a viable technique. Single cell tests using uncoated CeO2 electrolytes using tubular cells showed a performance of about 100mA/sq cm at 0.4 V at approximately 800 C while the performance of planar cells is about 250mA/sq cm at 0.4 V. The main challenge is to fabricate composite electrolytes without causing either delamination or microcracking. Vacuum sputter deposition was chosen as the first process and alternate techniques such as EVD and plasma spraying are also being considered. The transport properties are then evaluated and electrodes are optimized for testing and evaluation as SOFCs.

  9. Self-Assembled, Nanostructured Carbon for Energy Storage and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2011 Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries Synthesis and Characterization of Structured Si-Carbon Nanocomposite Anodes and Functional Polymer Binders

  10. EERE Success Story—Solar Junction Develops World Record Setting Concentrated Photovoltaic Solar Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE supported the development of Solar Junction's concentrated photovoltaic technology that set a world record for conversion efficiency.

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.3 Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.3 - 1 3.3 Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies that can provide energy for an array of applications, including stationary power, portable power, and transportation. Also, hydrogen can be used as a medium to store energy created by intermittent renewable power sources (e.g., wind and solar) during periods of high availability and low demand,

  12. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.3 Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STORAGE SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.3 - 1 3.3 Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies that can provide energy for an array of applications, including stationary power, portable power, and transportation. Also, hydrogen can be used as a medium to store energy created by intermittent renewable power sources (e.g., wind and solar) during periods of high availability and low

  13. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.9 Market Transformation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MARKET TRANSFORMATION SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.9 - 1 3.9 Market Transformation The Market Transformation sub-program is conducting activities to help implement and promote commercial and pre-commercial hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real world operating environments. These activities also provide feedback to research programs, U.S. industry manufacturers, and potential technology users. Currently, the capital and installation costs of early

  14. Making Fuel Cells Cleaner, Better, and Cheaper(Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    helps reduce contaminants in fuel cells, enabling the industry to cut costs and commercialize state-of-the-art technologies. As fuel cell systems become more commercially com- petitive, and as automo- tive fuel cell research and development trend toward decreased catalyst loadings and thinner membranes, fuel cell operation becomes even more susceptible to contaminants. Therefore, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners have performed research on contaminants derived from

  15. Materials and process development for the monolithic interconnected module (MIM) InGaAs/InP TPV cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatemi, N.S.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Weizer, V.G.; Wilt, D.M.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.

    1997-06-01

    Four major components of a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system are a heat source, a graybody or a selective emitter, spectrum shaping elements such as filters, and photovoltaic (PV) cells. One approach to achieving a high voltage/low current configuration is to fabricate a device, where small area PV cells are monolithically series connected. The authors have termed this device a monolithic interconnected module (MIM). A MIM device has other advantages over conventional one-junction cells, such as simplified array interconnections and heat-sinking, and radiation recycling capability via a back surface reflector (BSR). The authors confine the contents of this article to the MIM materials, process development, and some optical results. The successful fabrication of InGaAs/InP MIM devices entails the development and optimization of several key components and processes. These include: isolation trench via geometry, selective chemical etching, contact and interconnect metallization, dielectric isolation barrier, back surface reflector (BSR), and anti-reflection (AR) coating. The selection, development, and testing of the materials and processes described above for MIM fabrication will be described.

  16. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

    2002-12-31

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

  17. Analysis of Factors Controlling Cell Cycle that Can Be Synchronized Nondestructively During Root Cap Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Hawes

    2011-02-04

    Publications and presentations during the final funding period, including progress in defining the substrate specificity, the primary goal of the project, are listed below. Both short-term and long-term responses mediated by PsUGT1 have been characterized in transgenic or mutant pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis with altered expression of PsUGT1. Additional progress includes evaluation of the relationship between control of the cell cycle by PsUGT1 and other glycosyltransferase and glycosidase enzymes that are co-regulated in the legume root cap during the onset of mitosis and differentiation. Transcriptional profiling and multidimensional protein identification technology ('MudPIT') have been used to establish the broader molecular context for the mechanism by which PsUGT1 controls cell cycle in response to environmental signals. A collaborative study with the Norwegian Forest Research Institute (who provided $10,000.00 in supplies and travel funds for collaborator Dr. Toril Eldhuset to travel to Arizona and Dr. H. H. Woo to travel to Norway) made it possible to establish that the inducible root cap system for studying carbohydrate synthesis and solubilization is expressed in gymnosperm as well as angiosperm species. This discovery provides an important tool to amplify the potential applications of the research in defining conserved cell cycle machinery across a very broad range of plant species and habitats. The final work, published during 2009, revealed an additional surprising parallel with mammalian immune responses: The cells whose production is controlled by PsUGT1 appear to function in a manner which is analogous to that of white blood cells, by trapping and killing in an extracellular manner. This may explain why mutation within the coding region of PsUGT1 and its homolog in humans (UGT1) is lethal to plants and animals. The work has been the subject of invited reviews. A postdoctoral fellow, eight undergraduate students, four M.S. students and three Ph

  18. Research and Development of Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications: Initial Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This report addresses Task 1.1, model development and application, and Task 1.2, vehicle mission definition. Overall intent is to produce a methanol-fueled 10-kW power source, and to evaluate electrochemical engine (ECE) use in transportation. Major achievements include development of an ECE power source model and its integration into a comprehensive power source/electric vehicle propulsion model, establishment of candidate FCV (fuel cell powered electric vehicle) mission requirements, initial FCV studies, and a candidate FCV recommendation for further study.

