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1

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This Page Intentionally Left Blank EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document describes the process used to derive a set of risk-based ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for many of the soil contaminants that are frequently of ecological concern for plants and animals at hazardous waste sites and provides guidance for their use. The Eco-SSL derivation process represents the group effort of a multi-stakeholder workgroup consisting of federal, state, consulting, industry, and academic participants led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). The

2

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Developing Eco-SSLs Attachment 1-4 November 2003 2 - 1 2.0 DATA REQUIREMENTS AND RETRIEVAL When compiling information from a variety of data sets, it is important to...

3

Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD): To create guidelines for ecologic site and infrastructure design that are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD): GOALS · To create guidelines for ecologic site plan. #12;Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD): PROCESS · ANALYSIS of Landscape Units, Mapping and Site Principles For Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD) 1. COMPLETE WASTE AND WATER CYCLES 2. INTEGRATED

Ishii, Hiroshi

4

Selecting indicators of soil, microbial, and plant conditions to understand ecological changes in Georgia pine forests  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing how resource use and management activities affect ecological conditions is necessary to document and understand anthropogenic changes in ecological systems. Resource managers on military installations have the delicate task of balancing the training needs of soldiers effectively with the need to maintain a high quality of ecological conditions. This study considers ways that ecological indicators can provide information on impacts that training has on environmental characteristics that occur at different scales and in different sectors of the environment. The characteristics examined include soil chemistry, soil microbes, and vegetation. A discriminant function analysis was conducted to determine whether ecological indicators could differentiate among different levels of military use. A combination of 10 indicators explained 90% of the variation among plots from five different military use levels. Results indicated that an appropriate suite of ecological indicators for military resource managers includes soil, microbial, and vegetation characteristics. Since many of these indicators are related, managers at this location potentially have freedom to choose indicators that are relatively easy to measure, without sacrificing information.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Sobek, Edward A [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Soil Environment Mediates Its Ecological Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Allelopathic functions of plant-released chemicals are often studied through growth bioassays assuming that these chemicals will directly impact plant growth. This overlooks the role of soil factors in mediating allelopathic activities of chemicals, particularly non-volatiles. Here we examined the allelopathic potential of 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ), a chemical reported to be exuded from the roots of Centaurea diffusa. Methodology/Principal Findings: Growth bioassays and HQ recovery experiments were performed in HQ-treated soils (non-sterile, sterile, organic matter-enriched and glucose-amended) and untreated control soil. Root growth of either Brassica campestris or Phalaris minor was not affected in HQ-treated non-sterile soil. Soil modifications (organic matter and glucose amendments) could not enhance the recovery of HQ in soil, which further supports the observation that HQ is not likely to be an allelopathic compound. Hydroxyquinoline-treated soil had lower values for the CO2 release compared to untreated non-sterile soil. Soil sterilization significantly influenced the organic matter content, PO 4-P and total organic nitrogen levels. Conclusion/Significance: Here, we concluded that evaluation of the effect of a chemical on plant growth is not enough in evaluating the ecological role of a chemical in plant-plant interactions. Interaction of the chemical with soil factors largely

Devika Bajpai; M. S. Rajeswari

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

Reeve, Jennifer [Washington State University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne [Washington State University; Kang, S. [University of Oklahoma; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Reganold, John P. [Washington State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Ecological effects of oil shale development: problems, perspectives, and approaches  

SciTech Connect

Although current oil shale developments in the Piceance Basin appear to have had little impact on ecosystems, it is important to recognize that planned expansion of the industry in the Basin will greatly magnify the potential for serious perturbations of the Piceance environs. The relatively small scale of the present oil shale activities in the Basin provides the biologist with a unique opportunity to establish and conduct quantitative studies designed to measure impacts as they occur. This paper is intended to focus attention on some of the problems, perspectives and recommended approaches to conducting ecosystem effects studies that will provide criteria for evaluation and mitigation of impacts should they occur. The purpose of this paper is not to criticize past and current environmental studies on oil shale, but in light of anticipated growth of the industry, to focus attention on the need to carefully define, design and execute ecological effects studies to quantify and provide mitigation criteria for impacts that will undoubtedly result from accelerated industry activities.

Hakonson, T.E.; White. G.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Departments - Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

departments > ecology departments > ecology Ecology Department Core Capabilities Advanced Technology Bioenergy Biofuels Human Health Soil Systems Water Resources People Facilities, Centers & Labs Publications Ecology Department Principal Investigators Gary Andersen Harry Beller Nicholas Bouskill Eoin Brodie Romy Chakraborty Eric Dubinsky Hoi-Ying Holman Christer Jansson Janet Jansson Nigel Quinn Tamas Torok Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Historical Background ecology comic In 1995 the Center for Environmental Biotechnology was set up as a multidivisonal center under the direction of Dr. Jennie Hunter-Cevera. In 1998, the Ecology Department was created within the Earth Sciences

9

Wireless sensor networks for soil science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks can revolutionise soil ecology by providing measurements at temporal and spatial granularities previously impossible. This paper presents our first steps towards fulfilling that goal by developing and deploying two experimental ... Keywords: WSNs, environmental monitoring, soil moisture, soil monitoring, soil science, soil temperature, urban forests, web services, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Andreas Terzis; Razvan Musaloiu-E.; Joshua Cogan; Katalin Szlavecz; Alexander Szalay; Jim Gray; Stuart Ozer; Chieh-Jan Mike Liang; Jayant Gupchup; Randal Burns

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Geothermal handbook. Geothermal project, 1976. [Ecological effects of geothermal resources development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal program of Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior, aims to develop ecologically sound practices for the exploration, development, and management of geothermal resources and the identification of the biological consequences of such development so as to minimize adverse effects on fish and wildlife resources. This handbook provides information about the ecological effects of geothermal resource development. Chapters are included on US geothermal resources; geothermal land leasing; procedures for assessing the effects on fish and game; environmental impact of exploratory and field development operations; and wildlife habitat improvement methods for geothermal development.

Not Available

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development and validation of a citrate synthase directed quantitative PCR marker for soil bacterial communities  

SciTech Connect

Molecular innovations in microbial ecology are allowing scientists to correlate microbial community characteristics to a variety of ecosystem functions. However, to date the majority of soil microbial ecology studies target phylogenetic rRNA markers, while a smaller number target functional markers linked to soil processes. We validated a new primer set targeting citrate synthase (gtlA), a central enzyme in the citric acid cycle linked to aerobic respiration. Primers for a 225 bp fragment suitable for qPCR were tested for specificity and assay performance verified on multiple soils. Clone libraries of the PCR-amplified gtlA gene exhibited high diversity and recovered most major groups identified in a previous 16S rRNA gene study. Comparisons among bacterial communities based on gtlA sequencing using UniFrac revealed differences among the experimental soils studied. Conditions for gtlA qPCR were optimized and calibration curves were highly linear (R2 > 0.99) over six orders of magnitude (4.56 10^5 to 4.56 10^11 copies), with high amplification efficiencies (>1.7). We examined the performance of the gtlA qPCR across a variety of soils and ecosystems, spanning forests, old fields and agricultural areas. We were able to amplify gtlA genes in all tested soils, and detected differences in gtlA abundance within and among environments. These results indicate that a fully developed gtlA-targeted qPCR approach may have potential to link microbial community characteristics with changes in soil respiration.

Castro Gonzalez, Hector F [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Austin, Emily E [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crawford, Kerri M [Rice University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Waste and Environmental Protection Emergency Response December 2002 Agency OSWER 9355.4-24 Superfund SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR SUPERFUND...

14

Soil Thermal and Ecological Impacts of Rain on Snow Events in the Circumpolar Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain on snow (ROS) events are rare in most parts of the circumpolar Arctic, but have been shown to have great impact on soil surface temperatures and serve as triggers for avalanches in the midlatitudes, and they have been implicated in ...

Kevin J. Rennert; Gerard Roe; Jaakko Putkonen; Cecilia M. Bitz

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable RAPIDLY RENEWABLE MATERIALS: WOOL AND CORK Done by: Bin Ou-Yang David Tan Ritesh Bhan #12;i ABSTRACT This report presents an investigation into the feasibility of using two rapidly renewable materials, cork

16

Developing an integrated ecological resource management and monitoring plan as part of an environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in defining the appropriate content of an Environmental Management System (EMS) as specified by ISO 14001 prompted a study to determine how ecological concerns should be integrated into an EMS and subsequently implemented. This paper describes an approach for developing objectives, targets, and processes for ecological resource management at those Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where an ecological resource management approach that goes beyond simple regulatory compliance is warranted. A major goal of this approach is to position DOE facilities so that they can proactively address ecological concerns, rather than being forced to respond retroactively to damage claims, restoration requirements, and/or bad publicity. Although DOE is not requiring ISO 14001 implementation at its facilities, it is recommending ISO 14001 as a voluntary approach to encourage good environmental practices, such as pollution prevention and sustainable development, by adopting an integrated systems approach. The DOE position is that existing DOE orders and policy statements are consistent with, and have elements of, the ISO 14001 EMS approach.

Michael, D.; Hooten, M. [Neptune and Co., Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Roy-Harrison, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration and soil organic carbon (SOC) accretion was evaluated using the respiratory quotient (qCO2) and the ratio of the SMB to SOC (SMBC:SOC ratio). Newly leveled, 1-, 3-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 23-year-old reclaimed mixed overburden as well as an unmined soil were sampled bimonthly to measure SMIBC and other parameters. Three methods [chloroform fumigation incubation (FI), chloroform fumigation extraction (FE), and substrate-induced respiration (SIR)] were used to measure SMB and compared as estimators of SMB in reclaimed mine soils. Basal respiration (CO2 evolved from untreated soil), metabolic quotient (i.e. specific respiratory activity; qCO2; C02 produced per unit mass of SMB), and the SMBC:SOC ratio (the abundance of SMB relative to SOC) were used to determine trends in microbial biomass dynamics relative to SOC accumulation. A nearly linear increase in SMB was observed over the chronosequence of mine soils (r--O.98 to 0.99) for each of the three biomass methods. Mean values of SMB from 12 sample dates ranged from 41 pg SMIBC g-1 at the 0-year site to 291 ptg SMBC g-' at the 23-year site. The unmined reference soil averaged 84 jig SMBC g-1 through the period of the study. The qCO2 declined from 0.24 to 0. 12 Mg C02-C Mg SMBC d-' during the first year and tended to stabilize near 0.06 to 0.09 as reclaimed sites matured. The ratios of SMBC:SOC increased linearly with age of site through 23 years (r--O. 97). A substantial amount of seasonal variation in SMB was observed during the two-year study. Older sites (15-and 23-years) showed significant fluctuations of SMB that correlated well with the growing season of Coastal bermudagrass. Microbial biomass peaked during mid to late summer and declined to a minimum during the cold, wet winter months. Younger sites were less affected by seasonal influences, and changes at these sites appeared more related to changes in soil moisture.

