Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The impact and management of cognitive gap in high performance product development organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close alignment of applied research and development units with manufacturing operational structures can provide excellent opportunities for maintaining robust product pipelines and reducing product development cycle times. Within such an integrated ... Keywords: Adaption, Innovation, O3 (technological change), Organizational development, Problem solving, Product development, Research and development

Kathryn W. Jablokow; David E. Booth

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and modeling the impact of system parameters on levelized cost of electricity .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells which are at the right intersection of cost and performance to… (more)

Kang, Moon Hee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development Impacts of high-speed rail : megalopolis formation and implications for Portugal's Lisbon-Porto High-Speed Rail Link  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-speed rail (HSR) has been gaining acceptance worldwide with development of rail technology and rising concerns over climate change and congestion in airports and on roads. The implementation of high-speed rail lines ...

Melibaeva, Sevara (Sevara Mukhtarovna)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High Performance Networks for High Impact Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface...

6

Final Systems Development Report for the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Development Report represents the third major step in the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mound Nevada. The first of these steps was to forge a Research Design that would serve as a guide for the overall research process. The second step was the construction of the Base Case, the purpose of which was to describe existing conditions in Clark County in the specified analytic areas of Economic-Demographic/Fiscal, Emergency Planning and Management, Transportation and Sociocultural analysis. The base case description will serve as a basis for assessing changes in these topic areas that might result from the Yucca Mountain project. These changes will be assessed by analyzing conditions with and without repository development in the county. Prior to performing such assessments, however, the snapshot type of data found in the base case must be operationalized or systematized to allow for more dynamic data utilization. In other words, a data system that can be used to analyze the consequences of the introduction of different variables (or variable values) in the Clark County context must be constructed. Such a system must be capable of being updated through subsequent data collection and monitoring efforts to both provide a rolling base case and supply information necessary to construct trend analyses. For example, during the Impact Assessment phase of the study process, the without repository analysis is accomplished by analyzing growth for the county given existing conditions and likely trends. These data are then compared to the with Yucca Mountain project conditions anticipated for the county. Similarly, once the emergency planning management and response needs associated with the repository are described, these needs will be juxtaposed against existing (and various future) capacity(ies) in order to determine the nature and magnitude of impacts in this analytic area. Analogous tasks will be performed for the other analytic areas detailed in the Base Case and outlined below.

NONE

1992-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

7

High impact resistant ceramic composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

Derkacy, J.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

High impact resistant ceramic composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of .beta.-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB.sub.2. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800.degree. C. to less than the transition temperature of .beta.-SiC to .alpha.-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material.

Derkacy, James A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

High Impact Business Program (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact Business Program (Illinois) High Impact Business Program (Illinois) High Impact Business Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Illinois Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Sales Tax Incentive Provider Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity The High Impact Business Program provides tax incentives to encourage large-scale economic development. Businesses may qualify for: investment tax credits, a state sales tax exemption on building materials, an exemption from state sales tax on utilities, a state sales tax exemption on purchases of personal property used or consumed in the manufacturing

10

Economic Development Impacts of 20% Wind (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will require enourmous investment in wind farms, manufacturing, and infrastructure. This investment will create substantial economic development impacts on local, regional, and national levels. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 outlines the various economic development impacts from a 20% wind scenario.

Kelly, M.; Tegen, S.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/39/39/42122112.pdf Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Screenshot References: Modelling Ag Policy[1] Overview "The role of agricultural policies in addressing the development needs of poorer countries is high on the political agenda, for both structural reasons and as a result of recent market developments. In the first place,

13

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three categories: Project Development and Onsite Labor Impacts Local Revenue and Supply Chain Impacts Induced Impacts JEDI model defaults are based on interviews with industry...

14

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. High-siliocon fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate and prioritize policies across an economy and clearly explain the process

16

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects...

17

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Photovoltaics (PV) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from PV projects. JEDI PV has default...

18

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Coal model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts from coal power generation projects. Applying a...

19

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from...

20

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high-impact-assessment-bulletins high-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-215-networkminer-directory-traversal-and-insecure-library-loading-vulnerabilities V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Impact of Seasat-A Scatterometer Data on High-Resolution Analyses and Forecasts: The Development of the QE II Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the impact of Seasat scatterometer winds in numerical weather prediction (NWP) is discussed with the help of the results of some cases studied.

A. C. M. Stoffelen; G. J. Cats

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

23

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the construction phase and for the ongoing operations phase. For the construction phase, the impacts are broken out by project development and on-site labor impacts,...

24

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Models Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version About JEDI Geothermal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Geothermal model allows users...

25

High performance steam development  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now: Project Development and On-site Labor (re-labeled from Direct) Turbine and Supply Chain Impacts (re-labeled from Indirect) Induced Impacts Impacts during the operating...

27

high impact Designing a human-powered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the local mill and pay to have it ground into flour, or grind it themselves by hand with a mortar and pestleLow tech, high impact Designing a human-powered grain mill for Africa Ten-year-old Solomoni Mafuta) to a diesel-pow- ered mill to be ground. The time-consuming task has pulled him away from his studies

Endres. William J.

28

High Activity Crud Burst Impacts and Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several PWRs have experienced particulate crud bursts during outages, which have a negative impact on outage proficiency. Consequences of these crud releases include increased reactor coolant cleanup time, elevated shutdown dose rates, elevated smearable activity levels in low flow regions, increased wear of eddy current probes, releases of activity during steam generator inspections, and increases in personnel contamination risks. This report presents the PWR High Activity Crud Template for utilities to...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Title Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties...

30

High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

Brownell, J.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Environmental impacts of increased hydroelectric development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27 iii 3 . 2 . 7 Energy Security Benefits . . . . . . . 3 . 3 IMPACTS OF GENERATION USING FOSSIL FUELS . . . 3 . 3 . 1 Water Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . 3 . 2 Air Quality...

33

Impacts of Marcellus Shale Development on Municipal Governments in Susquehanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Marcellus Shale Development on Municipal Governments in Susquehanna and Washington Marcellus shale gas development. The study focused on how gas development is affecting the demand (1) their already extensive shale activity; (2) their divergent geographical, cultural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

34

Analysis of the potential impacts of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to analyze the considerations regarding the environmental impacts of shale gas development by a rational, objective, fact-based assessment. Flowback… (more)

Yi, Hyukjoong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

Goff, S.; Goff, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering...

37

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Models The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) biofuel models include JEDI Dry Mill Corn Ethanol, JEDI Lignocellulosic Ethanol, and JEDI Biopower. These JEDI...

38

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze...

39

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development < LEDSGP‎ | analysis/impacts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate

40

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Jobs and Economic Development Impact  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet Thumbnail of the JEDI fact sheet. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Potential impact of high temperature superconductors on maglev transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the potential impact that high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) may have on transportation by magnetically levitated vehicles. It is not intended as a planning document, but rather as an overview of potential HTS applications to magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation. The present maglev program in the United States is summarized, and the present status of development of HTSs is described. Areas identified for possible impact on maglev technology are (1) liquid-nitrogen-cooled levitation magnets, (2) magnetic-field shielding of the passenger compartment, (3) superconducting magnetic energy storage for wayside power, (4) superconducting bearings for flywheel energy storage for wayside power, (5) downleads to continuously powered liquid-helium-cooled levitation magnets, and (6) liquid-hydrogen-cooled levitation magnets and linear motor propulsion windings. Major technical issues that remain to be resolved for the use of HTSs in maglev applications include thermal magnetic stability, mechanical properties, and critical current density at liquid-nitrogen temperatures.

Hull, J.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

High Impact Performance Incentive Grant (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Performance Incentive Grant (Florida) Impact Performance Incentive Grant (Florida) High Impact Performance Incentive Grant (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Grant Program Provider Enterprise Florida The High Impact Performance Incentive Grant (HIPI) is a negotiated grant used to attract and grow major high impact facilities in Florida. Grants are provided to pre-approved applicants in certain high-impact sectors such as clean energy. Projects must create at least 50 new full-time jobs in a three-year period, and make a cumulative investment in the state of at least $50 million in a three year period. The business can be granted 50%

43

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Malheur County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Malheur County, shown in Figure 1. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Malheur County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued responding as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. Public service impacts include costs such as education, fire protection, roads, waste disposal, and water supply. The project assumption discussion notes experiences at other geothermal areas. The background section compares geothermal with conventional power plants. Power plant fuel distinguishes geothermal from other power sources. Other aspects of development are similar to small scale conventional thermal sources. The process of geothermal development is then explained. Development consists of well drilling, gathering system construction, power plant construction, plant operation and maintenance, and wellfield maintenance.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Jump to: navigation, search Site head analysis jedi.jpg Overview Originally developed in 2002 for the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America project, the Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model was designed to be an easy-to-use, excel based calculator which uses IMPLAN's economic multipliers to estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. It comes as a separate model for wind, PV, natural gas, CSP, coal, and biofuels. Job's, earnings, and impact are outputs. Inputs are construction costs, equipment costs, O&M costs, financing parameters and any other costs associated with the project. With its success in

45

General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Implementation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: General Renewable Energy-Productive Uses and Development Impact[1] Resources Productive Uses Productive Uses of Energy for Rural Development, R. Anil Cabraal, Douglas F. Barnes, and Sachin G. Agarwal, Annual Rev. Environ. Resour. 2005. 30:117-44. Millennium Development Goals: Status 2004, United Nations Energy and Gender Bioenergy-Based Productive Use Platforms for Rural Economic

46

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Deschutes County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be Deschutes County. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Deschutes County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economical impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result for the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Harney County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Harney Count. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Harney County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Development Impacts Assessment Tools help country, regional, and local policymakers find tools and online resources to assess the impacts of low-emission development strategies (LEDS). These tools equip decision makers with information to explore policy options and build consensus with stakeholders to acheive low-emission development. LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit Pages in category "LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits" The following 65 pages are in this category, out of 65 total.

49

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

50

Simon Thoma Implementation and Impact of the Millennium Development Goals on Development Policies in Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Pakistan Implementation and Impact of the Millennium Development Goals on Development Policies in Pakistan are asked to make special efforts to move towards the Goals. Pakistan as a developing country faces many in Pakistan. The first research hypothesis states that the Goals do not have a direct impact on development

Richner, Heinz

51

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Development of Impact-Oriented Climate Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appropriate scenarios of future climate must be developed prior to any assessment of the impacts of climate change. Information needed was examined in consultation with those having experience in scenario use. Most assessors require regional ...

P. J. Robinson; P. L. Finkelstein

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Power Development's Economic Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power Development's Economic Impact on Rural Communities June 12, 2013 Audio with Jason Brown, Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank Economist (MP3 2.5 MB). Download Windows Media...

54

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Whatcom County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Whatcom County, Washington, near Mt. Baker, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Whatcom County was chosen due to both identified geotherrnal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Whatcom County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Skamania County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Skamania County, Washington, near Mt. Adams, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Skamania County was chosen due to both identified geothermal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Skamania County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sales Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Business Designated High Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Business Designated High Impact Sales Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Business Designated High Impact Business Sales Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Business Designated High Impact Business < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 07/01/2009 State Illinois Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption of Retailers' Occupation Tax for building materials incorporated into the facility Provider Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity A business establishing a new wind power facility in Illinois that will not be located in an Enterprise Zone* may be eligible for designation as a "High Impact Business." After receiving the designation, the facility is entitled to a full exemption of the state sales tax (6.25%) and any

57

Impact of Urban Effects on Precipitation in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This numerical study examines the impact of urban growth and release of aerosols, moisture, and heat on precipitation for Fairbanks, Alaska, a remote city at high latitude. The remote location allows atmospheric changes to be attributed to the ...

Nicole Mölders; Mark A. Olson

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Force criterion prediction of damage for carbon/epoxy composite panels impacted by high velocity ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H, Kedward, K. T. Modeling Hail Ice Impacts and PredictingInvestigation of High Velocity Ice Impacts on Woven Carbon/Analysis Correlation of Hail Ice Impacting Composite

Rhymer, Jennifer D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Factors that Impact Implementing a System Development Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿This paper presents the findings of empirical research from 61 companies, mostly from the United States, to identify the factors that may impact implementation of a system development methodology (SDM). The study uses a survey instrument to ... Keywords: Systems development methodology, analysis and design, project management, life cycle, managers, implementation.

Tom L. Roberts, Jr.; Michael L. Gibson; Kent T. Fields; R. Kelly Rainer, Jr.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Line Model Transmission Line Model The Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts associated with transmission line projects. Applying a similar user interface as other JEDI models, Transmission Line JEDI requires a few additional user inputs such as: Transmission Line Type Line Length Terrain Type Right-of-Way Characteristics. Results are presented in the same manner as those in other JEDI models. This allows the transmission line JEDI model to be used by itself or in conjunction with electricity generation JEDI models. As with all JEDI models, reasonable default values are provided. Individual projects may vary and when possible project specific data should be used to obtain the best estimate of economic development impacts.

62

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties Title Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication...

64

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS November 7, 2012 V-018: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Flash Player. November 5, 2012 V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Performance Insight. November 2, 2012 V-015: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users Bypass the Screen Lock, and Applications Obtain Kernel Address Information Three vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. November 1, 2012 V-014: Cisco Prime Data Center Network Manager JBoss RMI Services Let

65

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS August 9, 2013 V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities The vulnerabilities are reported in versions 1.4.1 and prior August 8, 2013 V-214: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Vulnerabilities The vulnerabilities are reported in versions prior to 23.0. August 5, 2013 V-211: IBM iNotes Multiple Vulnerabilities IBM iNotes has two cross-site scripting vulnerabilities and an ActiveX Integer overflow vulnerability August 2, 2013 V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerabilities Cisco Wide Area Application Services (WAAS) when configured as Central Manager (CM), contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated,

66

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of High Solar Penetration Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection Debra Lew National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nicholas Miller, Kara Clark, Gary Jordan, and Zhi Gao GE Energy Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-49667 December 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection Debra Lew National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nicholas Miller, Kara Clark, Gary Jordan, and Zhi Gao GE Energy Prepared under Task No. SM101610

67

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS June 28, 2013 V-188: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability The vulnerability addresses the possibility of a heap overflow condition June 27, 2013 V-187: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Vulnerabilities These vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting and spoofing attacks, disclose potentially sensitive information, bypass certain security restrictions, and compromise a user's system. June 19, 2013 V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Oracle Java. June 14, 2013 V-178: IBM Data Studio Web Console Java Multiple Vulnerabilities IBM Data Studio Web Console uses the IBM Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and

68

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Model CSP Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from CSP projects. JEDI CSP has default information that can be utilized to run a generic impacts analysis assuming industry averages. Model users are encouraged to enter as much project-specific data as possible. Download the JEDI CSP Model Printable Version JEDI Home About JEDI Biofuels Models Coal Model CSP Model Geothermal Model Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model Natural Gas Model Photovoltaics Model Transmission Line Model Wind Model Download JEDI Methodology Interpreting Results Advanced Users Limitations of JEDI Models Publications Forum Webinars Contact Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback.

69

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

70

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Wind turbine blades wind their way by train through Denver. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20894 Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will lead to benefits to rural landowners and towns, the manufacturing sector, and infrastructure across America.[1] The following provide more information about wind energy and economic development: Resources European Wind Energy Association. Economic Benefits of Wind This page outlines the economic benefits of wind energy in Europe. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (March 2013). Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado. Accessed November 29, 2013. This fact sheet summarizes a recent analysis, commissioned by the Wyoming

71

Environment Impact Evaluation of Coal Development Based on BP Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the Environment impact of coal development, this paper selected evaluation indicators of the Environment impact of coal development according to certain principles and constructed Environment impact model of the coal development ... Keywords: Environment Impact, Coal Development, BP neural network

Kai Guo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

73

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

76

High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

273 273 July 2009 Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential M. Milligan and B. Kirby National Renewable Energy Laboratory R. Gramlich and M. Goggin American Wind Energy Association National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-550-46273 July 2009 Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential M. Milligan and B. Kirby National Renewable Energy Laboratory R. Gramlich and M. Goggin American Wind Energy Association

78

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country priorities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and

79

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Limitations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limitations of JEDI Models Limitations of JEDI Models Results are an estimate, not a precise forecast. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are input-output based models, also appropriately called calculators or screening tools. As such, they share important limitations with all models based on input-output calculation methodologies. For the interested user, the Environmental Protection Agency recently published EPA Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy: A Resource for States1, which discusses and compares different types of models and screening tools for assessing economic impacts and jobs, including JEDI (see Chapter 5, pp. 136-142). The most important limitation to note is that JEDI results are estimates, not precise forecasts, for the following reasons.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

China Refrigerator Information Label: Specification Development and Potential Impact  

SciTech Connect

In the last five years, China's refrigerator market has grown rapidly, and now urban markets are showing signs of saturation, with ownership rates in urban households reaching 92%. Rural markets continue to grow from a much lower base. As a result of this growth, the Chinese government in 2006 decided to revise the refrigerator standards and its associated efficiency grades for the mandatory energy information label. In the Chinese standards process, the efficiency grades for the information label are tied to the minimum standards. Work on the minimum standards revision began in 2006 and continued through the first half of 2007, when the draft standard was completed under the direction of the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS). Development of the information label grades required consideration of stakeholder input, continuity with the previous grade classification, ease of implementation, and potential impacts on the market. In this process, CLASP, with the support of METI/IEEJ, collaborated with CNIS to develop the efficiency grades, providing technical input to the process, comment and advice on particular technical issues, and evaluation of the results. After three months of effort and three drafts of the final grade specifications, this work was completed. In addition, in order to effectively evaluate the impact of the label on China's market, CLASP further provided assistance to CNIS to collect data on both the efficiency distribution and product volume distribution of refrigerators on the market. The new information label thresholds to be implemented in 2008 maintain the approach first adopted in 2005 of establishing efficiency levels relative to the minimum standard, but increased the related required efficiency levels by 20% over those established in 2003 and implemented in 2005. The focus of improvement was on the standard refrigerator/freezer (class 5), which constitutes the bulk of the Chinese market. Indeed, the new requirements to achieve grade 1 on the label are now virtually as stringent as those for US Energy Star-qualified or EU A-grade refrigerators. When the energy information label went into effect in March 2005, refrigerator manufacturers were required to display their declared level of efficiency on the label and report it to the China Energy Label Center (CELC), a newly established unit of CNIS responsible for label program management. Because of the visible nature of the label, it was found, through a METI/IEEJ-supported study, that MEPS non-compliance dropped from 4% to zero after the label became mandatory, and that the percentage of higher-grade refrigerators increased. This suggests that the label itself does have potential for shifting the market to higher-efficiency models (Lin 2007). One challenge, however, of assessing this potential impact is the lack of a comprehensive baseline of market efficiency and a program to evaluate the market impact on a yearly basis. As a result, the impact evaluation in this study draws upon the market transformation experience of the related EU energy information label, for which quantitative assessments of its market impact exist. By assuming a parallel process unfolding in China, it is possible to look at the potential impact of the label to 2020. The results of the analysis demonstrates that a robust market transformation program in China focused on the energy information label could save substantial amounts of electricity by 2020, totaling 16.4 TWh annually by that year, compared to a case in which the efficiency distribution of refrigerators was frozen at the 2007 level. Remarkably, the impact of a successful market transformation program with the label would essentially flatten the consumption of electricity for refrigerator use throughout most of the next decade, despite the expectations of continued growth in total stock by nearly 190 million units. At the end of this period, total consumption begins to rise again, as the least efficient of the units have been mostly removed from the market. Such a level of savings would reduce CO{sub

Fridley, David; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Lin, Jiang; Jianhong, Cheng; Sakamoto, Tomoyuki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet) Title The Impact of Wind Development on...

83

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume I. Economic impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis identifies the economic impacts associated with OTEC development and quantifies them at the national, regional, and industry levels. It focuses on the effects on the United States' economy of the domestic development and utilization of twenty-five and fifty 400 MWe OTEC power plants by the year 2000. The methodology employed was characteristic of economic impact analysis. After conducting a literature review, a likely future OTEC scenario was developed on the basis of technological, siting, and materials requirements parameters. These parameters were used to identify the industries affected by OTEC development; an economic profile was constructed for each of these industries. These profiles established an industrial baseline from which the direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts of OTEC implementation could be estimated. Each stage of this analysis is summarized; and the economic impacts are addressed. The methodology employed in estimating the impacts is described.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

ATW system impact on high-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept which aims at destruction of key long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste (HLW), both fission products and actinides. This focus makes it different from most other transmutation concepts which concentrate primarily on actinide burning. The ATW system uses an accelerator-driven, sub-critical assembly to create an intense thermal neutron environment for radionuclide transmutation. This feature allows rapid transmutation under low-inventory system conditions, which in turn, has a direct impact on the size of chemical separations and materials handling components of the system. Inventories in ATW are factors of eight to thirty times smaller than reactor systems of equivalent thermal power. Chemical separations systems are relatively small in scale and can be optimized to achieve high decontamination factors and minimized waste streams. The low-inventory feature also directly impacts material amounts remaining in the system at its end of life. In addition to its low-inventory operation, the accelerator-driven neutron source features of ATW are key to providing a sufficient level of neutrons to allow transmutation of long-lived fission products.

Arthur, E.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

ATW system impact on high-level waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept which aims at destruction of key long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste (HLW), both fission products and actinides. This focus makes it different from most other transmutation concepts which concentrate primarily on actinide burning. The ATW system uses an accelerator-driven, sub-critical assembly to create an intense thermal neutron environment for radionuclide transmutation. This feature allows rapid transmutation under low-inventory system conditions, which in turn, has a direct impact on the size of chemical separations and materials handling components of the system. Inventories in ATW are factors of eight to thirty times smaller than reactor systems of equivalent thermal power. Chemical separations systems are relatively small in scale and can be optimized to achieve high decontamination factors and minimized waste streams. The low-inventory feature also directly impacts material amounts remaining in the system at its end of life. In addition to its low-inventory operation, the accelerator-driven neutron source features of ATW are key to providing a sufficient level of neutrons to allow transmutation of long-lived fission products.

