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1

NETL: Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting. Preliminary Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Topical Report PDF-381KB (October 2012) Development of a Novel Gas...

2

NETL: Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007567 Carbon Capture Scientific is developing and testing a novel, proprietary, Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) process-based technology for CO2 capture from post-combustion flue gases. GPS process-based technology has many advantages. For the solvent based process it will be able to: Reduce the energy penalty associated with solvent regeneration Increase the CO2 desorption pressure Integrate CO2 capture and compression into one step Reduce CO2 compression needs Reduce solvent degradation These advantages could potentially eliminate CO2 compression entirely, hence reducing the total parasitic power load of a CO2 capture process to about 0.14kWh/kgCO2. This power load is a 60 percent reduction compared to the baseline case of 0.38kWh/kgCO2. The economic impact of this parasitic power reduction is a reduction in the incremental cost of electricity (COE) by about 21 mills/kWh.

3

Purposes of Strip Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...arriving at the most economical use of material. Economy of material usage must be considered so as to obtain fully the possible reductions of manufacturing costs through use of progressive dies. The strip development should be studied with a view toward using the narrowest possible carrier strips...

4

Strip Development for Progressive Dies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 2 Strip development for a ring-shaped part (two at a time). Note idle stage for die strength, layout of strip for material economy....

5

Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Oyenekan, Babatunde A. (Katy, TX)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Recent Product Developments with Ultra-Thin Cast Strip Products ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... low-carbon steel type, offering yield strengths covering the range 275 to 380 MPa and strip .... Process Window Study for Heat Resistant Nanocoated Steel.

8

Arizona strip breccia pipe program: exploration, development, and production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the long-range plans for the Energy Fuels Corporation, they have embarked on one of the most active and aggressive uranium exploration programs in the US. These exploration efforts are located in the northwestern part of Arizona in an area referred to as the Arizona Strip. At a time when the domestic uranium industry is staggering to recover from its worst economic slump, Energy Fuels is spending millions of dollars a year on exploration, development, production, and milling. The reason for Energy Fuels' commitment to uranium exploration and production lies in the ground of Arizona in unique geologic formations called breccia pipes. Some of these structures, generally no more than 300 to 350 ft in diameter, contain uranium that is, on the average, five to ten times richer than ore found elsewhere in the US. The richness of this Arizona ore makes it the only conventionally mined uranium in the US that can compete in today's market of cheaper, high-grade foreign sources. Between January 1980 and December 1986, Energy Fuels has mined more than 10 billion lb of uranium from breccia pipe deposits at an average grade of 0.65% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Currently, Energy Fuels is operating six breccia pipe mines, and a plan of operations on a seventh mine has been submitted to the appropriate government agencies for the necessary mining permits.

Mathisen, I.W. Jr.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Compression Stripping of Flue Gas with Energy Recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SOX and NOX and CO2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO2, SO2, and H2O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L.; O' Connor, William K.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

A DOZEN NEW GALAXIES CAUGHT IN THE ACT: GAS STRIPPING AND EXTENDED EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN THE COMA CLUSTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present images of extended H{alpha} clouds associated with 14 member galaxies in the Coma cluster obtained from deep narrowband imaging observations with the Suprime-Cam at the Subaru Telescope. The parent galaxies of the extended H{alpha} clouds are distributed farther than 0.2 Mpc from the peak of the X-ray emission of the cluster. Most of the galaxies are bluer than g - r {approx} 0.5 and they account for 57% of the blue (g - r < 0.5) bright (r < 17.8 mag) galaxies in the central region of the Coma cluster. They reside near the red- and blueshifted edges of the radial velocity distribution of Coma cluster member galaxies. Our findings suggest that most of the parent galaxies were recently captured by the Coma cluster potential and are now infalling toward the cluster center with their disk gas being stripped off and producing the observed H{alpha} clouds.

Yagi, Masafumi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Furusawa, Hisanori [Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Okamura, Sadanori [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Miller, Neal A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Carter, David [Astronomical Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Warf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Jogee, Shardha, E-mail: YAGI.Masafumi@nao.ac.j [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Gas developments lead Canadian activity  

SciTech Connect

Canada has an immense supply of natural gas. The Western Sedimentary Basin of Canada is North America`s largest gas-bearing geologic province and extends from British Columbia on Canada`s west coast, eastward through the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba and includes portions of the Northwest Territories and the Yukon. The basin supplies most of Canada`s natural gas with nearly 85% of it coming from Alberta. The production of natural gas supplies from conventional fields continues to increase. Major gas discoveries, made in the frontier and offshore regions, are going to be developed as well over time, as the economics and the markets dictate. Furthermore, Canada`s relatively unexplored Arctic and offshore basins, which promise excellent geological potential, will be developed at some point in the future. The paper discusses gas exploration and drilling activities, market access, the future of Canadian natural gas, how price challenges development of heavy oil and tar sands, and extending life of oil fields.

Riahi, M.L.; Perdue, J.M.; Kunkel, B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Act) and numerous state and local environmental and public health laws apply to shale gas and other unconventional oil and gas development. Consequently, the fracturing...

14

DEVELOPMENT OF CHEMICAL REDUCTION AND AIR STRIPPING PROCESSES TO REMOVE MERCURY FROM WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

Jackson, D.; Looney, B.; Craig, B.; Thompson, M.; Kmetz, T.

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture...

16

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes...

17

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface...

18

Optimization of offshore natural gas field development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis the target is to find the optimal development solution of an offshore natural gas field. Natural gas is increasing in importance… (more)

Johansen, Gaute Rannem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

KINEMATICS AND EXCITATION OF THE RAM PRESSURE STRIPPED IONIZED GAS FILAMENTS IN THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of deep imaging and spectroscopic observations of very extended ionized gas (EIG) around four member galaxies of the Coma Cluster of galaxies: RB 199, IC 4040, GMP 2923, and GMP 3071. The EIGs were serendipitously found in an H{alpha} narrowband imaging survey of the central region of the Coma Cluster. The relative radial velocities of the EIGs with respect to the systemic velocities of the parent galaxies from which they emanate increase almost monotonically with the distance from the nucleus of the respective galaxies, reaching {approx} - 400 to - 800 km s{sup -1} at around 40-80 kpc from the galaxies. The one-sided morphologies and the velocity fields of the EIGs are consistent with the predictions of numerical simulations of ram pressure stripping. We found a very low velocity filament (v{sub rel} {approx} -1300 km s{sup -1}) at the southeastern edge of the disk of IC 4040. Some bright compact knots in the EIGs of RB 199 and IC 4040 exhibit blue continuum and strong H{alpha} emission. The equivalent widths of the H{alpha} emission exceed 200 A and are greater than 1000 Angstrom-Sign for some knots. The emission-line intensity ratios of the knots are basically consistent with those of sub-solar abundance H II regions. These facts indicate that intensive star formation occurs in the knots. Some filaments, including the low-velocity filament of the IC 4040 EIG, exhibit shock-like emission-line spectra, suggesting that shock heating plays an important role in ionization and excitation of the EIGs.

Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yagi, Masafumi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Furusawa, Hisanori [Astronomical Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hattori, Takashi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'Ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Okamura, Sadanori, E-mail: yoshidam@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Development &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipelinesk > Development & Expansion Pipelinesk > Development & Expansion About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Development and Expansion Timing | Determining Market Interest | Expansion Options | Obtaining Approval | Prefiling Process | Approval | Construction | Commissioning Timing and Steps for a New Project An interstate natural gas pipeline construction or expansion project takes an average of about three years from the time it is first announced until the new pipe is placed in service. The project can take longer if it encounters major environmental obstacles or public opposition. A pipeline development or expansion project involves several steps: Determining demand/market interest

23

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas...

24

Challenges and strategies of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this paper is to help new investors and project developers identify the challenges of shale gas E&P and to enlighten them of… (more)

Lee, Sunje

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the fabrication and testing of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) based hot gas filters. The fabrication approach utilized a modified filament winding method that combined both continuous and chopped fibers into a novel microstructure. The work was divided into five primary tasks. In the first task, a preliminary set of compositions was fabricated in the form of open end tubes and characterized. The results of this task were used to identify the most promising compositions for sub-scale filter element fabrication and testing. In addition to laboratory measurements of permeability and strength, exposure testing in a coal combustion environment was performed to asses the thermo-chemical stability of the CFCC materials. Four candidate compositions were fabricated into sub-scale filter elements with integral flange and a closed end. Following the 250 hour exposure test in a circulating fluid bed combustor, the retained strength ranged from 70 t 145 percent of the as-fabricated strength. The post-test samples exhibited non-catastrophic failure behavior in contrast to the brittle failure exhibited by monolithic materials. Filter fabrication development continued in a filter improvement and cost reduction task that resulted in an improved fiber architecture, the production of a net shape flange, and an improved low cost bond. These modifications were incorporated into the process and used to fabricate 50 full-sized filter elements for testing in demonstration facilities in Karhula, Finland and at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. After 581 hours of testing in the Karhula facility, the elements retained approximately 87 percent of their as-fabricated strength. In addition, mechanical response testing at Virginia Tech provided a further demonstration of the high level of strain tolerance of the vacuum wound filter elements. Additional testing in the M. W. Kellogg unit at the PSDF has accumulated over 1800 hours of coal firing at temperatures of 760 °C including a severe thermal upset that resulted in the failure of several monolithic oxide elements. No failures of any kind have been reported for the MTI CFCC elements in either of these test campaigns. Additional testing is planned at the M. W. Kellogg unit and Foster Wheeler unit at the PSDF over the next year in order to qualify for consideration for the Lakeland PCFB. Process scale-up issues have been identified and manufacturing plans are being evaluated to meet the needs of future demand.

RICHARD A. WAGNER

1998-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Gated strip proportional detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gated strip proportional detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM); Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos, NM); Atencio, Leroy G. (Espanola, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas...

29

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas...

30

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Hot Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same

31

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

OPTIMIZATION OF NATURAL GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Field development of natural gas reservoirs is one of the main aspects of exploration and production of natural gas for oil and gas operators. After… (more)

Olatunji, Adewale

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Total pressing Indonesian gas development, exports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total is on track to become Indonesia's leading gas exporter by the turn of the century. Total's aggressive development of its Mahakam Delta acreage in East Kalimantan is intended to keep pace with growing liquefied natural gas demand, mainly from Japan but also increasingly from South Korea and Taiwan. A frantic scramble is under way among natural gas suppliers in the Pacific Rim region, particularly those with current LNG export facilities, to accommodate projections of soaring natural gas demand in the region. Accordingly, Total's Indonesian gas production goal is the centerpiece of a larger strategy to become a major player in the Far East Asia gas scene. Its goals also fall in line with Indonesia's. Facing flat or declining oil production while domestic oil demand continues to soar along with a rapidly growing economy, Indonesia is heeding some studies that project the country could become a net oil importer by the turn of the century. The paper describes Total's Far East strategy, the Mahakam acreage which it operates, the shift to gas development, added discoveries, future development, project spending levels, and LNG export capacity.

Not Available

1994-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer This Primer on Modern Shale Gas Development in the United...

35

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer Modern Shale Gas Development in the...

36

Development of a thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier.  

SciTech Connect

Praxair, in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing a new technology, thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators, for liquefaction of natural gas. This is the only technology capable of producing refrigeration power at cryogenic temperatures with no moving parts. A prototype, with a projected natural gas liquefaction capacity of 500 gallons/day, has been built and tested. The power source is a natural gas burner. Systems will be developed with liquefaction capacities up to 10,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The technology, the development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed. In February 2001 Praxair, Inc. purchased the acoustic heat engine and refrigeration development program from Chart Industries. Chart (formerly Cryenco, which Chart purchased in 1997) and Los Alamos had been working on the technology development program since 1994. The purchase included assets and intellectual property rights for thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse tube refrigerators (TADOPTR), a new and revolutionary Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) technology, aspects of Orifice Pulse Tube Refrigeration (OPTR) and linear motor compressors as OPTR drivers. Praxair, in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the licensor of the TADOPTR and TASHE patents, is continuing the development of TASHE-OPTR natural gas powered, natural gas liquefiers. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at -161 C (-259 F) at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 TADOPTR invention by Drs. Greg Swift (LANL) and Ray Radebaugh (NIST) demonstrated the first technology to produce cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators use acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The basic driver and refrigerator consist of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. The liquefier development program is divided into two components: Thermoacoustically driven refrigerators and linear motor driven refrigerators (LOPTRs). LOPTR technology will, for the foreseeable future, be limited to natural gas liquefaction capacities on the order of hundreds of gallons per day. TASHE-OPTR technology is expected to achieve liquefaction capacities of tens of thousands of gallons per day. This paper will focus on the TASHE-OPTR technology because its natural gas liquefaction capacity has greater market opportunity. LOPTR development will be mentioned briefly. The thermoacoustically driven refrigerator development program is now in the process of demonstrating the technology at a capacity of about 500 gallon/day (gpd) i.e., approximately 42,000 standard cubic feet/day, which requires about 7 kW of refrigeration power. This capacity is big enough to illuminate the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction at reasonable cost and to demonstrate the liquefaction of about 70% of an input gas stream, while burning about 30%. Subsequent to this demonstration a system with a capacity of approximately 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet/day (scfd) = 10,000 gpd with a projected liquefaction rate of about 85% of the input gas stream will be developed. When commercialized, the TASHE-OPTRs will be a totally new type of heat-driven cryogenic refrigerator, with projected low manufacturing cost, high reliability, long life, and low maintenance. A TASHE-OPTR will be able to liquefy a broad range of gases, one of the most important being natural gas (NG). Potential NG applications range from distributed liquefaction of pipeline gas as fuel for heavy-duty fleet and long haul vehicles to large-scale liquefaction at on-shore and offshore gas wellheads. An alternative to the thermoacoustic driver, but with many similar technical and market advantages, is the linear motor compressor. Linear motors convert electrical power directly into oscillating linear, or axial, motion. Attachment of a piston to the oscillator results in a direct drive compressor. Such a compressor

Wollan, J. J. (John J.); Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Backhaus, S. N. (Scott N.); Gardner, D. L. (David L.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development of a thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Praxair, in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing a new technology, thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators, for liquefaction of natural gas. This is the only technology capable of producing refrigeration power at cryogenic temperatures with no moving parts. A prototype, with a projected natural gas liquefaction capacity of 500 gallons/day, has been built and tested. The power source is a natural gas burner. Systems will be developed with liquefaction capacities up to 10,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The technology, the development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed. In February 2001 Praxair, Inc. purchased the acoustic heat engine and refrigeration development program from Chart Industries. Chart (formerly Cryenco, which Chart purchased in 1997) and Los Alamos had been working on the technology development program since 1994. The purchase included assets and intellectual property rights for thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse tube refrigerators (TADOPTR), a new and revolutionary Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) technology, aspects of Orifice Pulse Tube Refrigeration (OPTR) and linear motor compressors as OPTR drivers. Praxair, in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the licensor of the TADOPTR and TASHE patents, is continuing the development of TASHE-OPTR natural gas powered, natural gas liquefiers. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at -161 C (-259 F) at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 TADOPTR invention by Drs. Greg Swift (LANL) and Ray Radebaugh (NIST) demonstrated the first technology to produce cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators use acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The basic driver and refrigerator consist of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. The liquefier development program is divided into two components: Thermoacoustically driven refrigerators and linear motor driven refrigerators (LOPTRs). LOPTR technology will, for the foreseeable future, be limited to natural gas liquefaction capacities on the order of hundreds of gallons per day. TASHE-OPTR technology is expected to achieve liquefaction capacities of tens of thousands of gallons per day. This paper will focus on the TASHE-OPTR technology because its natural gas liquefaction capacity has greater market opportunity. LOPTR development will be mentioned briefly. The thermoacoustically driven refrigerator development program is now in the process of demonstrating the technology at a capacity of about 500 gallon/day (gpd) i.e., approximately 42,000 standard cubic feet/day, which requires about 7 kW of refrigeration power. This capacity is big enough to illuminate the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction at reasonable cost and to demonstrate the liquefaction of about 70% of an input gas stream, while burning about 30%. Subsequent to this demonstration a system with a capacity of approximately 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet/day (scfd) = 10,000 gpd with a projected liquefaction rate of about 85% of the input gas stream will be developed. When commercialized, the TASHE-OPTRs will be a totally new type of heat-driven cryogenic refrigerator, with projected low manufacturing cost, high reliability, long life, and low maintenance. A TASHE-OPTR will be able to liquefy a broad range of gases, one of the most important being natural gas (NG). Potential NG applications range from distributed liquefaction of pipeline gas as fuel for heavy-duty fleet and long haul vehicles to large-scale liquefaction at on-shore and offshore gas wellheads. An alternative to the thermoacoustic driver, but with many similar technical and market advantages, is the linear motor compressor. Linear motors convert electrical power directly into oscillating linear, or axial, motion. Attachment of a piston to the oscillator results in a direct drive compressor. Such a compressor

Wollan, J. J. (John J.); Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Backhaus, S. N. (Scott N.); Gardner, D. L. (David L.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Program to develop advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The need for an advanced turbine program for land-based engines has been broadly recognized in light of reductions in military funding for turbines, rapid growth in the sale of gas turbines for utility and industrial usage, and the fierce competition with off-shore manufacturers. Only with Government support can US manufacturers meet rapidly changing market conditions such as increased emissions requirements and lower capital cost requirements. In light of this, ATS planning was requested by Congress in the fiscal year (FY) 92 appropriations and is included in thee Energy Policy Act of 1992. The program budget has increased rapidly, with the FY 94 budget including. over $28 million for ATS program activities. The Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program Crosscut Plan, 1993--1998, includes the ATS program as part of the overall DOE plan for natural gas-related research and development (R&D) activities. Private sector support for the program is sufficient. Three open meetings have been held during the last 2 years to provide an opportunity for industry suggestions and comments. As the result of a public review of the program plan held June 4, 1993, in Pittsburgh, 46 letters of support were received from industry, academia, and others. Gas turbines represent the fastest growing market segment in electrical and cogeneration markets, with over 60 percent of recent installations based on gas turbines. Gas turbine systems offer low installation and operating costs, low emissions (currently with add-on equipment for non-attainment areas), and quick installation (1--2 years). According to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993, electricity and natural gas demand should both grow substantially through 2010. Natural gas-fired gas turbine systems continue to be the prime candidates for much of both new and retrofit capacity in this period. Emissions requirements continue to ratchet downward with single-digit NO{sub x} ppM required in several non-attainment areas in the US

Webb, H.A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Parks, W.P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems study is to investigate innovative natural gas fired cycle developments to determine the feasibility of achieving 60% efficiency within a 8-year time frame. The potential system was to be environmentally superior, cost competitive and adaptable to coal-derived fuels. Progress is described.

Bannister, R.L.; Little, D.A.; Wiant, B.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip  

SciTech Connect

Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lateral flow strip assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Francesca S. (Livermore, CA); Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L. (Livermore, CA)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Greece poised for oil and gas development  

SciTech Connect

The first indigenous crude oil in Greece will be produced by late 1980, and commercial operations are expected to start in early 1981 from the offshore oil and gas field in the North Aegean Sea. The discovery of oil in Greek waters started a new era in the economic development of Greece and could be considered a milestone in the development of the country. The discovery also had international political implications. Many analysts consider it as the main cause of the dispute between Greece and Turkey over the delineation of the continental shelf of the Aegean Sea. The Greek Government, after the collapse of the dictatorial regime in 1974, has enacted new legislation regarding oil exploration and exploitation activities in Greece. Oil found so far amounts to 12% of present domestic consumption, and there is hope of more as the Public Petroleum Corporation turns its attention westward.

Vougaris, C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. Operators can use the data on the websites to expand natural gas recovery in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and the central Appalachian Basin of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. As production from conventional natural gas resources declines, natural gas from tight-gas sandstone formations is expected to contribute a growing percentage to the nation's energy supply. "Tight gas" is natural gas

45

Development of inorganic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen for commercial coal liquefaction processes may be provided by a coal gasification plant operated to maximize hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a major chemical requirement for coal liquefaction, and the use of liquefaction by-products such as mineral ash residue as feed to the gasifier can improve the overall process efficiency and economics. Also, recovery of hydrogen from gaseous streams in the coal liquefaction plant can have a significant impact on coal liquefaction process economics. In these hydrogen production scenarios, there is a need to improve the quality of the hydrogen produced by separating the other impurity gases from it. The DOE-Fossil Energy AR TD Materials Program is presently developing inorganic membranes for gas separation, including the recovery of valuable resources such as hydrogen from hot-gas streams. A summary of efforts to produce alumina membranes with mean pore radii <5 {angstrom} is presented as well as a status report on declassification of this important technology. 2 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z.; Fain, D.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biological conversion of synthesis gas culture development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research continues on the conversion of synthesis by shift reactions involving bacteria. Topics discussed here include: biological water gas shift, sulfur gas utilization, experimental screening procedures, water gas shift studies, H{sub 2}S removal studies, COS degradation by selected CO-utilizing bacteria, and indirect COS utilization by Chlorobia. (VC)

Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Public acceptance of natural gas infrastructure development in the UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for underground gas storage (UGS) the development of LNG terminals with above-ground storage tanks projects listed; underground gas storage projects proposed or under development in Cheshire, Lancashire, and Yorkshire; and the liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals at Milford Haven and the Isle of Grain

48

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

49

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

50

Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development January 10, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What is RPSEA? The Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America - or RPSEA -

51

Strip Mine Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the Department of Natural Resources to adopt and promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to strip mining of coal and reclamation, review...

52

Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate

William Ruckelshaus

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Platform 2010 -2015 Accounting Building/Data Mining · Aim: improve the UK's greenhouse gas inventory by replacing generic IPCCC emission inventory #12;Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Platform ­ missing data #12;AC0115 ­ led by IBERS

Edinburgh, University of

54

Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania Introduction states where other shale fields are already in full- fledged gas production. The abun- dance of water of precipita- tion. Water is a critical component of the process of removing natural gas from underground shale

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

55

Spray forming lead strip. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative research project was conducted between the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) to adapt the INEL spray forming process to produce near-net-shape lead alloy strip. The emphasis of the work was to spray form lead strip samples at INEL, using a variety of spray conditions, for characterization at JCI. An existing glove box apparatus was modified at INEL to spray form lead. The main spray forming components were housed inside the glove box. They included a spray nozzle, tundish (crucible), substrate assembly, gas heater and furnaces to heat the nozzle and tundish. To spray form metal strip, liquid metal was pressure-fed at a controlled rate through a series of circular orifices that span the width of the nozzle. There the metal contacted high velocity, high temperature inert gas (nitrogen) which atomized the molten material into fine droplets, entrained the droplets in a directed flow, and deposited them onto glass plates that were swept through the spray plume to form strip samples. In-flight convection cooling of the droplets followed by conduction and convection cooling at the substrate resulted in rapid solidification of the deposit. During operation, the inside of the glove box was purged with an inert gas to limit the effects of in-flight oxidation of the particles and spray-formed strips, as well as to protect personnel from exposure to airborne lead particulate. Remote controls were used to start/stop the spray and control the speed and position of the substrate. In addition, substrate samples were loaded into the substrate translator manually using the gloved side ports of the box. In this way, the glove box remained closed during a series of spray trials, and was opened only when loading the crucible with a lead charge or when removing lead strip samples for shipment to JCI.

McHugh, K.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Natural Gas Engine Development: July 2003 -- July 2005  

SciTech Connect

Discusses project to develop heavy-duty, 8.1L natural gas vehicle engines that would be certifiable below the 2004 federal emissions standards and commercially viable.

Lekar, T. C.; Martin, T. J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Natural Gas Engine Development: July 2003--July 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes project to develop natural gas engines that would be certifiable to nitrogen oxide and nonmethane hydrocarbon emission levels below 2004 federal standards.

Lekar, T. C.; Martin, T. J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

priority challenges associated with safely and prudently developing unconventional shale gas and tight oil resources. Implementation Plan The Program Consortium will...

59

International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and Development 1991 November 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas ... Production figures in this report may differ slightly from

60

Gas turbine noise mitigation for a residential development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A residential development was proposed adjacent to a gas turbine electrical power production peaking facility. To determine compliance with local standards

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of the potential impacts of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to analyze the considerations regarding the environmental impacts of shale gas development by a rational, objective, fact-based assessment. Flowback… (more)

Yi, Hyukjoong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 November 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 iii Contacts International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development 1991 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Oil and Gas, Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Reserves and Production Branch.