  19. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy 17_johnson_2011_p.pdf (651.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells

  20. Development of high-bandgap AlGaInP solar cells grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2016-03-29

    AlGaInP solar cells with bandgaps between 1.9 and 2.2 eV are investigated for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This quaternary alloy is of great importance to the development of III-V solar cells with five or more junctions and for cells optimized for operation at elevated temperatures because of the high bandgaps required in these designs. In this work, we explore the conditions for the organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. Initial efforts focused on developing ~2.0-eV AlGaInP solar cells with a nominal aluminum composition of 12%. Under the direct spectrum at 1000more » W/m2 (AM1.5D), the best of these samples had an open-circuit voltage of 1.59 V, a bandgap-voltage offset of 440 mV, a fill factor of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. We then varied the aluminum composition of the alloy from 0% to 24% and were able to tune the bandgap of the AlGaInP layers from ~1.9 to ~2.2 eV. Furthermore, while the samples with a higher aluminum composition exhibited a reduced quantum efficiency and increased bandgap-voltage offset, the bandgap-voltage offset remained at 500 mV or less, up to a bandgap of ~2.1 eV.« less

  1. Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B.D.; Baum, G.N.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    This report determines cost and performance requirements for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles carrying pure H{sub 2} fuel, to achieve parity with internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. A conceptual design of a near term FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) is presented. Complete power system weight and cost breakdowns are presented for baseline design. Near term FCEV power system weight is 6% higher than ICE system, mid-term FCEV projected weights are 29% lower than ICE`s. There are no inherently high-cost components in FCE, and at automotive production volumes, near term FCEV cost viability is closer at hand than at first thought. PEM current vs voltage performance is presented for leading PEM manufacturers and researchers. 5 current and proposed onboard hydrogen storage techniques are critically compared: pressurized gas, cryogenic liquid, combined pressurized/cryogenic, rechargeable hydride, adsorption. Battery, capacitor, and motor/controller performance is summarized. Fuel cell power system component weight and cost densities (threshold and goal) are tabulated.

  2. EA-0510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator Development Project (METC), Churchill, Pennsylvania

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to enter into a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the development of high-temperature solid oxide...

  3. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haryadi, Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E.

    2015-12-29

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm{sup −1} and 3300 cm{sup −1} respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10{sup −2} S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  4. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX reg sign ) molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  5. Development and Demonstration of a New Generation High Efficiency 10kW Stationary Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Thomas Russell

    2013-04-30

    The overall project objective is to develop and demonstrate a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell combined heat and power (PEMFC CHP) system that provides the foundation for commercial, mass produced units which achieve over 40% electrical efficiency (fuel to electric conversion) from 50-100% load, greater than 70% overall efficiency (fuel to electric energy + usable waste heat energy conversion), have the potential to achieve 40,000 hours durability on all major process components, and can be produced in high volumes at under $400/kW (revised to $750/kW per 2011 DOE estimates) capital cost.

  6. Development of 50 kW Fuel Processor for Stationary Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Stevens; Balaji Krishnamurthy; Paolina Atanassova; Kerry Spilker

    2007-08-29

    The objective of the project was to develop and test a fuel processor capable of producing high hydrogen concentration (>98%) with less than ppm quantities of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at lower capital cost and higher efficiency, compared to conventional natural gas reformers. It was intended that we achieve our objective by developing simple reactor/process design, and high durability CO2 absorbents, to replace pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or membrane separators. Cost analysis indicated that we would not meet DOE cost goals so the project was terminated before construction of the full scale fuel processor. The work on adsorbent development was focused on the development of calcium oxide-based reversible CO2 absorbents with various microstructures and morphologies to determine the optimum microstructure for long-term reversible CO2 absorption. The effect of powder production process variables was systematically studied including: the final target compositions, the reagents from which the final products were derived, the pore forming additives, the processing time and temperature. The sorbent materials were characterized in terms of their performance in the reversible reaction with CO2 and correlation made to their microstructure.

  7. Direct Visualization of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation in Lithium-Ion Batteries with In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Sacci, Robert L; Adamczyk, Leslie A; Alsem, Daan Hein; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Complex, electrochemically driven transport processes form the basis of electrochemical energy storage devices. The direct imaging of electrochemical processes at high spatial resolution and within their native liquid electrolyte would significantly enhance our understanding of device functionality, but has remained elusive. In this work we use a recently developed liquid cell for in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy to obtain insight into the electrolyte decomposition mechanisms and kinetics in lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries by characterizing the dynamics of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and evolution. Here we are able to visualize the detailed structure of the SEI that forms locally at the electrode/electrolyte interface during lithium intercalation into natural graphite from an organic Li-ion battery electrolyte. We quantify the SEI growth kinetics and observe the dynamic self-healing nature of the SEI with changes in cell potential.

  8. Development of 1.25 eV InGaAsN for triple junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LI,N.Y.; SHARPS,P.R.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Development of next generation high efficiency space monolithic multifunction solar cells will involve the development of new materials lattice matched to GaAs. One promising material is 1.05 eV InGaAsN, to be used in a four junction GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge device. The AMO theoretical efficiency of such a device is 38--42%. Development of the 1.05 eV InGaAsN material for photovoltaic applications, however, has been difficult. Low electron mobilities and short minority carrier lifetimes have resulted in short minority carrier diffusion lengths. Increasing the nitrogen incorporation decreases the minority carrier lifetime. The authors are looking at a more modest proposal, developing 1.25 eV InGaAsN for a triple junction GaInP{sub 2}/InGaAsN/Ge device. The AMO theoretical efficiency of this device is 30--34%. Less nitrogen and indium are required to lower the bandgap to 1.25 eV and maintain the lattice matching to GaAs. Hence, development and optimization of the 1.25 eV material for photovoltaic devices should be easier than that for the 1.05 eV material.