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analysis of ecological effects of geopressured-geothermal resource development. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities involved in geopressured-geothermal resource production are identified and their ecological impacts are discussed. The analysis separates those activites that are unique to geopressured-geothermal development from those that also occur in oil and gas and other resource developments. Of the unique activities, those with the greatest potential for serious ecological effect are: (1) accidental brine discharge as a result of a blowout during well drilling; (2) subsidence; (3) fault activation and enhanced seismicity; and (4) subsurface contamination of water, hydrocarbon, and mineral reservoirs. Available methods to predict and control these effects are discussed.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of a China Dataset of Soil Hydraulic Parameters Using Pedotransfer Functions for Land Surface Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a dataset of the soil hydraulic parameters associated with two empirical soil functions (i.e., a water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity) using multiple pedotransfer functions (PTFs). The dataset ...

Yongjiu Dai; Wei Shangguan; Qingyun Duan; Baoyuan Liu; Suhua Fu; Guoyue Niu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Exploratory research and development project for soil sampling probe investigation  

SciTech Connect

The report investigates a number of design concepts for a soil sampling probe. The design concepts are shown as a series of figures drawn to scale. The probe would be attached to the lower end of a 2-inch diameter drill casing that is inserted into the ground with a steady downward force. It is intended to be used at soil depths of 0-50 feet. Small soil samples will be gathered through the use of a pneumatic jet or a remotely operated mechanical finger. The soil sample will then be transported pneumatically from the tip of the probe to the surface via a sample line in the center of the drill casing. This is achieved by entraining the soil samples in a stream of clean dry nitrogen. At the surface, the soil sample will be filtered from the carrier gas. The report also considers designs that use a carrier capsule. The soil would be remotely placed in a transport capsule at the tip of the probe and pneumatic pressure would be used to force the capsule up the sample line to the surface for retrieval. The soil sampling is to be done without removing the drill casing or using any of the typical coring tools. The sampling system is specifically aimed at soil that may be contaminated with radioactive or toxic materials. The system is suitable for remote operation with a minimum impact and generation of waste. The concepts may also be useful for remote sampling for other applications. 8 figs.

Thurston, G.C.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C . K W O N * Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory,...

23

Recent developments in the techniques of controlling and measuring suction in unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difficulty of measuring and controlling suction in unsaturated soils is one of the reasons why the development of the mechanics of unsaturated soils has not been as advanced as that of saturated soils. However, significant developments have been carried out in the last decade in this regard. In this paper, a re-view of some developments carried out in the techniques of controlling suction by using the axis translation, the osmotic method and the vapour control technique is presented. The paper also deals with some recent de-velopments in the direct measurement of suction by using high capacity tensiometers and in the measurement of high suction by using high range psychrometers. The recent progresses made in these techniques have been significant and will certainly help further experimental investigation of the hydromechanical behaviour of un-saturated soils.

Delage, Pierre; Tarantino, Alessandro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of the Soil Moisture Index to Quantify Agricultural Drought and Its User Friendliness in Severity-Area-Duration Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the role of soil moisture in quantifying drought through the development of a drought index using observed and modeled soil moisture. In Nebraska, rainfall is received primarily during the crop-growing season and the supply of ...

Venkataramana Sridhar; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Jinsheng You; Eric D. Hunt

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Research and ecology semiannual progress report, January--June 1972. Chemistry research and development  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: chemistry research and development, chemistry instrumentation, process chemistry, chemical technology, and environmental research. (DHM)

Thompson, M.A.

1973-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, temperatures measured at a depth of 2-meters is an efficient method for mapping thermal anomalies at a high level of detail. This is useful for augmenting deeper

27

CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pore pressure development in small-strain undrained loading of soils according to a simple model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note discusses a simple equation that may be useful in the study of pore pressures generated in the undrained loading of soils. The equation is employed to describe the pore pressure development accompanying a small stress increment in the undrained triaxial compression test and in the undrained simple shear test. The cases of incompressible and compressible pore fluids are examined.

Jos Jorge Nader

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

30

Sampling Soil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

31

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Designing for ecology : the ecological park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

Power, Andres M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.  

SciTech Connect

Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Corrosion Rate, Effect of Soil Properties: Development of a Sensor System to Calculate Corrosion Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses corrosion of substation ground grids and the development of a corrosion sensor system and supporting algorithms that can be used in the field to quickly estimate the corrosion rate of a metal in soils of low resistivity.The system is based on the linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique, an electrochemical method of calculating corrosion rates by measuring the relationship between electrochemical potential and the electric current between electrodes. ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development and Testing of a Frozen Soil Parameterization for Cold Region Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper simulation of soil freezing and thawing processes is an important issue in cold region climate studies. This paper reports on a frozen soil parameterization scheme for cold region studies that includes water flow and heat transfer in soil ...

Xia Zhang; Shu Fen Sun; Yongkang Xue

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports applied research and technology development (AR&TD) for remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The program centers on delivering advanced scientific approaches and technologies from highly-leveraged, strategic investments that maximize impact to reduce risk and life-cycle cleanup costs. The current groundwater and soil remediation program consists of four applied programmatic areas: Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies Applied Field Research Initiative Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management. This paper provides an overview of the applied programmatic areas, fiscal year 11 accomplishments, and their near-term technical direction.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Aylward, R. S.; Cercy, Mike; Seitz, Roger; Ramirez, Rosa; Skubal, Karen L.; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

39

Numerical Simulations of the Effect of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Cover on the Development of Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional (column) version of a primitive equations model has been used to study the impact of soil moisture and vegetation cover on the development of deep cumulus convection in the absence of dynamical forcing. The model includes ...

Craig A. Clark; Paymond W. Arritt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sensible Heat Observations Reveal Soil-Water Evaporation Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil-water evaporation is important at scales ranging from microbial ecology to large-scale climate. Yet routine measurements are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in soil-water evaporation. ...

J. L. Heitman; R. Horton; T. J. Sauer; T. M. DeSutter

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Linking nitrogen biogeochemistry to different stages of wetland soil development in the Mississippi River delta, Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Extensive wetland loss and nutrient-enhanced eutrophication occur across the Mississippi River delta and include newly emergent landscapes, in the early stages of ecological succession, and (more)

Henry, Kelly Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (otherwise called the "Tri-Party Agreement", or "TPA") contains various enforceable milestones that apply to tank waste management activities. DOE is also required to comply with applicable requirements of

43

Development of practical site-specific management methods for reclaiming salt-affected soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustaining irrigated agricultural production systems in semi-arid and arid regions requires consideration of with saline and sodic soil conditions. The spatial variability of these conditions makes soil reclamation an ideal practice in which to apply ... Keywords: DPPC, ECa, ECe, EM38, EMI, ESP, Electrical conductivity, Electromagnetic induction, GIS, SAR, SSM, Saline-sodic soils, Salinity, Soil reclamation

Randy D. Horney; Brock Taylor; Daniel S. Munk; Bruce A. Roberts; Scott M. Lesch; Richard E. Plant

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

densities, lower exchangeable Al and higher Ca contents in the sub- soil after application of phosphogypsum

Parrott, Wayne

45

The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports technology development and technical assistance for the remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The core of the program is centered on delivering proactive, responsive expertise and technologies with highly-leveraged, carefully selected investments that maximize impact on life-cycle cleanup costs and risks across the DOE complex. The program currently focuses on four main priorities: improved sampling and characterization strategies, advanced predictive capabilities, enhanced remediation methods, and improved long-term performance evaluation and monitoring. In FY 2010, the program developed a detailed research and development (R&D) plan in support of a larger initiative to integrate R&D efforts across EM. This paper provides an overview of the high priority action areas and the program s near-term technical direction.

Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lake Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Ecology Lake Ecology Name: Jody Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have a partically natural/ partially man-dug lake in our back yard. It is approximately 3 acres in size. The fish in this tiny like are plentiful and HUGE :) Bass up to 20" s (so far) and blue gill up to 10"s (so far). My question is this... we appear to have a heavy goose population and I was wondering if they are the cause of the green slimmy stuff that is all over the top of the water as well as the lighter green slime on the plants growing under the water? Are the fish being harmed by waste from the geese and if so, what can I put in the water to ensure their health? Additionally, I noticed hundreds of frogs during the mating period yet I've yet to see even one tad pole and I am at the lake atleast 5 out of the 7 days in a week. Is there a reason for this. The frogs are two toned.. light green with patches of darker shades of green on the head and body. I've never seen frogs like these before but then again, I've never lived in wet lands prior. The frogs are also very agressive... tend to attack fishing line and even leap up to 4' in the air to attack a fishing rod. Thank heavens they don't have teeth! . We do not keep the fish we catch, we always release.

47

Valuation of ecological resources  

SciTech Connect

Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Industrial Ecology offers an introduction to the topic commences with an exploration of the prerequisites for achieving sustainable development,...

49

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... ROI is a not-for-profit entity dedicated to promoting industrial ecology, particularly in developing countries. This website contains a collection of...

50

Thermography for Estimating Near-Surface Soil Moisture under Developing Crop Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous investigations of thermal infrared techniques using remote sensors (thermography) for estimating soil water content have been limited primarily to bare soil. Ground-based and aircraft investigations were conducted to evaluate the ...