Arthur, E.D.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Venture Capital, High Technology and Regional Development’  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the role ofventure capital in technological innovation and regional development. Both aggregate data and a unique firm level data base are employed to determine the location of major centres of venture capital, flows of venture capital investments, and patterns of investment syndication or coinvestment among venture capital firms. Three major centres of venture capital arc identified: California (San Francisco-Silicon Valley); New York; and Ncw England (Massachusetts-Connecticut): as well as three minor venture capital centres: Illinois (Chicago); Texas; and Minnesota. Venture capital firms are found to cluster in areas with high concentrations of financial institutions and those with high concentrations of technology-intensive enterprises. Venture capital firms which are based in financial centres are typically export-oriented, while those in technology centres tend to invest in their own region and attract outside venture capital. Venture capital investmcnts flow predominantly toward established high technology areas such as Silicon Valley and Boston-Iioute 128, and venturc investing is also characterized by high degrees of intra-and inter-regional syndication or coinvestment. The venture capital industry displays a high level of agglomeration due to the information intensive nature of the investment process and the importance of venture capital networks in locating investments, mobilizing resources, and establishing business start-ups. The existence of well developed venture capital networks in technology-based regions significantly accelerates the pace of technological innovation and economic development in those regions.

Richard L. Florida; Martin Kenneyt

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DES 10-59; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. National Park Service; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, South Pacific Division; Arizona Game and Fish Department; California Energy Commission; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public Lands Policy Coordination Office; Clark County, Nevada,

88

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

89

Sub-Hourly Impacts of High Solar Penetrations in the Western United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents results of analysis on the sub-hourly impacts of high solar penetrations from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2. Extreme event analysis showed that most large ramps were due to sunrise and sunset events, which have a significant predictability component. Variability in general was much higher in the high-solar versus high-wind scenario. Reserve methodologies that had already been developed for wind were therefore modified to take into account the predictability component of solar variability.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hummon, M.; Hodge, B. M.; Heaney, M.; King, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

China Refrigerator Information Label: Specification Development and Potential Impact  

SciTech Connect

In the last five years, China's refrigerator market has grown rapidly, and now urban markets are showing signs of saturation, with ownership rates in urban households reaching 92%. Rural markets continue to grow from a much lower base. As a result of this growth, the Chinese government in 2006 decided to revise the refrigerator standards and its associated efficiency grades for the mandatory energy information label. In the Chinese standards process, the efficiency grades for the information label are tied to the minimum standards. Work on the minimum standards revision began in 2006 and continued through the first half of 2007, when the draft standard was completed under the direction of the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS). Development of the information label grades required consideration of stakeholder input, continuity with the previous grade classification, ease of implementation, and potential impacts on the market. In this process, CLASP, with the support of METI/IEEJ, collaborated with CNIS to develop the efficiency grades, providing technical input to the process, comment and advice on particular technical issues, and evaluation of the results. After three months of effort and three drafts of the final grade specifications, this work was completed. In addition, in order to effectively evaluate the impact of the label on China's market, CLASP further provided assistance to CNIS to collect data on both the efficiency distribution and product volume distribution of refrigerators on the market. The new information label thresholds to be implemented in 2008 maintain the approach first adopted in 2005 of establishing efficiency levels relative to the minimum standard, but increased the related required efficiency levels by 20% over those established in 2003 and implemented in 2005. The focus of improvement was on the standard refrigerator/freezer (class 5), which constitutes the bulk of the Chinese market. Indeed, the new requirements to achieve grade 1 on the label are now virtually as stringent as those for US Energy Star-qualified or EU A-grade refrigerators. When the energy information label went into effect in March 2005, refrigerator manufacturers were required to display their declared level of efficiency on the label and report it to the China Energy Label Center (CELC), a newly established unit of CNIS responsible for label program management. Because of the visible nature of the label, it was found, through a METI/IEEJ-supported study, that MEPS non-compliance dropped from 4% to zero after the label became mandatory, and that the percentage of higher-grade refrigerators increased. This suggests that the label itself does have potential for shifting the market to higher-efficiency models (Lin 2007). One challenge, however, of assessing this potential impact is the lack of a comprehensive baseline of market efficiency and a program to evaluate the market impact on a yearly basis. As a result, the impact evaluation in this study draws upon the market transformation experience of the related EU energy information label, for which quantitative assessments of its market impact exist. By assuming a parallel process unfolding in China, it is possible to look at the potential impact of the label to 2020. The results of the analysis demonstrates that a robust market transformation program in China focused on the energy information label could save substantial amounts of electricity by 2020, totaling 16.4 TWh annually by that year, compared to a case in which the efficiency distribution of refrigerators was frozen at the 2007 level. Remarkably, the impact of a successful market transformation program with the label would essentially flatten the consumption of electricity for refrigerator use throughout most of the next decade, despite the expectations of continued growth in total stock by nearly 190 million units. At the end of this period, total consumption begins to rise again, as the least efficient of the units have been mostly removed from the market. Such a level of savings would redu

Fridley, David; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Lin, Jiang; Jianhong, Cheng; Sakamoto, Tomoyuki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

Protsailo, Lesia

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

Tegen, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analyze qualitatively development and climate impacts from pursuing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

impacts that could be qualitatively assessed include: Economic: employment, job creation, income, food production, rural electrification and stability in supply, terms of...

94

Analyze qualitatively development and climate impacts of LEDS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

impacts that could be qualitatively assessed include: Economic: employment, job creation, income, food production, rural electrification and stability in supply, terms of...

95

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Model Kcmil Thousand Circular Mils kV kilovolts MW Megawatt NESC National Electrical Safety Code NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory O&M Operations and Maintenance...

96

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental ImpactReport  

SciTech Connect

This environmental impact report (EIR) has been prepared pursuant to the applicable provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its implementing guidelines (CEQA Guidelines), and the Amended University of California Procedures for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (UC CEQA Procedures). The University of California (UC or the University) is the lead agency for this EIR, which examines the overall effects of implementation of the proposed 2006 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP; also referred to herein as the 'project' for purposes of CEQA) for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL; also referred to as 'Berkeley Lab,' 'the Laboratory,' or 'the Lab' in this document). An LRDP is a land use plan that guides overall development of a site. The Lab serves as a special research campus operated by the University employees, but it is owned and financed by the federal government and as such it is distinct from the UC-owned Berkeley Campus. As a campus operated by the University of California, the Laboratory is required to prepare an EIR for an LRDP when one is prepared or updated pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.09. The adoption of an LRDP does not constitute a commitment to, or final decision to implement, any specific project, construction schedule, or funding priority. Rather, the proposed 2006 LRDP describes an entire development program of approximately 980,000 gross square feet of new research and support space construction and 320,000 gross square feet of demolition of existing facilities, for a total of approximately 660,000 gross square feet of net new occupiable space for the site through 2025. Specific projects will undergo CEQA review at the time proposed to determine what, if any, additional review is necessary prior to approval. As described in Section 1.4.2, below, and in Chapter 3 of this EIR (the Project Description), the size of the project has been reduced since the Notice of Preparation for this EIR was issued. This reduction was in response to consultation with the City of Berkeley as well as other factors. CEQA requires that, before a decision can be made by a state or local government agency to approve a project that may have significant environmental effects, an EIR must be prepared that fully describes the environmental effects of the project. The EIR is a public informational document for use by University decision-makers and the public. It is intended to identify and evaluate potential environmental consequences of the proposed project, to identify mitigation measures that would lessen or avoid significant adverse impacts, and to examine feasible alternatives to the project. The information contained in the EIR is reviewed and considered by the lead agency prior to its action to approve, disapprove, or modify the proposed project.

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ion Armageddon: Measuring the Impact Energy of Highly ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in detail.** Understanding how ions discharge their energy upon impact will ... for a variety of micro- and nanoscale production processes, techniques ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Population, affluence, and environmental impact across development: Evidence from panel cointegration modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes urban population's and affluence's (GDP per capita's) influence on environmental impact in developed and developing countries by taking as its starting point the STIRPAT framework. In addition to considering environmental impacts ... Keywords: Environment and development, Environmental/Carbon Kuznets Curve, FMOLS panel cointegration, GHG emissions, IPAT, Population and environment, STIRPAT

Brantley Liddle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

103

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ruth Baranowski, NRELPIX 16410 The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis Introduction The economic...

104

NWCC Guidelines for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 The primary objective of this study is to provide examples of thorough and consistent analysis and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development.

Michael Taylor, Northwest Economic Associates Alan Fox, Northwest Economic Associates Jill Chilton, Northwest Economic Associates NWCC Economic Development Work Group Contributors Steve Clemmer, Lisa Daniels, Ed DeMeo, Rick Halet, Ron Lehr, Michael Milligan Vince Robinson

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

New Developments on Metallurgy and Applications of High Strength ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oils & Gas Applications Oral Presentations. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ... LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF HIGH STRENGTH.

106

Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Conductor Development for High Field Dipole Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the development of an "armored cable" conductor. Bi-2212AMU [25] is developing an armored cable of Bi- 2212 strands

Scanlan, R.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High velocity impact of metal sphere on thin metallic plates: a comparative smooth particle hydrodynamics study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different shock-capturing schemes used in smooth particle hydrodynamics are compared as applied to moderately high-velocity impacts (at 3 km/s) and hypervelocity impacts (at ?6 km/s) of metallic projectiles on thin metal plates. The target ... Keywords: Riemann problem, artificial viscosity, hydrocode, hypervelocity impact

Vishal Mehra; Shashank Chaturvedi

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fracture and Impact Properties of HT-9 Steel Irradiated to High Dose ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Fracture and Impact Properties of HT-9 Steel Irradiated to High ... 250, and the irradiation temperature in a servo-hydraulic testing machine.

111

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHEC). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000 acres). This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

112

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

113

High-density Fuel Development for High Performance Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, High density UMo (7-12wt% Mo) fuel for high performance research ... High Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Deformation Behavior of Alloy HT9.

114

Procedures for evaluating health impacts resulting from development of energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a compilation of formats, protocols, and procedures that may be used by communities and state agencies to evaluate health impacts resulting from the development of energy resources. The manual also considers ways of using these evaluations to develop plans for coping with health impacts. It is an outgrowth of a study of health problems experienced by impacted communities in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EEEL Researchers Develop Novel Attenuator for High-energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EEEL Researchers Develop Novel Attenuator for High-energy Lasers. For Immediate Release: June 2, 2008. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

High Rate Plasticity under Pressure using a Windowed Pressure-Shear Impact Experiment  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technique has been developed to study the strength of materials under conditions of moderate pressures and high shear strain rates. The technique is similar to the traditional pressure-shear plate-impact experiments except that window interferometry is used to measure both the normal and transverse particle velocities at a sample-window interface. Experimental and simulation results on vanadium samples backed with a sapphire window show the utility of the technique to measure the flow strength under dynamic loading conditions. The results show that the strength of the vanadium is 600 MPa at a pressure of 4.5 GPa and a plastic strain of 1.7%.

Florando, J N; Jiao, T; Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Ferranti, L; Becker, R C; Minich, R W; Bazan, G

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;#12;Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy;#12;Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six-scale solar energy development in six southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new

Argonne National Laboratory

118

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are presented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices. Capsule: "Combining dynamical modeling of high-impact weather using traditional regional climate models with statistical techniques allows for comprehensive sampling of the full distribution, uncertainty estimation, direct assessment of impacts, and increased confidence in future changes."

Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Potential ecological impacts analysis of California high speed rail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposed California High Speed Rail project as detailed inof choosing the high speed rail modal alternative versus theand was based on high speed rail alignment data, including

Cameron, Dick; White, Mike; Stallcup, Jerre Ann; Penrod, Kristeen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New material systems and the experimental progress of high temperature superconductivity are briefly reviewed. We examine both oxides and non-oxides which exhibit stable and/or unstable superconductivity at high temperatures.

Hor, P. H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Development of Inorganic High Temperature Proton Exchange ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For fuel cell systems directly coupled to a reformer, the primary advantage of high temperatures is the elimination of CO poisoning. Direct methanol fuel cells ...

125

Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scope, Recently, significant progress has been made world-wide in both fabrication and fundamental understanding of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) ...

126

Lasting social impact : Community Development Venture Capital investing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Development Venture Capital Funds (CDVC) funds are an emerging group of Community Development Financial Institutions, that make equity investments in businesses in economically distressed areas. As equity investors, ...

Silberberg, Hattie Paige

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Pages that link to "Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:WhatLinksHereBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone" Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer...

128

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Final EIS/EIR) has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Proposed Action includes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a 48 megawatt (gross) geothermal power plant with ancillary facilities (10-12 production well pads and 3-5 injection well pads, production and injection pipelines), access roads, and a 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. Alternative locations for the power plant site within a reasonable distance of the middle of the wellfield were determined to be technically feasible. Three power plant site alternatives are evaluated in the Final EIS/EIR.

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcards), Wind Powering America (WPA), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Impacts Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model is a user-friendly tool that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. EERE Information Center

130

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTISPMA/Resources/handbook.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) Gold Standard Program Model Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results A handbook that seeks to provide project managers and policy analysts with

131

High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

Ray, E.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-injection carrier dynamics generated by MeV heavy ions impacting high-speed photodetectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of single event transients generated by the impact of high-energy ions in high-speed photodetectors leads to bit error rate degradation in optical communications in radiation hard environments such as space. High-energy heavy ions

Jamie Stuart Laird

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Developing performance and impact indicators and targets in public and education libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors trace recent changes in the idea of evaluating performance in UK education and libraries and examine some of the differences in impact assessment between the two fields; concluding that little attention has so far been given by librarians ... Keywords: Development planning, Education libraries, Impact assessment, Performance indicators, Public libraries

Sharon Markless; David Streatfield

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

2011-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Developing Yttria-based Ceramics Having High Liquid Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Green Technologies for Materials Manufacturing and Processing V. Presentation Title, Developing Yttria-based Ceramics Having High Liquid Metal ...

136

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives Clean Energy Market Analysis Toolkit 3b.3. Prioritize development options 3c. Analytical Decision Making -...

137

A Study of Software Development for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Study of Software Development for High Performance Computing Manish Parashar, Salim Hariri Parallel Distributed Systems, 1994 Abstract Software development in a High Performance Computing (HPC. The objective of this paper is to study the software development process in a high performance computing

Parashar, Manish

138

Studying Code Development for High Performance Computing: The HPCS Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying Code Development for High Performance Computing: The HPCS Program Jeff Carver1 , Sima at measuring the development time for programs written for high performance computers (HPC). Our goal. Introduction The development of High-Performance Computing (HPC) programs (codes) is crucial to progress

Basili, Victor R.

139

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

IMPACT OF HIGH-INPUT PRODUCTION PRACTICES ON SOYBEAN YIELD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High-input management practices are often heavily marketed to producers to increase soybean [Glycine max (L) Merr.] yield in already high-yielding environments. Field research was conducted… (more)

Jordan, Daniel L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Technology development for high power induction accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 17, 2012 October 17, 2012 V-004: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 October 2012 Critical Patch Update, security vulnerability fixes for proprietary components of Oracle Linux will be announced in Oracle Critical Patch Updates. October 16, 2012 V-003: Suse Update For Mozillafirefox - Critical An update that fixes 25 vulnerabilities is now available. October 12, 2012 V-001: Mozilla Security vulnerabilities Mozilla Firefox / Thunderbird / SeaMonkey Multiple Vulnerabilities October 10, 2012 U-278: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for October 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for October 2012. Microsoft has posted 1 Critical Bulletins and 6 Important Bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of

144

LOCAL POPULATION IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE GEYSERS - CALISTOGA REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socio-Economic Impacts of Geothermal Develop- ment. LawrenceMatlock, 1978. Summary of 1977 Geothermal Drilling - WesternUnited States, Geothermal Energy Magazine vo. 6, no. 5, pp.

Haven, Kendal F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China Authors biophysical effects of small (China's Nu River basin, and compare effects The hydropower sector currently comprises eighty percent of global capacity for renewable energy generation

Tullos, Desiree

146

Response to 'Comments on Factors that Impact the Implementation of a Systems Development Methodology'  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿This correspondence is a response to ¿Comments on Factors that Impact Implementing a System Development Methodology,¿ by Yadav et al. [24]. We are gratified to see that researchers are closely examining our work. However, we must take issue ...

Tom L. Roberts, Jr.; Michael L. Gibson; R. Kelly Rainer, Jr.; Kent T. Fields

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Wind and Water Nexus: Impacts of Wind Development on Water Use...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind and Water Nexus: Impacts of Wind Development on Water Use in the Energy Sector March 20, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all...

148

On the Development of Regional Climatic Scenarios for Policy-Oriented Climatic-Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review on the development of climatic scenarios related to policy-oriented assessment of the impact of climatic variations is presented. It seeks to provide background information needed to evaluate the extent to which existing regional ...

Peter J. Lamb

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NETL: Gasification Systems - Development of High-Pressure Dry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Development of High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Project Number: DE-FC26-04NT42237 High-Pressure Solids Pump High-Pressure Solids Pump Pratt &...

150

The impact of accounting for research and development on innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines whether a change in the accounting rule for research and development (R&D) cost is associated with changes in the innovation process. Specifically, I examine whether R&D expenditure, the number of patents ...

Li, Lei (Lynn Lei)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Volume 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Volume 1 Executive Summary Chapters 1-7, 14-16 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

152

Impact of Transverse Irregularities at the Photocathode on High...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF TRANSVERSE IRREGULARITIES AT THE PHOTOCATHODE ON THE PRODUCTION OF HIGH-CHARGE ELECTRON BUNCHES M. Rihaoui, C.L. Bohn , Northern Illinois University, DeKalb,...

153

The Impact of High School Curriculum on College Enrollment Rates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines how the mandated curriculum, specifically, "rigorous" curriculum, is associated with the percentage of a high school's graduating class that chooses to enroll… (more)

Blosveren, Kate R.

154

High Speed Rail in Greece : methods for evaluating economic impacts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High Speed Rail is a mode that gains popularity every day. Many countries have such a network and others are on the way to adopting… (more)

Radopoulou, Stefania Christina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 10, 2012 July 10, 2012 U-209: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for July 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for July 2012. Microsoft has posted 3 Critical Bulletins and 6 Important Bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of "Critical" may allow remote execution of code. Microsoft is hosting a webcast to address customer questions on these bulletins on July 11, 2012, at 11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada). July 10, 2012 U-208: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Operations Agent. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system July 2, 2012 U-203: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service A vulnerability was reported in HP Photosmart. A remote user can cause

158

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2011 12, 2011 U-058: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability. December 9, 2011 U-057: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for December 2011 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for December 2011. Microsoft has posted 3 Critical Bulletins and 11 Important bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of "Critical" may allow propagation of Internet worm without user action. Microsoft will host a webcast to address customer questions on the security bulletins on December 14, 2011, at 11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada). December 8, 2011 U-055: Adobe Flash Player Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

159

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2012 September 13, 2012 U-259: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic and SSL Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code RSA BSAFE SSL-C Multiple Vulnerabilities September 12, 2012 U-258: Adobe Flash Player Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. September 11, 2012 U-256: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for September 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for September 2012. Microsoft has posted 0 Critical Bulletins and 2 Important Bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of "Critical" may allow remote execution of code. Microsoft is hosting a webcast to address customer questions on these bulletins on September 12,

160

Development of economically viable, highly integrated, highly modular SEGIS architecture.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initiated in 2008, the SEGIS initiative is a partnership involving the U.S. DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, private sector companies, electric utilities, and universities. Projects supported under the initiative have focused on the complete-system development of solar technologies, with the dual goal of expanding renewable PV applications and addressing new challenges of connecting large-scale solar installations in higher penetrations to the electric grid. Petra Solar, Inc., a New Jersey-based company, received SEGIS funds to develop solutions to two of these key challenges: integrating increasing quantities of solar resources into the grid without compromising (and likely improving) power quality and reliability, and moving the design from a concept of intelligent system controls to successful commercialization. The resulting state-of-the art technology now includes a distributed photovoltaic (PV) architecture comprising AC modules that not only feed directly into the electrical grid at distribution levels but are equipped with new functions that improve voltage stability and thus enhance overall grid stability. This integrated PV system technology, known as SunWave, has applications for 'Power on a Pole,' and comes with a suite of technical capabilities, including advanced inverter and system controls, micro-inverters (capable of operating at both the 120V and 240V levels), communication system, network management system, and semiconductor integration. Collectively, these components are poised to reduce total system cost, increase the system's overall value and help mitigate the challenges of solar intermittency. Designed to be strategically located near point of load, the new SunWave technology is suitable for integration directly into the electrical grid but is also suitable for emerging microgrid applications. SunWave was showcased as part of a SEGIS Demonstration Conference at Pepco Holdings, Inc., on September 29, 2011, and is presently undergoing further field testing as a prelude to improved and expanded commercialization.

Enslin, Johan (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Hamaoui, Ronald (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Haddad, Ghaith (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Rustom, Khalid (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Stuby, Rick (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Kuran, Mohammad (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Mark, Evlyn (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Amarin, Ruba (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Alatrash, Hussam (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Bower, Ward Isaac; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Power System Planning: Emerging Practices Suitable for Evaluating the Impact of High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report explores the impact of high-penetration renewable generation on electric power system planning methodologies and outlines how these methodologies are evolving to enable effective integration of variable-output renewable generation sources.

Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Impact of Taxation on the Development of Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contractor report reviews past and current tax mechanisms for the development and operation of geothermal power facilities. A 50 MW binary plant is featured as the case study. The report demonstrates that tax credits with windows of availability of greater than one year are essential to allow enough time for siting and design of geothermal power systems. (DJE 2005)

Gaffen, Michael; Baker, James

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

Matthews, K.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An Integrated Risk Management Strategy for High-Impact, Low-Frequency (HILF) Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the American electric system is one of the most reliable power systems in the world, it is vulnerable to events that rarely occur, but could have devastating impact. Collectively called high-impact, low-frequency (HILF) events, these include coordinated attacks, pandemics, severe geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs), electromagnetic pulse weapons (EMPs), and high-altitude electromagnetic pulse weapons (HEMPs). Industry has little experience in dealing with these events and lacks an integrated ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

High-Impact, Low-Frequency (HILF) Events in the Electric Power Industry: Potential Impacts, Mitigation, and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the North American electricity grid is one of the most reliable power systems in the world, a class of rare but potentially catastrophically damaging risks is of growing concern in the industry. These so-called "high-impact, low-frequency" (HILF) events potentially include electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons, geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs), coordinated cyber and/or physical attacks, and pandemics. Some HILF events have never occurred, and the probability of their occurrence is ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R D  

SciTech Connect

The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called Materials-by-Design (MBD).'' The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials' performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

Young, J.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Judging the Impact of Conference and Journal Publications in High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Judging the Impact of Conference and Journal Publications in High Performance Computing dimensions that count most, conferences are superior. This is particularly true in high performance computing and are never published in journals. The area of high performance computing is broad, and we divide venues

Zhou, Yuanyuan

170

Development of high temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made in 1991 on the development of ceramic membranes as catalytic reactors. Efforts were focused on the design, construction and startup of a reactor system capable of duplicating relevant commercial operating conditions. With this system, yield enhancement was demonstrated for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in a membrane reactor compared to the standard packed bed configuration. This enhancement came with no loss in styrene selectivity. During operation, coke deposition on the membrane was observed, but this deposition was mitigated by the presence of steam in the reaction mixture and a steady state permeability was achieved for run times in excess of 200 hours. Work began on optimizing the membrane reactor by exploring several parameters including the effect of N{sub 2} diluent in the reaction feed and the effect of a N{sub 2} purge on the permeate side of the membrane. This report details the experimental progress made in 1991. Interactions with the University of Wisconsin on this project are also summarized. Finally, current status of the project and next steps are outlined.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Job and Economic Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects Preprint March 2004 * NREL/CP-500-35953 M. Goldberg MRG & Associates K. Sinclair and M. Milligan (Consultant) National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2004 Global WINDPOWER Conference Chicago, Illinois March 29-31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

172

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the variable characteristics of solar power, as well as the accompanying grid dynamic performance and operational economics for a system with significant solar generation. The paper will show results of economic operational simulations of a very high solar generation future for the western half of the United States.

Lew, D.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Gao, Z.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

High Speed Rail in Greece : methods for evaluating economic impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Speed Rail is a mode that gains popularity every day. Many countries have such a network and others are on the way to adopting one. Greece, which is part of the European Union, is one of those countries that are looking ...

Radopoulou, Stefania Christina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Modeling the determinants of the social impacts of agricultural development projects  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to help policy-makers improve the social sustainability of development projects, this study identifies the key determinants of farmers' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the floodwater spreading project (FWSP) on the Gareh-Bygone plain in Iran. In order to analyze the links between the various factors that affect the experience of social impact, a theoretical framework was developed. Stratified random sampling was used to survey 138 farm households from the four villages in the region. One male and one female from each house were interviewed face-to-face using a questionnaire, resulting in a total of 276 interviews. Structural factors were found to be the largest contribution to stakeholders' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the project. Results from a cluster analysis suggested that the level of floodwater information, level of participation, water access, ownership change, and environmental worldview were the most important factors explaining attitude towards social impact of the FWSP.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: Ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Department of Rural Development Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iman, Mohammad Taghi, E-mail: Iman@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined by growth in per capita income and employment? Objective To address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Background * Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. * Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. * Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show

178

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of a practical modeling framework for estimating the impact of wind technology on bird populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most pressing environmental concerns related to wind project development is the potential for avian fatalities caused by the turbines. The goal of this project is to develop a useful, practical modeling framework for evaluating potential wind power plant impacts that can be generalized to most bird species. This modeling framework could be used to get a preliminary understanding of the likelihood of significant impacts to birds, in a cost-effective way. The authors accomplish this by (1) reviewing the major factors that can influence the persistence of a wild population; (2) briefly reviewing various models that can aid in estimating population status and trend, including methods of evaluating model structure and performance; (3) reviewing survivorship and population projections; and (4) developing a framework for using models to evaluate the potential impacts of wind development on birds.

Morrison, M.L. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States); Pollock, K.H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Loose strands: searching for evidence of public access ICT impact on development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Telecenters, libraries and internet cafés are often credited as being important venues for making information and communication technologies (ICTs) more widely available for people in developing and developed countries. Although numerous case ... Keywords: ICTs, cybercafés, impact, libraries, public access computing, telecentres

Araba Sey; Michelle Fellows

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Impact of risk and uncertainty on sustainable development of Kolubara lignite basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper analyzes the various risks and uncertainties and their possible impact on the future development of the Kolubara lignite basin area (Belgrade metropolitan region). What has been examined are the risks caused by the global financial crisis to ... Keywords: energy policy, lignite coal basin, privatisation, risks, sustainable development, uncertain

Slavka Zekovic; Miodrag Vujosevic

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Development of an Oxidation-resistant High-strength Sixth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Superalloys 2012. Presentation Title, Development of an Oxidation- resistant High-strength Sixth-generation Single-crystal Superalloy TMS-238.

183

Developing a High-Temperature Superconducting Bulk Magnet for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to these well-developed technologies, high-critical temperature superconductors that show superconductivity at liquid nitrogen are also prospective ...

184

Tungsten-Rhenium Super Alloy Development for Ultra High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tungsten-Rhenium Super Alloy Development for Ultra High Temperature Space Fission and Fusion Reactors. Author(s), Jonathan Webb, ...

185

Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone&oldid342524" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

186

Measured impacts of high efficiency domestic clothes washers in a community  

SciTech Connect

The US market for domestic clothes washers is currently dominated by conventional vertical-axis washers that typically require approximately 40 gallons of water for each wash load. Although the current market for high efficiency clothes washers that use much less water and energy is quite small, it is growing slowly as manufacturers make machines based on tumble action, horizontal-axis designs available and as information about the performance and benefits of such machines is developed and made available to consumers. To help build awareness of these benefits and to accelerate markets for high efficiency washers, the Department of Energy (DOE), under its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Program and in cooperation with a major manufacturers of high efficiency washers, conducted a field evaluation of high efficiency washers using Bern, Kansas as a test bed. Baseline washing machine performance data as well as consumer washing behavior were obtained from data collected on the existing machines of more than 100 participants in this instrumented study. Following a 2-month initial study period, all conventional machines were replaced by high efficiency, tumble-action washers, and the study continued for 3 months. Based on measured data from over 20,000 loads of laundry, the impact of the washer replacement on (1) individual customers` energy and water consumption, (2) customers` laundry habits and perceptions, and (3) the community`s water supply and waste water systems were determined. The study, its findings, and how information from the experiment was used to improve national awareness of high efficiency clothes washer benefits are described in this paper.

Tomlinson, J.; Rizy, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

High-burnup fuel and the impact on fuel management  

SciTech Connect

Competition in the electric utility industry has forced utilities to reduce cost. For a nuclear utility, this means a reduction of both the nuclear fuel cost and the operating and maintenance cost. To this extent, utilities are pursuing longer cycles. To reduce the nuclear fuel cost, utilities are trying to reduce batch size while increasing cycle length. Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed a number of fuel cycle studies to optimize both batch size and cycle length; however, certain burnup-related constraints are encountered. As a result of these circumstances, longer fuel cycles make it increasingly difficult to simultaneously meet the burnup-related fuel design constraints and the technical specification limits. Longer cycles require fuel assemblies to operate for longer times at relatively high power. If utilities continue to pursue longer cycles to help reduce nuclear fuel cost, changes may need to be made to existing fuel burnup limits.

Cacciapouti, R.J.; Weader, R.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 22, 2013 May 22, 2013 V-161: IBM Maximo Asset Management Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities Asset and Service Mgmt Products - Potential security exposure when using JavaTM based applications due to vulnerabilities in Java Software Developer Kits. May 17, 2013 V-158: BlackBerry Tablet OS Flash Player Multiple Vulnerabilities Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in BlackBerry Tablet OS, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions and compromise a user's system. May 16, 2013 V-157: Adobe Reader / Acrobat Multiple Vulnerabilities These updates address vulnerabilities that could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system May 14, 2013 V-155: Apache Tomcat FORM Authenticator Lets Remote Users Conduct Session

189

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Current Status and Potential Impacts Regarding the Proposed Development of a Rail Line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a description of the current status regarding the proposed development of a rail line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Nye County, Southern Nevada, which includes potential impacts analyzed during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and the subsequent creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the rail line. Potential impacts are addressed within the context of impacts to natural and human environmental resources found within the geographic area of the proposed federal project. Potential impacts to these resources have been fully analyzed in the Rail Alignment Draft EIS (DEIS). This paper includes a summary of the potential impacts analyzed in the DEIS. Examples of potential impacts include land use conflicts, air quality, water use, and impacts to biological and cultural resources, among others. In conclusion: Based on its obligations under the NWPA and its decision to select the mostly rail scenario for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, DOE needs to ship these materials by rail in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE prepared the Rail Alignment EIS to provide the background, data, information, and analyses to help decision makers and the public understand the potential environmental impacts that could result from constructing and operating a railroad for shipment of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing rail line in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. This railroad would consist of a rail line, railroad operations support facilities, and other related infrastructure. DOE will use the Rail Alignment EIS to decide whether to construct and operate the proposed railroad, and if so, to: - Select a rail alignment (Caliente rail alignment or Mina rail alignment) in which to construct the railroad; - Select the common segments and alternative segments within either a Caliente rail alignment or a Mina rail alignment. The Department would use the selected common segments and alternative segments to identify the public lands to be included in right-of-way applications; - Decide where to construct proposed railroad operations support facilities; - Decide whether to restrict use of the rail line to DOE trains, or whether to allow commercial shippers to operate over the rail line; and - Determine what mitigation measures to implement. (authors)

Lanthrum, G. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Gunnerson, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS FROM COAL, NATURAL GAS, AND WIND POWER Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Suzanne Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado The information contained in this poster is subject to a government license. * WINDPOWER 2006 * Pittsburgh, PA * June 4-7, 2006 * NREL/PO-500-39908 Michael Milligan, Consultant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado How does JEDI II work? The user enters data specific to the new coal, gas, or wind plant: * Year of installation * Size of the project * Location * Cost ($/kW) * Any other site-specific information

193

Development of a Real-Time, High-Speed Distribution Level Data Acquisition System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the development of smart grids and the deployment of their enabling technologies, improved data acquisition will be needed at the distribution level to understand the full impact of these changes. With this in mind, NREL has developed a high-speed measurement and data collection network targeted specifically at the distribution level. This network is based around adaptable, rugged measurement devices designed for deployment at a variety of low and medium voltage locations below the sub-station. Each of these devices is capable of real-time data transmission via an Internet connection. Additionally, several analysis and visualization applications have been developed around the incoming data streams.

Bank, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Computational and Experimental Development of Novel High-Temperature Alloys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Novel High-Temperature Alloys Background The need for fossil-fueled power plants to run cleaner and more efficiently leads toward ever-higher operating temperatures and pressures. Gas turbines, which can be fueled by natural gas, synthetic gas (syngas), or a high-hydrogen stream derived from coal, are critical components in this development. High-temperature operation of turbines is generally achieved by using nickel-chrome superalloys with coatings

195

Appropriate Methodology for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance. It may also support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. However, there is a need for a theoretically sound method for assessing the economic impacts of wind power development. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. Northwest Economic Associates (NEA), under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), investigated three case study areas in the United States where wind power projects were recently developed. The full report, ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power,'' is available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. The methodology used for that study is summarized here in order to provide guidance for future studies of the economic impacts of other wind power developments. The methodology used in the NEA study was specifically designed for these particular case study areas; however, it can be generally applied to other areas. Significant differences in local economic conditions and the amount of goods and services that are purchased locally as opposed to imported from outside the will strongly influence results obtained. Listed below are some of the key tasks that interested parties should undertake to develop a reasonable picture of local economic impacts that may accrue from existing or future wind development.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind Power (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using economic multipliers, JEDI II measures the potential employment (job and earnings) and economic development impacts (output) from new power plants by calculating the dollar flow from construction and annual operations. In its default form, JEDI II conducts state-specific analyses. County or regional analyses require additional multipliers.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The development of a methodology to quantify the impacts of information management strategies on EPC projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops and demonstrates a methodology to quantify time and cost impacts on Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) projects resulting from information management driven process changes in design related activities. Many companies have implemented information technologies expecting to save time and effort, gain competitive advantage, improve productivity, better align objectives, and improve product quality. The premise of this research is that these benefits can be quantified in terms of time and cost project performance measures. While previous efforts to quantify benefits have been function-or technology-specific, and have provided sub-optimal results, the methodology presented allows quantification at a total project level. A schematic representation of the EPC Process was developed and field data from both owner and contractor companies was collected to serve as a baseline condition. Fifteen specific design related activities were modeled in detail and also loaded with associated field collected time and cost data. Potential process changes from increasing levels of information management were investigated. Monte Carlo simulation was used as the means by which time and cost impacts of the process changes were observed and measured. The impacts found in the specific design activities were used to adjust the baseline condition of the EPC process. Resimulation of the total process enabled quantification of impacts at a project level. The results of the research demonstrated that potential impacts from information management can be quantified. The results also showed that very aggressive levels of information management improvements may potentially improve total project activity time and labor cost by 7% and 8%, respectively. More conservative changes showed impacts to the same parameters at approximately 3% and 1%. The research also provided an indication of the relative impact various level of information management may have on project elapsed time. Finally, the research illustrated the importance of measuring the impacts at a total project-level. That is, the magnitude of impacts at the project-level were much lower than those observed at the activity or task level, thus providing a more realistic approximation of information management impacts.

Moreau, Karen Anne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effective use of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for geothermal development projects  

SciTech Connect

Both the developed and developing nations of the world would like to move toward a position of sustainable development while paying attention to the restoration of natural resources, improving the environment, and improving the quality of life. The impacts of geothermal development projects are generally positive. It is important, however, that the environmental issues associated with development be addressed in a systematic fashion. Drafted early in the project planning stage, a well-prepared Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can significantly add to the quality of the overall project. An EIA customarily ends with the decision to proceed with the project. The environmental analysis process could be more effective if regular monitoring, detailed in the EIA, continues during project implementation. Geothermal development EIAs should be analytic rather than encyclopedic, emphasizing the impacts most closely associated with energy sector development. Air quality, water resources and quality, geologic factors, and socioeconomic issues will invariably be the most important factors. The purpose of an EIA should not be to generate paperwork, but to enable superb response. The EIA should be intended to help public officials make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences and take proper actions. The EIA process has been defined in different ways throughout the world. In fact, it appears that no two countries have defined it in exactly the same way. Going hand in hand with the different approaches to the process is the wide variety of formats available. It is recommended that the world geothermal community work towards the adoption of a standard. The Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)(OLADE, 1993) prepared a guide that presents a comprehensive discussion of the environmental impacts and suggested mitigation alternatives associated with geothermal development projects. The OLADE guide is a good start for providing the geothermal community a standard EIA format. As decision makers may only read the Executive Summary of the EIA, this summary should be well written and present the significant impacts (in order of importance), clarifying which are unavoidable and which are irreversible; the measures which can be taken to mitigate them; the cumulative effects of impacts; and the requirements for monitoring and supervision. Quality plans and Public Participation plans should also be included as part of the environmental analysis process.

Goff, S.J.

2000-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power--Case Studies Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance (O&M). It may also add to the supply of electric power in the area and support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. While there is a growing body of information about the local impacts of wind power, the economic impacts from existing wind power developments have not been thoroughly and consistently analyzed. Northwest Economic Associates, under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), conducted a study and produced a report entitled ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power.'' The primary objective of the study was to provide examples of appropriate analyses and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development, using case studies of three existing projects in the United States. The findings from the case studies are summarized here; more detail is available in the report, available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. It should be noted that specific results presented apply only to the respective locales studied and are not meant to be representative of wind power in general. However, qualitative findings, discussed below, are likely to be replicated in most areas where wind development occurs.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Questions & Answers Solicitation to Address High Purchase Costs and Disposal Impacts of PEV Battery Packs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Questions & Answers Solicitation to Address High Purchase Costs and Disposal Impacts of PEV Battery Packs PON12501 1. Relating to both Research Topic Areas, at what stage of the research does the Energ Commission envision a battery manufacturer needing to be involved? y The Energy

202

Genesis of the South Asian High and Its Impact on the Asian Summer Monsoon Onset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of the South Asian high (SAH) in spring and its impacts on the Asian summer monsoon onset are studied using daily 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) data together with a climate-mean composite technique and potential vorticity–diabatic ...

Boqi Liu; Guoxiong Wu; Jiangyu Mao; Jinhai He

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Simulation of high speed impact, penetration and fragmentation problems on locally refined Cartesian grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques are presented to solve problems involving high speed material interactions that can lead to large deformations followed by fragmentation. To simulate such problems in an Eulerian framework on a fixed Cartesian mesh, interfaces (free surfaces ... Keywords: Cartesian grid methods, Elasto-plastic solids, Eulerian, Fragmentation, Ghost fluid method (GFM), High velocity impact, Level set methods, Penetration, Sharp interface methods, Shock interface interactions, Void collapse

S. Sambasivan; A. Kapahi; H. S. Udaykumar

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Social Impact of Informational Production: Software Development as an Informational Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their larger social impact. Opening software meansthe information society. The social impact of this is quiteare. IV. The Social Impact of Software Practice: Failures,

Eischen, Kyle

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Berkeley ReadyMade Impact Assessment: Developing an Effective and Efficient Assessment Template for Social Enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work lead to broader social impact. For example, a nonprofitand Resources for Assessing Social Impact (TRASI). 3 2.need to evaluate broad social impact of proposed programs

Brown, Clair; Chait, Ariel; Freeman, Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Monitoring of Refractory Wall recession using high temperature impact echo instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Regression of refractory linings of furnaces occurs due to a variety of mechanisms. The specific mechanism selected for investigation during this program is the regression of refractories which are in direct contact with a liquid corrodant. Examples include the melting of glass, the production of pig iron and steel, and the melting of aluminum. The rates of regression to a wall thickness which requires reline or extensive reconstruction vary widely, from less than a year to over ten years depending on the specific service environment. This program investigated the feasibility of measuring refractory wall thickness with an impact-echo method while at operating temperature (wall temperatures exceeding 500 C). The impact-echo method uses the impact of a small sphere with the surface of the test object to send a stress wave into the object. In a plate-like structure, the stress wave reflects back to the front surface, reverberating in the structure and causing a periodic surface displacement whose frequency is inversely proportional to the thickness of the test object. Impact-echo testing was chosen because it requires access to only one side of the test object and could be performed during the operation of a refractory structure. Commercially-available impact-echo instrumentation is available for room temperature use for a variety of tests on concrete. The enabling technology for this work was to use a high-temperature piezoelectric material, aluminum nitride, as the receiving sensor for the stress waves, allowing its use on refractories during furnace operation.

University of Dayton

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Volume 5, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 New Mexico and Utah Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 12 and 13 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

209

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

210

Impact of High-Penetration PV on Distribution System Performance: Example Cases and Analysis Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High penetration of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in the electric grid is beginning to challenge distribution planners and engineers. This technical update discusses the factors that can have a significant impact on a distribution feeder's response to PV generation. The report considers both the circuit and the photovoltaic generation characteristics. The circuit types and characteristics span the expected range of power delivery and control elements. Photovoltaic characteristics include syste...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Development of a High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Development of a High Temperature Solid Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Merit Review Meeting Berkeley, CA, May 20, 2003 #12;Idaho National Engineering integration), W (electricity costs) #12;Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory 3 2. Approach

212

High-temperature seal development for the share receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal for the SHARE ceramic dome cavity receiver is reported. The mechanical contact seal which was tested on one-foot diameter silicon carbide ceramic dome hardware at pressure differentials to four atmospheres and dome temperatures to 2200/sup 0/F (1200/sup 0/C) showed negligible leakage at expected receiver operating conditions.