  9. High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es113_amine_2011_p.pdf (246.67 KB) More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries

  10. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-30

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  11. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - NREL- and Sandia-Developed HyStEP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Device Receives Far West FLC Award NREL- and Sandia-Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award September 1, 2016 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and industry partners Air Liquide, Boyd Hydrogen, California Air Resources Board, and Toyota were selected as 2016 recipients of a Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Far West Region Award for their outstanding partnership in designing, building, and deploying the Hydrogen Station

  12. Development and characterization of a hydrogen peroxide-resistant cholangiocyte cell line: A novel model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanan, Raynoo; Techasen, Anchalee; Hou, Bo; Jamnongkan, Wassana; Armartmuntree, Napat; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Murata, Mariko

    2015-08-14

    Oxidative stress is a cause of inflammation–related diseases, including cancers. Cholangiocarcinoma is a liver cancer with bile duct epithelial cell phenotypes. Our previous studies in animal and human models indicated that oxidative stress is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma development. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can generate hydroxyl radicals, which damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to cell death. However, some cells can survive by adapting to oxidative stress conditions, and selective clonal expansion of these resistant cells would be involved in oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to establish H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell line from an immortal cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) by chronic treatment with low-concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (25 μM). After 72 days of induction, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell lines (ox-MMNK1-L) were obtained. The ox-MMNK1-L cell line showed H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant properties, increasing the expression of the anti-oxidant genes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), and superoxide dismutase-3 (SOD3) and the enzyme activities of CAT and intracellular SODs. Furthermore, the resistant cells showed increased expression levels of an epigenetics-related gene, DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), when compared to the parental cells. Interestingly, the ox-MMNK1-L cell line had a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than the MMNK1 normal cell line. Moreover, ox-MMNK1-L cells showed pseudopodia formation and the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion (multi-layers) under additional oxidative stress (100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). These findings suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cells can be used as a model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis through molecular changes such as alteration of gene expression and epigenetic changes. - Highlights: • An H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant ox-MMNK1-L cells was established from

  13. Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe sub 2 solar cell modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanbery, B.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large-area CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS)/Cd{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y}S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin-film solar cell modules will enable 15% median efficiencies to be achieved in high-volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x{ge}0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30-year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large-area integrated thin-film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

  14. Development of a Low-Cost, Durable Membrane and Membrane Electrode Assemby for Stationary and Mobile Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel Foure; Gaboury, Scott; Goldbach, Jim; Mountz, David; Yi, Jung

    2008-01-31

    The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. (formerly Atofina, Inc.) to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the Fuel Cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted in using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® (Arkema trade name for PVDF) provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix. In a first phase, Arkema demonstrated the feasibility of the concept with the M31 membrane generation. After MEA optimization, it was shown that the beginning-of-life (BOL) performance of M31 MEAs was essentially on a par with that of PFSA MEAs at 60ºC under fully humidified conditions. On the other hand, long-term durability studies showed a high decay rate of 45µV/h over a 2100 hr. test. Arkema then designed several families of polyelectrolyte candidates, which, in principle, could not undergo the same failure mechanisms. A new membrane candidate was developed: M41. It offered the same generally good mechanical, ex-situ conductivity and gas barrier properties as M31. In addition, ex-situ accelerated testing suggested a several orders of magnitude improvement in chemical stability. M41 based MEAs showed comparable BOL performance with that of PFSA (80ºC, 100% RH). M41 MEAs were further shown to be able to withstand several hours temperature excursions at 120ºC without apparent damage. Accelerated studies were carried out using the DOE and/or US Fuel Cell Council

  15. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel T. Hennessy

    2010-06-15

    Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

  16. Performance of MicroLink Cells Developed Under Navy STTR: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-426

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, K.

    2013-06-01

    Evaluate MicroLink cells as a function of temperature and spectral irradiance following the teams' standard procedures. These measurements will include the standard procedures for evaluating multijunction cells including quantum efficiency measurements and current versus voltage measurements.

  17. Progress Letter Report on Bending Fatigue Test System Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study (Out-of-cell fatigue testing development - Task 2.4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Cox, Thomas S; Baldwin, Charles A; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom

    2013-08-01

    Vibration integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel in transportation remains to be a critical component of US nuclear waste management system. The structural evaluation of package for spent fuel transportation eventually will need to see if the content or spent fuel is in a subcritical condition. However, a system for testing and characterizing such spent fuel is still lacking mainly due to the complication involved with dealing radioactive specimens in a hot cell environment. Apparently, the current state-of-the-art in spent fuel research and development is quite far away from the delivery of reliable mechanical property data for the assessment of spent fuels in the transport package evaluation. Under the sponsorship of US NRC, ORNL has taken the challenge in developing a robust testing system for spent fuel in hot cell. An extensive literature survey was carried out and unique requirements of such testing system were identified. The U-frame setup has come to the top among various designs examined for reverse bending fatigue test of spent fuel rod. The U-frame has many features that deserve mentioned here: Easy to install spent fuel rod in test; Less linkages than in conventional bending test setup such as three-point or four-point bending; Target the failure mode relevant to the fracture of spent fuel rod in transportation by focusing on pure bending; The continuous calibrations and modifications resulted in the third generation (3G) U-frame testing setup. Rigid arms are split along the LBB axis at rod sample ends. For each arm, this results in a large arm body and an end piece. Mating halves of bushings were modified into two V-shaped surfaces on which linear roller bearings (LRB) are embedded. The rod specimen is installed into the test fixture through opening and closing slide end-pieces. The 3G apparently has addressed major issues of setup identified in the previous stage and been proven to be eligible to be further pursued in this project. On the other