J. L. Heilman; D. G. Moore

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However, these important grazers have been hunted to ecological extinction in some places for their eggs, meat, and skin. The conservation initiative for the survival of sea turtles requires the protection of their primary habitats in conjunction with a decrease in their interaction with humans. One way these objectives can be met is through the creation of species distribution maps (SDMs). For this thesis, a SDM was created from a generalized additive model used to identify major feeding areas for East Pacific green turtles residing in the Galapagos Islands. The input for the model was green turtle sighting locations during a June 2010 marine life observation survey and remotely sensed values of four oceanographic parameters obtained from satellite sensors (Bathymetry, Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll a, and Current Speed). Line transects of intertidal and subtidal shoreline regions of the islands of Isabela, San Cristobal, and Floreana were also completed, to describe similarities and differences in macroalgal abundance between the locations. A generalized additive model (GAM) explained 56% of the data's null deviance and had a true positive rate of 0.83. The corresponding species distribution map indicated that East Pacific green sea turtles prefer to forage in warm, low chlorophyll a, slow moving waters at depths mostly less than 250m throughout the archipelago. ANOVA analyses showed that macroalgal abundance was statistically different (p-value < 0.01) between the islands of San Cristobal and Isabela. The line transects analysis also documented that red algae was the most prominent phyla at the sites and that the macroalgal abundance did not vary much between months June 2010 and April/May 2011. With these results, potential foraging areas for East Pacific green turtles can be identified and protected. Future studies will be focused on the collection of macroalgae from coastal areas outlined in the SDM and the interactions between green turtles and their competitors and/or predators. This information can be used to validate the areas delineated by the model and to further the understanding of the spatial-temporal effects on macroalgal abundance.

Duncan, Roxanne

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

Payne, Suzette

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Biotransformation of PCBs in Substation Soils: A Review of Laboratory and Pilot-Scale Testing for the Development of an In Situ Proc ess for PCB Biotransformation in Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ methods are desirable for remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), to prevent disruption of activities at industrial sites such as substations. This study follows the development, from laboratory testing through pilot-scale demonstration, of an in situ soil irrigation process for biotransformation of PCBs in soils.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Development of Design Guidelines for Soil Embedded Post Systems Using Wide-flange I-beam to Contain Truck Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anti ram perimeter barriers are part of the protection of important facilities such as power plants, air ports and embassies against unrestricted vehicle access. Many different systems can be used to achieve the containment goal. One of these systems makes use of soil embedded posts either single posts if the soil is hard enough or groups of soil embedded posts tied together by beams if the soil is not hard enough for a single post to stop the in-coming truck. The design of these soil embedded posts needs to take account a number of influencing factors which include the soil strength and stiffness, the post strength and stiffness, the mass of the vehicle and its approach velocity. This dissertation describes the work done to develop a set of design recommendations to select the embedment of a single post or group of posts. The post is a steel beam with an H shape cross section: W14X109 for the single post system and W14X90 for the group system with a double beam made of square hollow steel section HSS8X8X1/2. The spacing of the posts for the group includes 2.44 m, 4.88 m, and 7.32 m. The soil strength varies from loose sand and soft clay to very dense sand and very hard clay. The vehicle has a mass of 6800 kg and the velocities include 80 km/h, 65 km/h, and 50 km/h. The design guidelines presented here are based on 10 medium scale pendulum impact tests, 2 medium scale bogie impact tests, 1 full scale impact test on a single post, 1 full scale impact test on a group of 8 side by side posts with a 5.2 m spacing and connected with two beams, approximately 150 4-D numerical simulations of full scale impact tests using LS-DYNA, as well as fundamental theoretical concepts.

Lim, Seok Gyu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of the On-Line Monitoring System for Farmland Soil Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the wireless sensor network technology, the paper designs an on-line monitoring system for farmland soil information. The system consists of two parts, namely, the wireless sensor network and the remote data managing center. Between them, the ... Keywords: soil information monitoring system, wireless sensor network, precision agriculture, MCU, APC220

Hui Yang; Lijia Xu; Songbo Chen; Chaoping Chen; Jiantao Tan; Boyi Li

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: nonmicrowave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Concept Development and Evaluation Program is being carried out for a proposed Satellite Power System (SPS). For purposes of this evaluation, a preliminary reference system has been developed. SPS, as described in the reference system, would collect solar energy on satellites in geosychronous orbit in space. The energy would be converted to microwaves and beamed to an earth-receiving antenna (rectenna). One task in the environmental part of the program is the assessment of the nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment. These effects would result from all phases of SPS development and operation. This report covers the current knowledge regarding these effects, and is based on the reference system. The assessment is summarized as to scope, methodology, impacts of terrestrial development, launch and recovery of spacecraft, space activities (including health effects of the space environment, ionizing radiation, electromagnetic exposure, spacecraft charging and environmental interactions, occupational hazards, etc.) and construction and operation of rectenna (ground receiving station).

White, M.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Mechanistic Treatment of the Dominant Soil Nitrogen Cycling Processes: Model Development, Testing, and Application  

SciTech Connect

The development and initial application of a mechanistic model (TOUGHREACT-N) designed to characterize soil nitrogen (N) cycling and losses are described. The model couples advective and diffusive nutrient transport, multiple microbial biomass dynamics, and equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. TOUGHREACT-N was calibrated and tested against field measurements to assess pathways of N loss as either gas emission or solute leachate following fertilization and irrigation in a Central Valley, California, agricultural field as functions of fertilizer application rate and depth, and irrigation water volume. Our results, relative to the period before plants emerge, show that an increase in fertilizer rate produced a nonlinear response in terms of N losses. An increase of irrigation volume produced NO{sub 2}{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching, whereas an increase in fertilization depth mainly increased leaching of all N solutes. In addition, nitrifying bacteria largely increased in mass with increasing fertilizer rate. Increases in water application caused nitrifiers and denitrifiers to decrease and increase their mass, respectively, while nitrifiers and denitrifiers reversed their spatial stratification when fertilizer was applied below 15 cm depth. Coupling aqueous advection and diffusion, and gaseous diffusion with biological processes, closely captured actual conditions and, in the system explored here, significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements.

Riley, William; Maggi, F.; Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.; Hornberger, G.M.; Venterea, R.T.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C.; Miller, N.L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Woodland development and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics and storage in a subtropical savanna ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woody plant invasion of grasslands is prevalent worldwide, but the biogeochemical consequences of this vegetation shift remain largely unquantified. In the Rio Grande Plains, TX, grasslands and savannas dominated by C4 grasses have undergone succession over the past century to subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by C3 trees/shrubs. To elucidate mechanisms of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total N (STN) storage and dynamics in this ecosystem, I measured the mass and isotopic composition (?13C, ?15N) of C and N in whole-soil and soil size/density fractions in chronosequences consisting of remnant grasslands (Time 0) and woody plant stands ranging in age from 10-130 years. Rates of SOC and STN storage averaged 10-30 g C m-2yr-1 and 1-3 g N m-2yr-1, respectively. These accumulation rates increased soil C and N pools 80-200% following woody encroachment. Soil microbial biomass (SMB-C) also increased after woody invasion. Decreasing Cmic/C org and higher qCO2 in woodlands relative to grasslands suggests that woody litter is of poorer quality than grassland litter. Greater SOC and STN following woody invasion may also be due to increased protection of organic matter by stable soil structure. Soil aggregation increased following woody encroachment; however, most of the C and N accumulated in free particulate organic matter (POM) fractions not protected within aggregates. Mean residence times (MRTs) of soil fractions were calculated based on changes in their ?13C with time after woody encroachment. Free POM had the shortest average MRTs (30 years) and silt+clay the longest (360 years). Fine POM had MRTs of about 60 years, reflecting protection by location within aggregates. ?15N values of soil fractions were positively correlated with their MRTs, suggesting that higher ?15N values reflect an increased degree of humification. Increases in SOC and STN are probably being sustained by greater inputs, slower turnover of POM (some biochemical recalcitrance), and protection of organic matter in aggregates and association with silt and clay. Grassland-to-woodland conversion during the past century has been geographically extensive in grassland ecosystems worldwide, suggesting that changes in soil C and N dynamics and storage documented here could have significance for global C and N cycles.

Liao, Julia Den-Yue

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of a Land Surface Model Including Evaporation and Adsorption Processes in the Soil for the LandAir Exchange in Arid Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional soil model has been developed to better predict heat and water exchanges in arid and semiarid regions. New schemes to calculate evaporation and adsorption in the soil were incorporated in the model. High performance of the model ...

Genki Katata; Haruyasu Nagai; Hiromasa Ueda; Nurit Agam; Pedro R. Berliner

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Presented at the Low Impact Development Roundtable Conference, Baltimore, MD, July 2001. Infiltration Through Compacted Urban Soils and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Infiltration Through Compacted Urban Soils and Effects on Biofiltration Design Robert Pitt,1 Shen-En Chen,2.................................................................................................................................................4 Soil Modifications to Enhance Infiltration...........................................6 Disturbed Urban Soil Field Infiltration Measurements

Pitt, Robert E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Terrestrial Ecology | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecology BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Terrestrial...

62

Original paper: Development of an integrated Cropland and Soil Data Management system for cropping system applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most cropping system models and decision support tools are structured for site-specific (i.e. field- or point-based) simulation and analysis. As the need grows for analyses on crop production and management at local, county, state, national, and even ... Keywords: Cropland Data Layer, Cropping system, Database management system, Geographic Information System (GIS), Map service, SSURGO, Soil data

Yubin Yang; Lloyd Ted Wilson; Jing Wang; Xiaobao Li

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial Ecology Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils Roberta M. Veluci1,2 , Deborah A. Neher1,3 and Thomas R. Weicht1,3 (1) Department of Earth, FL 32611-0760, USA (3) Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 105 Carrigan Dr

Neher, Deborah A.

64

AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS ANTHROPOLOGY CHILD DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CULTURAL STUDIES ECOLOGY ECONOMICS ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND MANAGEMENT* GEOGRAPHY HISTORY HUMAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study the production, distribution, and consumption of food, fiber, and energy in both developed and improving government policy, market performance, environmental quality, the efficiency of natural resource professional competence in a topical and a regional specialization and in Geographical Information System

Hammock, Bruce D.