63

XXIII ICTAM, 19-24 August 2012, Beijing, China Study of liquid destabilization and stripping in a liquid-gas mixing layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a liquid-gas mixing layer Jean-Philippe Matasa) , Sylvain Marty & Alain Cartellier LEGI, CNRS-Université de the atomization of a liquid sheet by a parallel gas flow, in order to understand the conditions of destabilization of injection turns a liquid flow into a homogeneous spray under the action of a fast gas stream. A good quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Geothermal Developments at San Diego Gas & Electric  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, the first well flow tests were conducted by NARCO and Magma Power to determine reservoir characteristics such as mass flow, temperature, stability, and mineral content of geothermal brine from the exploration wells. The results of these tests were encouraging. Brine temperatures were relatively hot, and salinity was less than previously experienced. Results were sufficient to justify further testing of the process design to determine an appropriate energy conversion cycle for a power plant. Both the flash cycle and binary cycle were considered. In the binary cycle, geothermal heat is transferred from hot brine to a secondary working fluid by means of heat exchangers. The heated secondary fluid expands to drive a turbine-generator. The flash cycle was rejected because the high measured noncondensible gas content of the brines seriously reduced the cycle efficiency. The reduced salinity was expected to result in reduced scaling characteristics. For these reasons the binary cycle was selected for initial design and field testing. In 1973, a series of field tests was conducted to support the design of the binary conversion cycle. Unfortunately, a rapid decline in heat exchanger performance resulting from scaling demonstrated a need to reevaluate the cycle design. A flash/binary process was chosen as the basis for facility design modifications and additional field testing. Design modifications were to use as much of the original design as possible in order to minimize cost. In March of 1974, SDG&E resumed field testing at Niland using reduced size models of the new flash/binary design. The 1974 test program confirmed the decision to modify the design, construction, and operation of the GLEF in a four-stage, flash/binary cycle configuration. In May of 1975, the design was completed and construction of the GLEF began. Startup operations were initiated and in June 1976 the facility was dedicated. In the fall of 1976 while debugging and initial operation was being accomplished, a test program was developed to provide additional basic information necessary for the design of a commercial flash/binary geothermal plant. The primary objective of the program was to develop binary heat exchanger heat design data under a variety of conditions.

Anastas, George; Hoaglin, Gregory J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The development of a UK natural gas spot market  

SciTech Connect

The growth of a natural gas spot market in the United Kingdom (UK) is a radical innovation for the industry. Spot markets turned the oil industry inside out, and will do the same for gas. Such a development seemed all but impossible to gas industry experts three years ago. The role and likely form of a spot market are now at the center of current industry debate about the designing of a daily balancing regime to replace unitary management by British Gas. This paper examines parallels between the evolution of spot markets for oil in the 1980`s and the current UK gas industry. 12 refs., 1 fig.

Roeber, J. [Joe Roeber Associates, London (United Kingdom)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Retractable barrier strip  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McQueen, Miles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Kalimantan field development hikes gas supply for LNG export  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of Tambora and Tunu gas fields in Kalimantan that have increased available gas supply for the export of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Indonesia. The demand for LNG is increasing in the energy thirsty Far East market. And Indonesia, the world's largest exporter, is keeping pace by expanding the Bontang liquefaction plant in East Kalimantan. A fifth train, with a capacity of around 2.5 million tons/year, began operating in January 1990. Start-up of a sixth train, of identical capacity, is planned for January 1994. The Bontang plant is operated by PT Badak on behalf of Pertamina, the Indonesian state oil and gas mining company. The feed to the fifth train comes primarily from the first-phase development of Total Indonesie's two gas fields, Tambora and Tunu. The sixth train will be fed by a second-phase development of the Tunu field.

Suharmoko, G.R. (Total Indonesie, Balikpapan (ID))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

DEVELOPMENT OF A THERMOACOUSTIC NATURAL GAS LIQUEFIER-UPDATE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators are being developed for liquefaction of natural gas. This is the only technology capable of producing refrigeration power at cryogenic temperatures with no moving parts. A prototype, with a projected natural gas liquefaction capacity of 500 gallons/day, has been built and tested. The power source is a natural gas burner. Systems are developed with liquefaction capacities up to 10,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The technology, the development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed.

J. WOLLAN; G. SWIFT

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Membrane Seal Development for Gas Separation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

develop the "seals" that are a key component of high-efficiency, low emissions fossil fuel conversion. Development of these seals also supports the U.S. Department of Energy...

72

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells… (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Environmental Research Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nies.go.jp/gaiyo/media_kit/9.WGIA_I067.pdf Country: Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Screenshot

74

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Fourteenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program sponsored by the Heat Engine Systems Branch, Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). Structurally, this program is made up of three parts: (1) documentation of the existing automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art; (2) conduction of an extensive component improvement program; and (3) utilization of the improvements in the design, and building of an Upgraded Engine capable of demonstrating program goals.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is an important energy source that contributes up to 25% of the total US energy reserves (DOE 2011). An increase in natural gas demand spurs further development of unconventional resources, including methane hydrate (Rajnauth 2012). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than 230 gas-hydrate deposits have been discovered globally. Several production technologies have been tested; however, the development of the Messoyakha field in the west Siberian basin is the only successful commercial gas-hydrate field to date. Although the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions and examines them based on the available geologic and engineering data. CMG STARS and IMEX software packages were used to calculate gas production from a hydrate-bearing formation on a field scale. Results of this analysis confirm the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field and also determine the volume of hydrates in place. The cumulative production from the field on January 1, 2012 is 12.9 x 10^9 m^3, and it was determined in this study that 5.4 x 10^9 m^3 was obtained from hydrates. The important issue of pressure-support mechanisms in developing a gas hydrate reservoir was also addressed in this study. Pressure-support mechanisms were investigated using different evaluation methods such as the use of gas-injection well patterns and gas/water injection using isothermal and non-isothermal simulators. Several aquifer models were examined. Simulation results showed that pressure support due to aquifer activity was not possible. Furthermore, it was shown that the water obtained from hydrates was not produced and remained in the reservoir. Results obtained from the aquifer models were confirmed by the actual water production from the field. It was shown that water from hydrates is a very strong pressure-support mechanism. Water not only remained in the reservoir, but it formed a thick water-saturated layer between the free-gas and gas-hydrate zone. Finally, thermodynamic behavior of gas hydrate decomposition was studied. Possible areas of hydrate preservation were determined. It was shown that the central top portion of the field preserved most of hydrates due to temperature reduction of hydrate decomposition.

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications  

SciTech Connect

Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Impacts Surface Impacts (non-water) Key Points: * There are many local economic and energy benefits from shale gas development; there is also an inherent risk of increased traffic or other habitat disturbances that could affect residents, agriculture, farming, fishing and hunting. 1 * Shale gas development can lead to socio-economic impacts and can increase demands on local infrastructure, traffic, labor force, education, medical and other services. 2 Federal and state laws are designed to mitigate the impact of these challenges. * The rapid expansion of shale gas development and hydraulic fracturing has increased attention on potential effects on human health, the environment and local wildlife habitat. Vegetation and soils are disturbed where gas wells require new roads, clearing and leveling.

79

DEVELOPMENT OF METALLIC HOT GAS FILTERS  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of metallic filters with high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance for fly ash capture is a key to enabling advanced coal combustion and power generation technologies. Compared to ceramic filters, metallic filters can offer increased resistance to impact and thermal fatigue, greatly improving filter reliability. A beneficial metallic filter structure, composed of a thin-wall (0.5mm) tube with uniform porosity (about 30%), is being developed using a unique spherical powder processing and partial sintering approach, combined with porous sheet rolling and resistance welding. Alloy choices based on modified superalloys, e.g., Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-3Fe (wt.%), are being tested in porous and bulk samples for oxide (typically alumina) scale stability in simulated oxidizing/sulfidizing atmospheres found in PFBC and IGCC systems at temperatures up to 850 C. Recent ''hanging o-ring'' exposure tests in actual combustion systems at a collaborating DOE site (EERC) have been initiated to study the combined corrosive effects from particulate deposits and hot exhaust gases. New studies are exploring the correlation between sintered microstructure, tensile strength, and permeability of porous sheet samples.

Anderson, I.E.; Gleeson, B.; Terpstra, R.L.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever increasing energy demand brings about widespread interest to rapidly, profitably and efficiently develop unconventional resources, among which tight gas sands hold a significant portion. However, optimization of development strategies in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information, and time and budget constraints. Unfortunately, classical full-scale reservoir evaluation cannot be routinely employed by small- to medium-sized operators, given its timeconsuming and expensive nature. In addition, the full-scale evaluation is generally built on deterministic principles and produces a single realization of the reservoir, despite the significant uncertainty faced by operators. This work addresses the need for rapid and cost-efficient technologies to help operators determine optimal well spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast, approximate reservoir simulation model to match and predict production performance in unconventional gas reservoirs. Simulation results were then fit with decline curves to enable direct integration of the reservoir model into a Bayesian decision model. These integrated tools were applied to the tight gas assets of Unconventional Gas Resources Inc. in the Berland River area, Alberta, Canada.

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Air Key Points: * Air quality risks from shale oil and gas development are generally the result of: (1) dust and engine exhaust from increased truck traffic; (2) emissions from diesel-powered pumps used to power equipment; (3) intentional flaring or venting of gas for operational reasons; and, (4) unintentional emissions of pollutants from faulty equipment or impoundments. 1 * Natural gas is efficient and clean compared to other fossil fuels, emitting less nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide than coal and oil, no mercury and very few particulates. However, the drilling

82

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

83

Wakes of ram pressure stripped disc galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spiral galaxies that move through the intracluster medium lose a substantial amount of their gas discs due to ram pressure stripping. The recent observations of NGC 4388 by Oosterloo & van Gorkom 2005 reveal a tail of stripped gas of ~ 100 kpc behind the source galaxy. We present first 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the evolution of such ram pressure stripped tails. We find that if the ICM wind does not vary significantly over a period of a few 100 Myr, subsonic galaxies produce a tail with regular features similar to a von-Karman vortex street. In this case, the tail widens systematically by about 45 kpc per 100 kpc distance behind the source galaxy. The widening rate is independent of the galaxy's inclination for a large range of inclinations. For supersonic galaxies, the tail is more irregular than for subsonic ones. The tail observed for NGC 4388 is narrower than the tails in our simulations. Reasons for this difference may be additional physical processes such as heat conduction or viscosity. In addition, we conclude that the observed S-shape of this tail is not due to von Karman oscillations, because this galaxy is likely to move supersonically. A reason for the observed shape may be motions in the ambient ICM. Finally, we discuss implications for the distribution of metals in the ICM due to ram pressure stipping.

E. Roediger; M. Brueggen; M. Hoeft

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

Hsu, R.H.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development requirements for an advanced gas turbine system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cooperation with US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, a Westinghouse-led team is working on the second part of an 8-year, Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technology required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. This paper reports on the Westinghouse program to develop an innovative natural gas-fired advanced turbine cycle, which, in combination with increased firing temperature, use of advanced materials, increased component efficiencies, and reduced cooling air usage, has the potential of achieving a lower heating value plant efficiency in excess of 60%.

Bannister, R.L.; Cheruvu, N.S.; Little, D.A.; McQuiggan, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thailand's offshore results encourage gas development  

SciTech Connect

Thailand, whose efforts to relieve its dependence on costly imported oil by exploring the Gulf of Thailand and Andaman Sea have been hampered by political unrest, is using a new approach of granting blocks of exploration concessions to several international companies. Early strikes indicate a potential supply of high-grade, low-sulfur oil and natural gas condensates. Development is underway by Weeks, Oceanic Exploration, Union Oil, and Esso in the Andaman Sea; Amoco, BP, Tenneco, Sun, Union Oil, Conoco, and Triton in the Gulf of Thailand. Centrally located Singapore is now providing much of the drilling supplies, but Thailand is setting up its own oil-support industry to provide oil well cement, Barite (mud lubricant) and logistical services. Delays in commercial development of the natural gas fields are due to negotiations over foreign investment, prices, customer assurance, and regulatory procedures. The Thai government plans to build a pipeline to connect the gas fields with Bangkok. (DCK)

Budhraja, P.S.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oil and gas developments in West Coast area in 1981  

SciTech Connect

The total exploratory footage and number of wells drilled in the onshore area of California during 1981 increased approximately 10% and20%, respectively, over the 1980 figures. Both the average footage drilled per well (5579 ft) and the percentage of success (32.7%) showed declines from 1980. Eight wildcats established new fields in 1981. Two of the wildcats discovered new oil fields and 6 found new gas fields. An additional gas find has been treated as a discovery because of its stratigraphic significance. Onshore development drilling included 2078 wells; 97% of these were completed as successful producers, the same percentage as in 1980. For the California offshore, just 5 exploratory well completions were reported to the Committee on Statistics of Drilling in 1981; only 2 were successful. Texaco announced its Pitas Point gas field extension in May, and Chevron announced a new oil field discovery, the Point Arguello, in October. There were 118 development wells drilled, of which 99 (83.9%) were successful. Development footage and number of wells were up, but the percentage of success declined from 90% in 1980. California's oil production reached an all-time high of 384.8 million bbl in 1981. The state's previous record, set in 1968, was 375.4 million bbl. Geothermal activity in California centered on development of the proven Imperial Valley and Geysers areas and the discovery of the Coso area in Inyo County. Activity in Oregon included evaluation of the Mount Hood and Newberry Volcano areas. Oil and gas exploratory drilling in Oregon druing 1981 led to the discovery of a new gas field by American Quasar in Linn County and to the establishment of a new gas pool by Reichhold Energy at the Mist field in Columbia County. The major portion of Washington's exploratory drilling in 1981 was carried out by Shell in Kittitas County in the south-central part of the state. At last report, the hydrocarbon accumulations found had been deemed noncommercial.

Dignes, T.W. (Chevron USA Inc., Concord, CA); Woltz, D.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered include the AGT 101 engine test compressor design modification cold air turbine testing Mod 1 alloy turbine rotor fabrication combustion aspects regenerator development and thermal screening tests for ceramic materials. The foil gas bearings, rotor dynamics, and AGT controls and accessories are also considered.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA...

91

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300°C and 900°C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geomechanical Development of Fractured Reservoirs During Gas Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within fractured reservoirs, such as tight gas reservoir, coupled processes between matrix deformation and fluid flow are very important for predicting reservoir behavior, pore pressure evolution and fracture closure. To study the coupling between gas desorption and rock matrix/fracture deformation, a poroelastic constitutive relation is developed and used for deformation of gas shale. Local continuity equation of dry gas model is developed by considering the mass conservation of gas, including both free and absorbed phases. The absorbed gas content and the sorption-induced volumetric strain are described through a Langmiur-type equation. A general porosity model that differs from other empirical correlations in the literature is developed and utilized in a finite element model to coupled gas diffusion and rock mass deformation. The dual permeability method (DPM) is implemented into the Finite Element Model (FEM) to investigate fracture deformation and closure and its impact on gas flow in naturally fractured reservoir. Within the framework of DPM, the fractured reservoir is treated as dual continuum. Two independent but overlapping meshes (or elements) are used to represent these kinds of reservoirs: one is the matrix elements used for deformation and fluid flow within matrix domain; while the other is the fracture element simulating the fluid flow only through the fractures. Both matrix and fractures are assumed to be permeable and can accomodate fluid transported. A quasi steady-state function is used to quantify the flow that is transferred between rock mass and fractures. By implementing the idea of equivalent fracture permeability and shape-factor within the transfer function into DPM, the fracture geometry and orientation are numerically considered and the complexity of the problem is well reduced. Both the normal deformation and shear dilation of fractures are considered and the stress-dependent fracture aperture can be updated in time. Further, a non-linear numerical model is constructed by implementing a poroviscoelastic model into the dual permeability (DPM)-finite element model (FEM) to investigate the coupled time-dependent viscoelastic deformation, fracture network evolution and compressible fluid flow in gas shale reservoir. The viscoelastic effect is addressed in both deviatoric and symmetric effective stresses to emphasize the effect of shear strain localization on fracture shear dilation. The new mechanical model is first verified with an analytical solution in a simple wellbore creep problem and then compared with the poroelastic solution in both wellbore and field cases.

Huang, Jian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor’s logic, which mimics human expert’s decision-making process. TGS Advisor’s recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

97

Natural gas research, development, and demonstration contractors review meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring two major programs to develop high efficiency, natural gas fueled power generation technologies. These programs are the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program and the Fuel Cell Program. While natural gas is gaining acceptance in the electric power sector, the improved technology from these programs will make gas an even more attractive fuel, particularly in urban areas where environmental concerns are greatest. Under the auspices of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE), the 8-year ATS Program is developing and will demonstrate advanced gas turbine power systems for both large central power systems and smaller industrial-scale systems. The large-scale systems will have efficiencies significantly greater than 60 percent, while the industrial-scale systems will have efficiencies with at least an equivalent 15 percent increase over the best 1992-vintage technology. The goal is to have the system ready for commercial offering by the year 2000. DOE/FE and DOE/EE also cooperate in the development of fuel cells. DOE/EE is responsible for transportation applications, while DOE/FE supports fuel cell development for stationary electric power. Fuel cell systems in the 100 kilowatt (M) to several megawatt (MW) size range are an attractive technology for power generation because of their ultra-high energy conversion efficiency and extremely low environmental emissions. As modular units for distributed power generation, fuel cells are expected to be particularly beneficial where their by-product heat can be effectively used in cogeneration applications. The first generation of fuel cells for power generation is currently entering the commercial market. Advanced fuel cell power systems fueled with natural gas are expected to be commercially available by the turn of the century. The domestic and international market for this advanced technology is expected to be very large.

Bajura, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress August 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 2011 Annual Plan | Page i Message from the Secretary As we take steps to create the clean energy economy of the future, prudent development of domestic oil and natural gas resources will continue to be part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security for decades to come. These operations have to be conducted responsibly, ensuring that communities are safe and that the environment is protected. As industry tackles the challenge of developing an increasingly difficult reserve base - in ultra-deepwater offshore and unconventional plays onshore - we must ensure through scientific

99

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop hot-gas desulfurization sorbent formulations for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343--538 C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The specific objective was to develop suitable sorbents, that would have high and stable surface area and are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. Stability of surface area during regeneration was achieved by adding stabilizers. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives that promote the light-off of the regeneration reaction at lower temperature was considered. Another objective of this study was to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343 to 538 C and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Development of a low swirl injector concept for gas turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injector Concept for Gas Turbines Robert K. Cheng * , Scottconcept for ultra- low NO x gas turbines. Low-swirl flamevirtually every industrial gas turbine manufacturer to meet

Cheng, R.K.; Fable, S.A.; Schmidt, D.; Arellano, L.; Smith, K.O.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology  

SciTech Connect

An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Davies, J. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Zammit, M. [AC Rochester, NY (United States); Patterson, P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology  

SciTech Connect

An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Davies, J. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Zammit, M. (AC Rochester, NY (United States)); Patterson, P. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 View History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Exploratory NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Development Wells Drilled NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012

106

The Comprehensive Evaluation Model of the Development Prospect of Shale Gas Based on Fuzzy Mathematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an unconventional gas resource, shale gas is an practically alternative energy. Through the analysis of the current situation of shale gas development at home and abroad, this paper ascertains the influencing factors of the development prospect of ... Keywords: shale gas, fuzzy mathematics, development prospect, influence factors

Yanping Wang; Fanqi Meng

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

108

Oil and gas developments in Europe in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Europe showed signs of recovering in 1987 from the downturn in oil- and gas-related activities following the 1986 oil price collapse. Statistics showed a lessening decrease, compared with 1986, in licensed acreage (down 19%), seismic exploration (down 14%), exploratory drilling (down 32%), and development drilling (down 10%). Crude oil production rose 2% and natural gas production was up 4%. Better news was a 20% increase in new-field wildcat discoveries, which numbered 85 in 1987 compared to 79 in 1986. The North Sea produced 34 discoveries, with 20 coming from the British sector. Italy reported 23 finds, an increase of 1 from 1986, despite drilling 18% fewer wells, and France bested its 1986 record with 7 discoveries from 51% fewer wells. Development drilling was emphasized over exploratory drilling in 1987 by 492 wells to 428 wells. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Yarbrough, S.C.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Gas-cooled reactors: the importance of their development  

SciTech Connect

The nearest term GCR is the steam-cycle HTGR, which can be used for both power and process steam production. Use of SC-HTGRs permits timely introduction of thorium fuel cycles and of high-thermal-efficiency reactors, decreasing the need for mined U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ before arrival of symbiotic fueling of fast-thermal reactor systems. The gas-turbine HTGR offers prospects of lower capital costs than other nuclear reactors, but it appears to require longer and more costly development than the SC-HTGR. Accelerated development of the GT-HTGR is needed to gain the advantages of timely introduction. The Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) offers the possibility of fast breeder reactors with lower capital costs and with higher breeding ratios from oxide fuels. The VHTR provides high-temperature heat for hydrogen production.

Kasten, P.R.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Annual Plan 2 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress August 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy I August 2012 Message from the Secretary Fueling our Nation's economy by making the most of America's natural gas and oil resources continues to be an important part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security and a clean energy economy. The Department continues its work toward safe and responsible · development of fossil fuels, while giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised. The EPACT Section 999 program (including the NETL Complementary Research program)

111

Gas-Cooled Reactors: the importance of their development  

SciTech Connect

Gas-Cooled Reactors are considered to have a significant future impact on the application of fission energy. The specific types are the steam-cycle High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the gas-turbine HTGR, and the Very High-Temperature Process Heat Reactor. The importance of developing the above systems is discussed relative to alternative fission power systems involving Light Water Reactors, Heavy Water Reactors, Spectral Shift Controlled Reactors, and Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. A primary advantage of developing GCRs as a class lies in the technology and cost interrelations, permitting cost-effective development of systems having diverse applications. Further, HTGR-type systems have highly proliferation-resistant characteristics and very attractive safety features. Finally, such systems and GCFRs are mutally complementary. Overall, GCRs provide interrelated systems that serve different purposes and needs; their development can proceed in stages that provide early benefits while contributing to future needs. It is concluded that the long-term importance of the various GCRs is as follows: HTGR, providing a technology for economic GCFRs and HTGR-GTs, while providing a proliferation-resistant reactor system having early economic and fuel utilization benefits; GCFR, providing relatively low cost fissile fuel and reducing overall separative work needs at capital costs lower than those for LMFBRs; HTGR-GT (in combination with a bottoming cycle), providing a very high thermal efficiency system having low capital costs and improved fuel utilization and technology pertinent to VHTRs; HTGR-GT, providing a power system well suited for dry cooling conditions for low-temperature process heat needs; and VHTR, providing a high-temperature heat source for hydrogen production processes.

Kasten, P.R.

1978-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development of the Erawan gas field, Gulf of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Erawan gas field is the first major domestic source of hydrocarbons available for industrial development in Thailand. The field has multiple producing facilities that are installed simultaneously and exemplify a tailored design to accommodate current market conditions in vendor and fabrication shops. Equipment modules and their complexity are adjusted to take advantage of workload, labor prices, and steel prices in different countries, which enables both a rapid schedule and significant cost savings.

Clapp, T.W.; Lower, G.D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of mixed-conducting ceramics for gas separation applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mixed-conducting oxides are used in many applications, including fuel cells, gas separation membranes, sensors, and electrocatalysis. This paper describes mixed-conducting ceramic membranes that are being developed to selectively remove oxygen and hydrogen from gas streams in a nongalvanic mode of operation (i.e., with no electrodes or external power supply). Because of its high combined electronic/ionic conductivity and significant oxygen permeability, the mixed-conducting Sr-Fe-Co oxide (SFC) has been developed for high-purity oxygen separation and/or partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas, i.e., syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The electronic and ionic conductivities of SFC were found to be comparable in magnitude and are presented as a function of temperature. The oxygen flux through dense SFC tubes during separation of oxygen from air is compared with the oxygen flux during methane conversion. Unlike SFC, in which the ionic and electronic conductivities are nearly equivalent, BaCe{sub 0.80}Y{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} (BCY) exhibits protonic conductivity that is significantly higher than its electronic conductivity. To enhance the electronic conductivity and increase hydrogen permeation, metal powder was combined with the BCY to form a cermet membrane. Nongalvanic permeation of hydrogen through the cermet membrane was demonstrated and characterized as a function of membrane thickness. A sintering aid was developed to avoid interconnected porosity in and improve the mechanical properties of the cermet membrane.

Balachandran, U.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

International oil and gas exploration and development activities  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed R&D collaboration, RD51, aims at facilitating the development of advanced gas-avalanche detector technologies and associated electronic-readout systems, for applications in basic and applied research. Advances in particle physics have always been enabled by parallel advances in radiation-detector technology. Radiation detection and imaging with gas-avalanche detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with a low material budget, have been playing an important role in many fields. Besides their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, gaseous detectors are employed in many other fields: astro-particle research and applications such as medical imaging, material science, and security inspection. While extensively employed at the LHC, RHIC, and other advanced HEP experiments, present gaseous detectors (wire-chambers, drift-tubes, resistive-plate chambers and others) have limitations which may prevent their use in future experiments. Present tec...