  18. A Yolk-Shell Design for Stabilized and Scalable Li-Ion Battery Alloy Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Nian; Wu, Hui; Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Yao, Yan; Wang, Chong M.; Cui, Yi

    2012-05-02

    Silicon is regarded as one of the most promising anode materials for next generation lithium-ion batteries. For use in practical applications, a Si electrode must have high capacity, long cycle life, high efficiency, and the fabrication must be industrially scalable. Here, we design and fabricate a yolk-shell structure to meet all these needs. The fabrication is carried out without special equipment and mostly at room temperature. Commercially available Si nanoparticles are completely sealed inside conformal, thin, self-supporting carbon shells, with rationally designed void space in between the particles and the shell. The well-defined void space allows the Si particles to expand freely without breaking the outer carbon shell, therefore stabilizing the solid-electrolyte interphase on the shell surface. High capacity (?2800 mAh/g at C/10), long cycle life (1000 cycles with 74% capacity retention), and high Coulombic efficiency (99.84%) have been realized in this yolk-shell structured Si electrode.

  19. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  20. Anodic polymerization of vinyl ethylene carbonate in Li-Ion battery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The half-wave potential (E12) for oxidation of VEC is ca. 3.6 V producing a resistive film on the electrode surface. GPC analysis of the film on a gold electrode produced by ...

  1. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es086srinivasan2010p.pdf More...

  2. Studies on the thermal breakdown of common Li-ion battery electrolyte components

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Roth, Emanuel Peter; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2015-08-06

    While much attention is paid to the impact of the active materials on the catastrophic failure of lithium ion batteries, much of the severity of a battery failure is also governed by the electrolytes used, which are typically flammable themselves and can decompose during battery failure. The use of LiPF6 salt can be problematic as well, not only catalyzing electrolyte decomposition, but also providing a mechanism for HF production. This work evaluates the safety performance of the common components ethylene carbonate (EC), diethyl carbonate (DEC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) in the context of the gasses producedmore » during thermal decomposition, looking at both the quantity and composition of the vapor produced. EC and DEC were found to be the largest contributors to gas production, both producing upwards of 1.5 moles of gas/mole of electrolyte. DMC was found to be relatively stable, producing very little gas regardless of the presence of LiPF6. EMC was stable on its own, but the addition of LiPF6 catalyzed decomposition of the solvent. As a result, while gas analysis did not show evidence of significant quantities of any acutely toxic materials, the gasses themselves all contained enough flammable components to potentially ignite in air.« less

  3. Studies on the thermal breakdown of common Li-ion battery electrolyte components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Roth, Emanuel Peter; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2015-08-06

    While much attention is paid to the impact of the active materials on the catastrophic failure of lithium ion batteries, much of the severity of a battery failure is also governed by the electrolytes used, which are typically flammable themselves and can decompose during battery failure. The use of LiPF6 salt can be problematic as well, not only catalyzing electrolyte decomposition, but also providing a mechanism for HF production. This work evaluates the safety performance of the common components ethylene carbonate (EC), diethyl carbonate (DEC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) in the context of the gasses produced during thermal decomposition, looking at both the quantity and composition of the vapor produced. EC and DEC were found to be the largest contributors to gas production, both producing upwards of 1.5 moles of gas/mole of electrolyte. DMC was found to be relatively stable, producing very little gas regardless of the presence of LiPF6. EMC was stable on its own, but the addition of LiPF6 catalyzed decomposition of the solvent. As a result, while gas analysis did not show evidence of significant quantities of any acutely toxic materials, the gasses themselves all contained enough flammable components to potentially ignite in air.

  4. Hard Carbon Materials for High-Capacity Li-ion Battery Anodes | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Harbec: A Fifteen Year Journey to the Beginning Harbec: A Fifteen Year Journey to the Beginning This presentation by HARBEC, Inc. at the 2014 Energy Summit in Niagara Falls, Ontario. discusses the company's progress over 15 years taking advantage of eco-economic opportunities by implementing an ISO 50001 Energy Management System and participating the Superior Energy Performance® (SEP(tm)) program. 15 Year Pursuit of Sustainable Manufacturing, 2014 (2.26 MB) More Documents & Publications

  5. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  6. Probing the failure mechanism of nanoscale LiFePO₄ for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ji-guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2015-05-18

    LiFePO4 is a high power rate cathode material for lithium ion battery and shows remarkable capacity retention, featuring a 91% capacity retention after 3300 cycles. In this work, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the gradual capacity fading mechanism of LiFePO4 materials. We found that upon prolonged electrochemical cycling of the battery, the LiFePO4 cathode shows surface amorphization and loss of oxygen species, which directly contribute to the gradual capacity fading of the battery. The finding is of great importance for the design and improvement of new LiFePO4 cathode for high-energy and high-power rechargeable battery for electric transportation.

  7. Nanoscale Silicon as Anode for Li-ion Batteries: The Fundamentals, Promise, and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; He, Yang; Zheng, Jianming; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-09-24

    Silicon (Si), associated with its natural abundance, low discharge voltage vs. Li/Li+, and extremely high theoretical discharge capacity (~ 4200 mAh g-1,), has been extensively explored as anode for lithium ion battery. One of the key challenges for using Si as anode is the large volume change upon lithiation and delithiation, which causes a fast capacity fading. Over the last few years, dramatic progress has been made for addressing this issue. In this paper, we summarize the progress towards tailoring of Si as anode for lithium ion battery. The paper is organized such that it covers the fundamentals, the promise offered based on nanoscale designing, and the remaining challenges that need to be attacked to allow using of Si based materials as anode for battery.