Jarvinen, P. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluating the use of Social Impact Assessment in the context of agricultural development projects in Iran  

SciTech Connect

The utilisation of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) in Iran is analysed in terms of its policy context and its application in practice. Five case studies where SIA was employed in conjunction with Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) for agricultural development projects are evaluated. In addition, the performance of the policy context is assessed. This research revealed that there are legal and institutional constraints to the effective functioning of SIA in Iran, and that there are deficiencies in the operating guidelines. There were serious problems associated with the way SIA was undertaken in all five case studies. Recommendations to improve the policy framework for the conduct of SIA are made. The recommendations advocate for a higher profile of SIA within legislation, for social issues to have greater emphasis in official guidelines for the conduct of EIA and SIA, and for a range of measures to increase the professionalism of SIA practice.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Faculty of Agriculture, Yasuj University, Yasuj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Gholam Hossein, E-mail: zamani@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: Frank.Vanclay@utas.edu.a [Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Investigation of ecosystems impacts from geothermal development in Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of three years of field ecological investigation in Imperial Valley Environmental Program is presented. The potential terrestrial habitat impacts of geothermal development are discussed for shorebirds and waterfowl habitat, the endangered clapper rail, powerline corridors, noise effects, animal trace element burdens, and the desert community. Aquatic habitats are discussed in terms of Salton Sea salinity, effects of geothermal brine discharges to the Salton Sea, trace element baselines, and potential toxicity of brine spills in freshwater. Studies of impacts on agriculture involved brine movement in soil, release of trace metals, trace element baselines in soil and plants, water requirements of crops, and H{sub 2}S effects on crop production in the presence of CO{sub 2} and ozone.

Shinn, J.H.; Ireland, R.R.; Kercher, J.R.; Koranda, J.J.; Tompkins, G.A.

1979-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program and its impact on geothermal exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study showed that the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program has had only a negligible effect on geothermal development and the response to the program was far less than expected. The streamlining of environmental regulations and leasing policies, and the granting of intangible drilling cost write-offs and depletion allowances to operators would have had a greater impact on geothermal energy development. The loan guaranty program did not promote the undertaking of any new projects that would not have been undertaken without it. The program only accelerated the pace for some development which might have commenced in the future. Included in the study are recommendations for improving the operation of the program thereby increasing its attractiveness to potential applicants.

Nasr, L.H.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Volume 2, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Arizona and California Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 8 and 9 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

218

Volume 7, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Comments and Responses July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

219

Volume 3, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Colorado Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapter 10 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

220

Assessing programming language impact on development and maintenance: a study on c and c++  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Billions of dollars are spent every year for building and maintaining software. To reduce these costs we must identify the key factors that lead to better software and more productive development. One such key factor, and the focus of our paper, is the ... Keywords: developer productivity, empirical studies, high-level languages, software evolution, software quality

Pamela Bhattacharya; Iulian Neamtiu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of a high-specific-speed centrifugal compressor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development of a subscale single-stage centrifugal compressor with a dimensionless specific speed (Ns) of 1.8, originally designed for full-size application as a high volume flow, low pressure ratio, gas booster compressor. The specific stage is noteworthy in that it provides a benchmark representing the performance potential of very high-specific-speed compressors, of which limited information is found in the open literature. Stage and component test performance characteristics are presented together with traverse results at the impeller exit. Traverse test results were compared with recent CFD computational predictions for an exploratory analytical calibration of a very high-specific-speed impeller geometry. The tested subscale (0.583) compressor essentially satisfied design performance expectations with an overall stage efficiency of 74% including, excessive exit casing losses. It was estimated that stage efficiency could be increased to 81% with exit casing losses halved.

Rodgers, C.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Social impact management through planning and development : Hedonic Psychology and a new approach to tourism in Zanzibar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes a new approach to tourism planning and development based on three threads in the literature on social impact management: (1) the current approach to tourism studies; (2) the writings and activities of ...

Metzger, A. Tell (Adam Tell), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The urban economic development impacts of ethnic entrepreneurship : a case study of Dominican entrepreneurs in Lawrence, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the process through which ethnic entrepreneurship impacts urban economic development. In many urban places across the United States, demographic change has led to the rise of ethnic communities and the ...

Cheigh, Brian Chaneung

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Security Sector Reform: a new framework for security assistance? : the Security-Development Nexus' impact on policies towards the South.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to investigate the security-development nexus' impact on donor policies towards fragile and post-conflict states in the South. The thesis… (more)

Nikolaisen, Trine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Land Market Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development: An Empirical Study of Rail Transit in Washington, D.C. and Atlanta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development:An Empirical Study of Rail Transit in Washington, D.C. andMarket Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development:

Cervero, Robert

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Impact of High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Wind Power High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS Bri-Mathias Hodge, Debra Lew, and Michael Milligan Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52251 July 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Impact of High Wind Power Penetrations on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS Bri-Mathias Hodge, Debra Lew, and Michael Milligan Prepared under Task No. WE110810 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52251 July 2011 NOTICE

229

Development of High Erosivity Well Scale Cleaning Tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Build up of scale deposits on the walls of geothermal wells can occur rapidly due to the high dissolved solids content of geothermal fluids. Scale formation is a significant problem for both the well and for surface heat transfer equipment. Geothermal brines contain a wide variety if dissolved salts including carbonates, silicates, sulfates, and metal sulfides. One technology recently proposed for scale removal is the use of an ultrasonic device. In the present effort we apply cavitation in a more direct manner by the use of acoustically enhanced cavitating water jets which can be made to be much more efficient and aggressive than ultrasonic devices. Cavitating and self-resonating jet technologies have been proven to enhance the erosive power of liquid jets in a number of cutting, cleaning, and drilling applications. In this study we investigated two related technologies - one that employs cavitation and one that breaks the jet up into a series of slugs that produce water hammer type pressures upon impact. These technologies enable operation in both submerged and nonsubmerged conditions.

K. M. Kalumuck; G. L. Chahine; G. S. Frederick; P. D. Aley

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control  

SciTech Connect

The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

Inmuong, Uraiwan, E-mail: uraiwan@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rithmak, Panee, E-mail: panrit@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Srisookwatana, Soomol, E-mail: soomol.s@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Traithin, Nathathai, E-mail: nathathai.t@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Maisuporn, Pornpun, E-mail: pornpun.m@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Development of an optimal impact energy absorber for highway crash cushions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a new and efficient method of absorbing a vehicle??s kinetic energy for highway safety crash cushions. A vehicle that makes a direct impact with a rigid highway structure traveling at highway speeds can be fatal for its occupants. Crash cushions are implemented on roadways in front of these rigid structures with the intent to ??soften?? the impact. The cushion will bring a vehicle to a stop at safe rates before it impacts the rigid structure. The energy absorbing component of the crash cushion must meet four main requirements. The cushion must reduce the vehicles speed at a rate that does not allow the occupant to impact the vehicle interior at velocities greater than 12 m/s. The cushion must then bring the vehicle to a complete stop with deceleration rates below 20 g??s. A crash cushion must satisfy these requirements for an 820 kg vehicle and a 2000 kg vehicle traveling at 100 km/hr. Advanced design methodologies were applied to enable multiple, innovative design concepts. These concepts made use of the deformation of steel in structural pipe, structural angle, and structural plate to reduce the velocity of a vehicle at a safe rate. Critical design parameters were identified which allowed for efficient and effective numerical experiments to be conducted. The data collected from these experiments were then validated when compared to physical test data. After the data had been collected, each of the designs was compared to one another in order to decide upon the best design. The design selected was the deforming plate concept which makes use of steel plate mounted in a fashion that created two arms that acted similar to two cantilever beams. A wedge was forced beneath these arms deforming them upward. This design is effective because the deformation can be easily controlled by the thickness of the plate, the moment arm created by the wedge, and the geometry of the wedge. Steel plate is a readily available material that requires minimal manufacturing for installation preparation making it cost-effective, and easy to install. In the event of impact with the cushion, new parts will be inexpensive and readily available. Being reusable, easy to repair and low in cost, the energy absorbing concept presented herein is a cost effective alternative to existing energy absorbing technology. Due to replaceable parts being readily available, repair time and cost will be reduced compared to other designs that require new parts to be fabricated for replacement. This will make for a competitive design.

Michalec, Christopher Ryan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producersâ?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A â??multi-methodâ? or â??mixed methodâ? research methodology was employed for each case study.

Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250°C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: ? Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments ? Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments ? Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics ? Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature ? Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: ? FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields ? Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) ? Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher temperature operation ? Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/?m. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200°C and non-hermetic packages at 250°C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

None

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Indian Summer Monsoon Precipitation Climatology in a High-Resolution Regional Climate Model: Impacts of Convective Parameterization on Systematic Biases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to develop a better simulation of the climatology of monsoon precipitation in climate models, this paper investigates the impacts of different convective closures on systematic biases of an Indian monsoon precipitation climatology ...

P. Mukhopadhyay; S. Taraphdar; B. N. Goswami; K. Krishnakumar

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted following an analytical plan. A review of the individual oxides for each glass revealed that there were no errors in batching significant enough to impact the outcome of the study. A comparison of the measured compositions of the replicates indicated an acceptable degree of repeatability as the percent differences for most of the oxides were less than 5% and percent differences for all of the oxides were less than 10 wt%. Chemical durability was measured using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). All but two of the study glasses had normalized leachate for boron (NL [B]) values that were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass. The two highest NL [B] values were for the CCC versions of glasses US-18 and US-27 (10.498 g/L and 15.962 g/L, respectively). Nepheline crystallization was identified by qualitative XRD in five of the US-series glasses. Each of these five glasses (US-18, US-26, US-27, US-37 and US-43) showed a significant increase in NL [B] values after the CCC heat treatment. This reduction in durability can be attributed to the formation of nepheline during the slow cooling cycle and the removal of glass formers from the residual glass network. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of each glass in the study was determined by both optical microscopy and XRD methods. The correlation coefficient of the measured XRD TL data versus the measured optical TL data was very good (R{sup 2} = 0.9469). Aside from a few outliers, the two datasets aligned very well across the entire temperature range (829 C to 1312 C for optical data and 813 C to 1310 C for XRD crystal fraction data). The data also correlated well with the predictions of a PNNL T{sub L} model. The correlation between the measured and calculated data had a higher degree of merit for the XRD crystal fraction data than for the optical data (higher R{sup 2} value of 0.9089 versus 0.8970 for the optical data). The SEM-EDS analysis of select samples revealed the presence of undissolved RuO{sub 2} in all glasses due to the low solubility of RuO{sub 2} in borosilicate glass. These

Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of a High Level Waste Tank Inspection System  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center was requested by it`s sister site, West Valley Nuclear Service (WVNS), to develop a remote inspection system to gather wall thickness readings of their High Level Waste Tanks. WVNS management chose to take a proactive approach to gain current information on two tanks t hat had been in service since the early 70`s. The tanks contain high level waste, are buried underground, and have only two access ports to an annular space between the tank and the secondary concrete vault. A specialized remote system was proposed to provide both a visual surveillance and ultrasonic thickness measurements of the tank walls. A magnetic wheeled crawler was the basis for the remote delivery system integrated with an off-the-shelf Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. A development program was initiated for Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to design, fabricate, and test a remote system based on the Crawler. The system was completed and involved three crawlers to perform the needed tasks, an Ultrasonic Crawler, a Camera Crawler, and a Surface Prep Crawler. The crawlers were computer controlled so that their operation could be done remotely and their position on the wall could be tracked. The Ultrasonic Crawler controls were interfaced with ABB Amdata`s I-PC, Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System so that thickness mapping of the wall could be obtained. A second system was requested by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), to perform just ultrasonic mapping on their similar Waste Storage Tanks; however, the system needed to be interfaced with the P-scan Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. Both remote inspection systems were completed 9/94. Qualifications tests were conducted by WVNS prior to implementation on the actual tank and tank development was achieved 10/94. The second inspection system was deployed at WSRC 11/94 with success, and the system is now in continuous service inspecting the remaining high level waste tanks at WSRC.

Appel, D.K.; Loibl, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, SC (United States); Meese, D.C. [Westinghouse West Valley Nuclear Services, West Valley, NY (United States)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

238

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Heat-pipe development for high-temperature recuperator application  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipes have been developed for operation in oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/K. The heat pipes comprise a metallic liner and wick structure with a protective outer shell of an oxidation resistant material. The working fluids used in the heat pipes are alkali metals. A number of configurations have been evaluated, ranging from pipes using a metallic inner liner of a chemically vapor deposited (CVD) refractory metal applied to ceramic tubing, to one utilizing ferrous materials with an outer layer of a developed oxide. A promising intermediate configuration consisting of free-standing refractory tubing covered with a layered structure of fine grain, equi-axed CVD silicon carbide has also been evaluated. The test heat pipe was fabricated using low-carbon, arc-cast molybdenum tubing and a wick composed of 150 mesh molybdenum screen. Hafnium gettering was used with sodium working fluid. Assembly of the pipe was by electron beam welding. Following closure and capping of the fill tube the assembly was operated in a vacuum for several hours prior to the chemical vapor deposition of the exterior ceramic coating. After coating, the pipe was operated in air and in combustion gases for performance evaluation. The use of iron-chromium-aluminum alloys as container materials for operating in high temperature oxidizing and sulfiding gas streams has been investigated. Alloys of this type develop heavy, protective oxide surface layers when exposed to high temperature oxidizing atmospheres, and are commonly used in electrical heating elements because of their exceptional oxidation resistance.

Merrigan, M.; Dunwoody, W.; Lundberg, L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located 0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL# 5793E LBNL# 5793E Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Jason P. Brown 1 USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jbrown@ers.usda.gov John Pender USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jpender@ers.usda.gov Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 RHWiser@lbl.gov Eric Lantz National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 eric.lantz@nrel.gov Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 20 Sawmill Road, Milan, NY 1257 BHoen@lbl.gov Pre-print of article submitted for publication to Energy Economics. Download from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988312001466

242

“The Long-run Macroeconomic Impacts of Fuel Subsidies in an Oil-importing Developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developing and emerging market countries have subsidies on fuel products. Using a small open economy model with a non-traded sector I show how these subsidies impact the steady state levels of macroeconomic aggregates such as consumption, labor supply, and aggregate welfare. These subsidies can lead to crowding out of non-oil consumption, inefficient inter-sectoral allocations of labor, and other distortions in macroeconomic variables. Across steady states aggregate welfare is reduced by these subsidies. This result holds for a country with no oil production and for a net exporter of oil. The distortions in relative prices introduced by the subsidy create most of the welfare losses. How the subsidy is financed is of secondary importance. Aggregate welfare is significantly higher if the subsidies are replaced by lump-sum transfers of equal value.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Development of a high-explosive driven crowbar switch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compact explosively-driven, metal-to-metal contact, solid dielectric switch was developed for use as a low-resistance, <10- mu OMEGA , low- inductance, < 10-nH, crowbar switch. A l00-milligram high-explosive charge is used to extrude a 0.090-in. plate through 0.040-in. polyethylene and achieve a hard current contact with a 0.625-in.-diameter die plate. The closure time, from the signal, which initiates the charge, to beginning of current rise in the switch, is 11.0 mu sec plus or minus 0.3 mu sec. In crowbar application the switch has carried 180 to 330 kA, which decays with a 1/e time of approximately 1.2 msec. (auth)

Dike, R.S.; Kewish, R.W. Jr.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire  

SciTech Connect

In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

Michael Hack

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IMPACT This project developed the heavy-duty ISX G natural gas engine with advanced emission reduction strategies, which demonstrated oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) emissions of 0.6 g...

250

Local population impacts of geothermal energy development in the Geysers: Calistoga region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The country-level population increase implications of two long-term geothermal development scenarios for the Geysers region in California are addressed. This region is defined to include the counties of Lake, Sonoma, Mendocino and Napa, all four in northern California. The development scenarios include two components: development for electrical energy production and direct use applications. Electrical production scenarios are derived by incorporating current development patterns into previous development scenarios by both industry and research organizations. The scenarios are made county-specific, specific to the type of geothermal system constructed, and are projected through the year 2000. Separate high growth rate and low growth rate scenarios are developed, based on a set of specified assumptions. Direct use scenarios are estimated from the nature of the available resource, existing local economic and demographic patterns, and available experience with various separate direct use options. From the composite development scenarios, required numbers of direct and indirect employees and the resultant in-migration patterns are estimated. In-migration patterns are compared to current county level population and ongoing trends in the county population change for each of the four counties. From this comparison, conclusions are drawn concerning the contributions of geothermal resource development to future population levels and the significance of geothermally induced population increase from a county planning perspective.

Haven, K.F.; Berg, V.; Ladson, Y.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NETL: Gasification Systems - Development of High-Pressure Dry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Project No.: DE-FC26-04NT42237 High-Pressure Solids Pump High-Pressure Solids Pump Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) is...

252

Development and characterization of a high CRI LED lamp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is to realize a high CRI LED lamp using the color mixing technique. We start from a high efficiency white… (more)

Meneghesso , Matteo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8220, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8220 (United States)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of manufacturing capability for high-concentration, high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the major results from a program to develop a manufacturable, high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cell and a cost-effective manufacturing facility. The program was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories through the Concentrator Initiative, and SunPower Corporation. The key achievements of the program include the demonstration of 26%-efficient silicon concentrator solar cells with design-point (20 W/cm{sup 2}) efficiencies over 25%. High-performance front-surface passivations; that were developed to achieve this result were verified to be absolutely stable against degradation by 475 days of field exposure at twice the design concentration. SunPower demonstrated pilot production of more than 1500 of these cells. This cell technology was also applied to pilot production to supply 7000 17.7-cm{sup 2} one-sun cells (3500 yielded wafers) that demonstrated exceptional quality control. The average efficiency of 21.3% for these cells approaches the peak efficiency ever demonstrated for a single small laboratory cell within 2% (absolute). Extensive cost models were developed through this program and calibrated by the pilot-production project. The production levels achieved indicate that SunPower could produce 7-10 MW of concentrator cells per year in the current facility based upon the cell performance demonstrated during the program.

Sinton, R.A.; Verlinden, P.J.; Crane, R.A.; Swanson, R.N. [SunPower Corp., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

System Impacts from Interconnection of Distributed Resources: Current Status and Identification of Needs for Further Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents and evaluates system impacts from the interconnection of distributed resources to transmission and distribution systems, including a focus on renewable distributed resource technologies. The report also identifies system impact-resolution approaches and actions, including extensions of existing approaches. Lastly, the report documents the current challenges and examines what is needed to gain a clearer understanding of what to pursue to better avoid or address system impact issues.

Basso, T. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing how JEDI II calculates economic impacts from wind projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s cap-and-trade and its impact on electricity markets.s planned cap-and-trade program for the electricity sector [

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Criteria for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 1–and Tyner, W. (2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on WorldClifford, P. (2009). Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 1–29. [Birur2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on World AgriculturalPolicies for Biofuel Production. Conservation Biology, 22(

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.

Tom Champness; Tony Worthen; John Finger

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of a Pilot Study Simulation to Investigate the Impact of Target Costing on Team Dynamics and Design Aesthetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target costing is widely accepted across the automobile manufacturing industries such as the Toyota Corporation followed by other manufacturing companies such as Nissan, Chrysler, Boeing, Sony, etc. However, its use in the construction industry has been limited. The application of target costing in the construction industry has been referred to as Target Value Design (TVD), which forms an important fragment of the whole lean delivery system, Integrated Project Delivery. For the purpose of studying the team dynamics and the impact of cost on aesthetics, this research is split in to the following two parts. 1. Conducting simple experiments /simulations with students, such as designing and building a product to target cost to explore the impact of cost on the design of the product and the team dynamics. 2. Exploring the challenges faced by the teams while working on TVD through literature review and Focus Group Interviews with construction industry professionals with experience in the TVD process. Similar to other lean simulations like the airplane game and the dice game, aimed at demonstrating the impact of lean, this simulation of designing a two feet (2’) tall wine glass holder with materials such as paper, Styrofoam plates, cups etc. is an attempt to understand the challenges of designing to target cost process. The simulation conducted is to mirror the real world TVD process. Results of the experiment conclude that cost does not have a negative influence on the design. There is no correlation between the high costs and better design, that is, the most expensive solutions are not always the best solutions. However, correlation existed between the target cost and the design aesthetics. Indeed, cost as a constraint aided the team in focusing on the design and developing solutions within the project constraints. The results of the experiment are similar to the practice of the TVD in reality as case studies and interviews arrive at similar conclusions. Finally, the experiment depicted that collaborating and working in a team might result in arguments but generates competitive design solutions without affecting the team dynamics. The research is of significance to construction industry professionals and owners to investigate the challenges and implications of implementing target costing in designing to target cost.

Gottipati, Udaya Naidu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development of a portable mechanical hysteresis measurement and imaging system for impact characterization in honeycomb sandwich structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Honeycomb sandwich materials are commonly used for aero-structures, but because the outer skins are typically thin, 2-10 plys, the structures are susceptible to impact damage. NDI methods such as tap tests, bond testers and TTU ultrasound are successfully deployed to find impact damage, but identifying the type/degree of damage is troublesome. As the type/degree of impact damage guides decisions by the maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) community regarding repair, the ability to characterize impacts is of interest. Previous work demonstrated that additional impact characterization may be gleaned from hysteresis loop area, as determined from an out-of-plane load-vs-displacement plot, where this parameter shows a correlation with impact energy. This presentation reports on current work involving the development of a portable hysteresis measurement and imaging system based on an instrumented tapper. Data processing and analysis methods that allow production of the load/displacement data from a single accelerometer are discussed, with additional reporting of tests of software to automatically vary pixel size during scanning to decrease C-scans inspection time.

Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K. [Center for NDE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

The design and development of a high-speed digital imaging system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to develop a high-speed digital imaging system is a for optically recording dynamic experimental mechanics events. Optical imaging ' valuable tool in the field of experimental mechanics because it yields full-field information about the stresses and displacements which develop in a material under steady-state or transient conditions. The first main design requirement for the system was to have an exposure time of less than fifty nanoseconds in order to avoid streaking of the images. Also, variable interframe times ranging from two to one hundred microseconds were required so that an appropriate time window of the event can be captured. The second main design function required that adequate spatial separation of each of the images be obtained. Finally, the recording medium had to preserve full, undisturbed gray-scale information and allow post-experiment image enhancement and processing to be performed. This last requirement translated into digital storage of the images. The high-speed digital imaging system that has been developed utilizes an acousto-optic deflector, or Bragg cell, to accomplish the necessary spatial separation of the images to be captured. The system employs a pulsed argon laser for its light source and uses a combination of charge-injection device cameras and a frame grabber to capture the images. The system was first evaluated by capturing static images of a test and a photoelastic compression specimen. The next evaluation phase involved grid capturing dynamic images of the stress waves travelling through a photoelastic impact specimen. The essential requirements for any high-speed recording system and the characteristics of existing systems are reviewed first, followed by a discussion of the essential elements of the new system. A detailed description of the arrangement and interaction between the system components is then presented, followed by the results from the evaluation experiments that have been performed. Finally, some comments concerning the further work needed to make the system fully operational are provided.