Gregor, I; Richer, J; Santos, D; Barsuk, S; Bencze, G; Hamar, G; Shah, M K; Catanesi, M G; Colaleo, A; Maggi, M; Loddo, F; Poli lener, M; Bagliesi, M; Temming, K K; Richter, R; Lahonde-hamdoun, C; Dris, M; Geralis, T; Kiss, G; Chechik, R; Ochi, A; Hartjes, F; Lopes, I M; Deshpande, A; Franz, A; Ketzer, B F; Dabrowski, W; Ferreira, A; Bastos de oliveira, C A; Ferreira natal da luz, P H; Plazas de pinzon, M C; Hillemanns, H; Tsarfati, T; Voss, B J R; Dafni, T; Carmona martinez, J M; Stocchi, A; Dinu, N; Bezshyyko, O; Bernard, D R L; Semeniouk, I; Giebels, B; Frotin, M; Marton, K; De leo, R; De lucia, E; Alviggi, M; Bellerive, A; Zimmermann, S U; Martin-albo simon, J; Serra diaz cano, L; Derre, J; Giomataris, I; Peyaud, A; Schune, P; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Wang, W; Markou, A; Edo, Y; Hessey, N P; Neves, F F; Solovov, V; Xia, L; Stoll, S; Gasik, P J; Sampsonidis, D; Mindur, B; Zielinska, A Z; Sauli, F; Watts, D A; Calapez de albuquerque veloso, J F; Kahlaoui, N; Sharma, A; Wotschack, J; Bilevych, Y; Zenker, K; Cebrian guajardo, S V; Luzon marco, G M; Dalmaz, A E; Geffroy, N A; Guillaudin, O J H; Cornebise, P; Lounis, A; Bruel, P J; Ruan, M; Haddad, Y; Laszlo, A; Mukerjee, K; Nappi, E; Nuzzo, S V; Cafagna, F S; Bencivenni, G; Cecchi, R; Tessarotto, F; Levorato, S; Munoz-vidal, J; Sorel, M; Liubarsky, I; Riallot, M; Jeanneau, F; Nizery, F G; Maltezos, S; Tsipolitis, G; Kyriakis, A; Lyashenko, A; Van der graaf, H; Alfonsi, M; Alexa, C; Liyanage, N; Dehmelt, K; Hemmick, T K; Polychronakos, V; Purschke, M L; Ball, M; Cisbani, E; Garibaldi, F; Koperny, S Z; Mora mas, F; Das neves dias carramate, L F; Formenti, F; Van stenis, M; Desch, K K; Soyk, D; Segui iglesia, L; Gonzalez diaz, D; Garcia pascual, J A; Adloff, C J; Chefdeville, M; Vouters, G; Poilleux, P R; Ranieri, A; Quinto, M; Lami, S; Shekhtman, L; Dolgov, A; Bamberger, A; Herten, G; Landgraf, U; Kortner, O; Ferrero, A; Legou, P; Aune, S; Attie, D M; Bressler, S; Tsigaridas, S; Surrow, B; Gnanvo, K A K; Feege, N M; Woody, C L; Boehmer, F V; Bhattacharya, S; Capogni, M; Hohlmann, M; Veenhof, R J; Tapan, I; Dangendorf, V; Castro serrato, H; De oliveira, R; Ropelewski, L; Franchino, S; Behnke, T; Diago ortega, A; Gracia garza, J; Peltier, F; Bourrion, O R; Boudry, V; Radicioni, E; Lai, A; Shemyakina, E; Gomez cadenas, J J; Yahlali haddou, N; Giganon, A E; Titov, M; Galan lacarra, J A; Komai, H; Van bakel, N A; Tchepel, V; Repond, J O; Metcalfe, J E; Li, Y; Kourkoumelis, C; Majumdar, N; Kowalski, T; Fiutowski, T; Da rocha azevedo, C D; Trabelsi, A; Riegler, W; Killenberg, M; Lupberger, M; Rosemann, C G; Iguaz gutierrez, F J; Drancourt, C; Samarati, J; Mayet, F; Geerebaert, Y; Fodor, Z P; De robertis, G; Murtas, F; Domenici, D; Morello, G; Scribano memoria, A; Dalla torre, S; Gregori, M; Menon, G; Bondar, A; Buzulutskov, A; Schwegler, P; Ferrario, P; Lorca galindo, D; Alvarez puerta, V; Colas, P M A; Neyret, D; Zito, M; Ferrer ribas, E; Procureur, S; Gazis, E; Breskin, A; Schon, R; Martoiu, V S; Dorheim, S; Petridou, C; Mukhopadhyay, S; Urciuoli, G M; Bucciantonio, M; Bhopatkar, V S; Biagi, S F; Ji, X; Capeans garrido, M D M; Schindler, H; Kaminski, J; Krautscheid, T; Lippmann, C; Arora, R; Garcia irastorza, I; Tomas alquezar, A; Karyotakis, Y; Jacquemier, J N; Puill, V; Wicek, F B; Burmistrov, L; Singh, K P; Pugliese, G; Berardi, V; Oldeman, R; Felici, G; Mannocchi, G; Iengo, P; Giordano, R; Latino, G; Kroha, H; Lux, T; Monrabal-capilla, F; Kunne, F; Charles, G; Chaus, A; Alexopoulos, T; Daskalakis, G; Yu, B; Xiao, Z; Tzanakos, G; Frullani, S; Toledo alarcon, J F; Sahin, O; Kalkan, Y; Giboni, K; Klempt, W; Muller, H; Krieger, C; Herrera munoz, D C; Gaglione, R; Breton, D R; Bhattacharyya, S; Abbrescia, M; Erriquez, O; Paticchio, V; Cardini, A; Aloisio, A; Turini, N; Bressan, A; Tikhonov, Y; Dixit, M S; Schumacher, M; Simon, F R; Nowak, S; Sforza, F; Sanchez nieto, F J; Herlant, S; Glonti, G; Fanourakis, G; Varga, D; Arazi, L; Homma, Y; Timmermans, J; Koppert, W; Ferreira marques, R; Fonte, P; Underwood, D G; Semertzidis, Y K; Azmoun, B; Fassouliotis, D; Wiacek, P; Esteve bosch, R; Fernandes dos santos, C A; Dos santos covita, D; Monteiro da silva, A L; Marques ferreira dos santos, J

118

The Development of Gas/Star Offsets in Tidal Tails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present models of interacting galaxies in order to study the development of spatial offsets between the gaseous and stellar components in tidal tails. Observationally, such offsets are observed to exist over large scales (e.g., NGC 3690; Hibbard et al. 2000), suggesting an interaction between the tidal gas and some (unseen) hot ISM. Instead, our models show these offsets are a natural consequence of the radially extended HI spatial distribution in disk galaxies, coupled with internal dissipation in the gaseous component driven by the interaction. This mechanism is most effective in systems involved in very prograde interactions, and explains the observed gas/star offsets in interacting galaxies without invoking interactions with a hot ISM, starburst ionization, or dust obscuration within the tails.

Chris Mihos

2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Development of Gas/Star Offsets in Tidal Tails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present models of interacting galaxies in order to study the development of spatial offsets between the gaseous and stellar components in tidal tails. Observationally, such offsets are observed to exist over large scales (e.g., NGC 3690; Hibbard et al. 2000), suggesting an interaction between the tidal gas and some (unseen) hot ISM. Instead, our models show these offsets are a natural consequence of the radially extended HI spatial distribution in disk galaxies, coupled with internal dissipation in the gaseous component driven by the interaction. This mechanism is most effective in systems involved in very prograde interactions, and explains the observed gas/star offsets in interacting galaxies without invoking interactions with a hot ISM, starburst ionization, or dust obscuration within the tails.

Mihos, C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pipeline issues shape southern FSU oil, gas development  

SciTech Connect

To future production from southern republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU), construction and revitalization of pipelines are as important as the supply of capital. Export capacity will limit production and slow development activity in the region until new pipelines are in place. Plenty of pipeline proposals have come forward. The problem is politics, which for every proposal so far complicates routing or financing or both. Russia has made clear its intention to use pipeline route decisions to retain influence in the region. As a source of external pressure, it is not alone. Iran and Turkey also have made strong bids for the southern FSU`s oil and gas transport business. Diplomacy thus will say as much as commerce does about how transportation issues are settled and how quickly the southern republics move toward their potentials to produce oil and gas. The paper discusses possible routes and the problems with them, the most likely proposal, and future oil flows.

NONE

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

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121

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm[sup 2]; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to fullsize, 60-mm OD by 1.5-meter-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are underway. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1.5-m-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are in progress. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues identified during testing and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NETL's Gas Process Development Unit for Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objectives for the GPDU project are to: (1) assess transport and fluidized bed reactor control and performance to determine the most suitable mode for continuous gas desulfurization, and (2) evaluate candidate sorbents for bulk removal of sulfurous compounds from syngas to assess the readiness of sorbents for commercial scale. The DOE has funded desulfurization and sorbent research for over 20 years and extensive laboratory-scale and bench-scale work has been conducted by government, academia and industry on the development and testing of regenerable sorbents for bulk sulfur removal from syngas (Cicero, et.al, 2000; Mitchell, 1998; Lew, 1989). However, the technologies still need to be proven in controlled conditions at a larger scale. Several Clean Coal Technology projects (i.e, the Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project, the Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project and the Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project) had proposed demonstrations of hot-gas desulfurization technology, but were not seen to completion (Clean Coal Technology Compendium website, 2002). As a result, there is a lack of data on sorbent and reactor performance under longer-term continuous conditions at a large scale. For commercial acceptance of hot- or warm-gas desulfurization, technology reliability is a question yet to be answered. The GPDU will fill the gap and has the objective to provide the proof-of-concept that is needed to foster commercialization of hot (greater than 538 C (1,000 F)) and/or warm (260 to 427 C (500 to 800 F)) gas desulfurization for IGCC processes. The GPDU facility, which includes a separate Syngas Generator (SGG) that supplies a simulated coal gas to the GPDU, is in the shakedown phase of operations with an initial reactor configuration of transport absorber-transport regenerator. The status and preliminary results of shakedown activities are presented to provide insight into startup and operations of a continuous transport desulfurization process.

Everitt, E.; Bissett, L.A.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

A video strip chart program  

SciTech Connect

A strip chart recorder has been utilized for trend analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory EN tandem since 1987. At the EN, the author could not afford the nice eight channel thermal pen recorder that was used at the 25 URC. He had to suffice with two channel fiber tip or capillary pen type recorders retrieved from salvage and maintained with parts from other salvaged recorders. After cycling through several machines that eventually became completely unserviceable, a search for a new thermal recorder was begun. As much as he hates to write computer code, he decided to try his hand at getting an old data acquisition unit, that had been retrieved several years ago from salvage, to meet his needs. A BASIC language compiler was used because time was not available to learn a more advanced language. While attempting to increase acquisition and scroll speed on the 6 MHz 80286 that the code was first developed on, it became apparent that scrolling only the first small portion of the screen at high speed and then averaging that region and histogramming the average provided both the speed necessary for capturing fairly short duration events, and a trend record without use of back scrolling and disk storage routines. This turned out to be quite sufficient.

Jones, N.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Accelerator-Based Atomic Physics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H{sub 2}S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H{sub 2}S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H{sub 2}S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur.

K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Development of NDE methods for hot gas filters.  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic hot gas candle filters are currently under development for hot gas particulate cleanup in advanced coal-based power systems. The ceramic materials for these filters include nonoxide monolithic, nonoxide-fiber-reinforced composites, and nonoxide reticulated foam. A concern is the lack of reliable data on which to base decisions for reusing or replacing hot gas filters during plant shutdowns. The work in this project is aimed at developing nondestructive evaluation (FIDE) technology to allow detection, and determination of extent, of life-limiting characteristics such as thermal fatigue, oxidation, damage from ash bridging such as localized cracking, damage from local burning, and elongation at elevated temperature. Although in-situ NDE methods are desirable in order to avoid disassembly of the candle filter vessels, the current vessel designs, the presence of filter cakes and possible ash bridging, and the state of NDE technology prevent this. Candle filter producers use a variety of NDE methods to ensure as-produced quality. While impact acoustic resonance offers initial promise for examining new as-produced filters and for detecting damage in some monolithic filters when removed from service, it presents difficulties in data interpretation, it lacks localization capability, and its applicability to composites has yet to be demonstrated. Additional NDE technologies being developed and evaluated in this program and whose applicability to both monolithics and composites has been demonstrated include (a) full-scale thermal imaging for analyzing thermal property variations; (b) fret, high-spatial-resolution X-ray imaging for detecting density variations and dimensional changes; (c) air-coupled ultrasonic methods for determining through-thickness compositional variations; and (d) acoustic emission technology with mechanical loading for detecting localized bulk damage. New and exposed clay-bonded SiC filters and CVI-SiC composite filters have been tested with these additional NDE methods.

Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Lee, H.; Spohnholtz, T.; Sun, J. G.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

129

AN ADVISORY SYSTEM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNCONVENTIONAL GAS RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the rapidly increasing demand for energy and the increasing prices for oil and gas, the role of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) as energy sources… (more)

Wei, Yunan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Oil and gas developments in Alaska in 1981  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-three exploratory wells were drilled in Alaska in 1981. Ten oil or gas discovery wells were drilled on the North Slope. 154 development and service wells were drilled and completed in the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk River fields on the North Slope. Geologic and geophysical field activity increased significantly in 1981, mainly because of increased North Slope activity and for OCS sale preparation in the Bering Sea. Two OCS lease sales were held and the first NPR-A lease sale was held. The State of Alaska continued a series of scheduled state lease sales.

Jones, B.C.; Sears, D.W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of a low swirl injector concept for gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a demonstration of a novel lean premixed low-swirl injector (LSI) concept for ultra-low NOx gas turbines. Low-swirl flame stabilization method is a recent discovery that is being applied to atmospheric heating equipment. Low-swirl burners are simple and support ultra-lean premixed flames that are less susceptible to combustion instabilities than conventional high-swirl designs. As a first step towards transferring this method to turbines, an injector modeled after the design of atmospheric low-swirl burner has been tested up to T=646 F and 10 atm and shows good promise for future development.

Cheng, R.K.; Fable, S.A.; Schmidt, D; Arellano, L.; Smith, K.O.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Improving Gas Storage Development Planning Through Simulation-Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first of two papers describing the application of simulator-optimization methods to a natural gas storage field development planning problem. The results presented here illustrate the large gains in cost-effectiveness that can be made by employing the reservoir simulator as the foundation for a wide-ranging search for solutions to management problems. The current paper illustrates the application of these techniques given a deterministic view of the reservoir. A companion paper will illustrate adaptations needed to accommodate uncertainties regarding reservoir properties.

Johnson, V.M.; Ammer, J.; Trick, M.D.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes  

SciTech Connect

Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

Jothimurugesan, K.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

134

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); O' Malley, Ronald J. (Miamisburg, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U[sub 3]O[sub 8] over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer.

Pool, T.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

138

Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Intrabeam stripping in H- Linacs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A beam loss in the superconducting part of the SNS linac has been observed during its commissioning and operation. Although the loss does not prevent the SNS high power operation, it results in an almost uniform irradiation of linac components and increased radiation levels in the tunnel. Multi-particle tracking could neither account for the magnitude of the observed loss nor its dependence on machine parameters. It was recently found that the loss is consistent with the intrabeam particle collisions resulting in stripping of H{sup -} ions. The paper describes experimental observations and corresponding analytical estimates of the intrabeam stripping.

Lebedev, V.; Solyak, N.; Ostigy, J.-F.; /Fermilab; Alexandrov, A.; Shishlo, A.; /Oak Ridge

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Prototype indicator strip for tank ammunition. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Combustible nitrocellulose ordnance casings offer advantages of: light weight, low cost, low detectability, and quick cycling of rounds by immediate disposal. However, mechanical strength is degraded with time by the action of humidity and nitroester diffusion through the casing to adhesives. The primary development effort of this study is a means to detect nitroester migration to the crucial skive joint which binds an assortment of warhead choices to propellant casings. This work has developed a prototype colorimetric indicator strip which, when applied in a field environment, produces a purple tint proportional to casing nitroester concentration, and inversely proportional to remaining adhesive joint strength. This work addressed the three steps in indicator strip use: (1) A suggested protocol for indicator strip preparation was developed. Various coatings, support reagents, and backings were examined resulting in a choice of polyethylene tape coating over separate AB- and C-impregnated cellulose punches. Various methods of punch creation and impregnation were tried resulting in stirred aqueous solutions and suspensions of AB and C, respectively. (2) Suggested protocols for indicator strip application to lab backings and field casings were developed. After chemical stripper was applied to the alumina-polyurethane paint on casings, C and AB punches were stacked and double-tape sealed. (3) A means for indicator strip monitoring was developed. From known time of indicator reaction, casing humidity, and indicator color, a means for field concentration determination was determined. Lab time-lapse photography was used to calibrate the indicator at a single level of humidity.

Bates, B.; Griest, W.

1993-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Energy (Oil and Gas) Exploration (and Development) on the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy (Oil and Gas) Exploration (and Development) on the U.S. Arctic Continental Shelf Jeff Walker of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Exploratory Activities Arctic nations will pursue oil and gas. Offshore;#12;Beaufort Sea Oil and Gas Lease Status #12;Chukchi Sea Oil and Gas Leasing Status #12;Alaska OCS Lease Sales

Kuligowski, Bob

142

Ceramic stationary gas turbine development program -- Fifth annual summary  

SciTech Connect

A program is being performed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the selective replacement of metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. The program focuses on design, fabrication, and testing of ceramic components, generating a materials properties data base, and applying life prediction and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The development program is being performed by a team led by Solar Turbines Incorporated, and which includes suppliers of ceramic components, US research laboratories, and an industrial cogeneration end user. The Solar Centaur 50S engine was selected for the development program. The program goals included an increase in the turbine rotor inlet temperature (TRIT) from 1,010 C (1,850 F) to 1,121 C (2,050 F), accompanied by increases in thermal efficiency and output power. The performance improvements are attributable to the increase in TRIT and the reduction in cooling air requirements for the ceramic parts. The ceramic liners are also expected to lower the emissions of NOx and CO. Under the program uncooled ceramic blades and nozzles have been inserted for currently cooled metal components in the first stage of the gas producer turbine. The louvre-cooled metal combustor liners have been replaced with uncooled continuous-fiber reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) liners. Modifications have been made to the engine hot section to accommodate the ceramic parts. To date, all first generation designs have been completed. Ceramic components have been fabricated, and are being tested in rigs and in the Centaur 50S engine. Field testing at an industrial co-generation site was started in May, 1997. This paper will provide an update of the development work and details of engine testing of ceramic components under the program.

Price, J.R.; Jimenez, O.; Faulder, L.; Edwards, B.; Parthasarathy, V.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of mixed-conducting oxides for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mixed-conducting oxides have been used in many applications, including fuel cells, gas separation membranes, sensors, and electrocatalysis. The authors are developing a mixed-conducting, dense ceramic membrane for selectively transporting oxygen and hydrogen. Ceramic membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which has high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductions, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} as a function of oxygen-partial-pressure gradient and temperature. At 900{degrees}C, oxygen permeability was {approx}2.5 scc{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}min{sup {minus}1} for a 2.9-mm-thick membrane and this value increases as membrane thickness decreases. The authors have fabricated tubular SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} membranes and operated them at 900{degrees}C for >1000 h during conversion of methane into syngas. The hydrogen ion (proton) transport properties of yttria-doped BaCeO{sub 3} were investigated by impedance spectroscopy and open-cell voltage measurements. High proton conductivity and a high protonic transference number make yttria-doped BaCeO{sub 3} a potential membrane for hydrogen separation.

Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Oil and gas exploration and development in Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent oil and gas exploration activity has been widespread throughout Arizona. Development drilling has continued in the Dineh-bi-keyah and Teec-nos-Pos fields in the northeastern corner, and exploratory drilling continues to test potential Paleozoic reservoirs elsewhere on the plateau. Several shallow wells north of the Grand Canyon encountered shows and limited recoveries of oil from Permian and Triassic rocks. The greatest activity has occurred along the Overthrust trend from northwestern to southeastern Arizona. Several million acres were leased and eight exploratory wells drilled along this trend. None were discoveries, but the presence of a Laramide thrust fault in the vicinity of Tombstone was established. The other tests have neither proved nor disproved the concept of the Overthrust belt in southern Arizona. Recent discoveries in the nonmarine Tertiary and marine Paleozoic of southern Nevada have stimulated interest in the oil potential of similar rocks and structures in the Basin and Range province of Arizona, which are coincident with the Overthrust trend. Reported gas discoveries by Pemex in Miocene marine sediments of the Gulf of California have stimulated leasing in the Yuma area, where one uncompleted well is reported to be a potential producer. The Pedregosa basin of extreme southeastern Arizona remains an area of great interest to explorationists because of the presence of a 25,000-ft (7600-m) sequence of Paleozoic marine sediments similar to those of the Permian basin, and Cretaceous marine rocks, including coral-rudist reefs, similar to those that produce in Texas and Mexico.

Nations, D.; Doss, A.K.; Ubarra, R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Dynamic response of guardrail systems encased in pavement mow strips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong post guardrail systems have long been employed to keep misguided vehicles on the roadway. In order to combat vegetation growth around the posts, many new guardrail installations are being encased in pavement mow strips. By increasing material stiffness of the confining layers around the posts, this practice changes the dynamic response of the guardrail system to the impact of a vehicle. This research aims to analyze existing mow strip configurations by using experimental testing and numerical simulation and to develop predictive, full-scale simulations that enable assessment of the performance of guardrail systems encased in mow strips. To develop a test matrix of mow strip designs in preparation for possible testing, a state of practice survey of Texas Department of Transportation districts is performed. Current mow strip construction methods and designs are gathered. Mow strip dimensions, materials, and depths are considered in addition to the presence of asphalt and grout "leave-out" layers around posts. Seventeen configurations using wood and steel posts embedded in asphalt, concrete, soil, and grout are subjected to dynamic impact testing with a bogie vehicle. Dynamic impact tests from the test matrix are numerically simulated using the nonlinear, dynamic, explicit code LS-DYNA. Modeling of soil, steel, concrete, and grout components is investigated. Results from numerical simulation are validated using experimental test results. Four full-scale mow strip system simulations are assembled using subcomponent models. Impact of a vehicle with a G4(1S) guardrail system is simulated. Results are compared to a full-scale crash test for validation. Enhancements to the simulation are made to increase numerical stability of the vehicle model and improve interaction between the vehicle and guardrail system. In addition, three mow strip guardrail systems are modeled using the G4(1S) system as a baseline case. Concrete mow strip and grout leave-out encasements are also examined. Through numerical simulation of a full-scale crash test it is shown that a concrete mow strip with 457x457 mm (18x18 in.) grout leave-outs performs at a similar level in a full-scale crash test to an equivalent system with posts embedded only in soil. This system is recommended for a full-scale crash test.

Seckinger, Nathaniel Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

147

Baseline gas turbine development program. Sixteenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental ungraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine proved to be mechanically sound but was also seriously deficient in power. Principal program effort has therefore been in the area of diagnostic testing and corrective development. To date, three upgraded engines were assembled and two were run in the test cell. Special diagnostic instrumentation was installed on Engine 3 to evaluate the compressor, turbine, and hot engine leakage. Engine airflow, starting characteristics, oil flow/heat rejection/blowby, emissions, leakage, and component performance tests were conducted in this quarter.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

1976-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fermilab silicon strip readout chip for BTev  

SciTech Connect

A chip has been developed for reading out the silicon strip detectors in the new BTeV colliding beam experiment at Fermilab. The chip has been designed in a 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology for high radiation tolerance. Numerous programmable features have been added to the chip, such as setup for operation at different beam crossing intervals. A full size chip has been fabricated and successfully tested. The design philosophy, circuit features, and test results are presented in this paper.

Yarema, Raymond; Hoff, Jim; Mekkaoui, Abderrezak; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Angeleri, Valentina; Manfredi, Pier Francesco; Ratti, Lodovico; Speziali, Valeria; /Fermilab /Bergamo U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development and Implementation of Interactive/Visual Software for Simple Aircraft Gas Turbine Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and Implementation of Interactive/Visual Software for Simple Aircraft Gas Turbine of software to analyze and design gas turbine systems has been an important part of this course since 1988 of this project was to develop MS Windows based software: Simple Aircraft Gas Turbine Design, that is easy to use

Ghajar, Afshin J.