  8. Anodic polymerization of vinyl ethylene carbonate in Li-Ion battery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chen, Guoying ; Zhuang, Guorong V. ; Richardson, Thomas J. ; Gao, Liu ; Ross Jr., Philip N. Publication Date: 2005-02-28 OSTI Identifier: 861305 Report Number(s): ...

  9. Thermal Stability of LiPF6 Salt and Li-ion Battery Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Yang, Hui ; Zhuang, Guorong V ; Ross, Jr, Philip N Publication Date: 2006-03-08 OSTI Identifier: 898281 Report Number(s): LBNL--58758 Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7753; JPSODZ; ...

  10. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Performance | Department of Energy Investigates operating conditions under which PGM elements get volatilized and transferred onto the downstream SCR catalyst, resulting in loss of NOx reduction performance deer12_chen.pdf (856.01 KB) More Documents & Publications The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst Function Specific Analysis of the Thermal Durability of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR Catalysts Energy

    May 7, 2010 In

  11. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Futures Study | Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010. multi-path_trans_futures.pdf (250.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Support for Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Analysis Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas

  12. Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary Technology for High Energy Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  13. Diagnostic Studies to Improve Abuse Tolerance and Life of Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  14. Role of Surface Structure on Li-ion Energy Storage Capacity of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (FIRST) Sponsoring Org: USDOE SC Office of Basic Energy Sciences (SC-22) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: catalysis (heterogeneous), solar ...

  15. Thermal Stability of LiPF 6 Salt and Li-ion Battery Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In the presence of water (300 ppm) in the carrier gas, its decomposition onset temperature is lowered as a result of direct thermal reaction between LiPF 6 and water vapor to form ...

  16. Thermal Stability of LiPF6 Salt and Li-ion Battery Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 898281 Report Number(s): LBNL--58758 Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7753; JPSODZ; R&D Project: 673502; BnR: VT0301030; TRN: US200703%%412 DOE Contract Number: ...

  17. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  18. Layer cathode methods of manufacturing and materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Sun-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2008-01-01

    A positive electrode active material for lithium-ion rechargeable batteries of general formula Li.sub.1+xNi.sub..alpha.Mn.sub..beta.A.sub..gamma.O.sub.2 and further wherein A is Mg, Zn, Al, Co, Ga, B, Zr, or Ti and 0

  19. Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries for Designing Better Li-Ion Batteries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Lee, K. J.; Santhanagopalan, S.

    2012-02-01

    This presentation describes the current status of the DOE's Energy Storage R and D program, including modeling and design tools and the Computer-Aided Engineering for Automotive Batteries (CAEBAT) program.

  20. Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron Transmission X-ray Microscopies. Abstract not provided. Authors: Sullivan, John P ; Bartelt, Norman C. ; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid ; Fenton, Kyle R 1 ;...

  1. Development of high, stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Annual technical progress report, October 1995--October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, X.; Izu, M.; Jones, S.J.; Kopf, R.

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this amorphous silicon research program is to develop high efficiency a-Si solar cells and to develop and improve processes for large area deposition of a-Si solar cells and modules. The knowledge obtained and technologies demonstrated in this program will be incorporated into ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll deposition process to further enhance its photovoltaic manufacturing technology.

  2. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  3. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  4. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.5 Manufacturing R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.5 - 1 3.5 Manufacturing R&D More than 15,000 fuel cell systems were shipped in 2010 worldwide, 1 representing more than 80 MW of power. As the market for hydrogen and fuel cells grows, the need for development of automation and manufacturing processes for mass production of these systems grows as well. To meet the needs of increasing production volumes in the growing hydrogen and fuel cells industries, the

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.5 Manufacturing R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MANUFACTURING SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.5 - 1 3.5 Manufacturing R&D More than 35,000 fuel cell systems were shipped in 2013 worldwide, 1 representing more than 170 MW of power. As the market for hydrogen and fuel cells grows, the need for the development of automation and manufacturing processes for mass production of these systems grows as well. To meet the needs of increasing production volumes in the growing hydrogen and fuel cells industries,

  6. sustainable development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sustainable development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Hydrogen Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells ...

  7. Interoperability of Materials Database Systems in Support of Nuclear Energy Development and Potential Applications for Fuel Cell Material Selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Lianshan; Austin, Timothy; Ren, Weiju

    2015-01-01

    Materials database interoperability has been of great interest in recent years for information exchange in support of research and development (R&D). In response to data and knowledge sharing needs of the GenIV International Forum (GIF) for global collaboration in nuclear energy R&D, the European Commission JRC Institute for Energy and Transport (JRC-IET) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have established a materials database interoperability project that develops techniques for automated materials data exchange between systems hosted at the two institutes MatDB Online at JRC IET and the Gen IV Materials Handbook at ORNL, respectively. The work to enable automatedmore » exchange of data between the two systems leverages the XML data import and export functionalities of both systems in combination with recently developed standards for engineering materials data. The preliminary results of data communication between the two systems have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of materials database interoperability, which constructs an interoperation framework that can be seamlessly integrated into the high-throughput First Principles material databases and thus advance the discovery of novel materials in fuel cell applications.« less

  8. Interoperability of Materials Database Systems in Support of Nuclear Energy Development and Potential Applications for Fuel Cell Material Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Lianshan; Austin, Timothy; Ren, Weiju

    2015-01-01

    Materials database interoperability has been of great interest in recent years for information exchange in support of research and development (R&D). In response to data and knowledge sharing needs of the GenIV International Forum (GIF) for global collaboration in nuclear energy R&D, the European Commission JRC Institute for Energy and Transport (JRC-IET) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have established a materials database interoperability project that develops techniques for automated materials data exchange between systems hosted at the two institutes MatDB Online at JRC IET and the Gen IV Materials Handbook at ORNL, respectively. The work to enable automated exchange of data between the two systems leverages the XML data import and export functionalities of both systems in combination with recently developed standards for engineering materials data. The preliminary results of data communication between the two systems have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of materials database interoperability, which constructs an interoperation framework that can be seamlessly integrated into the high-throughput First Principles material databases and thus advance the discovery of novel materials in fuel cell applications.