65

Mediating dual ecologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we investigated systems for supporting remote collaboration using mobile robots as communication media. It is argued that the use of a remote-controlled robot as a device to support communication involves two distinct ecologies: an ecology ... Keywords: CSCW, collaborative physical task, human-robot interaction, remote instruction, robot-mediated communication

Hideaki Kuzuoka; Jun'ichi Kosaka; Keiichi Yamazaki; Yasuko Suga; Akiko Yamazaki; Paul Luff; Christian Heath

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF SOIL FERTILITY IMPROVEMENT: A BIOECONOMIC MODEL FOR SENEGAL By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural productivity growth and food security in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), especially in agroecologically fragile regions like the Sahel. At present, low-external-input farming practices are mining SSAs nutrient-poor soils, which are subjected to continuous cropping and wind and water erosion. Despite evidence that inorganic fertilizers can contribute substantially to sustainable land use and crop production (Mudahar 1986; Padwick 1983;

Bocar N. Diagana; Valerie A. Kelly; Eric W. Crawford

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

Ugoretz, S.M. [Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (United States); Rineer, K.C. [Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (United States); Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Long-Term Ecological Research community metadata standardisation project: a progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the process by which the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network standardised their metadata through the adoption of the Ecological Metadata Language (EML). We describe the strategies developed to improve motivation ... Keywords: EML, LTER Network, Long-Term Ecological Research Network, ecological metadata language, machine-mediated data synthesis, metadata management, metadata-driven data synthesis, standardisation

Inigo San Gil; Karen Baker; John Campbell; Ellen G. Denny; Kristin Vanderbilt; Brian Riordan; Rebecca Koskela; Jason Downing; Sabine Grabner; Eda Melendez; Jonathan M. Walsh; Mason Kortz; James Conners; Lynn Yarmey; Nicole Kaplan; Emery R. Boose; Linda Powell; Corinna Gries; Robin Schroeder; Todd Ackerman; Ken Ramsey; Barbara Benson; Jonathan Chipman; James Laundre; Hap Garritt; Don Henshaw; Barrie Collins; Christopher Gardner; Sven Bohm; Margaret O'Brien; Jincheng Gao; Wade Sheldon; Stephanie Lyon; Dan Bahauddin; Mark Servilla; Duane Costa; James Brunt

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Luxembourg. EUROPEAN DIGITAL ARCHIVE OF SOIL MAPS (EUDASM) METADATA OF THE SOIL MAPS OF ASIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mission of the Institute of Environment and Sustainability is to provide scientific and technical support to EU strategies for the protection of the environment and sustainable development. Employing an integrated approach to the investigation of air, water and soil contaminants, its goals are sustainable management of water resources, protection and maintenance of drinking waters, good functioning of aquatic ecosystems and good ecological quality of surface waters. LEGAL NOTICE Neither the European Commission nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission is responsible for the use, which might be made of the following information. A great deal of additional information on the European Union is available on the Internet.

Senthil-kumar Selvaradjou; Luca Montanarella; Otto Spaargaren; David Dent; Seebah Dominik; Senthil-kumar Selvaradjou; Luca Montanarella; Otto Spaargaren; David Dent; Seebah Dominik; Senthil-kumar Selvaradjou; Luca Montanarella; Otto Spaargaren; David Dent; Seebah Dominik

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microbial properties of mine spoil materials in the initial stages of soil development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early years of soil genesis during mine spoil reclamation are critical for vegetative establishment and may help predict reclamation success. Mine spoils in the Halle-Leipzig region of Germany were analyzed for microbial changes following a hay mulch-seeding treatment without topsoil or fertilizer application. Microbial biomass carbon (C{sub mic}) and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of spoils were measured each year in the first 3 yr after treatment. In the third year, bacterial community DNA fingerprints were compared with those from a reference soil. Microbial indicators were measured at three depths in the upper 10 cm of spoils at three sites with contrasting parent materials: glacial till (sandy loam), limnic tertiary sediments (high-lignite sandy clay loam), and quaternary sand and gravel (loamy sand). Before reclamation, C{sub mic} means and standard deviations of surface spoils (0-1 cm) were 9{+-}6, 39{+-}11, and 38{+-}16 mg kg{sup -1} for the loamy sand, high-lignite sandy clay loam, and sandy loam spoils, respectively. Within one year, mean C{sub mic} at the surface increased to 148{+-}70, 229{+-}64, and 497{+-}167 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively, and was significantly higher at 0 to 1 cm than at lower depths. Highest DHA and DNA yields were obtained in the 0- to 1-cm depth of the sandy loam spoils. Microbial biomass C values exhibited significant correlations with DHA, DNA yield, and extractable C for all three mine spoils. Soil microbial indices were more responsive than plant measurements to differences in parent materials.

Machulla, G.; Bruns, M.A.; Scow, K.M. [University of Halle Wittenberg, Halle Saale (Germany). Inst. for Soil Science

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Codirectors of the Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Codirectors of the Program: Daniel Howard, Ph.D., department head, Biology of Science in Conservation Ecology MAJOR: Conservation Ecology MINOR: Conservation Ecology New Mexico State University offers a new interdisciplinary, undergraduate program in Conservation Ecology. The goal

Castillo, Steven P.

74

(International meetings on ecology)  

SciTech Connect

the travelers attended the Fifth International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL) in Yokohama, Japan, and two presented invited papers and chaired symposia. One traveler also attended the OJI International Seminar in Gifu, Japan and the Fukuoka Symposium on Theoretical Ecology in Fukuoka, Japan and presented invited papers. At these scientific gatherings, a large number of symposia and specific presentations were relevant to current research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), especially in the areas of landscape dynamics, plant physiology, and aquatic ecosystems.

DeAngelis, D.L.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Turner, M.G.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}  

SciTech Connect

Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Seasonal thermal energy storage in unsaturated soils: Model development and field validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes ten years of activity carried out at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBI) in the subject of seasonal storage of thermal energy in unsaturated soils. The objectives of the work were to make a conceptual study of this type of storage, to offer guidelines for planning and evaluation of the method, to produce models and simulation for an actual field experiment, to participate in an on-line data analysis of experimental results. and to evaluate the results in terms of the validation of the concept, models and the experimental techniques. The actual field experiments were performed in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Details of engineering and field operations are not included in this report.

Doughty, C.; Nir, Aharon, Tsang, Chin-Fu

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

78

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach M. Sperow Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 M. Eve US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit Fort Collins, Colorado 80522 K. Paustian Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 Abstract Field studies across the U.S. have been used to estimate soil C stock changes that result from changes in agricultural management. Data from these studies are not easily extrapolated to reflect changes at a national scale because soils and climate vary locally and regionally. These studies are also limited to addressing existing changes in

79

Standards in Genomic Sciences (2011) 5:198-202 DOI:10.4056/sigs.1874546 Meeting Report: The 2 nd Annual Argonne Soils Workshop,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of soil ecologists, microbiologists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists to discuss the challenges and opportunities related to implementation of metagenomics approaches in soil microbial ecology. The overarching theme of the workshop was designing ecologically meaningful soil metagenomics research, which encouraged presentations on both ecological and computational topics. The workshop fostered valuable cross-discipline communication and delivered the message that soil metagenomics research must be based on an iterative process between biological inquiry and bioinformatics tools.

Sarah L. Obrien; Elizabeth M. Glass; Jennifer M. Brulc; Jack A. Gilbert; Dionysios A; Folker Meyer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Mass Transport within Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Health and Ecological Effects of Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a naturally occurring element that can be found at background levels in food, soil, and water. It is also present in coal combustion products (CCPs) and CCP leachate. While selenium is essential to human and animal life, it has the potential to cause toxicity to humans and other organisms above a certain threshold level. This report summarizes the adverse human and ecological effects that can potentially occur from overexposure to selenium and the levels at which the effects can occur, with p...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Organizing Ecologies of Complex Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many sectors like health care, financial services, or renewable energy, new products and services are generated by an ecology of business firms, nonprofit foundations, public institutions, and other agents. Knowledge to innovate is dispersed across ... Keywords: complexity, ecologies, innovation

Deborah Dougherty; Danielle D. Dunne

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ecology 2006 20, 656661  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Nuptial feeding is reflected in tissue nitrogen isotope ratios, §Stable Isotope Laboratory, Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington St, 02215 Boston, USA, and ¶Department of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany Summary 1

Lehmann, Gerlind

84

The ecology of Malware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fight against malicious software (or malware, which includes everything from worms to viruses to botnets) is often viewed as an "arms race." Conventional wisdom is that we must continually "raise the bar" for the malware creators. However, the multitude ... Keywords: botnets, malware analysis, malware ecology, viruses, worms

Jedidiah R. Crandall; Roya Ensafi; Stephanie Forrest; Joshua Ladau; Bilal Shebaro

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Sampling Soil - Energy Innovation Portal  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos.

86

Ecology 2004 18, 584591  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chamber for 4 days. Nematodes from mineral soil were extracted by a cotton-wool filter method followed of freeliving nematodes II. Life history parameters of Caenor- habditis briggsae (Nematoda) at different levels

Neher, Deborah A.

87

Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Resources and Systems Ecological Resources and Systems Argonne develops and applies innovative approaches and tools to integrate environmental compliance and environmental performance into an organization's structure in a cost-effective manner. Argonne knows that our world exists in a delicate balance with technology. Our research focuses on measuring advanced energy and technology's effects on the world's ecological systems, creating preventive strategies to protect the Earth from harm and inventing new ways to preserve green resources for all. Highlights Kayakers and boats traverse the branch of the Chicago River in the downtown area. Every river contains a population of microbes; scientists at Argonne are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to map how the River's inhabitants change over the months and years. Click to enlarge.