151

REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS Advanced Natural Gas Engine Research and Development for Class 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS Advanced Natural Gas Engine Research and Development for Class 3 Notice (PON-12-504) entitled "Advanced Natural Gas Engine research and Development for Class 3 through of natural gas engine concepts for application in light heavy-duty vehicles (LHDV) and medium heavy duty

152

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project is to develop an advanced, clean coal biogasification (MicGAS) Process. The objectives of the research during FY 1993--94 were to: (1) enhance kinetics of methane production (biogasification, biomethanation) from Texas lignite (TxL) by the Mic-1 consortium isolated and developed at ARCTECH, (2) increase coal solids loading, (3) optimize medium composition, and (4) reduce retention time. A closer analysis of the results described here indicate that biomethanation of TxL at >5% solids loading is feasible through appropriate development of nutrient medium and further adaptation of the microorganisms involved in this process. Further understanding of the inhibitory factors and some biochemical manipulations to overcome those inhibitions will hasten the process considerably. Results are discussed on the following: products of biomethanation and enhance of methane production including: bacterial adaptation; effect of nutrient amendment substitutes; effects of solids loading; effect of initial pH of the culture medium; effect of hydrogen donors and carbon balance.

Walia, D.S.; Srivastava, K.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Baseline gas turbine development program. Eighteenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine proved to be mechanically sound, but was also 43% deficient in power. A continuing corrective development effort has to date reduced the power deficiency to 32%. Compressor efficiency was increased 2 points by changing to a 28-channel diffuser and tandem deswirl vanes; improved processing of seals has reduced regenerator leakage from about 5 to 2.5% of engine flow; a new compressor turbine nozzle has increased compressor turbine stage efficiency by about 1 point; and adjustments to burner mixing ports has reduced pressure drop from 2.8 to 2.1% of engine pressure. Key compressor turbine component improvements are scheduled for test during the next quarterly period. During the quarter, progress was also made on development of the Upgraded Vehicle control system; and instrumentation of the fourth program engine was completed by NASA. The engine will be used for development efforts at NASA LeRC.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E [comps.] [comps.

1977-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Induced Seismic Events Induced Seismic Events (Earthquakes) Key Points: * Induced seismic events are earthquakes attributable to human activity. The possibility of induced seismic activity related to energy development projects, including shale gas, has drawn some public attention. * Although hydraulic fracturing releases energy deep beneath the surface to break rock, studies thus far indicate the energy released is generally not large enough to trigger a seismic event that could be felt on the surface. 1 * However, waste fluid disposal through underground injection can "pose some risk for induced seismicity." 2 * According to the National Academies of Sciences (NAS), accurately predicting seismic event magnitude or occurrence is not possible, in part because of a lack of comprehensive data on

155

Development of fission gas swelling and release models for metallic nuclear fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel swelling and fission gas generation for fast reactor fuels are of high importance since they are among the main limiting factors in the development of metallic fast reactor fuel. Five new fission gas and swelling ...

Andrews, Nathan Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet details work by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

On-Road Development of the C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet details on-road development of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy-duty trucks, including emissions, fuel costs, and petroleum displacement.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Proceedings of the natural gas research and development contractors review meeting  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this meeting was to present results of the research in the DOE-sponsored Natural Gas Program, and simultaneously to provide a forum for real-time technology transfer, to the active research community, to the interested public, and to the natural gas industry, who are the primary users of this technology. The current research focus is to expand the base of near-term and mid-term economic gas resources through research activities in Eastern Tight Gas, Western Tight Gas, Secondary Gas Recovery (increased recovery of gas from mature fields); to enhance utilization, particularly of remote gas resources through research in Natural Gas to Liquids Conversion; and to develop additional, long term, potential gas resources through research in Gas Hydrates and Deep Gas. With the increased national emphasis on the use of natural gas, this forum has been expanded to include summaries of DOE-sponsored research in energy-related programs and perspectives on the importance of gas to future world energy. Thirty-two papers and fourteen poster presentations were given in seven formal, and one informal, sessions: Three general sessions (4 papers); Western Tight Gas (6 papers); Eastern Tight Gas (8 papers); Conventional/Speculative Resources (8 papers); and Gas to Liquids (6 papers). Individual reports are processed separately on the data bases.

Malone, R.D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program ninth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. NASA completed the first phase of their baseline engine heat balance tests, and an upgraded engine compressor is being scaled for test. EPA completed their report on vehicle tests including emissions and vehicle performance, and a new endurance engine is on test. Significant development progress was made on both fixed and variable geometry combustors. After 45 hours of engine operation with Vendor A ceramic regenerator, no significant deterioration of the matrix, seals, or elastomeric mount was encountered. Ceramic regenerator stress analysis has commenced. Additional developments in non-nickel oxide regenerator rubbing seals are encouraging. The first preprototype integrated control system is in vehicle operation. Control adaptation for variable inlet guide vanes and water injection is progressing. AiRefrac turbine wheels were verified dimensionally and are being processed for engine testing. Water injection tests with a four nozzle system were run, and additional performance documentation of variable inlet guide vanes was obtained. Linerless insulation is on test in the free rotor engine, the new endurance engine, and a performance engine. The free rotor engine completed test cell checkout and was installed in a vehicle. Vehicle checkout, including a preprototype integrated control, is underway. Detailed specifications of the upgraded engine were written.

Schmidt, C.E.

1975-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced information technology infrastructure to better support resource development and resource conservation. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells. The broad goal of this grant is to increase domestic production from Alaska's known producing fields through the implementation of preferred upstream management practices. (PUMP). Internet publication of extensive and detailed geotechnical data is the first task, improving the permitting process is the second task, and building an advanced geographical information system to offer continuing support and public access of the first two goals is the third task. Excellent progress has been made on all three tasks; the technical objectives as defined by the approved grant sub-tasks have been met. The end date for the grant was March 31, 2006.

Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through June 1998.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through January 2000.

NONE

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

NONE

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through October 1999.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

NONE

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through February 1999.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through September 1999.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Antenna structure with distributed strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Antenna structure with distributed strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Oil and gas developments in New York in 1981  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, there were 646 wells completed in New York. This figure is partly estimated. In existing fields, 107 oil and 450 gas wells were completed. The results of exploratory drilling included 12 new gas field discoveries, 4 new gas pool discoveries, 3 deeper pool discoveries, 1 shallower pool discovery, and 36 extensions to existing gas fields. Two Medina Sandstone discoveries were made in Allegany County, Nine Devonian black shale wells were completed in western New York. An Onondaga reef discovery was made in Cattaraugus County. Three Trenton Limestone discoveries were made in central New York. Arco completed a dry hole in eastern New York near the Eastern Overthrust area. A significant oil discovery from the Bass islands zone below the Onondaga Limestone was made in eastern Chautauqua County. Thirty-five extensions to Medina Sandstone gas fields were completed in 1981. There was also 1 extension to the Houghton, Marcellus black shale gas field. In all, 8 Devonian black shale discoveries, 8 Silurian Medina Sandstone discoveries, and 3 Ordovician Trenton Limestone discoveries were made in New York during 1981. Oil production in 1981 was 848,969 bbl and gas production amounted to 19,000 mmcf. The price for New York stripper crude was $38.00/bbl on January 1, 1981, and ended the year at $35.00/bbl. Wellhead gas prices ranged up to $3.18/mcf. Drilling for Medina Sandstone gas production and Devonian black shale gas production will continue. However, it is expected that overall drilling will decline due to a softening in crude oil prices and an oversupply of gas. Federal government approval of leasing and drilling for gas in Lake Erie has still not been forthcoming.

Van Tyne, A.M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Caspian countries are developing new oil and natural gas export ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Caspian Sea region has the potential to export oil and natural gas to European, South Asian, and East Asian markets. With rising energy prices and growing global ...

173

The Development of ODS Superalloys for Industrial Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

of advanced gas turbine engines, these alloys display long-term strength beyond the capabilities of conventional superalloys. The increasing use of ODS alloys,.

174

Development of Coated Single-Crystal Superalloy Systems for Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

properties of the SC alloys (Figure 2) make SC alloys attractive for turbine airfoil applications in advanced fuel-efficient, high-performance aircraft gas turbine ...

175

Development of Gatorized MERL 76 for Gas Turbine Disk Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FOR GAS TURBINE DISK APPLICATIONS. R. H. Caless and D. F. Paulonis. Materials. Engineering. Pratt & Whitney. 400 Main Street. East Hartford,. CT 06108.

176

Transportation in Developing Countries: Greenhouse Gas Scenarios for Delhi, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hand, compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleumcost of owning and operating CNG and LPG vehicles couldto store the fuels. Each CNG bus, for example, currently

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Tools & Models ... Oil production growth in the Bakken shale play mirrors somewhat the growth in natural gas production ... U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov

178

NGL Market Development Example Virtual Workshop on Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ethane in Remote Basins Alberta Ethane Market Vantage Pipeline. EIA Workshop 2012 3 NGL Recovery Decisions “Must-Recover” NGLs due to sales gas specs:

179

Developing a water treatment system for Subsea Gas processing plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The petroleum industry is currently moving to meet the ever-rising demand for oil and gas production. As onshore fields become depleted and decline in production,… (more)

Honer Badi M Nazhat, Dana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program twelfth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. The endurance engine was modified to incorporate a power turbine drive to the regenerators in order to simulate free rotor (upgraded) conditions. A portable baseline engine fixture complete with controls, intake, exhaust, and transmission is being assembled for odor evaluation. An additional 502 engine hours were accumulated on ceramic regenerators and seals. No core or seal failures were experienced during engine test. Initial fixture tests of zirconia seals show torque levels comparable with nickle oxide seals against the same matrix. An ambient compensation schedule was devised for the upgraded engine integrated control, and the integrated control system specifications were updated. A proposed hydromechanical automotive continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT) was evaluated and approved for preliminary development. Tests of heat rejection to the oil for lined versus linerless insulated engine assemblies indicated no heat loss penalty in omitting the metal liners. A study was made of various power turbine rotor assemblies and a final design was selected. Optimization studies of the two-stage power turbine reduction gears and regenerator spur and worm gears were completed. Initial tests on the fixture for simulating the scaled S-26 upgraded burner have begun.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

1975-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Tenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. A fuel control system is being developed to allow program evaluation of a very promising low emissions, single stage, fixed geometry proprietary burner. Ceramic regenerators are under test in the free-rotor vehicle, and some have completed 30 hours of performance evaluation. Three-dimensional ceramic regenerator transient thermal and structural analysis programs are operational. Initial friction and wear test fixture results show that zirconium oxide fully stabilized by yttrium oxide is an effective substitute for nickel oxide in a plasma sprayed seal. A preprototype control system was adapted for variable inlet guide vane control in a vehicle installation. An evaluation of the free-rotor accessory drive concept in a vehicle showed no serious mechanical integrity problems. Simplifications are being made to the water injection system; significant metallurgical analysis of observed erosion/corrosion problems was accomplished. Variable inlet guide vane aerodynamic loss characteristics were determined. Generally satisfactory results with linerless insulation are resulting in extended use and application. Pattern work for the upgraded engine housing and the power turbine wheel castings are in process. A computer design analysis of the regenerator drive gears was made, and an analysis was completed of a three peripheral roller regenerator support and drive proposal for the upgraded engine.

Schmidt, F.W.; Wagner, C.E.

1975-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Baseline gas turbine development program. Seventeenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine has proved to be mechanically sound, but has also been seriously deficient in power. Principal program effort has therefore been in the area of diagnostic testing and corrective development. To date, three upgraded engines have been assembled and run in the test cell. Engine 2 was installed in an upgraded vehicle and became operational on January 25, 1977. Special diagnostic instrumentation was installed on Engine 3 to evaluate the compressor, turbine, and hot engine leakage. It was determined that the power deficiency was principally due to problems in the compressor and first stage turbine areas and during this quarter several corrective changes have been initiated. Parts for a fourth engine being built for NASA Lewis have been shipped to NASA for installation of special instrumentation.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program fifth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. Baseline engines 5, 6, and 7 were built. Action to correct a 7 percent power deficiency is underway. Two baseline vehicles are operational, with the third ready for engine installation. Measurement of baseline performance and emissions is in process. NASA Lewis has their baseline engine installation operational. They are also assemblying a cold flow power turbine test rig and have made substantial progress in defining upgraded engine aerodynamics. A study was made of sizing the upgraded engine for a compact size vehicle. Chrysler's proprietary linerless insulation was installed into the endurance engine. Evaluation was delayed by a power turbine section failure. Substantial progress was made in Chrysler's proprietary low emissions burner program. Preparations are being made to evaluate the Solar burner. Evaluation of ceramic regenerator cores are in process. A seal development program was initiated. AiResearch has most of the integrated control system preprototype elements defined, and has many key elements under test. Their transient engine simulation model is nearly operational. A compressor turbine wheel disc is being designed utilizing Pratt-Whitney superplastic forging properties. Procurement of two variable inlet guide vane assemblies is about complete. Detail drawings of a Free Rotor vehicle installation are being completed.

Wagner, C.E.

1974-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Alaskan Natural Gas Pipeline Developments (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The AEO2007 reference case projects that an Alaska natural gas pipeline will go into operation in 2018, based on EIAs current understanding of the projects time line and economics. There is continuing debate, however, about the physical configuration and the ownership of the pipeline. In addition, the issue of Alaskas oil and natural gas production taxes has been raised, in the context of a current market environment characterized by rising construction costs and falling natural gas prices. If rates of return on investment by producers are reduced to unacceptable levels, or if the project faces significant delays, other sources of natural gas, such as unconventional natural gas production and LNG imports, could fulfill the demand that otherwise would be served by an Alaska pipeline.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program second quaterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emissions standards and which is competitive in fuel economy, performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. Procurement delays have caused engine deliveries to slip one to two months. Assembly of Engine 3 with special instrumentation for NASA and Engine 4 to be used in the first vehicle has commenced. Resolution of some intake design details will complete the vehicle installation design. Other vehicle component and modification efforts are on schedule. Support activity has included: (1) studies and proposals for improving engine fuel economy; (2) ceramic recuperator calculations; (3) cooperation with NASA's program by giving a design review, providing engine drawings, planning and fabricating instrumentation for their engine, and advising them on matters relating to their engine test facilities; (4) refinement of a combustor test procedure; and (5) two ''sixth generation'' vehicle demonstrations. Engine endurance activity has started with the evaluation of a proprietary molded insulation. Limited progress was made in the experimental determination of variable geometry combustor control parameters. Ceramic regenerator specifications were prepared. A sub-contractor for an integrated control system was selected pending approval by the EPA Contract Officer. Design studies in support of the ''Gatorized'' turbine wheel contract are underway. Initial development tests on a rotary nozzle actuator are showing good progress towards achieving fast response times. A limited amount of development of the fuel control still remains before acceleration tests with and without a Free Rotor can be run.

Wagner, C.E.

1973-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Oil and gas developments in Far East in 1981  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum activity throughout the Far East region was brisk during 1981. Exploration acreage acquisition, drilling, and seismic activity proceeded rapidly in all of the main producing countries. In addition, activity expanded into some hitherto relatively inactive areas such as onshore Thailand, Sri Lanka, North Vietnam, etc. Exploration drilling increased approximately 12% in 1981. Indonesia was the most active country in the Far East again in 1981. Numerous discoveries were recorded. Exploration in India started in earnest along the east coast. Burma also recorded a busy year along the Irrawaddy River. Sri Lanka experienced exploration drilling in 1981 for the first time since 1976. Onshore Thailand had a flurry of activity and provided the most significant discoveries in the Far East Region. The Philippines also had an active year and progressed rapidly with development work on 2 additional producing fields. Production from the Far East region again declined slightly to an estimated 4.4 million BOPD. With no major discoveries over the last few years, present producing fields are for the most part fully developed and on the decline. Acreage acquisition during 1981 showed a large increase in many parts of the region. Indonesia offered 9 exploration blocks. All were successfully tendered. Onshore Thailand also had intense competition for areas adjacent to oil and gas discoveries by Shell and Esso. Participation by foreign contractors in exploration and production ventures throughout the Far East region increased during 1982. Countries such as Bangladesh, Burma, India, Thailand, and Malaysia all experienced increased interest by foreign companies. On the other hand, relinquishments by contractors in Pakistan and Philippines indicated a decrease in interest in those areas. (JMT)

Fletcher, G.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Gas shales characterization and technology development and transfer. Annual technical report, October 1991-September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Technology Transfer work area was to compile and publish the Technology Review, Sponsor Gas Shales Workshops, and manage the Marietta College Natural Gas Supply Information Center. In the Technical and Economic Evaluations work area, the objective was to quantify the gas shale resource and determine the potential economic benefits of future shale research. The objectives of the third work area, Field Projects in the Antrim Shale were to improve gas producibility from the Antrim Shale by optimizing stimulations and production practices and to develop log-based gas content and gas in-place calculations.

Wicks, D.; Decker, D.; Reeves, S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty in reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for planning in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. A major challenge of the available literature that deals with planning of oil and gas field infrastruc- tures uses a deterministicA novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

190

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission and the oil & gas industries. The combustion system used in Solar's products are discussed along- bility for the introduction of new combustion systems for gas turbine products to enhance fuel

Ponce, V. Miguel

191

DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN COMBUSTOR FOR A MICROFABRICATED GAS TURBINE ENGINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN COMBUSTOR FOR A MICROFABRICATED GAS TURBINE ENGINE A. Mehra, I. A. Waitz Gas Turbine Laboratory, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Massachusetts Institute, a program is underway to fabricate a gas turbine engine capable of producing 50W of electrical power

Waitz, Ian A.

192

Development of Novel Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the objectives, technical barrier, approach, and accomplishments for the development of a novel water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor for hydrogen enhancement and CO reduction. We have synthesized novel CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with high CO{sub 2} permeabilities and high CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO selectivities by incorporating amino groups in polymer networks. We have also developed a one-dimensional non-isothermal model for the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor. The modeling results have shown that H{sub 2} enhancement (>99.6% H{sub 2} for the steam reforming of methane and >54% H{sub 2} for the autothermal reforming of gasoline with air on a dry basis) via CO{sub 2} removal and CO reduction to 10 ppm or lower are achievable for synthesis gases. With this model, we have elucidated the effects of system parameters, including CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} selectivity, CO{sub 2} permeability, sweep/feed flow rate ratio, feed temperature, sweep temperature, feed pressure, catalyst activity, and feed CO concentration, on the membrane reactor performance. Based on the modeling study using the membrane data obtained, we showed the feasibility of achieving H{sub 2} enhancement via CO{sub 2} removal, CO reduction to {le} 10 ppm, and high H{sub 2} recovery. Using the membrane synthesized, we have obtained <10 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product in WGS membrane reactor experiments. From the experiments, we verified the model developed. In addition, we removed CO{sub 2} from a syngas containing 17% CO{sub 2} to about 30 ppm. The CO{sub 2} removal data agreed well with the model developed. The syngas with about 0.1% CO{sub 2} and 1% CO was processed to convert the carbon oxides to methane via methanation to obtain <5 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product.

Ho, W. S. Winston

2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

194

Oil and Gas Development in the United States in the Early 1990's ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

oil and gas reserves, production, and exploration and development expenditures. The firm of Arthur Ander-sen and Company has compiled these disclosures for

195

Transportation in Developing Countries: Greenhouse Gas Scenarios for Shanghai, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines are re-optimized for CNG and are calculated on amanufacturing the engine), then CNG would produce even moreChina natural gas (CNG). The taxi fleet is currently being

Zhou, Hongchang; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remove Exotics Manually or Chemically Air Quality X X Speed Limits Water Roads & Pads Flare Gas (Rather with drilling and pipeline compression operations. The main pollutant of concern is nitrogen oxides (NOx), which

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

197

Automatic Curve Extraction for Digitizing Rainfall Strip Charts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been developed that largely automates the labor-intensive extraction work for large amounts of rainfall strip charts and paper rolls. The method consists of the following five basic steps: 1) scanning the charts and rolls to high-...

H. E. van Piggelen; T. Brandsma; H. Manders; J. F. Lichtenauer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program eighth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. Major preparations for engine heat balance tests by NASA were completed. EPA laboratories completed Baseline vehicle emissions, noise, and odor tests. Assembly of the program endurance engine is nearing completion. Test cell evaluation of the government furnished combustor (Solar) verified steady state emissions to be extremely low. Initial engine tests of Vendor A ceramic regenerator cores with an elastomeric drive verified performance predictions. Efforts towards developing a non-nickel oxide regenerator seal show extreme sensitivity to porosity differences between cores of different suppliers. All three preprototype integrated control systems were built. Modifications are being worked out to achieve a stable low speed operation. Two prototype compressor turbine wheels made from the reuseable pattern process are being inspected and processed for testing. The engine housing modified for operation at higher cycle temperatures and pressures was received. The baseline engine converted to free rotor is completing test cell check out. The modified vehicle is ready for engine installation. The upgraded engine characterization was updated to include the latest information on V.I.G.V., rotors, and bearings. The upgraded engine housing is being modeled physically and analytically for design and stress studies. An accessory drive system for the upgraded engine was selected, and a final layout is in process.

Schmidt, C.E.

1974-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

200

Method of stripping metals from organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Smirnov, Igor V. (St.-Petersburg, RU); Babain, Vasily A. (St-Petersburg, RU); Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M. (St-Petersburg, RU)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development of a Liquid to Compressed Natural Gas (LCNG) Fueling Station. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective was the development of equipment and processes to produce compressed natural gas (CNG) from liquified natural gas (LNG) for heavy duty vehicular applications. The interest for this technology is a result of the increased use of alternative fuels for the reduction of emissions and dependency of foreign energy. Technology of the type developed under this program is critical for establishing natural gas as an economical alternative fuel.

Moore, J. A.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Caulking/Weather-stripping | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCaulkingWeather-stripping&oldid267150" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks What links...

204

US10 Capable Prototype Volvo MG11 Natural Gas Engine Development: Final Report, December 16, 2003 - July 31, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report discusses a project to develop a low-emissions natural gas engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and a three-way catalyst (TWC).

Tai, C.; Reppert, T.; Chiu, J.; Christensen, L.; Knoll, K.; Stewart, J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid (i .e. , steam, condensate, noncondensable gases,interactions between steam, condensate, and off-gas.Air stripping or steam stripping the condensate d. Periodic

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Natural Gas in the Rocky Mountains: Developing Infrastructure  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Supplement to EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook analyzes current natural gas production, pipeline and storage infrastructure in the Rocky Mountains, as well as prospective pipeline projects in these States. The influence of these factors on regional prices and price volatility is examined.

Information Center

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

Air Products and Chemicals

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

FY-2001 Accomplishments in Off-gas Treatment Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the efforts funded by the Tank Focus Area to investigate nitrogen oxide (NOx) destruction (a.k.a. deNOx) technologies and off-gas scrubber system designs. The primary deNOx technologies that were considered are staged combustion (a.k.a. NOx reburning), selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, and steam reformation. After engineering studies and a team evaluation were completed, selective catalytic reduction and staged combustion were considered the most likely candidate technologies to be deployed in a sodium-bearing waste vitrification facility. The outcome of the team evaluation factored heavily in the establishing a baseline configuration for off-gas and secondary waste treatment systems.

Marshall, Douglas William

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: 1998-2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: 1998-2005 S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: 1998-2005 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 1 This special report examines the current status of the underground natural gas storage sector in the United States and how it has changed since 1998, particularly in regards to deliverability from storage, working gas capacity, ownership, and operational capabilities. In addition, it includes a discussion and an analysis of underground natural gas storage expansions in 2005 and an examination of the level of proposed additional storage expansions over the next several years. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to James Tobin at james.tobin@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-4835.

211

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Eleventh quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. NASA completed initial heat balance testing of a baseline engine. An additional 450 hours were run on ceramic regenerators and seals. Seal wear rates are very good, and the elastomeric mounting system was satisfactory. An engine/control oil supply system based on the power steering pump is successfully operating in baseline vehicles. The design of the upgraded engine power turbine nozzle actuator was finalized, and layouts of the inlet guide vane actuator are in process. A lock-up torque converter was installed in the free rotor vehicle. Baseline engine and vehicle testing of water injection and variable inlet guide vanes was completed. A thermal analysis of the gas generator is in process. A steady-state, full power analysis was made. A three-dimensional stress analysis of the compressor cover was made. The power turbine nozzle actuating system layout was completed. The analytical studies of the power turbine rotor bearings were completed. MTI completed the design of the gas generator rotor simulation fixture and is starting to build it. Optimized reduction gears were successfully tested in a baseline engine.

Schmidt, F.W.; Wagner, C.E.