  9. Development of Na/sup +/-dependent hexose transport in cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK/sub 1/)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.R.; Amsler, K.; Dawson, W.D.; Cook, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors were explored to analyze how they interact to yield the increasing transport capacity in differentiating cell populations. These factors include the number of functional transporters in the population, the distribution of these transporters among the individual cells, the Na/sup +/ chemical gradient, the transmembrane potential, the pathways and activities of these pathways for efflux of glucoside, and cell-cell coupling between accumulating and non-accumulating cells. 35 references, 9 figures, 2 tables. (ACR)

  10. NREL Develops ZnSiP2 for Silicon-Based Tandem Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combining an Earth-abundant chalcopyrite with a silicon layer could significantly boost conversion efficiency above that of single-junction silicon solar cells. A current technological challenge in photovoltaics (PV) is to implement a lattice-matched, optically efficient material to be used in conjunction with silicon for tandem PV cells. III-V materials currently hold the world-record conver- sion efficiencies for both single- and multijunction cells. Researchers at the National Renewable

  11. Development of Novel RTP-like Processing for Solar Cell Fabrication using UV-Rich Light Sources: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-11-442

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2013-01-01

    NREL and Mattson Technology are interested in developing new processing techniques for fabrication of solar cells using UV-rich optical processing. UV light has a very high absorption coefficient in most semiconductors, allowing the semiconductor surface to be heated locally and, in some cases, without a significant increase in the substrate temperature. NREL has several projects related to cell processing that currently use an optical furnace (having a spectrum rich in visible and infrared light). Mattson Technology has developed a UV rich light source that can be used in either pulse or continuous modes. The objective of this CRADA is to explore applications in solar cell processing where absorption characteristics of UV light can lead to lower cell cost and/or higher efficiencies.

  12. Development of Ni1-xCoxO as the cathode/interconnect contact for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zigui; Xia, Guanguang; Templeton, Joshua D.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Nie, Zimin; Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-06-01

    A new type of material, Ni1-xCoxO, was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode/interconnect contact applications. The phase structure, coefficient of thermal expansion, sintering behavior, electrical property, and mechanical bonding strength of these materials were evaluated against the requirements of the SOFC cathode/interconnect contact. A dense cathode/interconnect contact layer was developed through reaction sintering from Ni and Co metal powders. An area specific resistance (ASR) as low as 5.5 mohm.cm2 was observed after 1000 h exposure in air at 800 C for the LSM/Ni0.33Co0.67O/AISI441 assembly. Average mechanical strengths of 6.8 and 5.0 MPa were obtained for the cathode/contact/cathode and interconnect/contact/interconnect structures, respectively. The significantly low ASR was probably due to the dense structure and therefore improved electrical conductivity of the Ni0.33Co0.67O contact and the good bonding of the interfaces between the contact and the cathode, and between the contact and the interconnect.

  13. Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wessel, Silvia; Harvey, David

    2013-06-28

    performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: • The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system • The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model • A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model • An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation • The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model • The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model • The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model • Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions • Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves • A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): • Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) • Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release • Stage 2 - Beta

  14. The Development of Structure Activity Relationships for Advance Cell Chemistries within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell power plant technology. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, H. C.; Sanderson, R. A.; Wertheim, R. J.; Farris, P. F.; Mientek, A. P.; Nickols, R. C.; Katz, M.; Iczkowski, R. P.; Fredley, R. R.; Stewart, R. C.; Kunz, H. R.; Gruver, G. A.; Bregoli, L. J.; Smith, S. W.; Steuernagel, W. H.; Szymanski, S. T.

    1980-03-01

    The overall objective of this 29-month program is to develop and verify the design of a prototype molten carbonate fuel cell stack which meets the requirements of 1990's competitive coal-fired electrical utility central station or industrial cogeneration power plants. During the first quarter, effort was initiated in all four major task areas: Task 1 - system studies to define the reference power plant design; Task 2 - cell and stack design, development and verification; Task 3 - preparation for fabrication and testing of the full-scale prototype stack; and Task-4 developing the capability for operation of stacks on coal-derived gas. In the system study task, a study baseline fuel cell system and module configuration were established. Studies to determine user requirements and to characterize the fuel cell power block and coal gasifier subsystems were initiated. Cell stack design was initiated with completion of preliminary design requirements for the cell cathodes. Laboratory tests were also initiated to identify alternative materials for separator plates, reactant manifold seals, and electrolyte tile fillers. A mechanical tape casting technique for producing 18 x 24 inch sheets of electrolyte matrix tape was successfully demonstrated in Task 3. In Task 4, theoretical and experimental studies were initiated to define the effects of known sulfur contaminants on cell performance. A literature survey was initiated to identify other possible contaminants. Planning and design efforts for construction of a mobile cell test unit were initiated. The mobile unit will be used to verify the molten carbonate cell's ability to operate on gasified coal by tests at a gasifier site.