Thomas, Matthew Ray

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of high-power gyrotrons with gradually tapered cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In high power gyrotrons, the parasitic modes coupled with the operating mode cannot be avoided in the beam-wave interaction. These parasitic modes will decrease the efficiency of the gyrotrons. The purity of the operating mode affected by different tapers should be carefully studied. The steady-state self-consistent nonlinear theory for gyrotron with gradually tapered cavity is developed in this paper. A steady-state calculation code including 'cold cavity' and 'hot cavity' is designed. By comparison, a time-domain model analysis of gyrotron operation is also studied by particle-in-cell (PIC). It is found that the tapers of gyrotron have different influences on the modes coupling between the operating mode and the parasitic modes. During the study, an example of 94 GHz gyrotron with pure operating mode TE{sub 03} has been designed. The purity of the operating mode in the optimized cavity is up to -77 dB, and in output waveguide of the cavity is up to -76 dB. At the same time, the beam-wave interaction in the designed cavity has been simulated, too. An output power of 120 kW, corresponding to 41.6% efficiency and an oscillation frequency of 94.099 GHz have been achieved with a 50 kV, 6 A helical electron beam at a guiding magnetic field of 3.5485 T. The results show that the power in spurious modes of the optimized cavity may be kept far below than that of the traditional tapered cavity.

Lei Chaojun [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); The Chinese People's Armed Police Force Academy, Langfang 065000 (China); Yu Sheng; Niu Xinjian; Liu Yinghui; Li Hongfu; Li Xiang [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of an expert system for tackling the public's perception to climate-change impacts on petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change could cause significant impacts on human activities, which is especially true for regions that are of high latitude such as Canada. Petroleum industry is a main economic sector in Canada's prairie, where a number of its production and ... Keywords: Adaptation, Climate change, Expert system, Knowledge acquisition, Petroleum industry

Y. F. Huang; G. H. Huang; Z. Y. Hu; I. Maqsood; A. Chakma

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein reservoir being the Marcellus Shale play. The Marcellus Shale play stretches across an area of 95,000 square

Mohaghegh, Shahab

270

Fundamental Studies and Development of III-N Visible LEDs for High-Power Solid-State Lighting Applications  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this program is to understand in a fundamental way the impact of strain, defects, polarization, and Stokes loss in relation to unique device structures upon the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and efficiency droop (ED) of III-nitride (III-N) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and to employ this understanding in the design and growth of high-efficiency LEDs capable of highly-reliable, high-current, high-power operation. This knowledge will be the basis for our advanced device epitaxial designs that lead to improved device performance. The primary approach we will employ is to exploit new scientific and engineering knowledge generated through the application of a set of unique advanced growth and characterization tools to develop new concepts in strain-, polarization-, and carrier dynamics-engineered and low-defect materials and device designs having reduced dislocations and improved carrier collection followed by efficient photon generation. We studied the effects of crystalline defect, polarizations, hole transport, electron-spillover, electron blocking layer, underlying layer below the multiplequantum- well active region, and developed high-efficiency and efficiency-droop-mitigated blue LEDs with a new LED epitaxial structures. We believe new LEDs developed in this program will make a breakthrough in the development of high-efficiency high-power visible III-N LEDs from violet to green spectral region.

Dupuis, Russell

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of the Impacts of Distribution-Connected PV Using High-Speed Data Sets: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper, presented at the IEEE Green Technologies Conference 2013, utilizes information from high resolution data acquisition systems developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and deployed on a high-penetration PV distribution system to analyze the variability of different electrical parameters. High-resolution solar irradiance data is also available in the same area which is used to characterize the available resource and how it affects the electrical characteristics of the study circuit. This paper takes a data-driven look at the variability caused by load and compares those results against times when significant PV production is present. Comparisons between the variability in system load and the variability of distributed PV generation are made.

Bank, J.; Mather, B.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Method for the separation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is provided for separating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) plastics from each other. The ABS and HIPS plastics are shredded to provide a selected particle size. The shredded particles of the ABS and HIPS plastics are applied to a solution having a solution density in a predefined range between 1.055 gm/cm.sup.3 and 1.07 gm/cm.sup.3, a predefined surface tension in a range between 22 dynes/cm to 40 dynes/cm and a pH in the range of 1.77 and 2.05. In accordance with a feature of the invention, the novel method is provided for separating ABS and HIPS, two solid thermoplastics which have similar densities by selectively modifying the effective density of the HIPS using a binary solution with the appropriate properties, such as pH, density and surface tension, such as a solution of acetic acid and water or a quaternary solution having the appropriate density, surface tension, and pH.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Arman, Bayram (Amherst, NY); Karvelas, Dimitrios E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pomykala, Jr., Joseph A. (Crest Hill, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Japanese and American competition in the development of scroll compressors and its impact on the American air conditioning industry  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the technological development of scroll compressors and its impact on the air conditioning equipment industry. Scroll compressors, although considered to be the compressors of the future for energy-efficient residential heat pumps and possibly for many other applications, are difficult to manufacture on a volume-production base. The manufacturing process requires computer-aided, numerically controlled tools for high-precision fabrication of major parts. Japan implemented a global strategy for dominating the technological world market in the 1970s, and scroll compressor technology benefited from the advent of new-generation machine tools. As a result, if American manufacturers of scroll compressors purchase or are essentially forced to purchase numerically controlled tools from Japan in the future, they will then become dependent on their own competitors because the same Japanese conglomerates that make numerically controlled tools also make scroll compressors. This study illustrates the importance of the basic machine tool industry to the health of the US economy. Without a strong machine tool industry, it is difficult for American manufacturers to put innovations, whether patented or not, into production. As we experience transformation in the air conditioning and refrigeration market, it will be critical to establish a consistent national policy to provide healthy competition among producers, to promote innovation within the industry, to enhance assimilation of new technology, and to eliminate practices that are incompatible with these goals. 72 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Ushimaru, Kenji (Energy International, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Impact induced response spectrum for the safety evaluation of the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic impact to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel caused by heavy load drop is analyzed. The impact calculation is carried out by applying the ABAQUS computer code. An impact-induced response spectrum is constructed in order to evaluate whether the HFIR vessel and the shutdown mechanism may be disabled. For the frequency range less than 10 Hz, the maximum spectral velocity of impact is approximately equal to that of the HFIR seismic design-basis spectrum. For the frequency range greater than 10 Hz, the impact-induced response spectrum is shown to cause no effect to the control rod and the shutdown mechanism. An earlier seismic safety assessment for the HFIR control and shutdown mechanism was made by EQE. Based on EQE modal solution that is combined with the impact-induced spectrum, it is concluded that the impact will not cause any damage to the shutdown mechanism, even while the reactor is in operation. The present method suggests a general approach for evaluating the impact induced damage to the reactor by applying the existing finite element modal solution that has been carried out for the seismic evaluation of the reactor.

Chang, S.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Numerical Approach for Development of High Elastic Casting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is suggested how to make high elastic aluminum alloys using ... Frequency Modulation Effect on the Solidification of Alloy 718 Fusion Zone.

276

Development of High Strength Alloys 945 / 945X for HPHT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These alloys are manufactured as rods, mechanical tubes, pump shafts and wires. ... A High-Strength Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy for Severe Oil and Gas Environments.

277

Development of Resistance Spot Welding Applying Pulsed High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the fact, we clarify that the pulsed current pattern, the combination of short holding and short high current, can improve cross tension strength of HSS and ...

278

Research and Development of High Performance AlN Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Therefore, AlN has been used for heat dissipative material of high power devices like IGBT (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) and LED (Light Emitting Diode) ...

279

Recent Developments in High Strength Steels for Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy sectors which includes conventional oil/natural gas, shale gas, and wind energy. ... Development of API X70 on a Thin-Slab Casting and Rolling Mill.

280

Development of a High Recovery Process Flowsheet for Appia's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Elliot Lake mines were major producers of uranium between 1957 and 1996 and significant yttrium producers. Appia Energy Corp. is developing ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

(USC) Power Plant Development and High Temperature Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For further improvement of thermal efficiency and decreasing CO2 emission China intents to develop the advanced USC power plant with the ...

282

High-Temperature Nano-derived Sensor Development for Detection ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... coal-fired power plants are a significant concern for environmental safety. Emission of those must be monitored through the whole coal process. Developing ...

283

Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North ...

284

High-Temperature Interlaminar Tension Test Method Development ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, standard test methods only address the characterization of interlaminar tensile ... This work addresses the development of a new test technique for the ...

285

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The impact of manufacturing offshore on technology development paths in the automotive and optoelectronics industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a two-case study of the impact of manufacturing offshore on the technology trajectory of the firm and the industry. It looks in particular at the automotive and optoelectronics industries. The ...

Fuchs, Erica R. H. (Erica Renee H.), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Impact of Alternative Energy Prices, Tenure Arrangements and Irrigation Technologies on a Typical Texas High Plains Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major contributing factor in crop production on the Texas High Plains. It is responsible for greatly increasing crop production and farm income for the region. Two factors, a declining groundwater supply and increasing production costs, are of primary concern because they impact on farm operations and producer economic viability. A recursive linear programming model for a typical Texas High Plains irrigated farm was developed to evaluate expected impact of price changes, tenure and new technology. The model includes a Fortran sub-routine that adjusts irrigation factors each year based on the linear programming solution of the previous year. After calculating new pumping energy requirements, well yield, and pumping lift, the Fortran component updates the linear programming model. This procedure continues automatically to the end of a specified planning period or to economic exhaustion of the groundwater, whichever occurs first. Static applications of the model, in a deep water situation, showed that a natural gas price increase from $1.50 to $2.20 per thousand cubic feet (mcf) would result in reductions in irrigation levels. Irrigation was terminated when the price of natural gas reached about $7.00 per mcf. In a shallow water situation, much higher natural gas prices were reached ($3.60 per mcf) before short-run adjustments in farm organization began to occur. Under furrow irrigation, irrigation was terminated when the natural gas price reached $7.00 per mcf. Increased natural gas prices impact heavily on returns above variable costs (up to 15 percent reductions) for a 60 percent natural gas price increase. The effects of rising natural gas prices over a longer period of time were more significant. Annual returns (above variable and fixed costs) were reduced by as much as 30 percent, and the present value of returns to water was reduced by as much as 80 percent as the natural gas price was increased annually by $0.25 per mcf (from $1.50 per mcf). The economic life of deep groundwater was shortened by as much as 18 years. Renter-operators are even more vulnerable to rising natural gas prices than are owner-operators. With rising natural gas prices, profitability over time for the renter is low. As natural gas prices continue to increase, the greater will be the incentives for renter-operators to seek more favorable rental terms such as a sharing of irrigation costs. With the problem of a declining groundwater supply and rising natural gas prices, an economic incentive exists for producers to find new technologies that will enable them to make more efficient use of remaining groundwater and of natural gas. Substantial economic gains appear feasible through improved pump efficiency. Increasing pump efficiency from 50 to 75 percent will not increase the economic life of the water supply, but can improve farm profits over time; e.g., the present value of groundwater was increased 33 percent for a typical farm with an aquifer containing 250 feet of saturated thickness and 15 percent for 75 feet of saturated thickness. Improved irrigation distribution systems can help conserve water and reduce irrigation costs. Results indicate that irrigation can be extended by 11 or more years with 50 percent improved distribution efficiency. In addition, the increase in present value of groundwater on the 1.69 million irrigated acres of the Texas High Plains was estimated to be $995 million with 50 percent improved efficiency. Limitations in borrowing can substantially reduce annual net returns. This analysis suggests that the farmer can economically justify very high costs of borrowing rather than a limitation of funds available for operating expenses.

Petty, J. A.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Whitson, R. E.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

High Energy Photoemission: Development of a New Electrostatic Lens for a Novel High Resolution Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

In recent years growing interest has been dedicated to photoemission experiments at high energy because a significant bulk sensitivity in photoemission measurements can be achieved only by increasing the kinetic energy of the analysed photoelectrons. Within the 5th European framework, a RTD project named VOLPE (VOLume PhotoEmission from solids) has been funded. Aim of the project is to measure bulk electronic properties on solids by the Photoemission Spectroscopy with Synchrotron Radiation preserving an energy resolution comparable to modern surface sensitive photoemission spectra. This will be possible by performing photoemission experiments in a photolectron Kinetic Energy range of 6-10 keV, keeping the overall energy resolution at 20-30 meV. Presently, the beamline ID16 at ESRF posses the necessary characteristics (1011 photons/sec and 15-100 meV resolution at photon energies between 6 keV and 15 keV) to perform these class of experiments, while a new spectrometer is being developed in the framework of VOLPE project. This spectrometer is an hemispherical deflector analyser with electrostatic input lens and 2D position sensitive detector. The spectrometer will be characterised by an ultimate resolving power of 3 105 at 10 keV. We will report on the particular lens system developed for this project which is optimised to guarantee very high retarding ratio, between 50 and 600, with constant linear magnification. A prototype of this lens has been realised and we will report on the first measurements performed at INFM, Unita Roma Tre.

Paolicelli, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Offi, F. [INFM, Unita Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84 -I 00146 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G. [INFM, Unita Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84 -I 00146 Rome (Italy); Dip. di Fisica 'E. Amaldi', Universita Roma Tre Via della Vasca Navale 84-I 00146 Rome (Italy)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of Ultra High Gradient and High Q{sub 0} Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We report on the recent progress at Jefferson Lab in developing ultra high gradient and high Q{sub 0} superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for future SRF based machines. A new 1300 MHz 9-cell prototype cavity is being fabricated. This cavity has an optimized shape in terms of the ratio of the peak surface field (both magnetic and electric) to the acceleration gradient, hence the name low surface field (LSF) shape. The goal of the effort is to demonstrate an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 10{sup 10} at 2 K in a 9-cell SRF cavity. Fine-grain niobium material is used. Conventional forming, machining and electron beam welding method are used for cavity fabrication. New techniques are adopted to ensure repeatable, accurate and inexpensive fabrication of components and the full assembly. The completed cavity is to be first mechanically polished to a mirror-finish, a newly acquired in-house capability at JLab, followed by the proven ILC-style processing recipe established already at JLab. In parallel, new single-cell cavities made from large-grain niobium material are made to further advance the cavity treatment and processing procedures, aiming for the demonstration of an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 2?10{sup 10} at 2K.

Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Follkie, James E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Harris, Teena M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kushnick, Peter W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Machie, Danny [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Martin, Robert E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Perry, Era A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Slack, Gary L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Williams, R. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC, Menlo Park, California, (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC, Menlo Park, California, (United States); Hao, J. K. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking University, Beijing (China)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Develop safe, low-cost method of manufacturing rechargeable, high conductivity lithium batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of much of this work is the rechargeable lithium battery, because of its high energy density, and the use of solid polymer electrolytes (SPE`s) for ease of fabrication and lightness of weight. The classical solid polymer electrolyte is based on the use of salts such as lithium triflate dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or poly(propylene oxide). This specific polymer electrolyte has severe limitations. Poly(ethylene oxide) is a microcrystalline polymer at 25 C, and ion migration occurs only in the 20--30% of the material that is amorphous. Useable conductivities (10{sup {minus}5} S/cm) can be achieved only when the material is heated above 80 C. Two approaches to generate higher electrolyte conductivities at ambient temperatures are being developed. In the first, organic solvents are added to the polymer to plasticize it and dissolve the microcrystallites. This increases the conductivity but raises the possibility of fires if the battery casing ruptures during high charge or discharge conditions or when the device is punctured by impact. The alternative is to design new polymers that are good solid electrolyte media but which are completely amorphous and have low glass transition temperatures. Such a polymer is MEEP (poly[bis(methoxyethoxy)phosphazene]), first synthesized in the author`s laboratories. The main objective was to develop crosslinking methods for MEEP which could be used on a mass production scale to produce thin film rechargeable lithium batteries. A further objective was to assemble working energy storage devices to investigate the feasibility that this system could be developed commercially.

Allcock, H.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal...

293

DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE ULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are needed to maintain the reliability of aging power plants for long term operation. The high temperature transducers are necessary to realize SHM (monitor wall thickness of the pipings

A. Baba; C. T. Searfass; B. R. Tittmann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development and optimization of high-throughput zebrafish screening platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high-throughput zebrafish screening platform is a revolutionary tool that enables subcellular precision in vivo whole animal screening of Danio Rerio. It can perform laser surgery and/or imaging in less than twenty ...

Koo, Bryan Kyo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ?10-?m crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation of the crystal-tolerant HLW glasses for higher waste loading. A physical modeling effort revealed that the Stokes and Richardson-Zaki equations can be used to adequately predict the accumulation rate of spinel crystals of different sizes and concentrations in the glass discharge riser of HLW melters. The determined shape factor for the glass beads was only 0.73% lower than the theoretical shape factor for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for the spinel crystals matched the theoretically predicted value to within 10% and was smaller than that of the beads, given the larger drag force caused by the larger surface area-to-volume ratio of the octahedral crystals. In the hindered settling experiments, both the glass bead and spinel suspensions were found to follow the predictions of the Richardson-Zaki equation with the exponent n = 3.6 and 2.9 for glass beads and spinel crystals, respectively.

Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of The High Speed Pellet Injector For Ignitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENEA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are collaborating on the development of a four barrel, two-stage pneumatic injector for the Ignitor experiment, featuring two innovative concepts: (i) the proper shaping of the ...

Coppi, Bruno

297

High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

Joseph Pierre

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Development Effects of High-Speed Rail Stations and Implications for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA Rail System The CalSpeed research group at theresearch and development, and Figure California High- Speed Rail

Sands, Brian D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Approaches To Crisis Prevention In Lean Product Development By High Performance Teams And Through Risk Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates crisis prevention in lean product development, focusing on high performance teams and risk management methods.

Oehmen, Josef

300

The climate impacts of high-speed rail and air transportation : a global comparative analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concerns about the energy use and climate impacts of the transportation sector have prompted policymakers to consider a variety of options to meet the future mobility needs of the world's population, while ...

Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted radiotherapeutics currently is a daunting task. Our central hypothesis is that improvements in 211At radiochemistry are critically dependent on gaining an understanding of and compensating for the effects of radiolysis induced by 211At {alpha}-particles. Because of the widespread interest in labeling antibodies, antibody fragments and peptides with 211At, our proposed work plan will initially focus on reagents that we have developed for this purpose. Part of our strategy is the use of synthetic precursors immobilized on polymeric resins or perfluorous and triarylphosphonium supports. Their use could eliminate the need for a purification step to separate unreacted tin precursor from labeled product and hopefully provide a simple kit technology that could be utilized at other institutions. The specific aims of this project are: (1) To optimze methods for 211At production and isolation of 211At from cyclotron targets; (2) To develop convenient and reproducible methodologies for high activity level and high specific activity radiohalogenation of biomolecules with 211At; (3) to develop a procedure for extending the shelf-life of 211At beyond a few hours so that this radionuclide can be utilized at centers remote from its site of production; and (4) to work out high activity level synthesis methods for utilizing support immobilized tin precursors for 211At labeling. If we are successful in achieving our goals, the radiochemical methodologies that are developed could greatly facilitate the use of 211At-labeled targeted cancer therapeutics in patients, even at institutions that are distant from the few sites currently available for 211At production.

MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

TRIGA high wt -% LEU fuel development program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The principal purpose of this work was to investigate the characteristics of TRIGA fuel where the contained U-235 was in a relatively high weight percent (wt %) of LEU (low enriched uranium - enrichment of less than 20%) rather than a relatively low weight percent of HEU (high enriched uranium). Fuel with up to 45 wt % U was fabricated and found to be acceptable after metallurgical examinations, fission product retention tests and physical property examinations. Design and safety analysis studies also indicated acceptable prompt negative temperature coefficient and core lifetime characteristics for these fuels.

West, G.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development  

SciTech Connect

Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompasses—fuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additions—significant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed during the period February 21, 2006 through August 21, 2006 is summarized herein. During this period, efforts were focused on 5 kWe bundle testing, development of on-cell reformation, the conceptual design of an advanced module, and the development of a manufacturing roadmap for cells and bundles. A 5 kWe SOFC system was built and delivered to the Pennsylvania State University; fabrication of a second 5 kWe SOFC for delivery to Montana State University was initiated. Cell testing and microstructural analysis in support of these efforts was also conducted.

Joseph F. Pierre

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

Session: Why avian impacts are a concern in wind energy development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This lunchtime session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session provided a more detailed overview of the environmental community's perspective on wind power's impacts on birds. The presentation described how wind projects impact birds, detailing the species distribution of collisions at various sites around the US and discussing problems such as avoidance, habitat disturbance, and cumulative effects on populations. The presentation, ''Wind Turbines and Birds'', was given by Gerald Winegrad from the American Bird Conservancy.

Winegrad, Gerald

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The development of high definition television : an ecology of games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is an analysis of the forces that shaped the overall character of a new US television system, high definition or HDTV, between the early 1980s and 2010, with a primary focus on the period leading up the Federal ...

Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

312

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NRELs JEDI Model  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 M. Costanti Bozeman, Montana Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 M. Costanti

313

Report: Evaluating the Impact of Newer Researcher Training & Development: Which Direction Forward? (Report of a Joint Seminar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.srhe.ac.uk/publications.gpi.asp ). Tony led the first session by providing an update on the practice of evaluating impact of researcher development programmes, to include higher education staff with research roles as well as postgraduate researchers, with suggestions about how... this? - keeping and nurturing the best researchers (stemming the brain drain); - generating research income for institutions, grant awards but also REF returns subsequently; - PRES & CROS survey results may be a criterion for government funding...

Gough, Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Economic Development Impacts from Wind Power in the Western Governors' Association States (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Governors' Association created the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Committee (CDEAC) "to utilize the region's diverse resources to produce affordable, sustainable, and environmentally reponsible energy." This conference poster, prepared for WINDPOWER 2007 in Los Angeles, outlines the economic impact to the Western United States from new wind energy projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

High-R window technology development. Phase 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 ``super`` windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

Arasteh, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced Boost System Developing for High EGR Applications  

SciTech Connect

To support industry efforts of clean and efficient internal combustion engine development for passenger and commercial applications • This program focuses on turbocharger improvement for medium and light duty diesel applications, from complete system optimization percepective to enable commercialization of advanced diesel combustion technologies, such as HCCI/LTC. • Improve combined turbocharger efficiency up to 10% or fuel economy by 3% on FTP cycle at Tier II Bin 5 emission level.

Sun, Harold

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of fluorides for high power laser optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The laser-assisted thermonuclear fusion program has significant needs for improved optical materials with high transmission in the ultraviolet, and with low values of nonlinear index of refraction. Lithium fluoride (LiF) possesses a combination of optical properties which are of potential use. Single-crystalline LiF is limited by low mechanical strength. In this program, we investigated the technique of press-forging to increase the mechanical strength. LiF single crystals were press-forged over the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C to produce fine-grained polycrystalline material.

Ready, J.F.; Vora, H.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

High-R Window Technology Development : Phase II Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 super'' windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

Arasteh, Dariush

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Coordinated Cyber-Physical Attacks, High-Impact Low-Frequency (HILF) Events, and Risk Management in the Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the North American electricity grid is one of the most reliable power systems in the world, the high-impact low-frequency (HILF) class of rare but potentially catastrophically damaging events is of growing concern in the industry. This white paper summarizes key activities under two EPRI initiatives that address a HILF cyber-physical attack as well as risk assessment approaches and management tools relevant to a HILF event.EPRI’s Cyber Security and Privacy Program ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Text Version  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Impacts of Offshore Wind Impacts of Offshore Wind November 20, 2013 Coordinator: Thank you all for standing by. All lines have been placed on a listen-only mode throughout the duration of today's conference. Today's conference is being recorded. If you do have any objections, you may disconnect at this time. I would now like to turn the call over to Ian Baring-Gould. Thank you. You may begin. Ian Baring-Gould: Hi, this is Ian Baring-Gould from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. I want to thank you all for joining us for our call - or on our webinar today. This is our standard monthly series of webinars for the stakeholder engagement and outreach activities of the wind program under the Department of Energy. And pleased today that we get to have a series of presentations on a

324

ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change. Climate change in some regions is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of geoengineering activities have been proposed: carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and solar radiation management (SRM, or sunlight reflection methods), whereby a small percentage of sunlight is reflected back into space to offset warming from greenhouse gases. In this review, we evaluate some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, including the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to Earth. Specifically, we find evidence that, if implemented successfully, some CDR methods and continue use of some SRM methods) could alleviate some of the deleterious ecosystem impacts associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.

Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Mace, Georgina; Jackson, Robert B.; Shepherd, John; Liss, Peter; Leinen, Margaret; Schimel, David; Vaughan, Naomi E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Boyd, Philip W.; Norby, Richard J.; Caldeira, Ken; Merikanto, Joonas; Artaxo, Paulo; Melillo, Jerry; Morgan, M. Granger

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of a solar thermal receiver for high temperature applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal receiver for point focus collectors is being constructed. Its design, which is based upon experience with a commercial receiver, employs the advantages of that receiver and improves some of its features. The new receiver uses as a buffer between the cavity surface and the heat transfer fluid a thermal mass, which with a very small temperature drop penalty smooths the flux distribution to eliminate hot spots. Maximum operating temperature range was extended from 620/sup 0/C to 870/sup 0/C and receiver efficiency was improved. The design of the receiver enables significant spillage flux at the receiver to be used. Thus, lower quality optics can be employed in applications not requiring very high temperatures. Design and construction features of the receiver are presented and the testing program is described.

Bohn, M.; Bessler, G.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of high efficiency collector plates. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Composite metal technology was used to manufacture intermetallic compound (IC) absorption surfaces and to combine them integrally with composite metal tube-in-sheet collector plates. Five material systems in which Al was one component metal and Fe, Cr, or Ni and their alloy was the other pair, were evaluated. All intermetallic compounds had high solar absorptance ..cap alpha.. approx. = 0.9. The AlNi was most promising and ..cap alpha.. > or = 0.95 and epsilon approx. = 0.3 were obtained over a broad range of compounding conditions. After eight months exposure in a flat plate collector enclosure the characteristic properties of AlNi surfaces remained virtually unchanged. Only LCS/Cu composite metal tube-in-sheet collector plates could be manufactured successfully. The technical difficulties associated with integrating the intermetallic compound and tube-in-sheet technologies make the manufacturing of composite metal collector plates at the time being economically unfeasible.

Santala, T.; Sabol, R.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change, which is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of activities have been proposed: solar radiation management (SRM), or sunlight reflection methods, which involves reflecting a small percentage of solar light back into space to offset the warming due to greenhouse gases, and carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. This report evaluates some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, which include the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to the Earth. Therefore, the question considered in this review is whether CDR and SRM methods would exacerbate or alleviate the deleterious impacts on ecosystems associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change, which is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of activities have been proposed: solar radiation management (SRM), or sunlight reflection methods, which involves reflecting a small percentage of solar light back into space to offset the warming due to greenhouse gases, and carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. This report evaluates some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, which include the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to the Earth. Therefore, the question considered in this review is whether CDR and SRM methods would exacerbate or alleviate the deleterious impacts on ecosystems associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.

Russell, Lynn M [University of California, San Diego; Jackson, Robert B [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A model of collaboration between developed and developing clusters of high-tech innovation : benefits and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation is not produced in an isolated fashion but rather it is a highly interactive process where firms establish a wide variety of networks. This concept is valid for any cluster at any stage of development. Innovation ...

Botero Ramírez, Juan Carlos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of Design Guidelines for Soil Embedded Post Systems Using Wide-flange I-beam to Contain Truck Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anti ram perimeter barriers are part of the protection of important facilities such as power plants, air ports and embassies against unrestricted vehicle access. Many different systems can be used to achieve the containment goal. One of these systems makes use of soil embedded posts either single posts if the soil is hard enough or groups of soil embedded posts tied together by beams if the soil is not hard enough for a single post to stop the in-coming truck. The design of these soil embedded posts needs to take account a number of influencing factors which include the soil strength and stiffness, the post strength and stiffness, the mass of the vehicle and its approach velocity. This dissertation describes the work done to develop a set of design recommendations to select the embedment of a single post or group of posts. The post is a steel beam with an H shape cross section: W14X109 for the single post system and W14X90 for the group system with a double beam made of square hollow steel section HSS8X8X1/2. The spacing of the posts for the group includes 2.44 m, 4.88 m, and 7.32 m. The soil strength varies from loose sand and soft clay to very dense sand and very hard clay. The vehicle has a mass of 6800 kg and the velocities include 80 km/h, 65 km/h, and 50 km/h. The design guidelines presented here are based on 10 medium scale pendulum impact tests, 2 medium scale bogie impact tests, 1 full scale impact test on a single post, 1 full scale impact test on a group of 8 side by side posts with a 5.2 m spacing and connected with two beams, approximately 150 4-D numerical simulations of full scale impact tests using LS-DYNA, as well as fundamental theoretical concepts.

Lim, Seok Gyu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of a high-power lithium-ion battery.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Safety is a key concern for a high-power energy storage system such as will be required in a hybrid vehicle. Present lithium-ion technology, which uses a carbon/graphite negative electrode, lacks inherent safety for two main reasons: (1) carbon/graphite intercalates lithium at near lithium potential, and (2) there is no end-of-charge indicator in the voltage profile that can signal the onset of catastrophic oxygen evolution from the cathode (LiCoO{sub 2}). Our approach to solving these safety/life problems is to replace the graphite/carbon negative electrode with an electrode that exhibits stronger two-phase behavior further away from lithium potential, such as Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. Cycle-life and pulse-power capability data are presented in accordance with the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) test procedures, as well as a full-scale design based on a spreadsheet model.

Jansen, A. N.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Pilot Study to Evaluate Development Effort for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Pilot Study to Evaluate Development Effort for High Performance Computing Victor Basili1 the development time for programs written for high performance computers (HPC). To attack this relatively novel students in a graduate level High Performance Computing class at the University of Maryland. We collected

Basili, Victor R.

332

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102009-2918 October 2009 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on an earlier draft of

333

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced Laser Diagnostics Development for the Characterization of Gaseous High Speed Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of high-speed flows represents a challenging problem in the fluid dynamics field due to the presence of chemical reactions and non-equilibrium effects. Hypersonic flights, where speeds reach Mach 5 and above, are particularly influenced by these effects, resulting in a direct impact on the flow and consequently on the aerodynamic performance of a vehicle traveling at these speeds. The study of hypersonic flow conditions requires the experimental capability of determining local temperatures, pressures and velocities using non-intrusive techniques. Furthermore, the simultaneous measurement of two or more variables in a complex flow boosts the amount of information that is obtained since valuable correlations can be established. This research includes the design, construction and characterization of a hypersonic flow apparatus explicitly intended as a tool for advanced laser diagnostics development. This apparatus is characterized by its pulsed operation mode that translates into a significant reduction in mass flow rates and can be operated for long periods at Mach numbers ranging from 2.8 to 6.2. The flow conditions during the uniform flow time interval of each pulse vary by less than 1%, generating a flow of sufficient quality for quantitative measurements. The development of a laser diagnostic technique, the VENOM technique, which is a non-intrusive method to provide simultaneous 2-D measurements of the mean and instantaneous fluctuations in two-component velocity and temperature is also presented. This technique represents the first single diagnostic capable of instantaneous two-component velocimetry and thermometry in a gaseous flow field by combining two Nitric Oxide Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence methods: two-component Molecular Tagging Velocimetry and two-line thermometry, employing the nascent NO(v"=1) arising from the NO2 photodissociation as a molecular tracer. The VENOM technique is expected to be not only applicable to cold high-speed flows, which is the focus of the present work, but also to combustion and other reactive or high-enthalpy flow fields.

Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

IMPACT OF URANIUM AND THORIUM ON HIGH TIO2 CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focused on the potential impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. All but one of the study glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which is typically found in DWPF-type glasses and had no practical impact on the durability of the glass. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the study glasses and the viscosities of the glasses were well predicted by the current DWPF models. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE/EIS-0303D; High-Level Waste Tank Closure Draft Environmental Impact Statement (November 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0303D EIS-0303D DRAFT November 2000 Summary S-iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Savannah River Site, High-Level Waste Tank Closure Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0303D), Aiken, SC. CONTACT: For additional information or to submit comments on this environmental impact statement (EIS), write or call: Andrew R. Grainger, NEPA Compliance Officer U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office Building 742A, Room 183 Aiken, South Carolina 29802 Attention: Tank Closure EIS Local and Nationwide Telephone: (800) 881-7292 Email: nepa@srs.gov The EIS is also available on the internet at: http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/docs/docs.htm For general information on the process that DOE follows in complying with the National Environmental

337

Accession No. 4. Title and Subtitle Impacts of Energy Developments on the Texas Transportation System Infrastructure 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas’s energy sector has a critical impact—historically and currently—on both the state economy and the Texas transportation system. The state’s various transportation modes, including rail, highways, pipelines, and ports, form a system that supports the energy sector in a number of ways. Examples include the (a) movement of various components during the construction and implementation of the energy source (e.g., wind turbines and solar farms), (b) provision of enabling infrastructure (e.g., transmission lines), and (c) movement of the intermediate and final products in some energy supply chains (e.g., low sulfur mid-west coal by Class 1 unit trains to the major coal burning plants in Texas). It is thus critical that TxDOT develop a better understanding of the current and future impacts of the energy sector on Texas’s transportation system, as well as quantify these impacts to ensure both adequate maintenance and its future sustainability. 17. Key Words Texas transportation system, energy, supply chains, wind turbines, solar farms, transmission lines, coal, oil, natural gas, environmental. 19. Security Classif. (of report)

A Prozzi; Sergey Grebenschikov; Ambarish Banerjee; Jorge Prozzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 percent)). Cumulative wind turbine capacity installed inper capita income of wind turbine development (measured inour sample, cumulative wind turbine capacity on a per person

J., Brown

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hydrogen Production from Biomass via Indirect Gasification: The Impact of NREL Process Development Unit Gasifier Correlations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of updated gasifier correlations developed by NREL to predict biomass gasification products and Minimum Hydrogen Selling Price.

Kinchin, C. M.; Bain, R. L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Volume 6, Part 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Part 1 6, Part 1 Appendices A-I July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Impact of unsteady flow processes on the performance of a high speed axial flow compressor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the unsteady interactions between blade rows in a high Mach number, highly-loaded compressor stage. Two straight vane/rotor configurations with different axial spacing between vane and rotor are ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The impact of covariance localization for radar data on enKF analyses of a developing MCS: Observing system simulation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) were performed to assess the impact of covariance localization of radar data on ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) analyses of a developing convective system. Simulated WSR-88D radar observations ...

Ryan A. Sobash; David J. Stensrud

343

The Impact of Covariance Localization for Radar Data on EnKF Analyses of a Developing MCS: Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) were performed to assess the impact of covariance localization of radar data on ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) analyses of a developing convective system. Simulated Weather Surveillance Radar-...

Ryan A. Sobash; David J. Stensrud

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Detachable high heel shoe construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal on this investigation was to develop a detachable high heel shoe construction that could enter the current high heel market. The impact of high heel shoes on women's fashion is enormous but there are associated ...

Morales, Alfredo Louis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Impact of Stochastic Convection on Ensemble Forecasts of Tropical Cyclone Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two versions of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) global ensemble, with and without a stochastic convection scheme, are compared regarding their performance in predicting the development and evolution of tropical ...

Andrew Snyder; Zhaoxia Pu; Carolyn A. Reynolds

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s recently-adopted targets for developing renewable electricity—wind, solar, and biomass—would require expansion on an unprecedented scale in China and relative to existing global installations. An important question ...

Zhang, X.

347

An analysis of the impact of mergers between community development corporations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the occurrence of mergers between community development corporations (CDC's) in the United States in the past five years. The research examines how mergers between CDC's affect their capacity to achieve ...

Haque, Shoma S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Development of a High-Pressure/High-Temperature Downhole Turbine Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project as originally outlined has been to achieve a viable downhole direct current (DC) power source for extreme high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) environments of >25,000 psi and >250 C. The Phase I investigation posed and answered specific questions about the power requirements, mode of delivery and form factor the industry would like to see for downhole turbine generator tool for the HPHT environment, and noted specific components, materials and design features of that commercial system that will require upgrading to meet the HPHT project goals. During the course of Phase I investigation the scope of the project was HPHT downhole DC power. Phase I also investigated the viability of modifying a commercial expanded, without additional cost expected to the project, to include the addition of HT batteries to the power supply platform.

Timothy F. Price

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of High-Temperature/High-Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature/ Temperature/ High-Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor Background The Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMI) Program provides a mechanism for cooperative research among these institutions, the private sector, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy. The program provides for the exchange of technical information to raise the overall level of HBCU/OMI competitiveness with other institutions in the field of fossil

350

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Tooele County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Tooele County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants Nikhil Mongha, MBA, MS Carollo Engineers Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development College of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 August 2006 DOE/GO-102006-2353 Contract No. DE-FG48-05R810736 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

351

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Utah County, Utah from the Development of Wind Power Plants  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Utah County, Utah from the Development of Wind Power Plants Nikhil Mongha, MBA, MS Carollo Engineers Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development College of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 May 2006 DOE/GO-102006-2316 DE-FG48-05R810736 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Special thanks to Marshall Goldberg for his assistance with the analysis and Sarah Wright and Christine Watson Mikell for their review of this report. ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

352

Analysis of the Economic Impact on Box Elder County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Box Elder County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants Nikhil Mongha, MBA, MS Carollo Engineers Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development College of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 August 2006 DOE/GO-102006-2350 Contract No. DE-FG48-05R810736 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

353

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Technical analysis. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the detailed results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report examines the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This summary presents the significant results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report summarizes the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phases of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

SunShot Initiative: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Productization of Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated PV Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated PV Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated PV Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated PV Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Development and Productization of

356

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement: A detailed environmental analysis for any proposed major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. A tool to assist in decision-making, it describes the positive and negative environmental effects of the proposed undertaking and alternatives. A draft EIS is issued, followed by a final EIS. Scoping: An early and open process in which the public is invited to participate in identi- fying issues and alternatives to be con- sidered in this EIS. DOE allows a minimum of 30 days for the receipt of public comments. Alternatives: A range of courses of action that would meet the agency's purpose and need for action. NEPA requires that an EIS con- sider a No Action Alternative. Comment Period: A regulatory minimum 45-day

357

Record of Decision for the Disposition of Surplus Highly Envirched Uranium Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19 19 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 151 / Monday, August 5, 1996 / Notices contact: Carol M. Borgstrom, Director, Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585, Telephone: 202-586-4600 or leave a message at 800-472-2756. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On July 17, 1996, the Department published a notice in the Federal Register (61 FR 37247) announcing its intent to prepare an environmental impact statement for interim storage of plutonium at the RFETS and the commencement of a public scoping period that was to continue until August 16, 1996. The July 17, 1996, notice also announced a public scoping meeting scheduled for August 6, 1996. In response to a stakeholder's request, the Department is rescheduling the public scoping meeting

358

High Energy Beam Impacts on Beam Intercepting Devices: Advanced Numerical Methods and Experimental Set-Up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Intercepting Devices are potentially exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct impacts of energetic particle beams. State-of-the-art numerical methods are required to simulate the behaviour of affected components. A review of the different dynamic response regimes is presented, along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each of them. The consequences on LHC tungsten collimators of a number of beam abort scenarios were extensively studied, resorting to a novel category of numerical explicit methods, named Hydrocodes. Full shower simulations were performed providing the energy deposition distribution. Structural dynamics and shock wave propagation analyses were carried out with varying beam parameters, identifying important thresholds for collimator operation, ranging from the onset of permanent damage up to catastrophic failure. Since the main limitation of these tools lies in the limited information available on constitutive material models under extreme conditions, a dedica...

Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Timmins, M; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

High Energy Beam Impacts on Beam Intercepting Devices: Advanced Numerical Methods and Experimental Set-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Intercepting Devices are potentially exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct impacts of energetic particle beams. State-of-the-art numerical methods are required to simulate the behaviour of affected components. A review of the different dynamic response regimes is presented, along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each of them. The consequences on LHC tungsten collimators of a number of beam abort scenarios were extensively studied, resorting to a novel category of numerical explicit methods, named Hydrocodes. Full shower simulations were performed providing the energy deposition distribution. Structural dynamics and shock wave propagation analyses were carried out with varying beam parameters, identifying important thresholds for collimator operation, ranging from the onset of permanent damage up to catastrophic failure. Since the main limitation of these tools lies in the limited information available on constitutive material models under extreme conditions, a dedica...

Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Timmins, M; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Case Study of High-Impact Wet Snowfall in Northwest Germany (25–27 November 2005): Observations, Dynamics, and Forecast Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate numerical weather prediction of intense snowfall events requires the correct representation of dynamical and physical processes on various scales. In this study, a specific event of high-impact wet snowfall is examined that occurred in ...

Claudia Frick; Heini Wernli

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Indranil Das

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Das, Indranil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

Geisz, J. F.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

Canon, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Empirically assessing the impact of dependency injection on the development of web service applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) has been broadly conceived as the next big thing in distributed software development. The software industry has embraced SOC through Web Services -functionality that is accessible via ubiquitous protocols such as HTTP-. ... Keywords: code-first outsourcing, dependency injection, service-oriented computing, text mining, web Services

Marco Crasso; Cristian Mateo; Alejandro Zunino; Marcelo Campo

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Impacts of Energy Research and Development With Analyses of Price-Andersen Act & Hydro Relicensing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report deals primarily with the Research and Development provisions of S. 1766, organized across four areas: energy efficiency, renewable energy, fossil energy, and nuclear energy. The provisions are assessed using the results from AEO2002 and other side cases, rather than a direct quantitative analysis.