1975-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, July 1994--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

North American natural gas markets have changed dramatically over the past decade. A competitive, cost-conscious production, transportation, and distribution system has emerged from the highly regulated transportation wellhead pricing structure of the 1980`s. Technology advances have played an important role in the evolution of the gas industry, a role likely to expand substantially as alternative fuel price competition and a maturing natural gas resource base force operators to maximize efficiency. Finally, significant changes continue in regional gas demand patterns, industry practices, and infrastructure needs. As the complexity of the gas system grows so does the need to evaluate and plan for alternative future resource, technology, and market scenarios. Traditional gas modeling systems focused solely on the econometric aspects of gas marketing. These systems, developed to assess a regulated industry at a high level of aggregation, rely on simple representation of complex and evolving systems, thereby precluding insight into how the industry will change over time. Credible evaluations of specific policy initiatives and research activities require a different approach. Also, the mounting pressure on energy producers from environmental compliance activities requires development of analysis that incorporates relevant geologic, engineering, and project economic details. The objective of policy, research and development (R&D), and market analysis is to integrate fundamental understanding of natural gas resources, technology, and markets to fully describe the potential of the gas resource under alternative future scenarios. This report summarizes work over the past twelve months on DOE Contract DE-AC21-92MC28138, Development of a Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The products developed under this project directly support the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in carrying out its natural gas R&D mission.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. GTI has been developing high-efficiency steam methane reformers and fuel processing technology looks to introduce innovative, compact natural gas steam reforming system and appliance quality hydrogen system integration for efficient operation of the unit. High- Efficiency Natural Gas Steam Reformer

214

Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Technologies Inc. and its subcontractors, during the period April 1, 1993 through October 31, 1994 under Phase II of the DOE Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development program. The objective of the program is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

Williams, R.S.; Campbell, S.L.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); Campbell, Steven L. (Middletown, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Design and Development of An Externally Fired Steam Injected Gas Turbine for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the theoretical background and the design and development of a prototype externally fired steam injected (ECSI) gas turbine which has a potential to utilize lower grade fuels. The system is designed around a 2 shaft 360 HP gas turbine. Several modifications to the gas turbine (Brayton Cycle) and the effects of cycle parameters such as pressure ratio and turbine inlet temperature are discussed. Steams injected cycles are examined and the concept of the ECSI gas turbine is introduced. The discussion includes criteria for selecting a suitable heat exchanger and considerations for start-up cycles. The feasibility of the concept and discussion of problem areas in the prototype are discussed.

Boyce, M. P.; Meher-Homji, C.; Ford, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fracture Fluids Fracture Fluids Key Points: * Shale fracture fluid, or "slickwater," is largely composed of water (99%); but a number of additives are mixed in with it to increase the effectiveness of the fracturing operation. These additives vary as a function of the well type and the preferences of the operator. * Hydraulic fracturing fluids can contain hazardous chemicals and, if mismanaged, spills could leak harmful substances into ground or surface water. However, good field practice, governed by existing regulations, "should provide an adequate level of protection" from fracturing fluid risks. 1 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "MIT Study on the Future of Natural Gas," June 6, 2011, Chapter 2: Supply, page 41.

219

Eastern gas shale database development program. Annual report 1 May 1983-30 April 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) Eastern Gas Data System is an interactive information resource developed to provide ready access to substantive data on wells producing from the Devonian shales. The system is a computerized database which contains descriptive and historical geological and engineering data on a large number of Devonian shale gas wells in the Appalachian Basin. The principal purpose of the system is to meet the requirements for technical data of gas producers, researchers and GRI. The data is provided by cooperating industry sources, many of whom were also instrumental in the original definition and design of the system. The information which has been collected and compiled on individual wells includes data on identification, location, elevation, drilling, geology, cementing, perforation, stimulation, cleanup, and production histories. The Eastern Gas Data System currently contains extensive information on over 620 Devonian shale gas wells completed in the Appalachian Basin.

DeVos, D.R.; Hasselback, F.W.; Hoffmann, R.L.; Lerner, B.J.; May, J.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of Ni Base Superalloy for Industrial Gas Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to this demand, Ni-base superalloys have been developed by MHI's alloy design system. These Ni-base superalloys have been applied to rotating ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of a catalytic combustion system for the MIT Micro Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the MIT micro-gas turbine engine project, the development of a hydrocarbon-fueled catalytic micro-combustion system is presented. A conventionally-machined catalytic flow reactor was built to simulate the ...

Peck, Jhongwoo, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Towards effective development of Nigeria’s natural gas: lessons from Alberta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nigeria has a huge natural gas reserve, but to date this resource has been largely under-developed. This state of affair has impacted negatively on Nigeria’s… (more)

Badejo, Ifueko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Regulation of shale gas development : an argument for state preeminence with federal support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas development has become big business in the United States during the past decade, introducing drilling to parts of the country that have not seen it in decades and provoking an accelerating shift in the country's ...

Kansal, Tushar, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Producer gas power plants can cut the oil bills of the developing countries  

SciTech Connect

As a power-generation fuel substitute in developing countries, producer gas from coal, biomass, or waste could reduce oil-import bills while assuring a steady fuel supply. An international working group formed at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences is assisting developing countries in setting up simple producer-gas plants consisting of a downdraft gasifier, cyclone, filter, and cooler. Sweden gained expertise in this technology during World War II and now manufactures much of the equipment needed for producer-gas facilities. Depending on oil price, a dual-fuel power plant (15% diesel oil, 85% producer gas) could compete economically with a diesel-only plant, assuming extra labor requirements of 20 min/hr of operation for the gas-fired facility.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Möbius Graphene Strip as Topological Insulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the electronic properties of M\\"{o}bius graphene strip with a zigzag edge. We show that such graphene strip behaves as a topological insulator with a gapped bulk and a robust metallic surface, which enjoys some features due to its nontrivial topology of the spatial configuration, such as the existence of edge states and the non-Abelian induced gauge field. We predict that the topological properties of the M\\"{o}bius graphene strip can be experimentally displayed by the destructive interference in the transmission spectrum, and the robustness of edge states under certain perturbations.

Z. L. Guo; Z. R. Gong; H. Dong; C. P. Sun

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

Christensen, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

Utah, University of

232

Development Water, Gas, and Electric Energy Use Projection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. In addition to the sewage flow demand created by the building development, parking drainage and pool backwash may also create additional sanitary sewer flow. These additional flows are assumed to be negligible compared to the rest of the project. B. Sanitary Sewage Discharge 1. The daily sanitary sewer flow will be near the daily building cold water usage as detailed above.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Commercial Reference Building: Strip Mall | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strip Mall Strip Mall Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Strip Mall for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

235

Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the test program were to obtain some preliminary information regarding the nature of particulate and vapor phase alkali compounds produced and to assess any deleterious impact they might have on materials of construction. Power Generating Incorporated (PGI) is developing a wood-fired gas turbine system for specialized cogeneration applications. The system is based on a patented pressurized combustor designed and tested by PGI in conjunction with McConnell Industries. The other components of the system are fuel receiving, preparation, storage and feeding system, gas clean-up equipment, and a gas turbine generator.

Smith, V.; Selzer, B.; Sethi, V.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Exploration and Development of U.S. Oil and Gas Fields, 1955-2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the exploration and development of oil and gas fields in the United States over the period 1955-2002. We make four contributions to explaining the economic evolution of the oil and gas industry during this period. First, we derive a testable model of the dynamics of competitive oil and gas field exploration and development. Second, we show how to empirically distinguish Hotelling scarcity effects from effects due to technological change. Third, we test these hypotheses using statewide panel data of exploration and development drilling. We find that the time paths of exploration, development and total wells drilled are dominated by Hotelling scarcity effects. Our final contribution is to offer an explanation for why fixed costs from exploration can make the contracting equilibrium in the mineral rights market efficient.

John R. Boyce; Linda Nřstbakken

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of a 70-kW Gas Turbine System as Prime Mover for Multiple Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, natural-gas-fueled microturbine has been developed for powering cogeneration, cooling systems, and other commercial and light-industrial applications. Compared to internal combustion (reciprocating) engines of similar size, the new microturbine offers customers attractive economics by reducing installation and maintenance costs. This report discusses market forces behind development of this technology and current performance and economics.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injected, Ultra Low-NOx Natural Gas Engine: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Duggal, V. K.; Lyford-Pike, E. J.; Wright, J. F.; Dunn, M.; Goudie, D.; Munshi, S.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS FROM COAL, NATURAL GAS, AND WIND POWER Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Suzanne Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado The information contained in this poster is subject to a government license. * WINDPOWER 2006 * Pittsburgh, PA * June 4-7, 2006 * NREL/PO-500-39908 Michael Milligan, Consultant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado How does JEDI II work? The user enters data specific to the new coal, gas, or wind plant: * Year of installation * Size of the project * Location * Cost ($/kW) * Any other site-specific information

240

Development of a Small-Scale Natural Gas Liquefier. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the progress during the contract period March 1, 1998 through April 30, 2003, on the design, development, and testing of a novel mixed-refrigerant-based 1000 gal/day natural gas liquefier, together with the associated gas cleanup equipment. Based on the work, it is concluded that a cost-effective 1000 gal/day liquefaction system is technically and economically feasible. A unit based on the same developed technology, with 5000 gal/day capacity, would have much improved economics.

Kountz, K.; Kriha, K.; Liss, W.; Perry, M.; Richards, M.; Zuckerman, D.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of a digital control unit to displace diesel fuel with natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Full Circle Engineering (FCE), supported by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), proposed a Small Business CRADA with Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/Kansas City (FM&T/KC) for the development of a fumigation digital control unit (DCU) that would allow the displacement of diesel fuel with natural gas. Nationwide, diesel trucks and buses consumed over 21 billion gallons of fuel in 1992. The development of systems that allow the use of alternative fuels, natural gas in particular, for transportation would significantly reduce emissions and pollutants. It would also help implement DOE`s mandate for energy security (use of domestic fuels) required by the Energy Policy Act (EPACT).

Talbott, A.D. [AlliedSignal FM& T, Kansas City, MO (United States)]|[Full Circle Engineering, Northglenn, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Population enumeration and the effects of oil and gas development on dune-dwelling lizards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat loss is one of the leading causes of species decline across all taxa and conservation practices require information on population trends. The Mescalero Sands ecosystem, New Mexico, USA, is experiencing landscape changes associated with oil and gas development. The dune-dwelling lizard community contains a habitat specialist, Sceloporus arenicolus, that is of particular interest because it has a very limited geographic distribution that is entirely subject to oil and gas development. Distance sampling is widely used to estimate population densities of many vertebrate taxa however assumptions can be difficult to satisfy with certain species or in certain habitats. Researchers must investigate the likelihood that assumptions can be satisfied before implementing any population sampling method. I had two objectives. First to investigate the precision of population densities of dune-dwelling lizards estimated via distance sampling that was coupled with double-observer surveys. Second to compare abundances of dune-dwelling lizards among sites that varied in oil and gas development. I conducted distance line transects and compared those density estimates to densities obtained from total removal plots. I quantified the amount of oil and gas development, habitat quantity and quality and correlated those to lizard abundances to investigate the effects of oil and gas development on lizard populations. I found large differences in density estimates from distance sampling and total removal plots that resulted from violation of distance sampling assumptions. Although distance sampling is a low cost method, it does not produce reliable density estimates for dune-dwelling lizards and is not an appropriate sampling method in this system. I did not find oil and gas development effects on the habitat quantity, quality or on the abundances of lizards. Lizard abundances were most strongly correlated to habitat quantity. Lizard abundances may be influenced by complex interactions between oil and gas development and habitat quantity and quality but controlling for those interactions was beyond the scope of my study. Before and after experiments and long-term studies at multiple sites would be required to more fully address the effects of oil and gas development on lizard populations in the Mescalero Sands.

Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Category:StripMall | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

StripMall StripMall Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "StripMall" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVStripMall Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVStripMall Bismarck N... 69 KB SVStripMall International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVStripMall Internatio... 89 KB SVStripMall LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVStripMall LA CA City... 89 KB SVStripMall Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVStripMall Memphis TN... 64 KB SVStripMall Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVStripMall Minneapoli... 91 KB SVStripMall Minot ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png

244

Pulsed LASER for testing silicon strip detectors  

SciTech Connect

This DO Note describes a pulsed LASER setup for testing silicon strip detectors at the Silicon Detector Facility (SiDet) of Fermilab supporting the related projects and, in particular, the DO Silicon Tracker Upgrade. It will be used in the measurements of the efficiency of individual strips and their coupling. The LASER wavelength is 1060 nm, at which the absorption length in silicon is about 2 mm. The LASER setup is capable of producing light pulses with rise time of less than 1 ns, allowing the measurement of charge pulse shaping at individual strips and their capacitive couplings. Due to the high power output of the LASER, safety considerations are included. Also discussed are precautions for the safety of the LASER itself, and how to limit the light to an area smaller than 50,pm of diameter.

Vaz, M.; Cihangir, S.; Rapidis, P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gas injection as an alternative option for handling associated gas produced from deepwater oil developments in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shift of hydrocarbon exploration and production to deepwater has resulted in new opportunities for the petroleum industry(in this project, the deepwater depth greater than 1,000 ft) but also, it has introduced new challenges. In 2001,more than 999 Bcf of associated gas were produced from the Gulf of Mexico, with deepwater associated gas production accounting for 20% of this produced gas. Two important issues are the potential environmental impacts and the economic value of deepwater associated gas. This project was designed to test the viability of storing associated gas in a saline sandstone aquifer above the producing horizon. Saline aquifer storage would have the dual benefits of gas emissions reduction and gas storage for future use. To assess the viability of saline aquifer storage, a simulation study was conducted with a hypothetical sandstone aquifer in an anticlinal trap. Five years of injection were simulated followed by five years of production (stored gas recovery). Particular attention was given to the role of relative permeability hysteresis in determining trapped gas saturation, as it tends to control the efficiency of the storage process. Various cases were run to observe the effect of location of the injection/production well and formation dip angle. This study was made to: (1) conduct a simulation study to investigate the effects of reservoir and well parameters on gas storage performance; (2) assess the drainage and imbibition processes in aquifer gas storage; (3) evaluate methods used to determine relative permeability and gas residual saturation ; and (4) gain experience with, and confidence in, the hysteresis option in IMEX Simulator for determining the trapped gas saturation. The simulation results show that well location and dip angle have important effects on gas storage performance. In the test cases, the case with a higher dip angle favors gas trapping, and the best recovery is the top of the anticlinal structure. More than half of the stored gas is lost due to trapped gas saturations and high water saturation with corresponding low gas relative permeability. During the production (recovery) phase, it can be expected that water-gas production ratios will be high. The economic limit of the stored gas recovery will be greatly affected by producing water-gas ratio, especially for deep aquifers. The result indicates that it is technically feasible to recover gas injected into a saline aquifer, provided the aquifer exhibits the appropriate dip angle, size and permeability, and residual or trapped gas saturation is also important. The technical approach used in this study may be used to assess saline aquifer storage in other deepwater regions, and it may provide a preliminary framework for studies of the economic viability of deepwater saline aquifer gas storage.

Qian, Yanlin

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report NATURAL GAS SYSTEM INTRODUCTION New Mexico State University currently uses natural gas, provided by the City of Las Cruces

Castillo, Steven P.

248

Exploration and development of natural gas, Pattani basin, Gulf of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The geology of the Gulf of Thailand features a series of north-south-trending ridges and linear, fault-bounded basins with a sedimentary section predominantly of upper Tertiary sediments. The Pattani basin, located near the geographic center of the Gulf of Thailand, contains up to 8 km of almost entirely nonmarine fluvial-deltaic sediments. The gas/condensate fields described in this paper are on the west flank of the Pattani basin. Gas reservoirs are thin, randomly distributed sandstone beds occurring between 1200 and 3000 m below sea level. At greater depths, very high temperatures cause a degradation of reservoir properties. The gas fields occur on intensely faulted structures. The high fault density superimposed on the stratigraphic model limits the size of individual gas accumulations. Extensive three-dimensional seismic surveys were essential for delineating and developing these complex fields. An interactive computer system was used to interpret the 23,000 line-km of three-dimensional data. A new era in Thailand began when gas production commenced from Erawan field in August 1981. Baanpot, Satun, and Platong fields came on production between October 1983 and March 1985. In these four fields, 238 development wells have been drilled from 22 platforms. The wells can presently produce 475 MMCFGD, considerably in excess of Thailand's current requirements. The condensate ratios average 40 bbl/mmcf of gas. The commercial limits of each field have yet to be established. The advent of gas production has created a new industry in Thailand, with significant social and economic benefits to the country.

Lian, H.M.; Bradley, K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01/2004 Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing to monitor total NOx (0-1000 ppm), CO (0-1000 ppm) and O2 (1-15%) within the convective pass of the boiler of such sensor systems will dramatically alter how boilers are operated, since much of the emissions creation

Dutta, Prabir K.

250

Development of a Gas–Liquid Equilibrator for Estimating CO2 Flux at the Ocean Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for measuring partial pressure of CO2 in seawater (pCO2) has been developed as a part of a missing-sink elucidation study. The most important part of this system is the multistage bubbling gas–liquid equilibrator. This equilibrator has ...

Hiroyuki Katayama; Takashi Karasudani; Koji Ishii; Kenji Marubayashi; Hiromasa Ueda

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of a hot-gas desulfurization system for IGCC applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal because of their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. One key component of an advanced IGCC power plant is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing regenerable sorbents. To carry out hot-gas desulfurization in a fluidized-bed reactor, it is necessary that the sorbents have high attrition resistance, while still maintaining high chemical reactivity and sulfur absorption capacity. Also, efficient processes are needed for the treatment of SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration off-gas to produce environmentally benign waste or useful byproducts. A series of durable zinc titanate sorbents were formulated and tested in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor system. Reactive sorbents were developed with addition resistance comparable to fluid-bed cracking (FCC) catalysts used in petroleum refineries. In addition, progress continues on the development of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for converting SO{sub 2} in the regeneration off-gas to elemental sulfur. Plans are under way to test these bench-scale systems at gasifier sites with coal gas. This paper describes the status and future plans for the demonstration of these technologies.

Gupta, R.; McMichael, W.J.; Gangwal, S.K. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Jain, S.C.; Dorchak, T.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of the Low Swirl Injector for Fuel-Flexible GasTurbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gas turbines are primarily fueled with natural gas. However, changes in fuel cost and availability, and a desire to control carbon dioxide emissions, are creating pressure to utilize other fuels. There is an increased interest in the use of fuels from coal gasification, such as syngas and hydrogen, and renewable fuels, such as biogas and biodiesel. Current turbine fuel injectors have had years of development to optimize their performance with natural gas. The new fuels appearing on the horizon can have combustion properties that differ substantially from natural gas. Factors such as turbulent flame speed, heat content, autoignition characteristics, and range of flammability must be considered when evaluating injector performance. The low swirl injector utilizes a unique flame stabilization mechanism and is under development for gas turbine applications. Its design and mode of operation allow it to operate effectively over a wide range of conditions. Studies conducted at LBNL indicate that the LSI can operate on fuels with a wide range of flame speeds, including hydrogen. It can also utilize low heat content fuels, such as biogas and syngas. We will discuss the low swirl injector operating parameters, and how the LSC performs with various alternative fuels.

Littlejohn, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Nazeer,W.A.; Smith, K.O

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Case Studies of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects Implemented in the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes case studies of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offset project activities undertaken within the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) program. This paper is designed to communicate key lessons learned from the implementation of different types of GHG emissions offsets projects in the CDM to policy makers in the U.S. who may be interested in developing national, regional or state-based GHG offsets programs. This paper also is designed to provide important insights to entitie...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

255

Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling  

SciTech Connect

This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A. [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); UVHC, TEMPO EA 4542, F-59313 Valenciennes (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Urine Test Strips to Exclude Cerebral Spinal Fluid Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two Pearson Chi-Square tests. The first compared samplesO riginal R esearch Urine Test Strips to Exclude CerebralBayer Multistix ® urine test strips are designed to test

Marshall, Robin A; Hejamanowski, Chris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Western Europe: North Sea developments take priority. [Oil and gas industry activity in Western Europe  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the 1992-1993 years exploration and development in the onshore and offshore areas of western Europe. The North Sea area is considered a priority for future development because of the United Kingdom's recent abolition of financial incentives and subsidies to continental exploration and development. The paper provides figures on numbers of new wells, total footages, financial expenditures on exploration and development, and production from oil and gas producing countries. Specifically, these include the United Kingdom, Norway, the Netherlands, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Austria, Greece, and Spain.

Hughes, C.; Andersen, A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lab Tests Demonstrate Effectiveness of Advanced Power Strips (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

NREL engineers evaluate the functionalities of advanced power strips and help consumers choose the right one for their plug loads.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A generic study of strip mining impacts on groundwater resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates the influence of strip mining features, commonly found in the Northern Great Plains Coal Region, on ground

Hamilton, David Andrew

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MULTIFIELD MODEL OF CHURN-TURBULENT GAS/LIQUID FLOWS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accuracy of numerical predictions for gas/liquid two-phase flows using Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) methods strongly depends on the formulation of models governing the interaction between the continuous liquid field and bubbles of different sizes. The purpose of this paper is to develop, test and validate a multifield model of adiabatic gas/liquid flows at intermediate gas concentrations (e.g., churn-turbulent flow regime), in which multiple-size bubbles are divided into a specified number of groups, each representing a prescribed range of sizes. The proposed modeling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for each bubble field. The overall model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. The results of NPHASE-CMFD simulations have been validated against the experimental data from the TOPFLOW test facility. Also, a parametric analysis on the effect of various modeling assumptions has been performed.

Elena A. Tselishcheva; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski; Donna Post Guillen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lacking a detailed characterization of the resource base and a comprehensive borehole-to-burnertip evaluation model of the North American natural gas system, past R&D, tax and regulatory policies have been formulated without a full understanding of their likely direct and indirect impacts on future gas supply and demand. The recent disappearance of the deliverability surplus, pipeline deregulation, and current policy debates about regulatory initiatives in taxation, environmental compliance and leasing make the need for a comprehensive gas evaluation system critical. Traditional econometric or highly aggregated energy models are increasingly regarded as unable to incorporate available geologic detail and explicit technology performance and costing algorithms necessary to evaluate resource-technology-economic interactions in a market context. The objective of this research is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the natural gas system, including resource base, exploration and development, extraction technology performance and costs, transportation and storage and end use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level and the impact of alternative extraction technologies on well productivity and economics. GSAM evaluates the complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives in the context of the evolving gas markets. Scheduled for completion in 1995, a prototype is planned for early 1994. ICF Resources reviewed relevant natural gas upstream, downstream and market models to identify appropriate analytic capabilities to incorporate into GSAM. We have reviewed extraction technologies to better characterize performance and costs in terms of GSAM parameters.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Charge exchange stripping cell measurements over a wide pressure range  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of the stripping cell incorporated in a charge exchange analyzer has been measured over a pressure range of 1.8 to 130 mtorr and over an energy range of 1 to 130 keV/amu. In these measurements, a beam of hydrogen atoms was ionized by helium gas. As a by-product of the measurements, the scattering cross section was also measured. At the lowest pressure, the scattering cross section compared well with those measured previously; at high pressure, the cross section no longer followed an energy power law. The analyzer efficiency (defined as the fraction of the atoms that is ionized and not lost through scattering) can be modeled over the entire range of energy and pressure by including the measured scattering cross sections.

Colchin, R.J.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, July 1996--July 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of GSAM development is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the system, including the resource base, exploration and development practices, extraction technology performance and costs, project economics, transportation costs and restrictions, storage, and end-use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and subreservoir level. This disaggregation allows direct evaluation of alternative extraction technologies based on discretely estimated, individual well productivity, required investments, and associated operating costs. GSAM`s design allows users to evaluate complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives as they directly impact the gas market. GSAM development has been ongoing for the past five years. Key activities completed during the past year are described.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing  

SciTech Connect

Identifying gas species and their quantification is important for optimization of many industrial applications involving high temperatures, including combustion processes. CISM (Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements) at the Ohio State University has developed CO, O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and CO{sub 2} sensors based on TiO{sub 2} semiconducting oxides, zirconia and lithium phosphate based electrochemical sensors and sensor arrays for high-temperature emission control. The underlying theme in our sensor development has been the use of materials science and chemistry to promote high-temperature performance with selectivity. A review article presenting key results of our studies on CO, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} sensors is described in: Akbar, Sheikh A.; Dutta, Prabir K. Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies for Combustion Processes, PowerPlant Chemistry, 9(1) 2006, 28-33.