  16. Development of high, stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, X.; Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.`s (ECD) research under this program. ECD researchers explored the deposition of a-Si at high rates using very-high-frequency plasma MHz, and compared these VHF i-layers with radio-frequency (RF) plasma-deposited i-layers. ECD conducted comprehensive research to develop a {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer using VHF deposition process with the objectives of establishing a wider process window for the deposition of high-quality p{sup +} materials and further enhancing their performance of a-Si solar cells by improving its p-layers. ECD optimized the deposition of the intrinsic a-Si layer and the boron-doped {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer to improve the V{sub oc}. Researchers deposited wide-bandgap a-Si films using high hydrogen dilution; investigated the deposition of the ZnO layer (for use in back-reflector) using a sputter deposition process involving metal Zn targets; and obtained a baseline fabrication for single-junction a-Si n-i-p devices with 10.6% initial efficiency and a baseline fabrication for triple-junction a-Si devices with 11.2% initial efficiency. ECD researchers also optimized the deposition parameters for a-SiGe with high Ge content; designed a novel structure for the p-n tunnel junction (recombination layer) in a multiple-junction solar cell; and demonstrated, in n-i-p solar cells, the improved stability of a-Si:H:F materials when deposited using a new fluorine precursor. Researchers investigated the use of c-Si(n{sup +})/a-Si alloy/Pd Schottky barrier device as a tool for the effective evaluation of photovoltaic performance on a-Si alloy materials. Through alterations in the deposition conditions and system hardware, researchers improved their understanding for the deposition of uniform and high-quality a-Si and a-SiGe films over large areas. ECD researchers also performed extensive research to optimize the deposition process of the newly constructed 5-MW back-reflector deposition machine.

  17. Thermal Characterization and Analysis of A123 Systems Battery Cells, Modules and Packs: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-243

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.

    2012-03-01

    In support of the A123 Systems battery development program with USABC/DOE, NREL provided technical support in thermal characterization, analysis and management of batteries. NREL's effort was part of Energy Storage Project funded by DOE Vehicle Technologies Program. The purpose of this work was for NREL to perform thermal characterization and analysis of A123 Systems cells and modules with the aim for Al23 Systems to improve the thermal performance of their battery cells, modules and packs.

  18. Electrochemical Investigation of Al–Li/LixFePO4 Cells in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.J.; Zhou, Y.N.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Yang, X.Q.; Haas, O.

    2011-02-01

    1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight, 500 g mol{sup -1} (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}), was investigated as an electrolyte in experimental Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells. More than 60 cycles were achieved using this electrolyte in a Li-ion cell with an Al-Li alloy as an anode sandwiched between two Li x FePO{sub 4} electrodes (cathodes). Charging efficiencies of 96-100% and energy efficiencies of 86-89% were maintained during 60 cycles at low current densities. A theoretical investigation revealed that the specific energy can be increased up to 15% if conventional LiC{sub 6} anodes are replaced by Al-Li alloy electrodes. The specific energy and the energy density were calculated as a function of the active mass per electrode surface (charge density). The results reveal that for a charge density of 4 mAh cm{sup -2} about 160 mWh g{sup -1} can be reached with Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} batteries. Power limiting diffusion processes are discussed, and the power capability of Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells was experimentally evaluated using conventional electrolytes.

  19. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burningham, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  20. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

    2005-05-01

    This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

  1. Development of low-cost technology for the next generation of high efficiency solar cells composed of earth abundant elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-09-28

    The development of renewable, affordable, and environmentally conscious means of generating energy on a global scale represents a grand challenge of our time. Due to the “permanence” of radiation from the sun, solar energy promises to remain a viable and sustainable power source far into the future. Established single-junction photovoltaic technologies achieve high power conversion efficiencies (pce) near 20% but require complicated manufacturing processes that prohibit the marriage of large-scale throughput (e.g. on the GW scale), profitability, and quality control. Our approach to this problem begins with the synthesis of nanocrystals of semiconductor materials comprising earth abundant elements and characterized by material and optoelectronic properties ideal for photovoltaic applications, namely Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe). Once synthesized, such nanocrystals are formulated into an ink, coated onto substrates, and processed into completed solar cells in such a way that enables scale-up to high throughput, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. This project aimed to address the major limitation to CZTSSe solar cell pce’s – the low open-circuit voltage (Voc) reported throughout literature for devices comprised of this material. Throughout the project significant advancements have been made in fundamental understanding of the CZTSSe material and device limitations associated with this material system. Additionally, notable improvements have been made to our nanocrystal based processing technique to alleviate performance limitations due to the identified device limitations. Notably, (1) significant improvements have been made in reducing intra- and inter-nanoparticle heterogeneity, (2) improvements in device performance have been realized with novel cation substitution in Ge-alloyed CZTGeSSe absorbers, (3) systematic analysis of absorber sintering has been conducted to optimize the selenization process for large grain CZTSSe absorbers, (4) novel electrical

  2. New Multijunction Design Leads to Ultra-Efficient Solar Cell; Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    NREL has demonstrated a 45.7% conversion efficiency for a four-junction solar cell at 234 suns concentration. This achievement represents one of the highest photovoltaic research cell efficiencies ever achieved across all types of solar cells. NREL's new solar cell, which is designed for operation in a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system where it can receive more than 1,000 suns of concentrated sunlight, greatly improves earlier designs by adding an additional high quality absorber layer to achieve an ultra-high efficiency.

  3. The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George A. Marchetti

    1999-12-15

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

  4. Low Cost High Efficiency InP-Based Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-344

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells on 2-inch InP substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 4-inch InP substrates. NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells, including a metamorphic layer, on 2-inch GaAs substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 6-inch GaAs substrates. NREL will perform characterization measurements of the solar cells, including I-V and quantum efficiency measurements at AM1.5 1-sun.