James Kendell

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of a High Pressure/High Temperature Down-hole Turbine Generator  

SciTech Connect

As oil & natural gas deposits become more difficult to obtain by conventional means, wells must extend to deeper more heat-intensive environments. The technology of the drilling equipment required to reach these depths has exceeded the availability of electrical power sources needed to operate these tools. Historically, logging while drilling (LWD) and measure while drilling (MWD) devices utilized a wireline to supply power and communication from the operator to the tool. Lithium ion batteries were used in scenarios where a wireline was not an option, as it complicated operations. In current downhole applications, lithium ion battery (LIB) packs are the primary source for electrical power. LIB technology has been proven to supply reliable downhole power at temperatures up to 175 °C. Many of the deeper well s reach ambient temperatures above 200 °C, creating an environment too harsh for current LIB technology. Other downfalls of LIB technology are cost, limitations on charge cycles, disposal issues and possible safety hazards including explosions and fires. Downhole power generation can also be achieved by utilizing drilling fluid flow and converting it to rotational motion. This rotational motion can be harnessed to spin magnets around a series of windings to produce power proportional to the rpm experienced by the driven assembly. These generators are, in most instances, driven by turbine blades or moyno-based drilling fluid pumps. To date, no commercially available downhole power generators are capable of operating at ambient temperatures of 250 °C. A downhole power g enerator capable of operation in a 250 °C and 20,000 psi ambient environment will be an absolute necessity in the future. Dexter Magnetic Technologies’ High-Pressure High-Temperature (HPHT) Downhole Turbine Generator is capable of operating at 250 °C and 20, 000 psi, but has not been tested in an actual drilling application. The technology exists, but to date no company has been willing to test the tool.

Ben Plamp

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Impacts of Sea Surface Temperature Uncertainty on the Western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) and Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of short-term forecasts of the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH) and rainfall to sea surface temperature (SST) uncertainty using the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). A ...

Xiaodong Hong; Craig H. Bishop; Teddy Holt; Larry O’Neill

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Forcing and Sampling of Ocean General Circulation Models: Impact of High-Frequency Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant inertial oscillations are present in all primitive equation ocean general circulation models when they are forced with high-frequency (period order of days) wind stress fields. At specific latitudes the energy of the wind stress ...

Steven R. Jayne; Robin Tokmakian

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Financial impacts of and financing methods for high-speed rail in Portugal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-speed rail (HSR) becomes a very hot topic recently when all Portugal, the United Stated, China, Japan, Spain, etc. are ambitious in building their HSR systems. Although HSR is expected to shrink the temporal distance ...

Huang, Teng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Design outsourcing in the high-tech industry and its impact on supply chain strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The practice of outsourcing product design to a service provider is prevalent in fast-moving high-tech electronics. Product design affects all subsequent activities such as procurement, manufacturing, logistics and after-sales ...

Vakil, Bindiya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermodynamic and Hydrological Impacts of Increasing Greenness in Northern High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite remote sensing data indicate that greenness has been increasing in the northern high latitudes, apparently in response to the warming of recent decades. To identify feedbacks of this land-cover change to the atmosphere, the authors ...

Jing Zhang; John E. Walsh

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

THE RADIOLOGICAL IMPACT OF HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS ON THE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Radioactivity Produced and Released from Water and HighRadioactivity Produced in Accelerators Shields and Water incarrier for 11c and 15o produced in water beam dumps at the

Thomas, R.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Short Term Aging of Polymer Insulators: Impact of High Humidity Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years, EPRI has performed large scale aging tests on polymer insulators and evaluated many polymer insulators removed from service in an effort to understand what the aging factors are. EPRI has learned that a significant aging factor is corona discharge activity and has developed a test that focuses on how corona discharge activity degrades polymer insulators. This report highlights the latest development of a short-term aging test designed to assess how well a polymer insulator can ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of High Purity Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1432 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

377

The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI  

SciTech Connect

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R&D  

SciTech Connect

The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called ``Materials-by-Design (MBD).`` The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials` performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

Young, J.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model; Period of Performance: December 1, 2003--May 31, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic development potential that wind power offers is often an overlooked aspect of today's wind power projects. Much has been written about how wind can spur economic development, but few have attempted to quantify these impacts. Using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Jobs, Economic Development, and Impacts Model (JEDI), the author examined six counties in Montana to quantify these impacts. The overriding project goal was to illuminate economic development opportunities from wind project development for six Montana counties using an objective economic modeling tool. Interested stakeholders include the agriculture community, wind developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, and other decision-makers. The Model was developed to enable spreadsheet users with limited or no economic modeling background to easily identify the statewide economic impacts associated with constructing and operating wind power plants. The Model's User Add-In feature allows users to conduct county-specific analyses using county IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for PLANning) multipliers, while state-level multipliers are contained within the Model as default values for all 50 states.

Costanti, M.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluation of the impact of a committed site on fusion reactor development  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic merits of a committed fusion site for development of tokamak, mirror, and EBT reactor from ignition through demo phases were evaluated. Schedule compression resulting from evolving several reactor concepts and/or phases on a committed site as opposed to sequential use of independent sites was estimated. Land, water, and electrical power requirements for a committed fusion site were determined. A conceptual plot plan for siting three fusion reactors on a committed site was configured. Reactor support equipment common to the various concepts was identified as candidates for sharing. Licensing issues for fusion plants were briefly addressed.

Reid, R.L.; Nagy, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced High-Temperature Reactor Dynamic System Model Development: April 2012 Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a large-output fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). An early-phase preconceptual design of a 1500 MW(e) power plant was developed in 2011 [Refs. 1 and 2]. An updated version of this plant is shown as Fig. 1. FHRs feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR is designed to be a “walk away” reactor that requires no action to prevent large off-site releases following even severe reactor accidents. This report describes the development of dynamic system models used to further the AHTR design toward that goal. These models predict system response during warmup, startup, normal operation, and limited off-normal operating conditions. Severe accidents that include a loss-of-fluid inventory are not currently modeled. The scope of the models is limited to the plant power system, including the reactor, the primary and intermediate heat transport systems, the power conversion system, and safety-related or auxiliary heat removal systems. The primary coolant system, the intermediate heat transport system and the reactor building structure surrounding them are shown in Fig. 2. These systems are modeled in the most detail because the passive interaction of the primary system with the surrounding structure and heat removal systems, and ultimately the environment, protects the reactor fuel and the vessel from damage during severe reactor transients. The reactor silo also plays an important role during system warmup. The dynamic system modeling tools predict system performance and response. The goal is to accurately predict temperatures and pressures within the primary, intermediate, and power conversion systems and to study the impacts of design changes on those responses. The models are design tools and are not intended to be used in reactor qualification. The important details to capture in the primary system relate to flows within the reactor vessel during severe events and the resulting temperature profiles (temperature and duration) for major components. Critical components include the fuel, reactor vessel, primary piping, and the primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers (P-IHXs). The major AHTR power system loops are shown in Fig. 3. The intermediate heat transfer system is a group of three pumped salt loops that transports the energy produced in the primary system to the power conversion system. Two dynamic system models are used to analyze the AHTR. A Matlab/Simulink?-based model initiated in 2011 has been updated to reflect the evolving design parameters related to the heat flows associated with the reactor vessel. The Matlab model utilizes simplified flow assumptions within the vessel and incorporates an empirical representation of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS). A Dymola/Modelica? model incorporates a more sophisticated representation of primary coolant flow and a physics-based representation of the three-loop DRACS thermal hydraulics. This model is not currently operating in a fully integrated mode. The Matlab model serves as a prototype and provides verification for the Dymola model, and its use will be phased out as the Dymola model nears completion. The heat exchangers in the system are sized using spreadsheet-based, steady-state calculations. The detail features of the heat exchangers are programmed into the dynamic models, and the overall dimensions are used to generate realistic plant designs. For the modeling cases where the emphasis is on understanding responses within the intermediate and primary systems, the power conversion system may be modeled as a simple boundary condition at the intermediate-to-power conversion system heat exchangers.

Qualls, A.L.; Cetiner, M.S.; Wilson, T.L., Jr.

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Essays on the Impact of Development on Agricultural Land Amenities and Values in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market land prices ignore the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services; hence, too much agricultural land may be developed. Correct land valuation must include these non-market values. Values of ecosystem services provided by the Richland-Chambers constructed wetlands are assessed through meta-analysis to derive confidence intervals for the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for wetland services. Replacement costs are also used to estimate cost savings of creating wetlands to cleanse river water instead of constructing a conventional wastewater treatment facility. Benefit transfer is used to estimate WTP for non-market agricultural land amenities. Ecosystem services of runoff in the western and recharge in the eastern part of Comal County based on hydrological models are also calculated. Finally, seemingly unrelated regression is used to quantify the effects of growth on current agricultural land values in Texas. Using two different meta-analysis transfer functions, mean WTP for the Richland-Chambers wetlands are $843 and $999 / acre / year. Estimated 95% confidence interval is $95 to $7,435 / acre / year. This confidence interval clearly indicates the uncertainty associated with valuing ecosystem goods and services. The replacement cost of the Richland?Chambers constructed wetlands is estimated to be $1,688 / acre / year. Aggregate WTP to preserve farm and ranchland non-market amenities in Comal County is estimated to be $1,566 / acre. Using hydrologic models, the runoff is valued at $79 / acre, whereas, recharge value is $1,107 / acre. Development will cause a change in recharge, runoff, and pollution which will decrease societal welfare by $1,288 / acre. Seemingly unrelated regression results show that a percentage increase in population growth in the closest metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is associated with increases in land values of approximately $2 / acre. A one-mile increase in distance from the nearest MSA decreased land values by $4 / acre in 1997, $6 / acre in 2002, and $8 / acre in 2007. The diversity of studies illustrates that a cookbook type of methodology is not appropriate for valuing ecosystem goods and services. On the other hand, development contributes positively to land values through encroachment on agricultural lands.

Machingambi, Memory

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Multilayer co-extrusion technique for developing high energy density organic devices.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop multi-layered co-extrusion (MLCE) capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to produce multifunctional polymeric structures. Multi-layered structures containing layers of alternating electrical, mechanical, optical, or structural properties can be applied to a variety of potential applications including energy storage, optics, sensors, mechanical, and barrier applications relevant to the internal and external community. To obtain the desired properties, fillers must be added to the polymer materials that are much smaller than the end layer thickness. We developed two filled polymer systems, one for conductive layers and one for dielectric layers and demonstrated the potential for using MLCE to manufacture capacitors. We also developed numerical models to help determine the material and processing parameters that impact processing and layer stability.

Spangler, Scott W.; Schroeder, John Lee; Mrozek, Randy (Army Research Lab, Adelphi, MD); Bieg, Lothar Franz; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (Army Research Lab, Adelphi, MD); Stavig, Mark Edwin; Cole, Phillip James (Northrop-Grumman, Herndon, VA); Mondy, Lisa Ann; Winter, Michael R.; Schneider, Duane Allen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Recent developments in coal mining technology and their impact on miners' health  

SciTech Connect

Advances in technology have significantly reduced the long-term health risks associated with underground coal mining. While the potential risks include exposure to hazardous substances and noise, the reduction of respirable dust in the workplace has been emphasized here because of the greater probability of exposure and the well-documented consequences. Since enactment of the Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, great strides have been made in reducing worker exposure to respirable dust. As production rates continue to increase, particularly in longwall sections, continued advances in dust control technology will be required. These advances will be needed to meet existing, and perhaps even more stringent future, exposure limits. Mechanization has resulted in a significant reduction in exposure to hazards while increasing productivity. Use of remotely controlled equipment is also increasing rapidly, and efforts are underway to develop completely automated mining systems. These automated systems may further reduce the risk of health impairment due to the underground working environment. 80 refs.

Taylor, L.D.; Thakur, P.C. (CONSOL Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Economic Development Impacts in Colorado from Four Vestas Manufacturing Facilities, Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series  

SciTech Connect

This case study summarizes the economic development benefits to Colorado from four Vestas manufacturing facilities: one in Windsor, two in Brighton, and one in Pueblo (which is planned to be the world's largest tower-manufacturing facility). In the midst of an economic slowdown during which numerous U.S. manufacturers have closed their doors, wind energy component manufacturing is one U.S. industry that has experienced unprecedented growth during the past few years. As demand for wind power in the United States has increased and transportation costs have increased around the world, states have seen a significant increase in the number of manufacturers that produce wind turbine components in the United States. Vestas' Colorado operations will bring approximately $700 million in capital investment and nearly 2,500 jobs to the state.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Economic Development Impacts in Colorado from Four Vestas Manufacturing Facilities, Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case study summarizes the economic development benefits to Colorado from four Vestas manufacturing facilities: one in Windsor, two in Brighton, and one in Pueblo (which is planned to be the world's largest tower-manufacturing facility). In the midst of an economic slowdown during which numerous U.S. manufacturers have closed their doors, wind energy component manufacturing is one U.S. industry that has experienced unprecedented growth during the past few years. As demand for wind power in the United States has increased and transportation costs have increased around the world, states have seen a significant increase in the number of manufacturers that produce wind turbine components in the United States. Vestas' Colorado operations will bring approximately $700 million in capital investment and nearly 2,500 jobs to the state.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet details work by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

DOE and USCAR Announce $70 Million Project to Accelerate Development of Lightweight, High-Strength Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) today announced a $70 million, five year agreement to develop lightweight, high...

391

A lean enterprise approach for developing high speed rail in Japan and Portugal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores and evaluates the application of the lean enterprise concept to the expansion and development of the high speed railway industry in Japan. The basic idea of the lean enterprise is increasing value-added ...

Iwamura, Nobuhiro

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effects of temperature, humidity, sample geometry, and other variables on Bruceton type 12 impact initiation of HMX-based high explosives  

SciTech Connect

The drop weight impact test, developed at Bruceton Naval Research Laboratory 60 years ago, is still the most commonly used configuration for evaluating sensitivity of explosives to non-shock ignition. The standard drop weight impact test is performed under ambient conditions for temperature and humidity - variations in which are known to significantly affect the probability of reaction. We have performed a series of impact tests in an attempt to characterize the effect of temperature, humidity, sample geometry (height, mass, L/d, and pressed density), sample confinement, and impact surface properties (strength and coefficient of friction) on the probability of reaction in a drop weight impact test. Differences in the probability of reaction have been determined across a range of drop heights for each configuration. The results clearly show significant shifts in the probability of reaction and in the slope of the reaction probability curve for several of the variables.

Avilucea, Gabriel R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Daniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Paul D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Preston, Daniel N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartline, Ernest L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagelberg, Stephanie I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

What are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined by growth in per capita income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of all new electric power capacity. ·Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. ·Wind energy represented 2What are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined

394

Outdoor recreational use of the Salton Sea with reference to potential impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to describe the types, levels, and locations of outdoor recreation uses in the Salton Sea area, the number and principal activities of visitors, and to estimate the consequences upon outdoor recreation of geothermal development and other activities that might affect the Salton Sea. It is concluded that since the Salton Sea is considered legally to be a sump for agricultural, municipal, and presumably geothermal waste waters, recreational use of the Sea for fishing and boating (from present marinas) will undoubtedly continue to decline, unless there is a major policy change. Use of the shoreline for camping, the surrounding roads and lands for scenic viewing, ORV events, and retirement or recreation communities will not decline, and will probably increase, assuming control of hydrogen sulfide odors. Two ways in which the fishing and present boating facilities could be returned to a wholly usable steady state are discussed. One is by construction of a diked evaporation pond system at the south end of the Sea. This would allow a means of control over both water level and salinity. Another means, less costly but more difficult to effectively control, would be to budget geothermal plant use of, and disposal of wastes in, Salton Sea water. (JGB)

Twiss, R.; Sidener, J.; Bingham, G.; Burke, J.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of a Beowulf-Class High Performance Computing System for Computational Science Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Beowulf cluster computing technology, the Ateneo High Performance Computing Group has developed a high performance computing system consisting of eight compute nodes. Called the AGILA HPCS this Beowulf cluster computer is designed for computational science applications. In this paper, we present the motivation for the AGILA HPCS and some results on its performance evaluation.

Rafael Saldaña; Jerrold Garcia; Felix Muga Ii; William Yu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Impact of MHD Equilibrium Input Variations on the High-Beta Stability Boundaries of NSTX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ideal MHD stability limits of anticipated plasma configurations for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] and the dependence on the parameters defining the MHD equilibrium are evaluated. The study provides a quantitative computational evaluation of the stability limit variations induced by changes to the equilibrium of NSTX high-beta plasmas. The analysis is based on a reference free-boundary equilibrium with beta = 41.5%, monotonic safety factor q profile, and broad pressure profile p. On this reference target local variation of the plasma boundary, safety factor q, and pressure p profiles are imposed. Localized inflection of the outboard plasma boundary, produced by near-field effects from poloidal shaping field coils, weaken the stability due to the destabilization of high-n ballooning modes. Variation of the q profile at different radial location can also degrade stability. Both experimental profiles from existing tokamaks and spherical torus machines and profiles generated from transport modeling of anticipated neutral-beam-heated plasmas are used. Degraded stability is found at increasing pressure peaking factor due to the destabilization of n = 1 kink/ballooning modes. Direct access to the second region of stability is found in certain configurations and, for the entire set of variations considered, the lower calculated beta-limits values are still in the range of 20.0% without considering the stabilizing effect of the passive conducting structures.

F. Paoletti; S.A. Sabbagh; J. Manickam; J. Menard; R.J. Akers; D. Gates; S.M. Kaye; L. Lao

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

FRIT DEVELOPMENT FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 5: COMPOSITIONAL TRENDS FOR VARYING ALUMINUM CONCENTRATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to experimentally measure the properties and performance of a series of glasses with compositions that could represent Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) as processed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The data was used to provide recommendations to the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) regarding blending and washing strategies in preparing SB5 based on acceptability of the glass compositions. These data were also used to guide frit optimization efforts as the SB5 composition was finalized. Glass compositions for this study were developed by combining a series of SB5 composition projections with a group of frits. Three composition projections for SB5 were developed using a model-based approach at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These compositions, referred to as SB5 Cases B, C and D, projected removal of 25, 50 and 75% (respectively) of the aluminum in Tank 51 through the low temperature aluminum dissolution process. The frits for this study (Frits 530 through 537) were selected based on their predicted operating windows (i.e., ranges of waste loadings over which the predicted properties of the glasses were acceptable) and their potential (based on historical trends) to provide acceptable melt rates for SB5. Six additional glasses were designed to evaluate alternatives for uranium in DWPF-type glasses used for variability studies and some scoping studies. Since special measures are necessary when working with uranium-containing glasses in the laboratory, it is desirable as a cost and time saving measure to find an alternative for uranium to support frit optimization efforts. Hafnium and neodymium were investigated as potential surrogates for uranium, and other glasses were made by simply excluding the radioactive components and renormalizing the glass composition. The study glasses were fabricated and characterized at SRNL. Chemical composition analyses suggested only minor difficulties in meeting the targeted compositions for some of the oxides for some of the glasses. Although minor differences were observed, they did not have a significant impact on the conclusions made in this study. Several of the study compositions showed retention of more than 0.5 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass. Trevorite (a spinel) was the only crystalline phase that was positively identified in a few of the study glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Spinels are not of concern as they have been shown to have little impact on the durability of high level waste glasses. The crystallization behavior of the surrogate glasses was generally the same as that of their U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-containing counterparts. There are two pairs that were exceptions: SB5-04 (amorphous) and SB5-24 (possible trevorite), along with SB5-07 (amorphous) and SB5-25 (trevorite). In these cases, the surrogate glasses (SB5-24 and SB5-25) appear to be more conservative (more prone to crystallization) than their U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-containing counterparts. Chemical durability was quantified using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The normalized leachate (NL) values for B, Li, Na and Si for all of the study glasses were well below those of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass, regardless of heat treatment or compositional view. This indicates that all of the glasses had very acceptable durability performance. The highest NL [B] for the study glasses was 0.914 g/L (the quenched version of glass SB5-13), normalized using the measured, bias-correct composition. There was little practical impact of the CCC heat treatment on the PCT responses of the study glasses. The measured PCT responses were predictable by the current {Delta}G{sub p} models. In general, the PCT responses for the surrogate glasses or the glasses without U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were quite similar to their U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-containing counterparts. The average percent error in NL [B] normalized by the measured, bias-corrected compositions for the surrogate glasses compared with their radioactive counterparts was 8.8%. The largest difference in NL

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards; David Best; Irene Reamer; Phyllis Workman

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Impact of ASCAT Scatterometer Wind Observations on the High-Resolution Limited-Area Model (HIRLAM) within an Operational Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Denial experiments, also denoted observing system experiments (OSEs), are used to determine the impact of an observing system on the forecast quality of a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. When the impact is neutral or positive, new ...

Siebren de Haan; Gert-Jan Marseille; Paul de Valk; John de Vries

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix A Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-1 A.1 Introduction A-1 A.2 Methodology A-1 A.3 High-Level Waste Treatment and Interim Storage Site Selection A-3 A.3.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-3 A.3.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-3 A.3.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-3 A.3.4 Evaluation Process A-4 A.3.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-6 A.4 Low-Activity Waste Disposal Site Selection A-6 A.4.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-7 A.4.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-8 A.4.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-8 A.4.4 Evaluation Process A-8 A.4.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-9 A.4.6 Final Selection of a Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility

403

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Supplement. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supplement to the Technical Analysis presents additional results for a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. This supplementary analysis examines the new Department of Interior air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, and their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Impact of Alkali Source on Vitrification of SRS High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Savannah River Site is currently immobilizing high level nuclear waste sludge by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The processing strategy involves blending a large batch of sludge into a feed tank, washing the sludge to reduce the amount of soluble species, then processing the large ''sludge batch'' through the DWPF. Each sludge batch is tested by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using simulants and tests with samples of the radioactive waste to ''qualify'' the batch prior to processing in the DWPF. The DWPF pretreats the sludge by first acidifying the sludge with nitric and formic acid. The ratio of nitric to formic acid is adjusted as required to target a final glass composition that is slightly reducing (the target is for {approx}20% of the iron to have a valence of two in the glass). The formic acid reduces the mercury in the feed to elemental mercury which is steam stripped from the feed. After a concentration step, the glass former (glass frit) is added as a 50 wt% slurry and the batch is concentrated to approximately 50 wt% solids. The feed slurry is then fed to a joule heated melter maintained at 1150 C. The glass must meet both processing (e.g., viscosity and liquidus temperature) and product performance (e.g., durability) constraints The alkali content of the final waste glass is a critical parameter that affects key glass properties (such as durability) as well as the processing characteristics of the waste sludge during the pretreatment and vitrification processes. Increasing the alkali content of the glass has been shown to improve the production rate of the DWPF, but the total alkali in the final glass is limited by constraints on glass durability and viscosity. Two sources of alkali contribute to the final alkali content of the glass: sodium salts in the waste supernate and sodium and lithium oxides in the glass frit added during pretreatment processes. Sodium salts in the waste supernate can be reduced significantly by washing the solids to remove soluble species. The ''washing strategy'' for future sludge batches can be controlled to limit the soluble sodium remaining in the waste stream while balancing the alkali content of the frit to maintain acceptable glass properties as well as improve melter processing characteristics.