Dutta, Prabir

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, January 1994--January 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of GSAM development is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the system, including the resource base, exploration and development practices, extraction technology performance and costs, project economics, transportation costs and restrictions, storage, and end-use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level. This disaggregation allows direct evaluation of alternative extraction technologies based on discretely estimated, individual well productivity, required investments, and associated operating costs. GSAM`s design allows users to evaluate complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives as they directly impact the gas market. Key activities completed during the past year include: conducted a comparative analysis of commercial reservoir databases; licensed and screened NRG Associates Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the US reservoir database; developed and tested reduced form reservoir model production type curves; fully developed database structures for use in GSAM and linkage to other systems; developed a methodology for the exploration module; collected and updated upstream capital and operating cost parameters; completed initial integration of downstream/demand models; presented research results at METC Contractor Review Meeting; conducted other briefings for METC managers, including initiation of the GSAM Environmental Module; and delivered draft topical reports on technology review, model review, and GSAM methodology.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H{sub 2}S was typically studied using 10% H{sub 2}S diluted in He. The H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2} concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H{sub 2}S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H[sub 2]S was typically studied using 10% H[sub 2]S diluted in He. The H[sub 2]S and H[sub 2] concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H[sub 2]S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Conveyorized Photoresist Stripping Replacement for Flex Circuit Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

A replacement conveyorized photoresist stripping system was characterized to replace the ASI photoresist stripping system. This system uses the qualified ADF-25c chemistry for the fabrication of flex circuits, while the ASI uses the qualified potassium hydroxide chemistry. The stripping process removes photoresist, which is used to protect the copper traces being formed during the etch process.

Megan Donahue

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for powering a gas turbine or to supply industrial processin conjunetion with a gas turbine system providing severalincluding heating a gas to operate a turbine (4), providing

Hunt, Arlon J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1958. “Legal Battle Over Rio Gas Rights Opens: 20 AttorneysRio Vista discovers gas………………………………………..40 Part 1: Creationfor new economic avenues: The gas discovery……………..58 1. The

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 3. Rio Vista Natural Gas Field: The 193677 4. Calpine Natural Gas Company…………………………………………….82 5.Company [B0120] 4. Calpine Natural Gas, L.P. [C1330] ******

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Science and Technology Development to Integrate Energy Production and Greenhouse Gas Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the carbon cycle from the point of view of past and present human influence. Potential future human input to the cycle through science and technology to manage atmospheric greenhouse gas are considered. The review suggests that humans will need to ingeniously exploit even more energy to integrate its use with control of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Continuing development and application of energy is essential if the development of human society is to be sustained through the coming centuries. The continuing development of nuclear energy seems an essential energy supply component.

Pendergast, D.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Development of 77 kV 40 MVA gas-vapor cooled transformer  

SciTech Connect

A 77 KV 40 MVA gas-vapor cooled transformer has been developed as a prototype of substation transformers, which is directed to nonflammable and lightweight properties. To examine the operating reliability of the transformer, the reliability test has continued since July, 1981 at the Hokusetsu substation of KEPCO (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.). This report will cover the development work on thermal stability of materials, electrical fault test, insulation characteristics, cooling of model transformer, flow-induced static electrifiction, protection system and the prototype unit which is being built based upon these developments.

Tokoro, K.; Harumoto, Y.; Ina, T.; Kabayama, Y.; Sato, T.; Yamauchi, A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final project report describes a three-year long EPRI supplemental project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the United States and internationally.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

List of Caulking/Weather-stripping Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

stripping Incentives stripping Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 289 Caulking/Weather-stripping Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 289) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Building Insulation Caulking/Weather-stripping Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Duct/Air sealing Unspecified technologies Yes AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Building Insulation Caulking/Weather-stripping Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building

277

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Development Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Environmental Research Center is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot- gas filter elements as a function of particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability during relatively short-term operation (100-200 hours). A filter vessel will be used in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot- gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and indirectly the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville and the Clean Coal IV Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project. This program has a phased approach involving modification and upgrades to the TRDU and the fabrication, assembly, and operation of a hot-gas filter vessel (HGFV) capable of operating at the outlet design conditions of the TRDU. Phase 1 upgraded the TRDU based upon past operating experiences. Additions included a nitrogen supply system upgrade, upgraded LASH auger and 1807 coal feed lines, the addition of a second pressurized coal feed hopper and a dipleg ash hopper, and modifications to spoil the performance of the primary cyclone. Phase 2 included the HGFV design, procurement, and installation. Phases 3 through 5 consist of 200-hour hot-gas filter tests under gasification conditions using the TRDU at temperatures of 540-650{degrees}C (1000-1200{degrees}F), 9.3 bar, and face velocities of 1.4, 2. and 3.8 cm/s, respectively. The increased face velocities are achieved by removing candles between each test.

Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O., Jr. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of an Improved Methodology to Assess Potential Unconventional Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the important role played today by unconventional gas resources in North America and their enormous potential for the future around the world, it is vital to both policy makers and industry that the volumes of these resources and the impact of technology on these resources be assessed. To provide for optimal decision making regarding energy policy, research funding, and resource development, it is necessary to reliably quantify the uncertainty in these resource assessments. Since the 1970s, studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources have been conducted by various private and governmental agencies, the most rigorous of which was by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS employed a cell-based, probabilistic methodology which used analytical equations to calculate distributions of the resources assessed. USGS assessments have generally produced distributions for potential unconventional gas resources that, in our judgment, are unrealistically narrow for what are essentially undiscovered, untested resources. In this article, we present an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. Our methodology is a stochastic approach that includes Monte Carlo simulation and correlation between input variables. Application of the improved methodology to the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado with USGS data validates the means and standard deviations of resource distributions produced by the USGS methodology, but reveals that these distributions are not right skewed, as expected for a natural resource. Our investigation indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the gas resource distributions are caused by the use of narrow triangular input parameter distributions. The stochastic methodology proposed here is more versatile and robust than the USGS analytic methodology. Adoption of the methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input distributions, should allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar, Jesus; McVay, Duane A., E-mail: mcvay@pe.tamu.edu; Lee, W. John [Texas A and M University, Department of Petroleum Engineering, 3116 TAMU (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

late January 2008, extend its natural gas futures strip anComparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmentally clean power generation has never been so important. The increasing cost of fossil fuels and more stringent regulations on emissions (particularly CO2 and NOx), together with increasing demand for electricity, make the provision of cost... Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins Magdalene College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy June 2008...

Collins, William Tristan

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development and demonstration of a solid fuel-fired gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) and Power Generating Incorporated (PGI) are developing a solid fuel-fired gas turbine system for specialized cogeneration applications. The system is based on a patented pressurized combustor designed and tested by PGI in conjunction with McConnell Industries. The other components of the system are (a) fuel receiving, preparation, storage and feeding system, (b) gas clean-up equipment, and (c) a gas turbine generator. An approximately 400 kW prototype system is under construction at the WRI facilities in Laramie, Wyoming. As a part of this demonstration the integrated system, following a short shakedown period, will be operated on white wood. White wood was selected as the fuel for early tests because of its low ash (0.5 - 1.0 %), silica, and sulfur contents. The system will then be operated on coal. It is expected that the design of the coal-based system will evolve as the wood testing proceeds. In previous similar wood-fired system development attempts, albeit at lower turbine inlet temperatures, a major technical hindrance to long-term operation of a gas turbine power system has been the degradation of the hot section of the gas turbine. Deposition, erosion, and corrosion are main issues that need to be addressed. In the wood-fired PGI system, erosion is not likely to be of concern because of the low silica and low overall ash content of the fuel and the fact that the wood ash particle size is expected to be in the range where little or no erosion would be expected. However, because of the high alkali content of the fuel, deposition and corrosion can become major issues. This paper will deal with the issues pertaining to the design of the prototype being constructed at the WRI premises. Preliminary thoughts on the design aspects of the plant modifications required for coal testing will also be presented.

Speight, J.G.; Sethi, V.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power Generating Inc. (PGI) has developed and patented a unique direct-fired gas turbine power system (PGI Power System) that operates on solid wood-based fuels. The PGI Power System is designed to generate from 500 kilowatts to 3.5 megawatts of electrical power and up to 30 million Btu per hour of thermal energy for various industrial and utility applications. The system is expected to operate at thermal efficiency levels greater than 70% through full utilization of both the electrical and thermal energy it generates at a specific host facility. PGI and WRI built a 450-kW prototype system at the Western Research Institute (WRI) facilities in Laramie, Wyoming, to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of the PGI Power System. The plant has undergone a brief shakedown, and is presently being operated on white wood. In previous attempts to develop similar systems, the major technical hindrance to long-term operation of a gas turbine power system has been degradation of the hot section in the gas turbine. This problem is overcome in the PGI Power System through its unique design, by closely controlling fuel specifications, and by developing specialized operating procedures. In wood-fired testing conducted to date, no degradation in the engine performance is obvious.

Sethi, V.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM); Payne, Jason A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ottesen, Cory W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

A program to develop the domestic natural gas industry in Indonesia: Case history of two World Bank projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indonesia depends heavily on revenues from the export of LNG and oil, the availability of which appears to be decreasing. It is therefore making a strong effort to accelerate development of a domestic natural gas industry. A high priority has been given to the conversion of power plants and city gas systems, including local industries and commercial facilities, from liquid fuels to natural gas. This will release more oil for export, help to meet the objectives of Repelita V, and provide substantial environmental benefits. The World Bank recently provided loans to the Indonesian Government for two projects that are aimed at substituting natural gas for oil and manufactured gas in domestic markets. One project involves expansion of the gas distribution systems of Indonesia's natural gas utility (PGN) in three cities: Jakarta and Bogor in Java, and Medan in Sumatra. The project also includes training programs for PGN staff and an energy pricing policy study to be carried out by Indonesia's Ministry of Mines and Energy. The second project involves expansion of the supply of natural gas for Surabaya and twelve other towns in its vicinity in East Java, and further expansion of Medan's supply system. Technical assistance will be provided to enhance the skills ofPGN and the Ministry of Mines and Energy, and a Gas Technology Unit similar to the Institute of Gas Technology will be established at Indonesia's Research and Development Center for Oil and Gas (LEMIGAS) in Jakarta. 14 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Klass, D.L. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Khwaja, S. (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Development of an electrical resistivity cone for the detection of gas hydrates in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are formed when, under certain pressure and temperature conditions, gas molecules become encaged by hydrogenbonded oxygen atoms, forming a solid, ice-like crystalline substance. They have been found all over the world in both onshore and offshore environments, as well as in permafrost and tropical regions. The presence of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments are of concern to geotechnical engineers for several reasons, including: (1) their effect on the load bearing properties of ocean sediments, and (2) the effect that their dissociation has on the engineering properties of ocean sediments. The recovery of intact, in-situ samples of gas hydrates can be difficult due to their dependence on pressure and temperature conditions. The development of an electrical resistivity cone for the detection of gas hydrates in marine sediments would be ideal because: (1) there is a dramatic contrast between the electrical properties of gas hydrates and ocean sediments; (2) the resistivity module could be incorporated with standard cone penetrometer testing equipment; and (3) it could allow the in-situ detection of gas hydrates without dramatically affecting the surrounding temperature and pressure conditions. The objectives of this study were to design, fabricate and test an electrical resistivity cone using a two-electrode and four-electrode configuration. The laboratory testing program consisted of pushing the cone through a three-layer soil profile in which the central layer (target layer) consisted of simulated gas hydrates. The target layer thickness varied from 1 to 6 inches (2.5 to 15 cm) and the "hydrate" content varied from 10% to 100% by volume. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of the cone for use in the detection of thin resistive layers and randomly dispersed resistive nodules. The laboratory test results indicated that the four-electrode configuration may be more appropriate for the detection of both thin resistive layers and random resistive nodules. Layers as thin as 1 inch (2.5 cm) and containing as little as 10% "hydrate" nodules were successfully detected using this configuration.

McClelland, Martha Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

There is a multiplicity of development pathways in which low energy sector emissions are not necessarily associated with low economic growth. However, changes in development pathways can rarely be imposed from the top. On this basis, examples of energy efficiency opportunities to change development pathways toward lower emissions are presented in this paper. We review opportunities at the sectoral and macro level. The potential for action on nonclimate policies that influence energy use and emissions are presented. Examples are drawn from policies already adopted and implemented in the energy sector. The paper discusses relationships between energy efficiency policies and their synergies and tradeoffs with sustainable development and greenhouse gas emissions. It points to ways that energy efficiency could be mainstreamed into devel?opment choices.

Alterra, Swart; Masanet, Eric; Lecocq, Franck; Najam, Adil; Schaeffer, Robert; Winkler, Harald; Sathaye, Jayant

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

288

DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF AN ULTRA LOW NOx COMBUSTOR FOR GAS TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Alzeta Corporation has developed surface-stabilized fuel injectors for use with lean premixed combustors which provide extended turndown and ultra-low NOX emission performance. These injectors use a patented technique to form interacting radiant and blue-flame zones immediately above a selectively-perforated porous metal surface. This allows stable operation at low reaction temperatures. This technology is being commercialized under the product name nanoSTAR. Initial tests demonstrated low NOX emissions but, were limited by flashback failure of the injectors. The weld seams required to form cylindrical injectors from flat sheet material were identified as the cause of the failures. The approach for this project was to first develop new fabrication methods to produce injectors without weld seams, verify similar emissions performance to the original flat sheet material and then develop products for microturbines and small gas turbines along parallel development paths. A 37 month project was completed to develop and test a surface stabilized combustion system for gas turbine applications. New fabrication techniques developed removed a technological barrier to the success of the product by elimination of conductive weld seams from the injector surface. The injectors demonstrated ultra low emissions in rig tests conducted under gas turbine operating conditions. The ability for injectors to share a common combustion chamber allowing for deployment in annular combustion liner was also demonstrated. Some further development is required to resolve integration issues related to specific engine constraints, but the nanoSTAR technology has clearly demonstrated its low emissions potential. The overall project conclusions can be summarized: (1) A wet-laid casting method successfully eliminated weld seams from the injector surface without degrading performance. (2) Gas turbine cycle analysis identified several injector designs and control schemes to start and load engines using nanoSTAR technology. A mechanically simple single zone injector can be used in Solar Turbine's Taurus 60 engine. (3) Rig testing of single monolithic injectors demonstrated sub 3 ppmv NOX and sub 10 ppmv CO and UHC emissions (all corrected to 15% O2) at Taurus 60 full-load pressure and combustion air inlet temperature. (4) Testing of two nanoSTAR injectors in Solar Turbine's sector rig demonstrated the ability for injectors to survive when fired in close proximity at Taurus 60 full load pressure and combustion air inlet temperature. (5) Sector rig tests demonstrated emissions performance and range of operability consistent with single injector rig tests. Alzeta has committed to the commercialization of nanoSTAR injectors and has sufficient production capability to conclude development and meet initial demand.

NEIL K. MCDOUGALD

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF AN ULTRA LOW NOx COMBUSTOR FOR GAS TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Alzeta Corporation has developed surface-stabilized fuel injectors for use with lean premixed combustors which provide extended turndown and ultra-low NOX emission performance. These injectors use a patented technique to form interacting radiant and blue-flame zones immediately above a selectively-perforated porous metal surface. This allows stable operation at low reaction temperatures. This technology is being commercialized under the product name nanoSTAR. Initial tests demonstrated low NOX emissions but, were limited by flashback failure of the injectors. The weld seams required to form cylindrical injectors from flat sheet material were identified as the cause of the failures. The approach for this project was to first develop new fabrication methods to produce injectors without weld seams, verify similar emissions performance to the original flat sheet material and then develop products for microturbines and small gas turbines along parallel development paths. A 37 month project was completed to develop and test a surface stabilized combustion system for gas turbine applications. New fabrication techniques developed removed a technological barrier to the success of the product by elimination of conductive weld seams from the injector surface. The injectors demonstrated ultra low emissions in rig tests conducted under gas turbine operating conditions. The ability for injectors to share a common combustion chamber allowing for deployment in annular combustion liner was also demonstrated. Some further development is required to resolve integration issues related to specific engine constraints, but the nanoSTAR technology has clearly demonstrated its low emissions potential. The overall project conclusions can be summarized: (1) A wet-laid casting method successfully eliminated weld seams from the injector surface without degrading performance. (2) Gas turbine cycle analysis identified several injector designs and control schemes to start and load engines using nanoSTAR technology. A mechanically simple single zone injector can be used in Solar Turbine's Taurus 60 engine. (3) Rig testing of single monolithic injectors demonstrated sub 3 ppmv NOX and sub 10 ppmv CO and UHC emissions (all corrected to 15% O2) at Taurus 60 full-load pressure and combustion air inlet temperature. (4) Testing of two nanoSTAR injectors in Solar Turbine's sector rig demonstrated the ability for injectors to survive when fired in close proximity at Taurus 60 full load pressure and combustion air inlet temperature. (5) Sector rig tests demonstrated emissions performance and range of operability consistent with single injector rig tests. Alzeta has committed to the commercialization of nanoSTAR injectors and has sufficient production capability to conclude development and meet initial demand.

NEIL K. MCDOUGALD

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Development of a control algorithm for a dynamic gas mixing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An algorithm was developed to control the partial pressures of N2, O2, and CO2 in a gas mixing tank. The gases were premixed before being introduced into the low pressure Mars Dome. As an attempt to reduce the effects of pressure, the number of moles of the component gases was calculated and used to determine when gases needed to be added to the system or when gas concentrations needed to be diluted. There were two trial runs during each of the two experiments carried out. The total pressures in both the mixing tank and the Mars Dome remained within their limits of constraint during both trials. For the mixing tank, the pressure was maintained between 170kPa and 180kPa with a setpoint of 175kPa. Gas composition was evaluated at 67kPa and 33kPa in the Mars Dome. Again the pressure remained within its range of ±5kPa of its setpoint. Adequate control of the partial pressures of N2, and O2 were achieved in the mixing tank and the Mars Dome. With respect to the control of CO2, the algorithm was unable to maintain the partial pressure within the operational limits specified. The tendency was for CO2 to linger above its setpoint. Moreover, at 33kPa the CO2 sensor in the Mars Dome began to reflect a lower concentration of CO2 in the system than what was reported by the gas chromatograph or the CO2 sensor in the mixing tank. While sufficient control of the partial pressures was achieved, there are modifications to be made that should further tighten the control limits of the system. Such modifications include recalibrating the sensors in the system and adjusting gas flow rates.

Lovelady, April

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Optimal Cluster Mill Pass Scheduling With an Accurate and Rapid New Strip Crown Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Besides the requirement to roll coiled sheet at high levels of productivity, the optimal pass scheduling of cluster-type reversing cold mills presents the added challenge of assigning mill parameters that facilitate the best possible strip flatness. The pressures of intense global competition, and the requirements for increasingly thinner, higher quality specialty sheet products that are more difficult to roll, continue to force metal producers to commission innovative flatness-control technologies. This means that during the on-line computerized set-up of rolling mills, the mathematical model should not only determine the minimum total number of passes and maximum rolling speed, it should simultaneously optimize the pass-schedule so that desired flatness is assured, either by manual or automated means. In many cases today, however, on-line prediction of strip crown and corresponding flatness for the complex cluster-type rolling mills is typically addressed either by trial and error, by approximate deflection models for equivalent vertical roll-stacks, or by non-physical pattern recognition style models. The abundance of the aforementioned methods is largely due to the complexity of cluster-type mill configurations and the lack of deflection models with sufficient accuracy and speed for on-line use. Without adequate assignment of the pass-schedule set-up parameters, it may be difficult or impossible to achieve the required strip flatness. In this paper, we demonstrate optimization of cluster mill pass-schedules using a new accurate and rapid strip crown model. This pass-schedule optimization includes computations of the predicted strip thickness profile to validate mathematical constraints. In contrast to many of the existing methods for on-line prediction of strip crown and flatness on cluster mills, the demonstrated method requires minimal prior tuning and no extensive training with collected mill data. To rapidly and accurately solve the multi-contact problem and predict the strip crown, a new customized semi-analytical modeling technique that couples the Finite Element Method (FEM) with classical solid mechanics was developed to model the deflection of the rolls and strip while under load. The technique employed offers several important advantages over traditional methods to calculate strip crown, including continuity of elastic foundations, non-iterative solution when using predetermined foundation moduli, continuous third-order displacement fields, simple stress-field determination, and a comparatively faster solution time.

Malik, Arif S.; Grandhi, Ramana V. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Wright State University, 3640 Col. Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH 45435 (United States); Zipf, Mark E. [Intergrated Industrial Systems, Inc., 475 Main St., Yalesville, CT 06492 (United States)

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development of an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, various private and governmental agencies have conducted studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources, particularly those resources contained in tight sands, fractured shales, and coal beds. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has assessed the amount of unconventional gas resources in North America, and its estimates are used by other government agencies as the basis for their resource estimates. While the USGS employs a probabilistic methodology, it is apparent from the resulting narrow ranges that the methodology underestimates the uncertainty of these undiscovered, untested, potential resources, which in turn limits the reliability and usefulness of the assessments. The objective of this research is to develop an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources that better accounts for the uncertainty in these resources. This study investigates the causes of the narrow ranges generated by the USGS analyticprobabilistic methodology used to prepare the 1995 national oil and gas assessment and the 2000 NOGA series, and presents an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. The new model improves upon the USGS method by using a stochastic approach, which includes correlation between the input variables and Monte Carlo simulation, representing a more versatile and robust methodology than the USGS analytic-probabilistic methodology. The improved methodology is applied to the assessment of potential unconventional gas resources in the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado, and compared to results of the evaluation performed by the USGS in 2002. Comparison of the results validates the means and standard deviations produced by the USGS methodology, but shows that the probability distributions generated are rather different and, that the USGS distributions are not skewed to right, as expected for a natural resource. This study indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the resulting USGS probability distributions are not caused by the analytic equations or lack of correlation between input parameters, but rather the use of narrow triangular probability distributions as input variables. Adoption of the improved methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input probability distributions, will allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar Vanegas, Jesus

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development of the next generation medium-duty natural gas engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done under this subcontract in the areas of System Design, System Fabrication, and Experimental Program. The report contains the details of the engine development process for achieving throttleless stratified charge spark ignition (SI) engine operation as well as advanced turbocharging strategies. Engine test results showing the potential of the direct-injection stratified charge combustion strategy for increasing part-load engine efficiency on a John Deere 8.1-liter natural gas engine are also included in this report. In addition, steady state and step transient engine data are presented that quantify the performance of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) as well as a modified waste-gated turbocharger on the engine. The benefits of the technologies investigated during this project will be realized in the form of increased drive-cycle efficiency to diesel-like levels, while retaining the low emissions characteristics of a lean-burn natural gas engine.

Podnar, D.J.; Kubesh, J.T.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

295

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the first two years of a three-year long project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project is investigating an innovative approach to developing large-scale and potentially cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that could be implemented across broad geographic areas of the U.S. and internationally. The tools and information developed in this project will broaden the GHG emissions offset ...

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

Dunn, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

THE DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF GAS TURBINES IN SOUTH AFRICA WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO COAL AND NUCLEAR FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Aspects of gas turbine development with emphasis on applications in South Africa are discussed. A review of developmental work in various parts of the world on coal burning turbines is presented and local efforts on conventional combustion chambers and resonant combustion systems are outlined. The possible applications of gas turbines to nuclear reactors in South Africa are also examined. (J.R.D.)

Grant, W.L.; Roux, A.J.A.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein reservoir being the Marcellus Shale play. The Marcellus Shale play stretches across an area of 95,000 square

Mohaghegh, Shahab

299

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. , 2004. “The History of Natural Gas in Rio Vista”, River1936, the history making first natural gas well was drilledthe article “The History of the Natural Gas In Rio Vista”,

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and meditation on “oil and gas industries’ promotion thatrich in such resources, like oil and gas, have encounteredMost conflicts involving oil and gas drilling are rooted in

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Development of Direct Age 718 for Gas Turbine Engine Disk ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

as a commercial gas turbine aircraft engine disk material are described. Initial ... Engines (GEAE) in the production of gas turbine engine components (1).

306

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fleet of natural gas-fired power plants in the world, and asthese plants. Natural gas is the company's main power source

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

308

DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR HEADSPACE GAS SAMPLING OF TRANSURANIC WASTE DRUMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast, safe, and cost-effective method for obtaining headspace gas samples has been developed and implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A sample port is installed directly into a drum lid using a pneumatic driver, allowing sampling with a side-port needle. Testing has shown that the sample port can be installed with no release of radioactive material. Use of this system at LANL has significantly reduced the time required for sampling, and eliminates the need for many safety precautions previously used. The system has significantly improved productivity and lowered radiation exposure and cost.

Polley, M.; Ankrom, J.; Wickland, T.; Warren, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Spray-formed tooling and aluminum strip  

SciTech Connect

Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. De Laval nozzles offer an alternative method to the more conventional spray nozzle designs. Two applications are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the production of specialized tooling, such as injection molds and dies, for rapid prototyping.