  5. Process Development and Basic Studies of Electrochemically Deposited CdTe-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 15 May 1998 - 17 August 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaydanov, V. I.; Ohno, T. R.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes the long-term research and development issues related to polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Our general research approach is based on combining activities aimed at improvement of cell performance and stability with activities aimed at increasing our fundamental understanding of the properties of materials making up the cells: CdTe, CdS, multi-layer back-contact, and transparent conducting oxide (TCO) front-contact. We emphasize the relation between structural and electronic material properties and various processing procedures, as well as the microscopic mechanisms responsible for the cell performance and its degradation. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of basic issues behind the CdTe/CdS cell performance and stability, such as the nature and electronic properties of impurities and defects that control the majority-carrier concentration, mechanisms of the dopant compensation, recombination centers, their nature and properties, diffusion, electro migration and transformation of defects under various processing, stress, and operating conditions. We believe that better basic understanding of the specific influence of polycrystallinity, especially for fine-grain materials characteristic of CdTe-based cells, is now one of the most important issues we must address. We need to clarify the role of grain boundaries in forming the film electronic properties, as well as those of the p-n junction. It is important to study and understand the influence of the grain boundaries on the spatial distribution and migration of impurities and electrically active defects. To fulfill these tasks, one needs to develop new methods and techniques (or adjust existing ones) for material characterization, as well as develop more sophisticated approaches to data analysis and modeling.

  6. Evaluation of Ion Damage in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00234

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D.

    2013-01-01

    Equipment will be used by Greenville College to enhance a previously established collaboration in the area of radiation hardness of solar cells, using Greenville's unique Ion Accelerator. Equipment will be located at the E. College Avenue site.

  7. EERE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) posted a Notice of Intent (NOI), on behalf of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), for a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)...

  8. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration (MYRDD) Plan - Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Page C - 1 2012 Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality Appendix C - Hydrogen Quality The hydrogen fuel quality specification in Table C.1 below is based on the SAE International Surface Vehicle Standard SAE-2719 - Hydrogen Fuel Quality Guideline for Fuel Cell Vehicles, June 2011. This specification has been harmonized to the extent possible with the draft international standard, ISO/DIS 14687-2, Hydrogen Fuel - Product Specification - Part 2: Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell applications for road

  9. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  10. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SAFETY, CODES AND STANDARDS SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.7 - 1 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards The United States and many other countries have established laws and regulations that require commercial products and infrastructure to meet all applicable codes and standards to demonstrate that they are safe, perform as designed and are compatible with the systems in which they are used. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies have a history of safe use

  11. Development of a sub-scale dynamics model for pressure relaxation of multi-material cells in Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Alan K; Shashkov, Mikhail J; Fung, Jimmy; Canfield, Thomas R; Kamm, James R

    2010-10-14

    We have extended the Sub-Scale Dynamics (SSD) closure model for multi-fluid computational cells. Volume exchange between two materials is based on the interface area and a notional interface translation velocity, which is derived from a linearized Riemann solution. We have extended the model to cells with any number of materials, computing pressure-difference-driven volume and energy exchange as the algebraic sum of pairwise interactions. In multiple dimensions, we rely on interface reconstruction to provide interface areas and orientations, and centroids of material polygons. In order to prevent unphysically large or unmanageably small material volumes, we have used a flux-corrected transport (FCT) approach to limit the pressure-driven part of the volume exchange. We describe the implementation of this model in two dimensions in the FLAG hydrodynamics code. We also report on Lagrangian test calculations, comparing them with others made using a mixed-zone closure model due to Tipton, and with corresponding calculations made with only single-material cells. We find that in some cases, the SSD model more accurately predicts the state of material in mixed cells. By comparing the algebraic forms of both models, we identify similar dependencies on state and dynamical variables, and propose explanations for the apparent higher fidelity of the SSD model.

  12. High Performance Photovoltaic Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-169

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, M.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will provide certified measurements of the conversion efficiency at high concentration for several multijunction solar cells that were fabricated by Cyrium Technologies. In an earlier phase of the CRADA, Cyrium provided epitaxially-grown material and NREL processed the samples into devices and measured the performance.

  13. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    17johnson2011p.pdf (651.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells ...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sacci_2015_UserProjectHighlight_NanoLett...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium dendrite formation is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion and Li-metal batteries. In situ ec-STEM (a liquid cell electron microscopy based characterization method)...

  15. Conference Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium-IonLithium-Oxygen Cells," International Battery Association Meeting, Waikoloa, HI, January 2015. M. K. Y.Chan, "Li-Ion and Li-O2: Exploring Hybrid Electrode...

  16. CX-011307: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/08/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-011306: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Performance and Degradation Modeling of Batteries | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials Development of Si-based High Capacity Anodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Silicon-ba...

  19. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.1 Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.1 - 1 3.1 Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse energy resources, using a variety of process technologies. Energy resource options include fossil, nuclear, and renewables. Examples of process technologies include thermochemical, biological, electrolytic, and photolytic. 3.1.1 Technical Goal and Objectives Goal Research and develop technologies for low-cost, highly efficient hydrogen production from

  20. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.1 Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRODUCTION SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.1 - 1 3.1 Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse energy resources, using a variety of process technologies. Energy resource options include fossil, nuclear, and renewables. Examples of process technologies include thermochemical, biological, electrolytic, and photolytic. 3.1.1 Technical Goal and Objectives Goal Research and develop technologies for low-cost, highly efficient hydrogen production