89

Compost Application Practices for Revegetating Disturbed Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Urban development alters the physical and chemical properties of soil which presents challenges for vegetation establishment. Compost, when applied as a soil amendment, can help (more)

Dunifon, Shea Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Scaling Characteristics of Soil Hydraulic Parameters at Varying Spatial Resolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the challenge of soil hydraulic parameter scaling in soil hydrology and related applications in general; and, in particular, the upscaling of these parameters to provide effective values at coarse scales. Soil hydraulic properties are required for many hydrological and ecological models at their representative scales. Prediction accuracy of these models is highly dependent on the quality of the model input parameters. However, measurement of parameter data at all such required scales is impractical as that would entail huge outlays of finance, time and effort. Hence, alternate methods of estimating the soil hydraulic parameters at the scales of interest are necessary. Two approaches to bridge this gap between the measurement and application scales for soil hydraulic parameters are presented in this dissertation. The first one is a stochastic approach, based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) applied within a Bayesian framework. ANNs have been used before to derive soil hydraulic parameters from other more easily measured soil properties at matching scales. Here, ANNs were applied with different training and simulation scales. This concept was further extended to work within a Bayesian framework in order to provide estimates of uncertainty in such parameter estimations. Use of ancillary information such as elevation and vegetation data, in addition to the soil physical properties, were also tested. These multiscale pedotransfer function methods were successfully tested with numerical and field studies at different locations and scales. Most upscaling efforts thus far ignore the effect of the topography on the upscaled soil hydraulic parameter values. While this flat-terrain assumption is acceptable at coarse scales of a few hundred meters, at kilometer scales and beyond, the influence of the physical features cannot be ignored. anew upscaling scheme which accounts for variations in topography within a domain was developed to upscale soil hydraulic parameters to hill-slope (kilometer) scales. The algorithm was tested on different synthetically generated topographic configurations with good results. Extending the methodology to field conditions with greater complexities also produced good results. A comparison of different recently developed scaling schemes showed that at hill-slope scales, inclusion of topographic information produced better estimates of effective soil hydraulic parameters at that scale.

Belur Jana, Raghavendra

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ecology 2003 91, 383395  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includeaeoliandepositsof Cajonsandof Holoceneage and highly eroded alluvial Randsburg-Muroc soils of Pleistocene age (Hulin determines community structure can be viewed as the superior competitor, then these observations lend support superior competitors. Net-positive effects of Ambrosia on Acamptopappus may explain the observed

Schenk, H. Jochen

94

Integrated Modeling of Microbial Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling of Microbial Ecology in Subsurface Environments Speaker: Dr. Krishna Mahadevan Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry University of Toronto Date:...

95

Science and technology for industrial ecology  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

SRS ecology: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biochemistry and engineering analysis and design, students in this program will receive training in biology with ecological, agricultural and natural resource systems management. Students receive training in engineering engineering design and analysis techniques to address a wide range of ecological, agricultural and natural

Tullos, Desiree

99

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

100

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies Alendasocial realism, games, environment, ecology 1. INTRODUCTIONversions of the environment? The answer is multifaceted.

Chang, Alenda Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

Halverson, N.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.005 Ecological Applications 11(2): 343-355 (2001) R. Conant, K. Paustian, and E. Elliot Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorada State University Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory logo Sponsor: US Environmental Protection Agency, Ruminant Livestock Efficiency Program Abstract Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component for sustaining production in grassland ecosystems is the maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM), which can be strongly influenced by management. Many management techniques intended to increase forage production may potentially increase SOM, thus sequestering atmospheric

103

Natural 15N- and 13C-abundance as indicators of forest nitrogen status and soil carbon dynamics  

SciTech Connect

This book highlights new and emerging uses of stable isotope analysis in a variety of ecological disciplines. While the use of natural abundance isotopes in ecological research is now relatively standard, new techniques and ways of interpreting patterns are developing rapidly. The second edition of this book provides a thorough, up-to-date examination of these methods of research. As part of the Ecological Methods and Concepts series which provides the latest information on experimental techniques in ecology, this book looks at a wide range of techniques that use natural abundance isotopes to: {sm_bullet} follow whole ecosystem element cycling {sm_bullet} understand processes of soil organic matter formation {sm_bullet} follow the movement of water in whole watersheds {sm_bullet} understand the effects of pollution in both terrestrial and aquatic environments {sm_bullet} study extreme systems such as hydrothermal vents {sm_bullet}follow migrating organisms In each case, the book explains the background to the methodology, looks at the underlying principles and assumptions, and outlines the potential limitations and pitfalls. Stable Isotopes in Ecology and Environmental Science is an ideal resource for both ecologists who are new to isotopic analysis, and more experienced isotope ecologists interested in innovative techniques and pioneering new uses.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Lu, Benwhea Bonnie [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of Alternate Soil Clean-Up Goals for Hanford Waste Sites Using Fate and Transport Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Remedial Action Goals (RAGs) for soil contaminant levels that are protective of groundwater have been determined for the Removal/Treatment/Disposal (RTD) sites at the 200-UW-1 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site. The RAG values were determined using a methodology involving the back-calculation of soil contaminant levels protective of groundwater (i.e., resulting groundwater concentrations are {<=} MCLs) in conjunction with the fate and transport modeling as a risk-based alternative to the currently prescribed use of background or detection limit default values. This methodology is important for waste management activities at the Hanford Site because it provides risk-based metrics and a technical basis for determining the levels of contamination 'left in place' in the Hanford Site vadose zone that are protective of human health and the environment. The methodology and the use of fate and transport modeling described here comply with federal guidelines for the use of environmental models. This approach is also consistent with one of several allowable methods identified in State guidelines for deriving soil concentrations for ground water protection. Federal and state guidelines recommend the use of site-specific information and data in risk-based assessments of risk and/or protectiveness. The site-specific characteristics of the Hanford Site, which include consideration of the semi-arid climate, an unsaturated zone thickness of over 80 m (262 feet), and associated/other site features and processes, are integral for the risk-based assessments associated with the protection of groundwater pathway. This methodology yields soil cleanup values (RAGs) for the 200-UW-1 OU waste sites selected for the removal/treatment/disposal (RTD) remedy. These proposed RAGs for uranium, nitrate, and technetium-99 are derived from soil concentrations calculated not to cause contamination of groundwater at levels that exceed the ground water MCLs, and are 40 to 200 times greater than currently prescribed default values. The proposed RAG soil concentration values derive from the results of the fate and transport modeling for a reference volume of contaminated soil extending to a depth of 15 feet, and also for a depth extending from 15 feet to 30 feet. The site-specific parameters for the 200-UW-1 OU RTD waste sites used to calculate the proposed RAG values, and the fate and transport modeling are also described. The assessment of uncertainties, assumptions, and model limitations indicate that the model is capable of adequately representing the Hanford vadose zone system and that the estimated soil cleanup levels are conservatively biased toward over-estimation of groundwater impacts. The risk-based metrics provided by this methodology can potentially greatly reduce the amount of excavation needed at the hundreds of RTD waste sites, and also have significant implications for deeper vadose zone applications. These implications include an improved technical basis for remedy selection, decisions, characterization, and stakeholder communication and cost savings in the range of hundreds of millions of dollars. (authors)

Hoover, J.D. [Fluor Hanford, Inc. (United States); McMahon, W.J. [CH2M Hill Hanford Group (United States); Leary, K.D. [DOE/RL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Panasonic Ecology Systems (formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co) Place Kasugai, Aichi, Japan Zip 468-8522 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Japanese manufacturer of energy efficient residential and commercial electronic goods such as air conditioners, fans, and 'hybrid tower' which uses wind and solar power as street lights. Coordinates 35.277859°, 137.011215° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.277859,"lon":137.011215,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

106

The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function  

SciTech Connect

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

UF in Belize Marine Ecology and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Marine Ecology and Conservation Spring Extended: May 26-June 2, 2014 Understand Marine Ecology and Conservation. Explain Marine Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation Terms as they Relate to the Tropics of Belize. Compare and Contrast Marine Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation Principles and Practices

Florida, University of

108

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Spring Break March 1-9, 2014 Understand Ecology and Conservation. Explain Concepts and Terms. Compare and Contrast Wildlife Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation & Life Sciences Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Courses are taught by UF faculty WIS4905

Watson, Craig A.

109

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center -- Industrial Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials Sustainability ... Ecology, Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases, and...

110

Ecological safety of tidal-power projects  

SciTech Connect

The operating regime of tidal power plants requires ecological monitoring of their associated water area.

Fedorov, M. P.; Shilin, M. B. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

112

FINGERPRINTING SOILS A PROOF OF CONCEPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic soil characterization is an under-explored field in the forensic sciences. One aspect of forensic sciences is Locards Exchange Principle, which states that every contact leaves a trace. As soil characterization technology improves, applications of soil forensics can more accurately identify if a soil sample collected from a suspect corresponds to samples collected at a crime scene. This research focuses on the use of visible near and infrared, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR DRS) to develop spectral fingerprints of soils. Our hypothesis is that VNIR spectra of soils from a crime scene are unique from other soils, even soils of the same soil series. If soil spectra from a crime scene are unique, this data can be used to accurately assess Locards Exchange Principle. Soil samples were collected within in a thirty-mile radius of a designated crime scene in the Brazos River floodplain near Texas A

Kobylinski, Catherine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

METADATA OF THE SOIL MAPS OF LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN ISLANDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mission of the Institute of Environment and Sustainability is to provide scientific and technical support to EU strategies for the protection of the environment and sustainable development. Employing an integrated approach to the investigation of air, water and soil contaminants, its goals are sustainable management of water resources, protection and maintenance of drinking waters, good functioning of aquatic ecosystems and good ecological quality of surface waters. LEGAL NOTICE Neither the European Commission nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission is responsible for the use, which might be made of the following information. A great deal of additional information on the European Union is available on the Internet.

Senthil-kumar Selvaradjou; Luca Montanarella; Otto Spaargaren; David Dent; Hannes Isaak Reuter; Senthil-kumar Selvaradjou; Luca Montanarella; Otto Spaargaren; David Dent; Hannes Isaak Reuter; Senthil-kumar Selvaradjou; Luca Montanarella; Otto Spaargaren; David Dent; Hannes Isaak Reuter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Plant Ecology 171: 2333, 2004. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the hills. Water electrical conductivity (EC) values at the upper surface of the water table of this site of water potentials and transpiration rates across sites could be explained by higher values of soil the coastline of Tuscany have important ecological, environmental, historical and economical functions. Umbrella

Mencuccini, Maurizio

115

One-Dimensional Soil Moisture Profile Retrieval by Assimilation of Near-Surface Measurements: A Simplified Soil Moisture Model and Field Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kalman filter assimilation technique is applied to a simplified soil moisture model for retrieval of the soil moisture profile from near-surface soil moisture measurements. First, the simplified soil moisture model is developed, based on an ...