McHugh, K.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations were awarded by the Department of Energy to allow Enertechnix to conduct extended testing of the sensor at the Wabash River facility. In February, 2008 the sensor was installed on the gasifier in preparation for a long-term test. During the initial testing of the sensor a stainless steel tube on the sensor failed and allowed syngas to escape. The syngas self-ignited and the ensuing small fire damaged some of the components on the sensor. There was no damage to the gasifier or other equipment and no injuries resulted from this incident. Two meetings were held to identify the root causes of the incident-one at Wabash River and one at Enertechnix. A list of recommended improvements that would have addressed the causes of the incident was created and presented to the Department of Energy on May 2, 2008. However, the DOE decided not to pursue these improvements and terminated the project. This report describes all of the activities conducted during the project and reports the findings of each activity in detail. The investigation of potential sound generation and coupling methods led to the selection of a reflected shock method which has been developed into a functioning prototype device. The principles of operation of this device and its performance characteristics are described in the report. Modeling of the attenuation of sound by suspended particles and by interaction of the sound pulses with the high temperature syngas inside the gasifier was conducted and the predictions of those models were used to determine the required sound pulse intensity to allow the sound pulses to be detected after passage through the gasifier environment. These modeling results are presented in this report. A study of the likely spatial and temporal variability of gas composition inside the gasifier was performed and the results of that study was used to predict the impact of that variability on the accuracy of the acoustic temperature method. These results are reported here. A design for a port rodding mechanism was developed to deal with potential slagging issues and was incorporated i

Peter Ariessohn

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development Of An Acoustice Sensor For On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement In Gasifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. This report describes all of the activities conducted during the project and reports the findings of each activity in detail. The investigation of potential sound generation and coupling methods led to the selection of a reflected shock method which has been developed into a functioning prototype device. The principles of operation of this device and its performance characteristics are described in the report. Modeling of the attenuation of sound by suspended particles and by interaction of the sound pulses with the high temperature syngas inside the gasifier was conducted and the predictions of those models were used to determine the required sound pulse intensity to allow the sound pulses to be detected after passage through the gasifier environment. These modeling results are presented in this report. A study of the likely spatial and temporal variability of gas composition inside the gasifier was performed and the results of that study was used to predict the impact of that variability on the accuracy of the acoustic temperature method. These results are reported here. A design for a port rodding mechanism was developed to deal with potential slagging issues and was incorporated into the prototype sensor. This port rodding mechanism operated flawlessly during the field testing, but because these tests were performed in a region of the gasifier that experiences little slagging, the effectiveness of the rodding mechanism in dealing with highly slagging conditions was not fully demonstrated. This report describes the design and operation of the automated Gasifier Acoustic Pyrometer (autoGAP) which was tested at the Wabash River facility. The results of the tests are reported and analyzed in detail. All of the objectives of the project have been achieved. A field prototype acoustic pyrometer sensor has been successfully tested at the Wabash River gasifier plant. Acoustic signals were propagated through the gases inside the gasifier and were detected by the receiver unit, the times of flight of these sound pulses were measured and these propagation times were converted into temperatures which agreed very well with thermocouple measurements m

Peter Ariessohn; Hans Hornung

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Influence of Hot-strip Coiling Temperature on Microstructure and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Hot-strip Coiling Temperature on Microstructure and Properties of Ultra-low C Ti-bearing Enamel Steel Produced by Ultra-fast ...

313

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant ...  

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant Use in N0x Catalytic Reduction Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

314

Ecology of Sulfur Cycling in Flooded Strip Mines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Habitat restoration efforts in reclaimed coal mining areas have included the flooding of shallow strip mines, creating patches of wetland with special chemical characteristics, like… (more)

Wham, Breanna Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation of the power plants. On the other hand, these clauses may decrease competitiveness of thermal of multi-year regulation. Thermal generation (28 plants) includes nuclear, natural gas, coal and diesel to supply a 600 MW thermal plant on the Brazilian side of the border between the countries. Without

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

316

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

• Renewable Fuels Standard / RINS / cellulosic ethanol • Growth of natural gas use in transportation

317

23rd World Gas Conference, Amsterdam 2006 DEVELOPMENT OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST ABOVE-GROUND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LNG STORAGE TANK 1. INTRODUCTION Since the first introduction of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in Korea the growing needs of natural gas, Korea Gas Corporation (KOGAS) had to build a lot of LNG storage tanks around has grown remarkably. In order to meet the natural gas demand, KOGAS has built many LNG storage tanks

Laughlin, Robert B.

318

Mercury Speciation in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Experimental Studies and Model Development  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding of the catalytic reactions that are promoted by solid surfaces present in coal combustion systems and develop a mathematical model that described key phenomena responsible for the fate of mercury in coal-combustion systems. This objective was achieved by carefully combining laboratory studies under realistic process conditions using simulated flue gas with mathematical modeling efforts. Laboratory-scale studies were performed to understand the fundamental aspects of chemical reactions between flue gas constituents and solid surfaces present in the fly ash and their impact on mercury speciation. Process models were developed to account for heterogeneous reactions because of the presence of fly ash as well as the deliberate addition of particles to promote Hg oxidation and adsorption. Quantum modeling was used to obtain estimates of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions. Based on the initial findings of this study, additional work was performed to ascertain the potential of using inexpensive inorganic sorbents to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants without adverse impact on the salability fly ash, which is one of the major drawbacks of current control technologies based on activated carbon.

Radisav Vidic; Joseph Flora; Eric Borguet

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Human resource needs and development for the gas industry of the future  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry will confront many challenges in the 1990s and beyond, one of which is the development of human resources to meet future needs. An efficient, trained work force in this era of environmental concern, high technology, and alternative fuels is essential for the industry to continue to meet the competition and to safely deliver our product and service to all customers. Unfortunately, during this period there will be an increasing shortfall of technical personnel to replace those lost to attrition and a steady decline in the availability of new employees who are able to read, write, and perform simple math. Technological and government developments that will impact the industry and the skill levels needed by the industry employees are reviewed. In-house and external training of professional and nonprofessional personnel and the benefits and disadvantages of selected advanced training methods are discussed. Recommendations are presented that can help improve the training of gas industry employees to meet future needs. 22 refs.

Klass, D.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

High School Research at Jefferson Lab - Development of the GRINCH Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonlinear Particle Dynamics Nonlinear Particle Dynamics Previous Project (Nonlinear Particle Dynamics) High School Research Main Index Next Project (Fire Alarm Monitoring Systems) Fire Alarm Monitoring Systems Development of the GRINCH Gas Cherenkov Detector This project was done as a summation of all of the projects I have done referencing A1n and the GRINCH detector. To assist in the preparation of the A1n experiment, I helped develop and model a magnetic shielding box for an array of PMT's in the GRINCH detector. Using this box, as well as a compensation coil, seemed to provide ample shielding from the BigBite magnets magnetic field. The PMT's in the array were salvaged from a detector where they were submerged in water and sustained damage (micro-fractures) on their acceptance windows. By putting a layer of glue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Advanced manufacturing by spray forming: Aluminum strip and microelectromechanical systems  

SciTech Connect

Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. INEL is developing a unique spray-forming method based on de Laval (converging/diverging) nozzle designs to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Properties of the spray-formed material are tailored by controlling the characteristics of the spray plume and substrate. Two examples are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the replication of micron-scale features in micropatterned polymers during the production of microelectromechanical systems.

McHugh, K.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Development of proton-conducting membranes for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin and dense ceramic membranes fabricated from mixed protonic/electronic conductors can provide a simple, efficient means of separating hydrogen from gas streams and offer an alternative to existing methods of hydrogen recovery. Because mixed electronic/protonic conductors internally transport not only hydrogen (and thus provide the means to separate hydrogen from other gaseous components) but also electrons, hydrogen separation could be achieved in a non-Galvanic mode of operation (i.e., without the need for external electrodes, circuitry, and/or power supply). To be suitable as a hydrogen-permeable membrane, a material must exhibit sufficiently high electronic and protonic conductivities, and these conductivities must be approximately equal to one another to maximize hydrogen permeation through the material. In addition, the material must have sufficient mechanical integrity to withstand normal operating stresses and must be chemically stable under a wide range of gas atmospheres. This talk summarizes results obtained in Argonne`s effort to develop material for use as a hydrogen separation membrane. The transport properties of BaCe{sub 0.95}Y{sub 0.05}O{sub 3{minus}{alpha}} (5%-BCY) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Y{sub 0.05}O{sub 3{minus}{alpha}} (5%-SCY) were characterized by impedance spectroscopy, gas permeation, and open-cell voltage measurements. In this presentation, the authors describe the materials selection, synthesis, characterization, and performance evaluation of mixed-conducting dense ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation applications.

Balachandran, U.; Guan, J.; Dorris, S.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Liu, M. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

324

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Smart-Grid electricity allocation via strip packing with slicing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One advantage of smart grids is that they can reduce the peak load by distributing electricity-demands over multiple short intervals. Finding a schedule that minimizes the peak load corresponds to a variant of a strip packing problem. Normally, for strip ...

Soroush Alamdari, Therese Biedl, Timothy M. Chan, Elyot Grant, Krishnam Raju Jampani, Srinivasan Keshav, Anna Lubiw, Vinayak Pathak

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films and Membranes for Low-Energy Gas Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid organic-inorganic micro- or mesoporous materials that exhibit regular crystalline lattices with rigid pore structures. Chemical functionalization of the organic linkers in the structures of MOFs affords facile control over pore size and physical properties, making MOFs attractive materials for application in gas-separating membranes. A wealth of reports exist discussing the synthesis of MOF structures, however relatively few reports exist discussing MOF membranes. This disparity owes to challenges associated with fabricating films of hybrid materials, including poor substrate-film interactions, moisture sensitivity, and thermal instability. Since even nanometer scale cracks and defects can affect the performance of a membrane for gas separation, these challenges are particularly acute for MOF membranes. The focus of this work is the development of novel methods for MOF film and membrane fabrication with a view to overcoming these challenges. The MOF film production methods discussed herein include in situ synthesis using ligand-modified or metal-modified supports and rapid thermal deposition (RTD).

McCarthy, Michael

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Development of a coal-fired gas turbine cogeneration system: Status report  

SciTech Connect

The Allison Advanced Coal-Fueled Turbine Program is now in the sixth year of a development effort that has led to a POC engine demonstration test on a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. Earlier forecasts by CWS suppliers that suitable CWS fuels would be commercially available at an economic price have not been realized. A program replan has, therefore, been executed that incorporates the use of readily available dry pulverized coal. To support this program, technology issues relating to combustor performance and emission control, hot gas cleanup, and turbine deposition, erosion and corrosion (DEC) have been addressed. In addition, system assessment studies have been performed to evaluate the commercial prospects for small (<8 MWe) coal-fired industrial cogeneration systems and the application of the rich-quench-lean (RQL) coal-combustion technology to larger (> 100 MWe) utility-sized gas turbines. These results are reported by Wenglarz (1992). Combustor and engine tests on dry coal are now planned in preparation for a commercial demonstration that will follow the completion of this program.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Hart, P.J.; Thomas, W.H.; Rothrock, J.W.; Harris, C.N.; Bourke, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a Bayesian Network (BN) model to produce environmental risk maps for oil and gas site developments and to demonstrate the model’s scalability from a point to a collection of points. To reach this objective, a benchmark BN model was formulated as a “proof of concept” using Aquifers, Ecoregions and Land Use / Land Cover maps as local and independent input variables. This model was then used to evaluate the probabilistic geographical distribution of the Environmental Sensibility of Oil and Gas (O&G) developments for a given study area. A Risk index associated with the development of O&G operation activities based on the spatial environmental sensibility was also mapped. To facilitate the Risk assessment, these input variables (maps) were discretized into three hazard levels: high, moderate and low. A Geographical Information System (GIS) platform was used (ESRI ArcMap 10), to gather, modify and display the data for the analysis. Once the variables were defined and the hazard data was included on feature classes (layer shapefile format), Python 2.6 software was used as the computational platform to calculate the probabilistic state of all the Bayesian Network’s variables. This allowed to define Risk scenarios both on prognostic and diagnostic analysis and to measure the impact of changes or interventions in terms of uncertainty. The resulting Python – ESRI ArcMap computational script was called “BN+GIS, which populated maps describing the spatial variability of the states of the Environmental Sensibility and of the corresponding Risk index. The latter in particular, represents a tool for decision makers to choose the most suitable location for placing a drilling rig, since it integrates three fundamental environmental variables. Also, results show that is possible to back propagate the information from the Environmental Sensibility to define the inherent triggering scenarios (hazard variables). A case of study is presented to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology on a specific geographical setting. The Barnett Shale was chosen as a benchmark study area because sufficient information on this region was available, and the importance that it holds on the latest developments of unconventional plays in the country. The main contribution of this work relies in combining Bayesian Networks and GIS to define environmental Risk scenarios that can facilitate decision-making for O&G stakeholders such as land owners, industry operators, regulators and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), before and during the development of a given site.

Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection  

SciTech Connect

The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and distinguished from other chemical species that may be simultaneously present, is particularly challenging. Aside from the laboratory-based method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), where samples may be collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or cryofocusing, the other major approaches for gas-phase detection employ lasers typically operating in the mid-infrared wavelength region. While mass spectrometry can readily detect noble gases - the helium leak detector is an obvious example - laser-based methods such as infrared (IR) or Raman spectroscopy are completely insensitive to them as their monatomic nature precludes a non-zero dipole moment or changes in polarizability upon excitation. Therefore, noble gases can only be detected by one of two methods: (1) atomic emission spectroscopies which require the generation of plasmas through laser-induced breakdown, electrical arcing, or similar means; (2) non-spectroscopic methods which measure one or more physical properties (e.g., mass, thermal conductivity, density). In this report, we present our progress during Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) in the research and development of a non-spectroscopic method for noble gas detection. During Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), we demonstrated via proof-of-concept experiments that the combination of thermal conductivity detection (TCD) and coating-free damped resonance detection (CFDRD) using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could provide selective sensing of these inert species. Since the MEMS-based TCD technology was directly adapted from a brassboard prototype commissioned by a previous chemical sensing project, FY11 efforts focused on advancing the state of the newer CFDRD method. This work, guided by observations previously reported in the open literature, has not only resulted in a substantially measureable increase in selectivity but has also revealed a potential method for mitigating or eliminating thermal drift that does not require a secondary reference sensor. The design of an apparatus to test this drift compensation scheme will be described. We will conclude this report with a discussion of planned efforts in Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12).

Loui, A; McCall, S K

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

332

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 15 20 25 30 35 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Associated with oil Coalbed methane Tight gas Shale gas Alaska Non-associated onshore Non-associated...

333

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of proton-conducting membranes for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed protonic/electronic conductors are permeable only to hydrogen, and in principle, provide a simple efficient means of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures. At a time when world demand for hydrogen is growing, such proton- conducting membranes have the potential to significantly alter the economics of hydrogen separation and purification processes and thus improve the economic viability of processes that utilize hydrogen, such as some refinery operations and direct and indirect coal liquefaction. This paper describes a recently initiated program to develop materials and fabrication processes to separate hydrogen with dense ceramic membranes in a non-Galvanic mode of operation (i.e., without electrodes or external power supply).

Dorris, S.E.; Balachandran

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013

336

Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Materials in Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.

Ramesh Subramanian

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

Oil and Gas Development in the United States in the Early 1990's  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

An analysis of the growing prominence of smaller energy companies in U.S. oil and natural gas production.

Information Center

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

Stephenson, M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Environmental concerns and future oil and gas developments in Coastal Wetlands of Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have confirmed that much oil and natural gas have been overlooked and increases in future recoverable reserves will come from drilling in these areas. Increased production will result from identifying unexploited compartmentalized reservoirs, new infield reservoirs, and bypassed reservoirs, and by using enhanced recovery technologies for hydrocarbon recovery in incompletely drained reservoirs previously left unproduced for economic reasons. Most of southern Louisiana's hydrocarbon reserves underlie coastal wetland areas of the state. Major environmental concerns associated with the future development of existing reserves are canal dredging and destruction of wildlife habitat, use and disposal of oil-based muds, mitigation for wetland damage, and the recent emerging issue of surface contamination by naturally occurring radioactive materials with potential liabilities and future remedial regulation. To reduce wetland environmental damage caused by access canals to drilling sites, the Coastal Management Division of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources instituted a geologic reviews program to review drilling permit application in the coastal wetlands. This process provides a mechanism for state and federal agencies to comment on the requested drilling permit. As a result of this process, the total average wetland disturbed area has been reduced from 767 ac per year in 1982 to approximately 76 ac per year in 1991. Average lengths of access canals also have been reduced by approximately 78% during the period. Oil and gas companies are becoming increasingly aware of the environmental consequences of drilling in wetlands and are considering them in planning for development activities. In the current climate of increasing public consciousness about the environment, addressing environmental concerns in the planning state will go a long way in helping alleviate future environmental problems.

John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Natural Gas Compressor Stations on the Interstate Pipeline Network:Developments Since 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the use of natural gas pipeline compressor stations on the interstate natural gas pipeline network that serves the lower 48 States. It examines the compression facilities added over the past 10 years and how the expansions have supported pipeline capacity growth intended to meet the increasing demand for natural gas.

Information Center

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 219 EFFECTS OF NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT ON FOREST ECOSYSTEMS Mary Beth Adams, W. Mark Ford, Thomas M. Schuler, and Melissa-term research. In 2008, a natural gas well was drilled on the Fernow and a pipeline and supporting infrastructure constructed. We describe the impacts of natural gas development on the natural resources

342

Baseline gas turbine development program. First quarterly progress report, January 31, 1973  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine-powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emission Standards and which is competitive in fuel economy, performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine-powered, standard size American automobile. Procurement and assembly of parts for seven engines plus spares is basically on schedule, although some areas are requiring intensive follow-up. A partial engine (including regenerators) was assembled for shipment to Solar. It will be incorporated into their combustor test rig, where it will provide both pre-heat and a proper physical environment for their combustor evaluation and development. Of the two test cells being refurbished for use on this program, one was completed and the other is underway. Two engines loaned to start the program were checked out, qualified, and delivered. Vehicle installation design is nearly complete. The cars were ordered. Vehicle engineering to provide hydraulic power boost braking, heating and air conditioning, and transmission is underway. Procurement arrangements for basic body and chassis changes were completed. In support to the Government, an engine characterization was prepared and assistance given in developing a combustor test procedure. Work was initiated on developing a control system for a variable geometry combustor. A request for proposal for an upgraded engine control system was prepared and issued. Preparations are being made for a free rotor concept evaluation. A plan of performance was prepared and submitted. Included were program plan charts and estimated cumulative manpower graphs.

Not Available

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Twentieth quarterly progress report, October 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental Upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Activity during this twentieth program quarter has continued to emphasize development towards correcting power deficiency in the Upgraded Engine. Though no absolute improvements have been realized in this quarter, ssignificant progress has been made in identifying causes, appropriately adjusting original design constraints, and proceeding with corrective designs. Specifically, to reduce endwall and secondary flow losses, a new low velocity compressor turbine inlet duct, and blading both with an increased height and lighter loading is being designed. A large increase in the power turbine annulus is being used to significantly lower blade Mach number and leaving loss. Progress is also being made in uniforming regenerator flow for better heat recovery, and in the development of control system components. A Public Interest Car has been built and has proved effective in communicating overall program benefits and goals. In the area of advanced engine development, work is now underway towards processing sintered alpha silicon carbide into high temperature turbine stage components.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E [comps.] [comps.

1977-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.'' This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft[sup 2] cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Design and Initial Development of Monolithic Cross-Flow Ceramic Hot-Gas Filters  

SciTech Connect

Advanced, coal-fueled, power generation systems utilizing pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies are currently being developed for high-efficiency, low emissions, and low-cost power generation. In spite of the advantages of these promising technologies, the severe operating environment often leads to material degradation and loss of performance in the barrier filters used for particle entrapment. To address this problem, LoTEC Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are jointly designing and developing a monolithic cross-flow ceramic hot-gas filter. The filter concept involves a truly monolithic cross-flow design that is resistant to delamination, can be easily fabricated, and offers flexibility of geometry and material make-up. During Phase I of the program, a thermo-mechanical analysis was performed to determine how a cross-flow filter would respond both thermally and mechanically to a series of thermal and mechanical loads. The cross-flow filter mold was designed accordingly, and the materials selection was narrowed down to Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} (CS-50) and 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3SiO{sub 2} (mullite). A fabrication process was developed using gelcasting technology and monolithic cross-flow filters were fabricated. The program focuses on obtaining optimum filter permeability and testing the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials.

Barra, C.; Limaye, S.; Stinton, D.P.; Vaubert, V.M.

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

On-Road Development of John Deere 6081 Natural Gas Engine: Final Technical Report, July 1999 - January 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report that discusses John Deere's field development of a heavy-duty natural gas engine. As part of the field development project, Waste Management of Orange County, California refitted four existing trash packers with John Deere's prototype spark ignited 280-hp 8.1 L CNG engines. This report describes the project and also contains information about engine performance, emissions, and driveability.

McCaw, D. L.; Horrell, W. A. (Deere and Company)

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

350

Oil and gas development in the United States in the early 1990`s: An expanded role for independent producers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1991, the major petroleum companies` foreign exploration and development expenditures have exceeded their US exploration and development expenditures. The increasing dependence of US oil and gas development on the typically much smaller nonmajor companies raises a number of issues. Did those companies gain increased prominence largely through the reduced commitments of the majors or have they been significantly adding to the US reserve base? What are the characteristics of surviving and growing producers compared with companies exiting the US oil and gas business? Differences between majors` development strategies and those of other US oil and gas producers appear considerable. As the mix of exploration and development strategies in US oil and gas increasingly reflects the decisions of smaller, typically more specialized producers, what consequences can be seen regarding the costs of adding to US reserves? How are capital markets accessed? Are US oil and gas investments by the nonmajors likely to be undertaken only with higher costs of capital? This report analyzes these issues. 20 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Regenerable Sorbent Development for Sulfur, Chloride and Ammonia Removal from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of components in coal form corrosive and toxic compounds during coal gasification processes. DOE’s NETL aims to reduce contaminants to parts per billion in order to utilize gasification gas streams in fuel cell applications. Even more stringent requirements are expected if the fuel is to be utilized in chemical production applications. Regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal sorbents have been developed at NETL. These sorbents can remove the hydrogen sulfide to ppb range at 316 °C and at 20 atmospheres. The sorbent can be regenerated with oxygen. Reactivity and physical durability of the sorbent did not change during the multi-cycle tests. The sorbent development work has been extended to include the removal of other major impurities, such as HCl and NH3. The sorbents for HCl removal that are available today are not regenerable. Regenerable HCl removal sorbents have been developed at NETL. These sorbents can remove HCl to ppb range at 300 °C to 500 °C. The sorbent can be regenerated with oxygen. Results of TGA and bench-scale flow reactor tests with both regenerable and non-regenerable HCl removal sorbents will be discussed in the paper. Bench-scale reactor tests were also conducted with NH3 removal sorbents. The results indicated that the sorbents have a high removal capacity and good regenerability during the multi-cycle tests. Future emphasis of the NETL coal gasification/cleanup program is to develop multi-functional sorbents to remove multiple impurities in order to minimize the steps involved in the cleanup systems. To accomplish this goal, a regenerable sorbent capable of removing both HCl and H2S was developed. The results of the TGA conducted with the sorbent to evaluate the feasibility of both H2S and HCl sorption will be discussed in this paper.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Webster, T.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

353

Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2 concentration resulted in incremental loss in IAS performance and revealed progressive degrees of “staining” upon testing. Adsorption of SO2 by the IAS necessitates upstream removal of SO2 prior to CO2 capture.

Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL CERAMIC NANOFILM-FIBER INTEGRATED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR RAPID DETECTION OF COAL DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to conduct fundamental studies on advanced ceramic materials and fiber optic devices for developing new types of high temperature (>500{degree}C) fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for monitoring fossil (mainly coal) and biomass derived gases in power plants. The primary technical objective is to investigate and demonstrate the nanocrystalline doped-ceramic thin film enabled FOCS that possess desired stability, sensitivity and selectivity for in-situ, rapid gas detection in the syngas streams from gasification and combustion flue gases. This report summarizes research works of two integrated parts: (1) development of metal oxide solid thin films as sensing materials for detection and measurement of important gas components relevant to the coal- and biomass-derived syngas and combustion gas streams at high temperatures; and (2) development of fiber optic devices that are potentially useful for constructing FOCS in combination with the solid oxide thin films identified in this program.