LAMBERT, D. P.; MILLER, D. H.; PEELER, D. K.; SMITH, M. E.; STONE, M. E.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Development of Microfabricated Microbial Fuel Cell Array as a High Throughput Screening Platform for Electrochemically Active Microbes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are novel green technologies that convert chemical energy stored in biomass into electricity through microbial metabolisms. Both fossil fuel depletion and environmental concern have fostered significant interest in MFCs for both wastewater treatment and electricity generation. However, MFCs have not yet been used for practical applications due to their low power outputs and challenges associated with scale-up. High throughput screening devices for parallel studies are highly necessary to significantly improve and optimize MFC working conditions for future practical applications. Here in this research, microfabricated platforms of microbial fuel cell array as high throughput screening devices for MFC parallel studies have been developed. Their utilities were described with environmental sample screening to uncover electricigens with higher electrochemical activities. The first version of the MFC arrays is a batch-mode miniaturized 24-well MFC array using ferricyanide as catholyte. Several environmental species that showed higher electricity generation capabilities than Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SO) were uncovered using the developed MFC array, with one environmental electricigen, Shewanella sp. Hac353 (dq307734.1)(7Ca), showing 2.3-fold higher power output than SO. The second MFC array platform developed is an air-cathode MFC array using oxygen in air as electron acceptor, which is sustainable compared to ferricyanide that depletes over time. Environmental electricigen screenings were also conducted, showing parallel comparison capabilities of the developed array. The third MFC array platform is a microfluidic-cathode MFC array that enables long-term operations of miniature MFC arrays with improved power generation abilities. The capability of the microfluidic-cathode MFC array to support long-term parallel analysis was demonstrated by characterizing power generation of SO and 7Ca, proving extended operation time and improved power outputs compared to batch-mode MFC array. The fourth MFC array platform enables both catholyte and anolyte replenishments for long-term characterization of various carbon substrate performances. Finally, the 24-well microfluidic MFC array was further scaled up to 96 wells, which greatly increased the throughput of MFC parallel studies. The developed MFC arrays as high throughput screening platforms are expected to greatly impact how current MFC studies are conducted and ultimately lead to significant improvement in MFC power output.

Hou, Huijie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Impact of Science Notebook Writing on ELL and Low-SES Students' Science Language Development and Conceptual Understanding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This quantitative study explored the impact of literacy integration in a science inquiry classroom involving the use of science notebooks on the academic language development and conceptual understanding of students from diverse (i.e., English Language Learners, or ELLs) and low socio-economic status (low-SES) backgrounds. The study derived from a randomized, longitudinal, field-based NSF funded research project (NSF Award No. DRL - 0822343) targeting ELL and non-ELL students from low-SES backgrounds in a large urban school district in Southeast Texas. The study used a scoring rubric (modified and tested for validity and reliability) to analyze fifth-grade school students’ science notebook entries. Scores for academic language quality (or, for brevity, language) were used to compare language growth over time across three time points (i.e., beginning, middle, and end of the school year) and to compare students across categories (ELL, former ELL, non-ELL, and gender) using descriptive statistics and mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA). Scores for conceptual understanding (or, for brevity, concept) were used to compare students across categories (ELL, former ELL, non-ELL, and gender) in three domains using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. A correlational analysis was conducted to explore the relationship, if any, between language scores and concept scores for each group. Students demonstrated statistically significant growth over time in their academic language as reflected by science notebook scores. While ELL students scored lower than former ELL and non-ELL students at the first two time points, they caught up to their peers by the third time point. Similarly, females outperformed males in language scores in the first two time points, but males caught up to females in the third time point. In analyzing conceptual scores, ELLs had statistically significant lower scores than former-ELL and non-ELL students, and females outperformed males in the first two domains. These differences, however, were not statistically significant in the last domain. Last, correlations between language and concept scores were overall, positive, large, and significant across domains and groups. The study presents a rubric useful for quantifying diverse students’ science notebook entries, and findings add to the sparse research on the impact of writing in diverse students’ language development and conceptual understanding in science.

Huerta, Margarita

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Japanese direct investment in the US high-technology industry: background, strategies, trends, impact, and alternative responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth of foreign direct investment in the US, exceeding 1000% since 1970, has raised important issues regarding US policies toward foreign trade and domestic economic management. Japan, with its significant direct investment in America's high-technology industry, is often perceived as the most threatening of the foreign investors. This study was undertaken to determine the background, extent, and impact of Japanese direct investment in the US high-technology industry. Examination of patterns of foreign direct investment in the US since 1950 shows that Japan's participation has been governed largely by US monetary policies (e.g., revaluation of currency) and the proposed or actual imposition of protectionist measures (e.g., import quotas). Additional factors include US economic-growth potential, lenient tax laws, stable political structure, and many incentives at the state level, all of which provide an attractive environment for foreign investors. Results suggest that the problems associated with foreign direct investment in the US are far outweighed by its benefits of capital inflow and creation of new jobs. An optimum trade policy, in conjunction with the opening of Japan's trade and investment markets, would eliminate trade barriers and support a stabilization of currency.

Kavner, A.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Mason and Enterprise Development under the Biogas Program in Vietnam: An Impact Study of the Effects of the Biogas Program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research proposed to analyze the impact of a renewable energy project entitled ‘The Biogas Project Program for the department of Animal Husbandry and livestock… (more)

Schaart, I.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of6 I.3. High-Speed RailOperating High-Speed Rail .. 22 VI. Impact on Regional

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative and Durable High Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Development of Alternative and Durable High Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells PNNL: Yong Wang Conrad Zhang Vilayanur Viswanath Yuehe Lin Jun Liu Project kick Project kick - - off meeting off meeting Feb 13 Feb 13 - - 14, 2007 14, 2007 Ballard Power Systems: Stephen Campbell University of Delaware: Jingguang Chen ORNL: Sheng Dai 2 Technical Issues and Objective Technical Issues and Objective Current technical issues z Carbon support „ Susceptible to oxidation under fuel cell operating conditions. „ Oxidation further catalyzed by Pt „ Corrosion leads to Pt migration and agglomeration

412

Fundamental understanding and development of low-cost, high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

ROHATGI,A.; NARASIMHA,S.; MOSCHER,J.; EBONG,A.; KAMRA,S.; KRYGOWSKI,T.; DOSHI,P.; RISTOW,A.; YELUNDUR,V.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Study of the potential health and environmental impacts from the development of liquid-dominated geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes seven programs to provide scientific input, understanding, and forecasting capability for hydrothermal energy areas needing resolution. The three major areas addressed are (1) the impacts on living components of the aqueous and terrestrial ecosystems, (2) the impacts on the quality of the abiotic environment itself, and (3) the techniques needed to measure releases from hydrothermal activities.

Williams, J.M. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine  

SciTech Connect

This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

Reilly, Raymond W.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

High velocity impact fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in-depth understanding of dynamic ductile fracture is one of the most important steps to improve the survivability of critical structures such as the lost Twin Towers. In the present thesis, the macroscopic fracture ...

Teng, Xiaoqing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spend Nuclear Fuel and High-Leval Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Table of Contents Summary Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal

419

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spend Nuclear Fuel and High-Leval Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Volume I Impact Analyses Chapters 1 through 13 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D) (Repository SEIS). CONTACTS: For more information about this document, For general information on the DOE NEPA process, write

420

Immigration in high-skill labor markets: The impact of foreign students on the earnings of doctorates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the number of foreign students enrolled in American universities has transformed the higher education system, particularly at the graduate level. Many of these newly minted doctorates remain in the United States after receiving their doctoral degrees, so that the foreign student influx can have a significant impact in the labor market for high-skill workers. Using data drawn from the Survey of Earned Doctorates and the Survey of Doctoral Recipients, the study shows that a foreign student influx into a particular doctoral field at a particular time had a significant and adverse effect on the earnings of doctorates in that field who graduated at roughly the same time. A 10 percent immigration-induced increase in the supply of doctorates lowers the wage of competing workers by about 3 to 4 percent. About half of this adverse wage effect can be attributed to the increased prevalence of low-pay postdoctoral appointments in fields that have softer labor market conditions because of large-scale immigration. 2

George J. Borjas; George J. Borjas; George J. Borjas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High efficiency multilayer blazed gratings for EUV and soft X-rays: Recent developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilayer coated blazed gratings with high groove density are the best candidates for use in high resolution EUV and soft x-ray spectroscopy. Theoretical analysis shows that such a grating can be potentially optimized for high dispersion and spectral resolution in a desired high diffraction order without significant loss of diffraction efficiency. In order to realize this potential, the grating fabrication process should provide a perfect triangular groove profile and an extremely smooth surface of the blazed facets. Here we report on recent progress achieved at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in fabrication of high quality multilayer coated blazed gratings. The blazed gratings were fabricated using scanning beam interference lithography followed by wet anisotropic etching of silicon. A 200 nm period grating coated with a Mo/Si multilayer composed with 30 bi-layers demonstrated an absolute efficiency of 37.6percent in the 3rd diffraction order at 13.6 nm wavelength. The groove profile of the grating was thoroughly characterized with atomic force microscopy before and after the multilayer deposition. The obtained metrology data were used for simulation of the grating efficiency with the vector electromagnetic PCGrate-6.1 code. The simulations showed that smoothing of the grating profile during the multilayer deposition is the main reason for efficiency losses compared to the theoretical maximum. Investigation of the grating with cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a complex evolution of the groove profile in the course of the multilayer deposition. Impact of the shadowing and smoothing processes on growth of the multilayer on the surface of the sawtooth substrate is discussed.

Voronov, Dmitriy; Ahn, Minseung; Anderson, Erik; Cambie, Rossana; Chang, Chih-Hao; Goray, Leonid; Gullikson, Eric; Heilmann, Ralf; Salmassi, Farhad; Schattenburg, Mark; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

Development of ceramic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop high temperature, high pressure catalytic ceramic membrane reactors and to demonstrate the feasibility of using these membrane reactors to control gaseous contaminants (hydrogen sulfide and ammonia) in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Our strategy was to first develop catalysts and membranes suitable for the IGCC application and then combine these two components as a complete membrane reactor system. We also developed a computer model of the membrane reactor and used it, along with experimental data, to perform an economic analysis of the IGCC application. Our results have demonstrated the concept of using a membrane reactor to remove trace contaminants from an IGCC process. Experiments showed that NH{sub 3} decomposition efficiencies of 95% can be achieved. Our economic evaluation predicts ammonia decomposition costs of less than 1% of the total cost of electricity; improved membranes would give even higher conversions and lower costs.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, I.C.; Blum, Y.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Hirschon, A.; Way, J.D.; Collins, J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

ON THE IMPACT OF SUPER RESOLUTION WSR-88D DOPPLER RADAR DATA ASSIMILATION ON HIGH RESOLUTION NUMERICAL MODEL FORECASTS  

SciTech Connect

Assimilation of radar velocity and precipitation fields into high-resolution model simulations can improve precipitation forecasts with decreased 'spin-up' time and improve short-term simulation of boundary layer winds (Benjamin, 2004 & 2007; Xiao, 2008) which is critical to improving plume transport forecasts. Accurate description of wind and turbulence fields is essential to useful atmospheric transport and dispersion results, and any improvement in the accuracy of these fields will make consequence assessment more valuable during both routine operation as well as potential emergency situations. During 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) radars implemented a significant upgrade which increased the real-time level II data resolution to 8 times their previous 'legacy' resolution, from 1 km range gate and 1.0 degree azimuthal resolution to 'super resolution' 250 m range gate and 0.5 degree azimuthal resolution (Fig 1). These radar observations provide reflectivity, velocity and returned power spectra measurements at a range of up to 300 km (460 km for reflectivity) at a frequency of 4-5 minutes and yield up to 13.5 million point observations per level in super-resolution mode. The migration of National Weather Service (NWS) WSR-88D radars to super resolution is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current operational mesoscale model domains utilize grid spacing several times larger than the legacy data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of super resolution reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution is investigated here to determine the impact of the improved data resolution on model predictions.

Chiswell, S

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Development, characterization, and applications of high temperature superconductor nanobridge Josephson junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A well-controlled, high-yield Josephson junction process in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is necessary for the demonstration of ultra-high-speed devices and circuits which exceed the capabilities of conventional electronics. The authors developed nanobridge Josephson junctions in high quality thin-film YBaCuO with dimensions below 100 nm fabricated using electron-beam nanolithography. They characterized this Josephson junction technology for process yield, junction parameter uniformity, and overall applicability for use in high-performance circuits. To facilitate the determination of junction parameters, they developed a measurement technique based on spectral analysis in the range of 90--160 GHz of phase-locked, oscillating arrays of up to 2,450 Josephson junctions. Because of the excellent yield and uniformity of the nanobridge junctions, they successfully applied the junction technology to a wide variety of circuits. These circuits included transmission-line pulse formers and 32 and 64-bit shift registers. The 32-bit shift register was shown to operate at clock speeds near 100 GHz and is believed to be one of the faster and more complex digital circuit demonstrated to date using high temperature superconductor technology.

Wendt, J.R.; Tigges, C.P.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martens, J.S.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.E. [Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime  

SciTech Connect

Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Development program for the high-temperature nuclear process heat system  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive development program plan for a high-temperature nuclear process heat system with a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor heat source is presented. The system would provide an interim substitute for fossil-fired sources and ultimately the vehicle for the production of substitute and synthetic fuels to replace petroleum and natural gas. The dwindling domestic reserves of petroleum and natural gas dictate major increases in the utilization of coal and nuclear sources to meet the national energy demand. The nuclear process heat system has significant potential in a unique combination of the two sources that is environmentally and economically attractive and technically sound: the production of synthetic fuels from coal. In the longer term, it could be the key component in hydrogen production from water processes that offer a substitute fuel and chemical feedstock free of dependence on fossil-fuel reserves. The proposed development program is threefold: a process studies program, a demonstration plant program, and a supportive research and development program. Optional development scenarios are presented and evaluated, and a selection is proposed and qualified. The interdependence of the three major program elements is examined, but particular emphasis is placed on the supportive research and development activities. A detailed description of proposed activities in the supportive research and development program with tentative costs and schedules is presented as an appendix with an assessment of current status and planning. (auth)

Jiacoletti, R.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directed release of the 2002 New York State Energy Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement (Energy Plan). Since the Energy Plan was

William M. Flynn; Joseph H. Boardman; Erin M. Crotty

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and Southwire Company was to jointly develop a low cost, commercially viable, water-repellant anti-icing coating system for high voltage transmission lines. Icing of power lines and other structures caused by freezing rain events occurs annually in the United States, and leads to severe and prolonged power outages. These outages cause untold economic and personal distress for many American families and businesses. Researchers at the Department of Energy?s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have previously developed a set of superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anti-icing properties that could potentially be sprayed or painted onto high-tension power lines and pylons. These coatings drastically reduce ice accumulation on these structures during freezing rain events. The project involved obtaining technical input, supplies and test high voltage cables from Southwire, along with the joint development of anti-icing coating techniques, which would result in a commercial license agreement between Southwire and ORNL, and potentially other companies requiring water repellent anti-icing coatings.

Hunter, S. R. [ORNL] [ORNL; Daniel, A. [Southwire Company] [Southwire Company

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and Southwire Company was to jointly develop a low cost, commercially viable, water-repellant anti-icing coating system for high voltage transmission lines. Icing of power lines and other structures caused by freezing rain events occurs annually in the United States, and leads to severe and prolonged power outages. These outages cause untold economic and personal distress for many American families and businesses. Researchers at the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have previously developed a set of superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anti-icing properties that could potentially be sprayed or painted onto high-tension power lines and pylons. These coatings drastically reduce ice accumulation on these structures during freezing rain events. The project involved obtaining technical input, supplies and test high voltage cables from Southwire, along with the joint development of anti-icing coating techniques, which would result in a commercial license agreement between Southwire and ORNL, and potentially other companies requiring water repellent anti-icing coatings.

Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD Trade-Mark-Sign ) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-{mu}m object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K. [OI Analytical/CMS Field Products, 2148 Pelham Parkway, Bldg. 400, Pelham, Alabama 35124 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion® proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) – Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 °C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Impact of Breaking Wave Form Drag on Near-Surface Turbulence and Drag Coefficient over Young Seas at High Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of breaking waves on near-surface wind turbulence and drag coefficient are investigated using large-eddy simulation. The impact of intermittent and transient wave breaking events (over a range of scales) is modeled as localized form ...

Nobuhiro Suzuki; Tetsu Hara; Peter P. Sullivan

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

High-Resolution Climate Change Impact Analysis on Medium-Sized River Catchments in Germany: An Ensemble Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on three small- to medium-sized river catchments (Ammer, Mulde, and Ruhr) in Germany is investigated for the near future (2021–50) following the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on ...

Irena Ott; Doris Duethmann; Joachim Liebert; Peter Berg; Hendrik Feldmann; Juergen Ihringer; Harald Kunstmann; Bruno Merz; Gerd Schaedler; Sven Wagner

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

NETL: C&CBTL - Development of Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends Georgia Tech Research Corporation Project Number: FE0005339 Project Description The objectives of the proposed study are to obtain experimental reactor data and develop kinetic rate expressions for pyrolysis and char gasification for the coal-biomass blends under conditions free from transport limitations, to develop a detailed understanding of the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the porous char structure, to build mathematical models that combine true kinetic rate expressions with transport models for predicting gasification behavior for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, and to investigate the physical and chemical parameters that might lead to synergistic effects in coal-biomass blends gasification.

435

Developing a Highly Efficient Multi-use Special Economic Zone in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Highly Efficient Multi-use Special Economic Zone in India Developing a Highly Efficient Multi-use Special Economic Zone in India Speaker(s): Jagadeesh Taluri Kushboo Modgil Date: June 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 LBNL is collaborating with Metro Valley to create the most energy efficient built environment in India. The proposed project is an ITES (Information Technology Enabled Services) Special Economic Zone which is a multi-tenanted campus consisting of work and support spaces for companies involved in research or knowledge processing. The goal of the project reaches beyond an energy efficient built environment for the Knowledge Industry to sustainability in the broadest sense: a sustainable environment, not just from the point of view of energy consumption, but also relative to the people who use it, the organizations that inhabit it,

436

Development of Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetics and Mathematical Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends Background Significant progress has been made in recent years in controlling emissions resulting from coal-fired electricity generation in the United States through the research, development, and deployment of innovative technologies such as gasification. Gasification is a process that converts solid feedstocks such as coal, biomass, or blends

437

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of highly magnetostrictive composites for applications in magnetomechanical torque sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to investigate and develop a magnetomechanical material with high magnetomechanical response and low hysteresis. This material will be used in electronic torque sensors for advanced steering systems in automobiles which will replace the costly and fuel inefficient hydraulic steering systems currently in use. Magnetostruction and the magnetomechanical effect under torsional stress of magnetostrictive composites have been investigated in the present study.

Chen, Yonghua

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moving forward.. Accomplishments To date we’ve focused on four high-impact energy technologies under development at LBNL—advanced biofuels,

ed, Todd Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests: RTG-1 and RTG-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.; George, T.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing high impact" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microsoft PowerPoint - Development of High Temperature_Chen_Chonglin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature/High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor PhD Students: Erik Enriquez, Shanyong Bao, & Brennan Mace PhD Awarded: Dr. Chunrui Ma (UK) & Dr. Gregory Collins (WVU) PIs: Patrick Nash (retired 2012) and Chonglin Chen (PI) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1644 Phone: 210-458-6427, Email: cl.chen@utsa.edu Grant Number: DE-FE0003780 Project Manager: Dr. Susan M. Maley Performance Period: 09/01/2010-8/31/2013 * Introduction * Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductive LnBaCo 2 O 5.5 Oxides * Full Scale Chemical Sensor Development * Summary OBJECTIVES & GOALS * The objective of this research is: - investigate and understand the mechanisms of mixed ionic electronic conductive LaBaCo 2 O 5+ highly epitaxial

442

Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C. J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of a high current H{sup -} source for ESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the European Spallation Source (ESS), a volume source based on the HIEFS (high efficiency source) is being developed. The source will be optimized to produce high current densities in pulsed operation. A pulse generator delivering 1 to 1.5 ms pulses was installed. Furthermore, cesium was supplied to the plasma generator from an external oven. The cesium injection was optimized for a low e/H{sup -} ratio and a high current. We obtained a current density of 70 mA/cm{sup 2}. This way, with an aperture radius of 4.25 mm, an H{sup -} current of 40 mA was extracted at an extraction voltage of 22 kV. After a description of the source and the experimental setup, measurements of the beam current density and the e/H{sup -} ratio will be presented in this paper.

Maaser, A.; Beller, P.; Klein, H.; Volk, K.; Weber, M. [Ins