Jeffrey P. Walker; Garry R. Willgoose; Jetse D. Kalma

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Natural Soil Drainage Index An ordinal estimate of water availability in soils. Unpublished manuscript on file at FHTET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Many important geomorphic and ecological attributes center on soil water content, especially over long timescales. In this paper we present an ordinally based index, intended to generally reflect the amount of water that a soil supplies to plants under natural conditions, over long timescales. The Natural Soil Drainage Index (DI) ranges from 0 for the driest soils (e.g., those shallow to bedrock in a desert) to 99 (open water). The DI is primarily derived from a soils taxonomic subgroup classification, which is a reflection of its long-term wetness. Because the DI assumes that soils in drier climates and with deeper water tables have less plant-useable water, taxonomic indicators such as soil moisture regime and natural drainage class figure prominently in the base DI formulation. Additional factors that can impact soil water content, quality, and/or availability (e.g., texture), when also reflected in taxonomy, are quantified and added to or subtracted from the base DI to arrive at a final DI value. In GIS applications, map unit slope gradient can be added as an additional variable. The index has myriad applications in forestry, ecology, geomorphology, and environmental modeling, especially when examined spatially; we provide some examples in this paper. The DI has great potential for many landscape-scale modeling and GIS applications where soil water content is an important variable. DI values for all soils currently classified by the NRCS can be accessed from pull-down menus on the DI web site:

Randall J. Schaetzl; Frank J. Krist; Kristine Stanley; Christina M. Hupy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Soil Atlas of Europe European Soil Bureau Network of the European Commission,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil maps from the same area but different periods show how soils and their distribution were perceived and mapped over time. They tell a bit about developments in soil mapping and soil science in general. The first soil maps of Europe started to appear in the mid-1800s but it was not until the 1920s that a map for the whole continent was produced. Since that time several soil maps were published. In this review, I will first discuss the Soil Atlas of Europe, and then early generations of soil maps of Europe and how they compare. This first Soil Atlas of Europe is slightly bigger than my Times World Atlas but contains less than half of its pages. The primary aim is to provide comprehensive information about the soils of Europe and raising awareness of issues affecting soils; it is part of the European Soil Thematic Strategy that was adopted by the European Union in 2002. Another goal of the

Principal A. Jones; L. Montanarella; R. Jones

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Arsenic Health and Ecological Effects: Soil and Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic is a naturally occurring element found throughout the environment in many different forms. It is also found in coal and thus coal combustion products and can be associated with other power plant generation and delivery operations. This report summarizes information on the toxicity of arsenic in the environment and derives risk factors based on this information.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development of a screened cathode gas flow proportional counter for in situ field determination of alpha contamination in soil  

SciTech Connect

This study resulted in the design, construction and testing of a gas flow proportional counter for in-situ determination of soil contamination. The uniqueness of this detector is the screened material used for the cathode. A Pu-239 source of 0.006 {micro}Ci was mounted to the outside of the cathode to simulate radioactive soil. The detector probe was placed into a laboratory mock-up and tested to determine operating voltage, efficiency and energy resolution. Two gas flow proportional counters were built and tested. The detectors are cylindrical, each with a radius of 1.905 cm, having an anode wire with a radius of 0.0038 cm. The length of the smaller detector`s anode was 2.54 cm, and the length of the larger detector`s anode was 7.64 cm. Therefore, the active volumes were 28.96 cm{sup 3} and 87.10 cm{sup 3}, respectively, for the small and large detector. An operating voltage of 1,975 volts was determined to be sufficient for both detectors. The average efficiency was 2.59 {+-} 0.12% and 76.71 {+-} 10.81% for the small volume and large volume detectors, respectively. The average energy resolution for the low-energy peak of the small detector was 4.24 {+-} 1.28% and for the large-energy peak was 1.37 {+-} 0.66%. The large detectors` energy resolution was 17.75 {+-} 3.74%. The smaller detector, with better energy resolution, exhibited a bi-modal spectrum, whereas the larger detector`s spectrum centered around a single broad peak.

Bush, S.P.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Operational Soil Moisture Estimation for the Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational soil moisture monitoring capability for the midwestern United States is developed using a multilayer soil water balance model which incorporates daily weather data to calculate precipitation, soil evaporation, plant transpiration, ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ecologic Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ecologic Institute Name Ecologic Institute Address Pfalzburger Strasse 43/44 Place Berlin, Germany Year founded 1995 Phone number +49 (30) 86880-0 Website http://ecologic.eu/ Coordinates 52.493143445°, 13.3453845978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.493143445,"lon":13.3453845978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

124

Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecologic Analytics Ecologic Analytics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecologic Analytics Place Bloomington, Minnesota Zip 55425 Product Minnesota-based meter data management company. Coordinates 42.883574°, -90.926122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.883574,"lon":-90.926122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Development testing of the chemical analysis automation polychlorinated biphenyl standard analysis method during surface soils sampling at the David Witherspoon 1630 site  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) project is developing standardized, software-driven, site-deployable robotic laboratory systems with the objective of lowering the per-sample analysis cost, decreasing sample turnaround time, and minimizing human exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials associated with DOE remediation projects. The first integrated system developed by the CAA project is designed to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) content in soil matrices. A demonstration and development testing of this system was conducted in conjuction with surface soil characterization activities at the David Witherspoon 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The PCB system consists of five hardware standard laboratory modules (SLMs), one software SLM, the task sequence controller (TSC), and the human-computer interface (HCI). Four of the hardware SLMs included a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentrator, a column cleanup, and a gas chromatograph. These SLMs performed the sample preparation and measurement steps within the total analysis protocol. The fifth hardware module was a robot that transports samples between the SLMs and the required consumable supplies to the SLMs. The software SLM is an automated data interpretation module that receives raw data from the gas chromatograph SLM and analyzes the data to yield the analyte information. The TSC is a software system that provides the scheduling, management of system resources, and the coordination of all SLM activities. The HCI is a graphical user interface that presents the automated laboratory to the analyst in terms of the analytical procedures and methods. Human control of the automated laboratory is accomplished via the HCI. Sample information required for processing by the automated laboratory is entered through the HCI. Information related to the sample and the system status is presented to the analyst via graphical icons.

Hunt, M.A.; Klatt, L.N.; Thompson, D.H. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Corn production with perennial ground covers: evaluation of cover species and their effects on corn growth and development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of perennial ground covers (PGC) in corn production may offer a long term and ecological solution to soil conservation issues while allowing the (more)

Flynn, Ernest Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ohio River Ecological Research Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2009 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) fish community sampling near 14 Ohio River power plants. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Temporal representation of ecological knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This MSc thesis proposes a temporal logic to represent knowledge about seasonal cycles in ecosystems. The logic is mainly based on what we call modular temporal classes, and a simple temporal logic interpreter system is also defined and implemented to reason with ecological sentences expressed in a temporal language we call NatureTime.

Edjard De Souza Mota

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Soils of Ultramafic Origin from the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although soils developed from ultramafic parent materials have significance to agriculture, ecology and health, their bio-geochemistry is poorly understood. The mineralogical and bio-geochemistry of soils formed from the ultramafic parent materials of the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas was investigated. The objectives were to determine the mineralogical and bio-geochemical properties of the soils in order to assess the potential impact and challenges to agriculture, and environmental quality. Soil samples were taken from the crest, shoulder, footslope and the toeslope. Chemical analyses were performed by nuclear and spectroscopic techniques. Mineral characterization was conducted by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic techniques. Microbial whole-community structure was determined by the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) technique. The results indicate wide chemical and mineralogical compositions among the studied sites. The soils contain relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (some sites contain Cr(VI)), but low levels of K and Ca. The highest concentrations of trace metal were associated with chromite, Fe oxides and serpentinite. The concentrations of Mg were higher than those of Ca and varied between Zimbabwe and Texas soils largely due to the parent materials. Unique to these soils is the occurrence of talc, serpentine, chlorite, Fe-rich smectite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, Fe and Cr oxides in relatively large amounts. These soils also lack micas and have neglible amounts of kaolinite and feldspars. Palygorskite and serpentine occurred in specific soil horizons and at specific landscape positions. FAME profiles indicate that the soil microbial community structure is predominantly bacteria and fungi (including arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi) at each landscape position across the transect. Biomarkers for actinomycetes were undetectable. The proportions of Gram-positive bacteria were higher than those of the Gram-negative bacteria. Very low levels of nutrients (Ca and K), higher Mg/Ca molar ratios, and the relatively high concentrations of heavy metals in these soils impact agricultural productivity. High concentrations of heavy metals, the presence of the Cr(VI) as well as its great potential to form in these soils might impact microbial activity and environmental quality. The occurrence of fibrous minerals (e.g serpentine and amphiboles) in these soils will likely impact human health.

Bangira, Courage

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

131

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Chemical ecology investigations at the Geysers, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A chemical aquatic ecology program currently in progress at the Geysers geothermal field in Northern California is described. The ultimate objective of the program is to assess the long-term ecosystem effects of development-related effluents to the aquatic environment. The first phase was designed to: (1) identify partitioning and transport in water and sediment of a wide range of elemental constituents, and (2) to determine the degree of impact of geothermal development in an area where a natural background of thermal tributaries and abandoned mercury mine tailings exist. Selected constituents such as ammonia, boron, sulfate and potassium are shown to be enriched in both natural geothermal waters and in cooling tower waters and emissions. Analyses implicate geothermal units as significant contributors of aquatic input. The most probable transport process is cooling tower drift.

Ireland, R.R.; Carter, J.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS  

SciTech Connect

The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Toxicity of lead to soil respiration: mediation by clay minerals, humic acids, and compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Pb has no known biological function, elevated levels of Pb in soils and in other natural environments may adversely affect the indigenous biota, including the microbiota. Elevated levels of Pb in soil may also adversely affect microbemediated ecologic processes. There is, however, relatively little information on the mediating influence of the physicochemical factors of the recipient environment on the toxicity of Pb to microbe-mediated ecologic processes. This present study evaluated the influence of the clay minerals, kaolinite and montmorillonite, particulate humic acids, and compost on the degradation of glucose in soil.