Junhang Dong; Hai Xiao; Xiling Tang; Hongmin Jiang; Kurtis Remmel; Amardeep Kaur

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of MELCOR Input Techniques for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) can provide clean electricity,as well as process heat that can be used to produce hydrogen for transportation and other sectors. A prototypic HTGR, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP),will be built at Idaho National Laboratory.The need for HTGR analysis tools and methods has led to the addition of gas-cooled reactor (GCR) capabilities to the light water reactor code MELCOR. MELCOR will be used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the NGNP and other HTGRs. In the present study, new input techniques have been developed for MELCOR HTGR analysis. These new techniques include methods for modeling radiation heat transfer between solid surfaces in an HTGR, calculating fuel and cladding geometric parameters for pebble bed and prismatic block-type HTGRs, and selecting appropriate input parameters for the reflector component in MELCOR. The above methods have been applied to input decks for a water-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS); the 400 MW Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), the input for which is based on a code-to-code benchmark activity; and the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF), which is currently in the design phase at Oregon State University. RCCS results show that MELCOR accurately predicts radiation heat transfer rates from the vessel but may overpredict convective heat transfer rates and RCCS coolant flow rates. PBMR results show that thermal striping from hot jets in the lower plenum during steady-state operations, and in the upper plenum during a pressurized loss of forced cooling accident, may be a major design concern. Hot jets could potentially melt control rod drive mechanisms or cause thermal stresses in plenum structures. For the HTTF, results will provide data to validate MELCOR for HTGR analyses. Validation will be accomplished by comparing results from the MELCOR representation of the HTTF to experimental results from the facility. The validation process can be automated using a modular code written in Python, which is described here.

Corson, James

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of Brazing Technology for Use in High- Temperature Gas Separation Equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen separators, fuel gas reformers, solid oxide fuel cells, and chemical sensors is part of a rapidly expanding segment of the solid state technology market. These devices employ an ionic conducting ceramic as the active membrane that establishes the electrochemical potential of the device, either under voltage (i.e. to carry out gas separation) or under chemical gradient (to develop an electrical potential and thereby generate electrical power). Because the device operates under an ionic gradient that develops across the electrolyte, hermiticity across this layer is paramount. That is, not only must this thin ceramic membrane be dense with no interconnected porosity, but it must be connected to the rest of the device, typically constructed from a heat resistant alloy, with a high-temperature, gas-tight seal. A significant engineering challenge in fabricating these devices is how to effectively join the thin electrochemically active membrane to the metallic body of the device such that the resulting seal is hermetic, rugged, and stable during continuous high temperature operation. Active metal brazing is the typical method of joining ceramic and metal engineering components. It employs a braze alloy that contains one or more reactive elements, often titanium, which will chemically reduce the ceramic faying surface and greatly improve its wetting behavior and adherence with the braze. However, recent studies of these brazes for potential use in fabricating high-temperature electrochemical devices revealed problems with interfacial oxidation and subsequent joint failure [1,2]. Specifically, it was found that the introduction of the ceramic electrolyte and/or heat resistant metal substrate dramatically affects the inherent oxidation behavior of the braze, often in a deleterious manner. These conclusions pointed to the need for an oxidation resistant, high-temperature ceramic-to-metal braze and consequently lead to the development of the novel reactive air brazing (RAB) concept. The goal in RAB is to reactively modify one or both oxide faying surfaces with an oxide compound dissolved in a molten noble metal alloy such that the newly formed surface is readily wetted by the remaining liquid filler material. In many respects, this concept is similar to active metal brazing, except that joining can be conducted in air and the final joint will be resistant to oxidation at high temperature. Potentially, there are a number of metal oxide-noble metal systems that can be considered for RAB, including Ag-CuO, Ag-V2O5, and Pt-Nb2O5. Our current interest is in determining whether the Ag-CuO system is suitable for air brazing functional ceramic-to-metal joints such as those needed in practical electrochemical devices. In a series of studies, the wetting behavior of the Ag-CuO braze was investigated with respect to a number of potential hydrogen separation, oxygen separation, and fuel cell electrolyte membrane materials and heat resistant metal systems, including: alumina, (La0.6Sr0.4)(Co0.2Fe0.8)O3, (La0.8Sr0.2)FeO3, YSZ, fecralloy, and Crofer-22APU. Selected findings from these studies as well as from our work on joint strength and durability during high-temperature exposure testing will be discussed.

Weil, K.S.; Hardy, J.S.; Kim, J.Y.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology employed in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) permits burning coals with a wide range of sulfur concentrations. Emissions from the process should be reduced by an order of magnitude below stringent federal air quality regulations for coal-fired plants. The maximum thermal efficiency of this type of process can be achieved by removing sulfur and particulates from the high temperature gas. The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in IGCC systems. These catalytic membrane reactors were used to decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1,000. Feasibility of the membrane reactor process for decomposition of hydrogen sulfide was demonstrated; permeability and selectivity of molecular-sieve and Vycor glass membranes were studied at temperatures up to 1,000 C; experimental study of hydrogen sulfide in the membrane reactor was completed; and a generalized mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the high temperature membrane reactor.

Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Deloitte Energy Conference Deloitte Energy Conference May 21, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 3 shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to reach half of U.S. output 4 U.S. dry natural gas production trillion cubic feet Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

Chen, Shiaguo (Champaign, IL); Lu, Yonggi (Urbana, IL); Rostam-Abadi, Massoud (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Natural Gas Residential Pricing Developments During the 1996-97 Winter  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The industry structure as gauged by the HHI ... The natural gas market has changed fundamentally evolves, but price shifts will still occur. These price

363

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , B of A/Merrill Lynch, April 20, 2013

364

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS IN TIGHT GAS SANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on fossil fuels and the decline in their production promote producing hydrocarbon from unconventional sources. Natural gas existing in tight reservoirs has a… (more)

Kulga, Ihsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Developing a PC-Based GIS for the North American Natural Gas Pipeline Network  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Natural Gas Pipeline Network (September 22-25, 1997)Conference of European StatisticiansBrighton, United KingdomAUTHOR: James Tobin

Information Center

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Customer Retention Strategies of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) in a Developing Country (Pakistan).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Background: Statistics say that Pakistan is the third largest user of compressed natural gas, its increased demand has encouraged investment in this sector. Number of… (more)

Naveed-ur-Rehman, Muhammad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Survey for the development of compressed natural gas systems (CNG) for vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) vehicles have been used internationally by fleets for decades. The use of CNG vehicles results in less petroleum consumption, resulting in… (more)

Abulamosha, A.M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas Residential Pricing Developments During the 1996-97 Winter  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is intended to provide an understanding the reasons behind the sharp rise in residential gas bills during the 1996-97 Winter

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Oil and gas developments in Louisiana Gulf Coast Onshore in 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decrease in operating and exploration costs prompted a rise in drilling, leasing, and geophysical activity in the south Louisiana onshore region in 1984. However, because of a persistent gas surplus and uncertain oil prices, operators adopted a conservative strategy for reserve replacement that included an increase in development drilling, an acceleration of enhanced oil recovery projects, and a concentration of extension and exploration drilling in the established Miocene and Oligocene trends. Operators drilled 1,447 wells in 1984, an increase of 15% over the 1,230 wells drilled in 1983. Total footage also rose from 13,453,752 to 15,324,733 ft. Oil companies drilled 245 wildcats, 302 other exploratory tests, and 900 development wells (development drilling increasing 18%). Seven newfield discovery wells were completed in 1984, of which 4 produced from Wilcox (Eocene) sandstones, 2 were perforated in the Oligocene, and 1 well was completed in the Austin Chalk (Cretaceous). There were 36 significant extensions, of which 33 found production in rocks of Miocene and Oligocene age. Leasing activity increased 10% to 885,903 ac. This level is far below that of 1980, 1981, and 1982 when more than 1 million ac were leased each year. Leasing activity was heaviest in Lafourche, St. Tammany, Vermilion, Calcasieu, and Beauregard Parishes. Geophysical activity also had a slight increase of 4% in 1984. A total of 1,259 crew-weeks of seismic shooting was recorded as compared to 1,212 crew-weeks in 1983. Cameron, St. Martin, Jefferson, Lafourche, Plaquemines, and Vermilion Parishes recorded the highest levels of geophysical activity.

Borowski, W.S.; Wilson, D.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development Best Practices in Indian Country  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & ASSOCIATED VERTICAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BEST PRACTICES IN INDIAN COUNTRY March 1, 2012 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO NORTH CONVENTION CENTER 3950 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas, NV 89119 The dynamic world of conventional energy (focusing on oil, gas and coal energy) is a critical piece of the American energy portfolio. This strategic energy forum will focus on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The third of a series of planned DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders, federal

371

The Strip: Las Vegas and the Symbolic Destruction of Spectacle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was emblematic of the atomic age Las Vegas participatedwas a monument to the Atomic Age and the fervor of Sputniktheme to the Strip: space age. Atomic imagery had become an

Al, Stefan Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Surface Mounted Under Counter Dimmable LED Strip-STR8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The product under assessment is an advanced lighting technologya controllable, surface mounted under-counter light emitting diode (LED) strip lighting system that is designed to provide various levels of direct and indirect white light.

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

Gas recombination assembly for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An assembly for recombining gases generated in electrochemical cells wherein a catalyst strip is enveloped within a hydrophobic, gas-porous film which, in turn, is encased between gas-porous, metallic layers. The sandwich construction of metallic layers and film is formed into a spiral with a tab for connection to the cell.

Levy, Isaac (New Fairfield, CT); Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worldwide, multiple countries are investing a great deal of time and energy towards developing a new class of technologically advanced nuclear reactors. These new reactors have come to be known as the Generation IV (Gen IV) class of nuclear reactors. Similarly to the other designs, the Gas Fast Reactor (GFR) has many advantages, such as electricity production at high efficiency, hydrogen production, minor actinide burning capabilities, etc. However, there are currently no immediate plans to build a GFR due to uncertainties regarding safety issues. The study conducted herein contains input techniques for the development of new neutronic and thermal hydraulic input decks for the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE) GFR design. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) and MELCOR codes are used to model neutronic and thermal hydraulic characteristics, respectively. These codes are used with the intention of gaining further insight into GFR design and steady state operating characteristics of the US DOE GFR. Descriptions of inputs for all input decks, along with the results of the execution of both input decks can be found in this thesis. Although many alterations are made to original design specifications, results found in this thesis support the design modifications that have been made. Results suggest that steady-state operation of the GFR is a plausible possibility, given the right conditions. The lack of design criteria for both the reflector and borated shield regions imposes a necessity of invention upon all those who seek to clarify design criteria for the US DOE GFR. Furthermore, resulting temperature profiles for the fuel, cladding and coolant give rise to the possibility of the design of a system, based on thermionic principles, that converts core thermal energy directly to electricity. Such a system is envisioned to provide electricity to a decay heat removal system and possibly increase plant efficiency.

Dercher, Andrew Steven

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development of a Multiscale Ionized Gas (MIG) Flow Code for Plasma Applications Subrata Roy Datta V. Gaitonde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics, electromagnetics, chemical kinetics and molecular physics amongst others. A finite element basedDevelopment of a Multiscale Ionized Gas (MIG) Flow Code for Plasma Applications Subrata Roy Datta V applications including space propulsion thrusters and high-speed air vehicles. These are of considerable

Roy, Subrata

378

A pilot-scale Process Development Unit for transport and fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has designed and is currently constructing an on-site, hot gas desulfurization (HGD) Process Development Unit (PDU). The PDU is designed to use regenerable solid metal oxide sorbents that absorb hydrogen sulfide from high-temperature, high-pressure simulated coal-gasification fuel gas that is generated by a METC designed syngas generator. The simulated coal gas is a mixture of partially combusted natural gas, water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. PDU process conditions will be representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling. The PDU supports the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) mission at METC by providing a test bed for development of IGCC cleanup systems that offer low capital cost, operating costs, and costs of electricity. METC intends to develop additional industrial involvement opportunities as the project progresses towards operations. The primary objectives of the PDU are to (1) fill the gap between small-scale testing and large-scale demonstration projects by providing a cost effective test site for transport and fluid-bed desulfurization reactor and sorbent development, (2) demonstrate sorbent suitability over a wide range of parameters, and (3) generate significant information on process control for transport and fluidized bed based desulfurization. PDU data is expected to be used to optimize process performance by expanding the experience for larger scale demonstration projects such as Sierra Pacific Power Company`s Clean Coal Technology project.

McMillian, M.H.; Bissett, L.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update covers the first year of a three-year-long EPRI research project entitled Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production. The report provides a project overview and explains the preliminary results yielded from the first year of on-farm research.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Evaluating the Potential to Develop New Greenhouse Gas Emission Offsets on Electricity Transmission System Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a final deliverable for a research project conceived and supported by EPRI. This project explored the potential technical feasibility of developing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets by implementing enhanced Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) to enhance management of biomass vegetation growing on high-voltage electricity ...

2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Reducing Office Plug Loads through Simple and Inexpensive Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the process (and results) of applying Advanced Power Strips with various control approaches.

Metzger, I.; Sheppy, M.; Cutler, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Design And Evaluation Of A Portable Electronic Flight Progress Strip System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been growing interest in using electronic alternatives to the paper Flight Progress Strip

Doble, Nathan

383

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and formulated aiming to reveal the interplay of the viscous, interfacial and gravity forces and to predict the gravity drainage performance. Scaling criteria for the scaled physical model design have been proposed based on an inspectional analysis. In Section II, equation of state (EOS) calculations were extended to study the effect of different tuning parameters on MMP for two reservoir crude oils of Rainbow Keg River and Terra Nova. This study indicates that tuning of EOS may not always be advisable for miscibility determination. Comparison of IFT measurements for benzene in water, ethanol mixtures with the solubility data from the literature showed that a strong mutual relationship between these two thermodynamic properties exists. These preliminary experiments indicate applicability of the new vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique to determine miscibility of ternary liquid systems. The VIT experimental apparatus is under construction with considerations of expanded capacity of using equilibrated fluids and a new provision for low IFT measurement in gas-oil systems. In Section III, recommendations in the previous progress reports have been investigated in this reporting period. WAG coreflood experiments suggest the use of ''Hybrid''-WAG type floods for improved CO{sub 2} utilization factors and recoveries. The effect of saturating the injection water with CO{sub 2} for core-floods has been investigated further in this quarter. Miscible WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine showed higher recoveries (89.2% ROIP) compared to miscible WAG floods using normal brine (72.5%). Higher tertiary recovery factors (TRF) were also observed for WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine due to improved mobility ratio and availability of CO{sub 2}. Continued experimentation for evaluation of both, ''Hybrid''-WAG and gravity stable type displacements, in Berea sandstone cores using synthetic as well as real reservoir fluids are planned for the next quarter.

Dandina N. Rao

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and formulated aiming to reveal the interplay of the viscous, interfacial and gravity forces and to predict the gravity drainage performance. Scaling criteria for the scaled physical model design have been proposed based on an inspectional analysis. In Section II, equation of state (EOS) calculations were extended to study the effect of different tuning parameters on MMP for two reservoir crude oils of Rainbow Keg River and Terra Nova. This study indicates that tuning of EOS may not always be advisable for miscibility determination. Comparison of IFT measurements for benzene in water, ethanol mixtures with the solubility data from the literature showed that a strong mutual relationship between these two thermodynamic properties exists. These preliminary experiments indicate applicability of the new vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique to determine miscibility of ternary liquid systems. The VIT experimental apparatus is under construction with considerations of expanded capacity of using equilibrated fluids and a new provision for low IFT measurement in gas-oil systems. In Section III, recommendations in the previous progress reports have been investigated in this reporting period. WAG coreflood experiments suggest the use of ''Hybrid''-WAG type floods for improved CO{sub 2} utilization factors and recoveries. The effect of saturating the injection water with CO{sub 2} for core-floods has been investigated further in this quarter. Miscible WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine showed higher recoveries (89.2% ROIP) compared to miscible WAG floods using normal brine (72.5%). Higher tertiary recovery factors (TRF) were also observed for WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine due to improved mobility ratio and availability of CO{sub 2}. Continued experimentation for evaluation of both, ''Hybrid''-WAG and gravity stable type displacements, in Berea sandstone cores using synthetic as well as real reservoir fluids are planned for the next quarter.

Dandina N. Rao

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Development of a Physics of Failure Model and Quantitative Assessment of the Fire Fatality Risk of Compressed Natural Gas Bus Cylinders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Title of Dissertation: DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSICS OF FAILURE MODEL AND QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE FIRE FATALITY RISKS OF COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS BUS CYLINDERS The… (more)

Chamberlain, Samuel Seamore

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

Netter, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of an advanced gas-fired mineral wool melter. Final report, October 1987-December 1990  

SciTech Connect

A gas-fired mineral wool melter was successfully designed and tested. The test results clearly show that the gas-fired melter offers significant advantages over the current state-of-the-art system, the coke-fired cupola. The primary benefits offered are: lower energy costs, fewer airborne pollutant emissions, virtual elimination of solid waste generation and superior control and quality of the resultant melt stream. Specifically, the unit eliminates the emission of carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and hydrocarbons. Emissions of SOx and particulate are substantially reduced as well. The generation of solid wastes is eliminated through the gas-fired melters ability to utilize untreated process wastes as a feedstock.

Vereecke, F.J.; Gardner, K.M.; Thekdi, A.C.; Swift, M.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

90.1 Prototype Building Models Strip Mall | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strip Mall Strip Mall The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

391

Development of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel chemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first portion of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the chemical environment in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO fuel particle. Fission product inventory versus burnup is calculated. Based on those ...

Diecker, Jane T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large… (more)

Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s energy-related CO 2 emissions from 1996 to 1999: thefoot: In measuring carbon emissions, it’s easy to confuseChina’s greenhouse gas emissions. Science, 294, 1835– 1837.

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The development of a curb valve flow meter for gas theft detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the supply of natural gas continues to dwindle, and government decontrol of pricing progresses, the rising cost of this essential natural resource will drive more individuals to consider various forms of pilferage as a ...

Fitzgerald, Kevin Francis

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development and assessment of a soot emissions model for aircraft gas turbine engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing candidate policies designed to address the impact of aviation on the environment requires a simplified method to estimate pollutant emissions for current and future aircraft gas turbine engines under different ...

Martini, Bastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Corporate bodies and chemical bonds : an STS analysis of natural gas development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas extraction in the United States in the early 21st century has transformed social, physical, legal and biological landscapes. The technique of hydraulic fracturing, which entails the high-pressure injection into ...

Wylie, Sara Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Compilation and Presentation of Existing Data on Oil and Gas Leasing Development in a Manner Useful to the NEPA Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recognition of our nation's increasing energy needs, the George W. Bush Administration's National Energy Policy Development Group report (May 2001) suggested that one way to increase domestic on-shore production of oil and gas is to increase access to undiscovered resources on federal lands. Also recognized is the need to protect and conserve natural resources, which often are located on and around federal lands. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was designed to create and maintain conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony. NEPA requires that federal agencies prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) prior to the approval of any development activities. The NEPA scope is broad, with the process applicable to many situations from the building of highways, barge facilities and water outtake facilities, bridges, and watersheds to other less significant projects. The process often involves cooperation among multiple federal agencies, industry, scientists and consultants, and the surrounding community. The objective of the project, titled Compilation and Presentation of Existing Data on Oil and Gas Leasing and Development in a Manner Useful to the NEPA Process, is to facilitate faster and more comprehensive access to current oil and gas data by land management agencies and operators. This will enable key stakeholders in the NEPA process to make decisions that support access to federal resources while at the same time achieving a legitimate balance between environmental protection and appropriate levels of development.

Amy Childers; Dave Cornue

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

399

Power Industry Development Paths and Natural Gas Market Risks: Cycles of Markets, Drilling, and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current natural gas market is depressed by a combination of unusual factorsa great excess of supply and weak demand. Excess supply comes from the momentum of exploration and production (EP) to the new U.S. gas shale plays, a phenomenon barely 18 months old and a game-changing event in the industry. Weak demand comes from the "Great Recession." The seeds for correcting this imbalance would appear to be a dramatic cutback in drilling, which has collapsed over the past year and which is a principal focu...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Market Conditions: EPRI Gas Turbine Exper ience and Intelligence Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine (CT) plant owners, operators, and project developers. The "EPRI Gas Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report" (GTE&IR) provides concise, well-organized, up-to-date technical, strategic, and business information for combustion turbine (CT) power producers. This technical report assembles all of the content from the most recent three years of GTE&IR (seven editions) into a single docu...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing gas stripping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Key Institutional Design Considerations and Resources Required to Develop a Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United Sta tes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets have emerged as a critical element of evolving U.S. climate policy and a critical factor in determining the future price of CO2 emissions and the economic costs of proposed policies. This report evaluates the governmental institutional requirements and resources needed to develop a large-scale national domestic GHG emissions offset program. It also describes potential institutional barriers that might limit the ability of the evolving carbon market to generate signi...

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

Developing and Implementing a Company-Wide Waste Accounting System at Public Service Electric & Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste accounting systems will enable utilities to track their recycling, reuse, and prevention efforts. This manual describes the implementation of EPRI's waste accounting method in support of Public Service Electric & Gas Company's pollution prevention efforts. This method provided a means for organizing information from many facilities, transmitting regular performance reports to facility personnel and management, and identifying opportunities for improving pollution prevention performance.

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, CA Landfill Gas-Recovery Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

405

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

406

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

407

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

408

Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

Liebowitz, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development and optimization of porous carbon papers suitable for gas diffusion electrodes. Final report, December 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report details results from the program to optimize porous carbon gas diffusion electrodes for use in fuel cells. Efforts focused on isolating discrete paper properties through a custom-made matrix, then fuel cell testing each variant to correlate properties to performance. Resulting reduced cost material was manufactured on production equipment and made available to DOE industry partners. The resulting product is suitable for continuous production, which will be evaluated in future work.

Fleming, Gerald J.; Fleming, Patrick J.

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development and Validation of Catalytic Combustion for Gas Turbines, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbines (CTs) have become the preferred customer choice for new power generation capacity. However, some challenges have arisen. While exhaust emissions from natural gas-fueled and distillate-fueled CTs are lower than most other power generation options, continued environmental pressure has led to permitted emission limits below what is commonly achievable -- even with advanced dry low-NOx (DLN) combustors. An advanced combustion approach, catalytic combustion, offers the potential to achieve...

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

act faster: a new sustainable energy path for AfricanCleveland, C. (2003). Energy and sustainable development atSustainable development of hydropower and biomass energy in

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of an advanced water-gas shift conversion system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed initial exploratory research to investigate the chemistry and use of a pressurized aqueous catalyst system for conducting the water-gas shift reaction. The research was done under sponsorship of the USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. A 1.0 liter continuous bench scale reactor system was built and operated to investigate water-gas shift chemistry at high pressure. Details regarding the chemistry of the aqueous, base-catalyzed system in both batch and continuous reactors are presented for a temperature range of 200 to 350/sup 0/C and pressures from 500 to 3000 psig. The catalyst choice is sodium carbonate at a concentration of 6% in water, but any material which can generate hydroxide ions at the process conditions will effectively catalyze the reaction. This report summarizes the results of the bench-scale research on the concept and presents a discussion of optimum operating conditions, pressure effects and limitations, kinetic data, effects of gas flow rates, catalyst type, and preliminary concept evaluation. 16 refs., 29 figs., 8 tabs.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Butner, R.S.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems  

SciTech Connect

CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

Not Available

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst, the kinetics for this catalyst, reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed reactors, and simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene. The goals for the quarter include: (1) Conduct experiments using a trickle bed reactor to determine the effect of reactor type on the product distribution. (2) Use spherical pellets of silica as a support for zirconia for the purpose of increasing surface, area and performance of the catalysts. (3) Conduct exploratory experiments to determine the effect of super critical drying of the catalyst on the catalyst surface area and performance. (4) Prepare a ceria/zirconia catalyst by the precipitation method.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Final report, May 1, 1990--May 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARCTECH has developed a novel process (MicGAS) for direct, anaerobic biomethanation of coals. Biomethanation potential of coals of different ranks (Anthracite, bitumious, sub-bitumious, and lignites of different types), by various microbial consortia, was investigated. Studies on biogasification of Texas Lignite (TxL) were conducted with a proprietary microbial consortium, Mic-1, isolated from hind guts of soil eating termites (Zootermopsis and Nasutitermes sp.) and further improved at ARCTECH. Various microbial populations of the Mic-1 consortium carry out the multi-step MicGAS Process. First, the primary coal degraders, or hydrolytic microbes, degrade the coal to high molecular weight (MW) compounds. Then acedogens ferment the high MW compounds to low MW volatile fatty acids. The volatile fatty acids are converted to acetate by acetogens, and the methanogens complete the biomethanation by converting acetate and CO{sub 2} to methane.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program]. Quarterly technical progress narrative No. 21, December 1, 1987--February 29, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm{sup 2}; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420