Debosz, K.; Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of field guidance for assessing feasibility of intrinsic bioremediation to restore petroleum-contaminated soils. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research evaluated the process of intrinsic bioremediation, also called natural attenuation, and the parameters that affected it. The goal of this study was to use these intrinsic bioremediation parameters to develop a valid prediction of the cleanup duration using this restoration technology. This analysis was limited to a JP-4 release and focused on the remediation of the BTEX constituents to a cleanup level of 10 ppm total BTEX. The review of intrinsic bioremediation found that the BTEX hydrocarbons can aerobically and anaerobically biodegrade. Of the many factors that affect intrinsic bioremediation, those that most influenced its occurrence were the quantities of aerobic and anaerobic electron acceptors used in biodegradation. The electron acceptors considered in this research were oxygen, nitrate, manganese (IV), iron (III), and sulfate. A no-dispersion biodegradation model was developed to determine the prediction of the intrinsic bioremediation duration based on the concentrations of individual electron acceptors. Only the aerobic electron acceptor had a measurable influence on the biodegradation model; hence, the prediction results focused on the aerobic biodegradation and its boundary with the anaerobic portion. The key factors used to characterize this boundary and its movement was the initial quantities of BTEX, dissolved oxygen and the relative velocity of the ground water moving through the retarded plume. A linear regression was performed to relate the three parameters mentioned above to the motion of the aerobic boundary.

Enyeart, J.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problems associated with shrink-swell soils are well known geotechnical problems that have been studied and researched by many geotechnical researchers for many decades. Potentially shrink-swell soils can be found almost anywhere in the world especially in the semi-arid regions of the tropical and temperate climate. Foundation slabs on grade on shrink-swell soils are one of the most efficient and inexpensive solutions for this kind of problematic soil. It is commonly used in residential foundations or any light weight structure on shrink-swell soils. Many design methods have been established for this specific problem such as Building Research Advisory Board (BRAB), Wire Reinforcement Institute (WRI), Post- Tensioning Institute (PTI), and Australian Standards (AS 2870) design methods. This research investigates most of these methods, and then, proposes a moisture diffusion soil volume change model, a soil-weather interaction model, and a soil-structure interaction model. The proposed moisture diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it, and explains a large scale laboratory test that verifies the proposed moisture diffusion soil volume change model. The proposed soil-weather interaction model uses the FAO 56-PM method to simulate a weightless cover performance for six cities in the US that suffer significantly from shallow foundation problems on shrink-swell soils due to seasonal weather variations. These simulations provide more accurate weather site-specific parameters such as the range of surface suction variations. The proposed weather-site specific parameters will be input parameters to the soil structure models. The proposed soil-structure interaction model uses Mitchell (1979) equations for moisture diffusion under covered soil to develop a new closed form solution for the soil mound shape under the foundation slab. Then, it presents a parametric study by carrying out several 2D finite elements plane strain simulations for plates resting on a semiinfinite elastic continuum and resting on different soil mounds. The parametric study outcomes are then presented in design charts that end with a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils. Finally, based on the developed weather-soil-structure interaction models, this research details two procedures of a proposed new design method for foundation slabs on grade on shrink-swell soils: a suction based design procedure and a water content based design procedure.

Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ecological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- Consequences of Nuclear Testing Amcl~itka isln,zd has a Iristory of disturbnnce by nroder~r matt, i,rclr~ding US. military operatio~ts on the isla~rd drrring Il'orld ll'nr % n~rterlnthrg the a~tder.qou~rd nuclear tests Nilrow nrrd Cannikin, for which preparation begntr in 1966. nlarry of the. terrestrial distarbnrrces resttlti,tg from ,taclear testing were superimposed o n scars remai~tirrg from the nrilitnry occt~pntiotz. Constrriction, road hirprouement, and the hlilrow an(/ Cnrrnikbt nt~clenr deto~rntions resulted bt the loss or deterioratio,t of about 420 Ira (1040ncres) of terrestrial hnbitnt, or less thmr 1.5% of the total area of An~clritka. A few streams and lakes were pollicted by drilling effluettts or human wastes; nornlalflrislting action is expected t

138

FRESHWATER ECOLOGY To help addressthese difficulties, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.'cosystl.'ms Illlll..tion, #12;ECOLOGY NO \\-- - TBligN -..(dIy) ~ .YES TP.'~ugIl «TN' '.0 -1--- expensive options

Canberra, University of

139

Problem Formulations for Ecological Risk Assessments Conducted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- deformities, fin erosion, lesions, and tumors ERA - ecological risk assessment HHRA - human health risk assessments ow K - octanol-water partition coefficients oc K - organic...

140

Justin D. Congdon | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ecology and ecotoxicology, including a major initiative on the effects of coal fly ash waste on aquatic and semi-aquatic organisms. Recent Projects: Turtle studies on the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

David E. Scott | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scott, Brian Metts, and Stacey Lance) Assessing the Ecological Health of the D-Area Ash Plume Wetland (Principal Investigators -- David Scott, Tracey Tuberville, Brian Metts,...

142

Industrial Ecology and Metal Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Topic Title: Powerpoint: Industrial Ecology and Metal Production Topic Summary: Metal extraction is on the the most Earth-intrusive industrial...

143

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

144

Development of a Time SeriesBased Methodology for Estimation of Large-Area Soil Wetness over India Using IRS-P4 Microwave Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture is a very important boundary parameter in numerical weather prediction at different spatial and temporal scales. Satellite-based microwave radiometric observations are considered to be the best because of their high sensitivity to ...

P. K. Thapliyal; P. K. Pal; M. S. Narayanan; J. Srinivasan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

810 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 86, No. 3 Ecology, 86(3), 2005, pp. 810811  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

810 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 86, No. 3 Ecology, 86(3), 2005, pp. 810­811 2005 by the Ecological of environmental statistics it will ren- der the task of teaching a little less daunting. This book is divided, books on methodology must focus on a narrow audience, which always comprises just a slice

Gotelli, Nicholas J.

146

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

147

Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Packaging and distributing ecological data from multisite studies  

SciTech Connect

Studies of global change and other regional issues depend on ecological data collected at multiple study areas or sites. An information system model is proposed for compiling diverse data from dispersed sources so that the data are consistent, complete, and readily available. The model includes investigators who collect and analyze field measurements, science teams that synthesize data, a project information system that collates data, a data archive center that distributes data to secondary users, and a master data directory that provides broader searching opportunities. Special attention to format consistency is required, such as units of measure, spatial coordinates, dates, and notation for missing values. Often data may need to be enhanced by estimating missing values, aggregating to common temporal units, or adding other related data such as climatic and soils data. Full documentation, an efficient data distribution mechanism, and an equitable way to acknowledge the original source of data are also required.

Olson, R.J.; Voorhees, L.D.; Field, J.M.; Gentry, M.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Adaptation for Nature: Ecological Impacts of Climate Change and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models CyberGIS for Geospatial Discovery and Innovation Ecological Impacts of Climate Change Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics in CAM5 Adaptation for Nature: Ecological...

150

Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent concerns regarding environmental contamination have necessitated the development of appropriate technologies to assess the presence and mobility of metals in soil and estimate possible ways to decrease the level of soil metal contamination. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that may be used to cleanup contaminated soils. Successful application of phytoremediation, however, depends upon various factors that must be carefully investigated and properly considered for specific site conditions. To efficiently affect the metal removal from contaminated soils we used the ability of plants to accumulate different metals and agricultural practices to improve soil quality and enhance plant biomass. Pot experiments were conducted to study metal transport through bulk soil to the rhizosphere and stimulate transfer of the metals to be more available for plants' form. The aim of the experimental study was also to find fertilizers that could enhance uptake of metals and their removal from contaminated soil.

Shtangeeva, I.; Laiho, J.V-P.; Kahelin, H.; Gobran, G.R.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effect of military training on indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of soil disturbance on several key indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia. Military activities at Fort Benning that result in soil disturbance include infantry, artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training. Soil samples were collected along a disturbance gradient that included: (1) reference sites, (2) light military use, (3) moderate military use, (4) heavy military use, and (5) remediated sites. With the exception of surface soil bulk density, measured soil properties at reference and light use sites were similar. Relative to reference sites, greater surface soil bulk density, lower soil carbon concentrations, and less carbon and nitrogen in particulate organic matter (POM) were found at moderate use, heavy use, and remediated sites. Studies along a pine forest chronosequence indicated that carbon stocks in POM gradually increased with stand age. An analysis of soil C:N ratios, as well as soil carbon concentrations and stocks, indicated a recovery of soil quality at moderate military use and remediated sites relative to heavy military use sites. Measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen are ecological indicators that can be used by military land managers to identify changes in soil from training activities and to rank training areas on the basis of soil quality.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Conterminous United States Multilayer Soil Characteristics Dataset for Regional Climate and Hydrology Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil information is now widely required by many climate and hydrology models and soilvegetationatmosphere transfer schemes. This paper describes the development of a multilayer soil characteristics dataset for the conterminous United States (...

Douglas A. Miller; Richard A. White

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Capillary bundle model of hydraulic conductivity for frozen soil Kunio Watanabe1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capillary bundle model of hydraulic conductivity for frozen soil Kunio Watanabe1 and Markus Flury2] We developed a capillary bundle model to describe water flow in frozen soil. We assume that the soil for both saturated and unsaturated soils, using a sand and two silt loam soils as examples. As temperature

Flury, Markus

155

Spatial pattern and uncertainty of soil carbon and nitrogen in a subtropical savanna landscape in southern Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woody invasion into grasslands has been reported world-wide and has affected both the magnitude and spatial heterogeneity of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). Since grasslands cover a large portion of the Earth's land surface, invasion of woody plants could have impacts on regional and global biogeochemistry. To understand large-scale ecological and policy implications of woody invasion, it is critical to understand the spatial pattern and uncertainty of soil C and N and their relationship with vegetation and soil attributes, as well as develop effective approaches to estimate soil C and N over large landscapes and regions. The goal of this study was to improve our understanding of the spatial pattern of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) and their controlling factors in savanna landscapes and develop efficient sampling strategies for evaluating the effects of woody invasion. Specific objectives of this study were to: (1) Quantify the spatial pattern and uncertainty associated with SOC and develop efficient sampling strategies to estimate SOC storage; (2) Assess the influence of soil and vegetation factors on spatial distribution of SOC and TN; and (3) Determine the influence of physical variables related to landscape position and soil on woody vegetation structure. Conditional sequential indicator simulations indicated that woody encroachment into grassland increased both spatial heterogeneity and uncertainty of SOC, which increased errors in estimating SOC storage. Stratified random sampling with higher density in woody patches, plus structured sampling in cluster with strong spatial pattern, substantially increased estimation accuracy. Efficient sampling strategies for estimating SOC storage were developed based on these findings. Direct and spatial correlation and scaling analyses showed that SOC and TN were strongly correlated with litter and root biomass. Invaded woody vegetation has the most impact on spatial distribution of SOC and TN. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that variables related to landscape position were the primary factors determining the spatial distribution of woody species. These new insights will facilitate the estimation of soil C and N pools at landscape and regional scales, and will help evaluate the potential impacts of woody plant encroachment on the biogeochemistry of C and N.

Liu, Feng

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Northern and Mid-Latitude Soil Data Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mid-Latitude Soil Data Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Northern and Mid-Latitude Soil Database, Version 1." This data set was developed...

157

Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

Huston, M.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Event:Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation: on 2012/07/20 China Ecological Forum will host a special session, in which keynote speeches will be presented by Ms. Amina Mohamed, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP and UN Assistant Secretary-General, and Prof. Yanhua Liu, Counsellor at the Counsellors' Office of the State Council of China. The special forum, titled "Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation", is focused on the new opportunities and challenges for South-South Cooperation and the way China cooperates with other developing countries in a post Rio+20 era. The forum also aims to inspire the science community to enhance its support

159

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ecological Effects of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive amount of research has been conducted to evaluate the potential adverse effects of coal-combustion products (CCPs) on the health of ecosystems. The objective of this project was to evaluate the ecological effects of CCPs and to identify the primary CCP-related factors that have the potential to pose the most substantial risk to ecological receptors. To meet this objective, the investigators conducted a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed chemical and toxicological literature on the eco...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Characterizing Soil Physical Properties for Soil Moisture Monitoring with the North Carolina Environment and Climate Observing Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture has important implications for meteorology, climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. This has led to growing interest in development of in situ soil moisture monitoring networks. Measurement interpretation is severely limited without ...

Weinan Pan; R. P. Boyles; J. G. White; J. L. Heitman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Ecological Informatics Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in Petersham, Massachusetts, USA (Fig. 1). This system

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

163

Repeatability and transparency in ecological research Aaron M. Ellison1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ecological research Aaron M. Ellison1 Harvard University, Harvard Forest, 324 North Main Street, Petersham

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

164

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

165

SOIL HEALTH AND SOIL QUALITY: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil health is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living system, by recognizing that it contains biological elements that are key to ecosystem function within land-use boundaries (Doran and Zeiss, 2000; Karlen et al., 2001). These functions are able to sustain biological productivity of soil, maintain the quality of surrounding air and water environments, as well as promote plant, animal, and human health (Doran et al., 1996). The concept of soil quality emerged in the literature in the early 1990s (Doran and Safely, 1997; Wienhold et al., 2004), and the first official application of the term was approved by the Soil Science Society of America Ad Hoc Committee on Soil Quality (S-581) and discussed by Karlen et al., (1997). Soil quality was been defined as the capacity of a reference soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation. Subsequently the two terms are used interchangeably (Karlen et al., 2001) although it is important to distinguish that, soil quality is related to soil function (Karlen et al., 2003; Letey et al, 2003), whereas soil

James Kinyangi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ecological Characterization Data for the 2004 Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A composite analysis is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 to ensure public safety through the management of active and planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities associated with the Hanford Site. The original Hanford Site Composite Analysis of 1998 must be revised and submitted to DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in 2004 because of revisions to waste site information in the 100, 200, and 300 Areas, updated performance assessments and environmental impact statements (EIS), changes in inventory estimates for key sites and constituents, and a change in the definition of offsite receptors. Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 to support ecological site assessment modeling for the 2004 Composite Analysis. This work was conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project (formerly the Groundwater Protection Program) managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. The purpose of this report is to provide summaries of the characterization information and available spatial data on the biological resources and ecological receptors found in the upland, riparian, aquatic, and island habitats on the Hanford Site. These data constitute the reference information used to establish parameters for the ecological risk assessment module of the System Assessment Capability and other assessment activities requiring information on the presence and distribution of biota on the Hanford Site.

Downs, Janelle L.; Simmons, Mary A.; Stegen, Jennifer A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Tiller, Brett L.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Zufelt, Rhett K.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford October 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Emerald Laija, EPA Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov 509-376-4919 Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov 509-372-7954 RICHLAND, Wash. -The Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with the Washington Department of Ecology, have made plans for remediating contaminated soil at four locations in the center of the Hanford Site. The agencies have chosen

168

An ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified point-centered quarter sampling technique (Kooser and Rankin). The survey was conducted to identify community types and the presence of areas with the potential to be identified as wetlands. The survey was cross-referenced with topographical maps for Waverly, Waverly South, Lucasville, and Wakefield (Department of Interior, 1987), with Wetlands Identification: Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands (Government Institutes, 1989)' and with the endangered and threatened species lists for Ohio. Additionally, the Division of Natural Areas and Preserves, Department of Natural Resources, was consulted. The Pike County Soil Conservation District Office was consulted to determine

169

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

170

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

Smith, M.H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Facility EcoCampus PV Sector Solar Facility Type Solar PV Facility Status In Service Owner Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Developer Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Energy Purchaser Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Address Kibbutz Lotan Location Israel, Zip 88855 Coordinates 29.987877559303°, 35.085187554359° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.987877559303,"lon":35.085187554359,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Implementation of a Two-Way Interactive Atmospheric and Ecological Model and Its Application to the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and ecosystem (CENTURY) modeling system has been developed to study regional-scale two-way interactions between the atmosphere and biosphere. Both atmospheric forcings and ecological ...

Lixin Lu; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Glen E. Liston; William J. Parton; Dennis Ojima; Melannie Hartman

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SRS near Aiken, South Carolina. The Laboratory's research mission during the 2001 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of one book and 83 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 77 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 54. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, global reptile decline, phytoremediation, and radioecology. Dr. Domy Adriano authored the second edition of his book ''Trace Elements in Terrestrial Environments: Biogeochemistry, Bioavailability, and Risks of Metals'', which was recently published by Springer-Verlag. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of many important aspects of trace elements in the environment. The first edition of the book, published in 1986, has become a widely acclaimed and cited reference. International attention was focused on the problem of reptile species decline with the publication of an article on this topic in the journal ''Bioscience'' in August, 2000. The article's authors included Dr. Whit Gibbons and a number of other SREL herpetologists who researched the growing worldwide problem of decline of reptile species. Factors related to these declines include habitat loss and degradation, introduction of invasive species, environmental pollution, disease, global climate change, and unsustainable commercial use. The conclusion reached by the article is that the disappearance of reptiles from the natural world is genuine and should be a matter of concern; current evidence suggests that these declines constitute a worldwide crisis. SREL's research in the area of phytoremediation was enhanced with the addition of Dr. Lee Newman as a faculty member in January 2001. Dr. Newman, an internationally recognized authority in the field, holds a joint appointment with the University of South Carolina and SREL. She is developing a collaborative program in phytoremediation on the SRS and offsite. Work is nearing completion on SREU s outdoor mesocosm irradiation facility, which is designed for studying the effects of low-level radiation doses on organisms. The 1-acre facility at Par Pond consists of 48 fiberglass tanks that can maintain small organisms such as fish and amphibians. Thirty of the tanks have sealed {sup 137}Cs sources suspended above them containing either 0.02,0.2, or 2.0 Ci. These sources can deliver average dose rates of 4, 40 and 400 mGy per day, respectively, to organisms under replicated conditions.

Bertsch, Paul M.; Janecek, Laura; Rosier, Brenda

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory.

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

175

The development and testing of technologies for the remediation of mercury-contaminated soils, Task 7.52. Topical report, December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The release of elemental mercury into the environment from manometers that are used in the measurement of natural gas flow through pipelines has created a potentially serious problem for the gas industry. Regulations, particularly the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), have had a major impact on gas companies dealing with mercury-contaminated soils. After the May 8, 1993, LDR deadline extension, gas companies were required to treat mercury-contaminated soils by designated methods to specified levels prior to disposal in landfills. In addition, gas companies must comply with various state regulations that are often more stringent than the LDR. The gas industry is concerned that the LDRs do not allow enough viable options for dealing with their mercury-related problems. The US Environmental Protection Agency has specified the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) as thermal roasting or retorting. However, the Agency recognizes that treatment of certain wastes to the LDR standards may not always be achievable and that the BDAT used to set the standard may be inappropriate. Therefore, a Treatability Variance Process for remedial actions was established (40 Code of Federal Regulations 268.44) for the evaluation of alternative remedial technologies. This report presents evaluations of demonstrations for three different remedial technologies: a pilot-scale portable thermal treatment process, a pilot-scale physical separation process in conjunction with chemical leaching, and a bench-scale chemical leaching process.

Stepan, D.J.; Fraley, R.H.; Charlton, D.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem analysis and research needs  

SciTech Connect

In May 1979, The Institute of Ecology held a workshop to determine the role of organic soils in the global carbon cycle and to ascertain their past, present and future significance in world carbon flux. Wetlands ecologists and soil scientists who participated in the workshop examined such topics as Soils as Sources of Atmospheric CO/sub 2/, Organic Soils, Primary Production and Growth of Wetlands Ecosystems, and Management of Peatlands. The major finding of the workshop is that the organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and Gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/.

Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Upton Reserve Ecological Research and Internships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Internships Research and Internships Every year, ecological and wildlife research is conducted to assist in understanding how the natural environment works. The information gained from these projects is used to make management decisions at the Laboratory. Many of these projects are conducted with the assistance of interns. Interns are high school or undergraduate students participating in the BNL's Office of Education summer programs. During 10 weeks, the students conduct experiments, population surveys, ecological monitoring, and other natural resource investigations. Students are required to complete a paper and/or poster as part of their internship. Examples of past research projects completed at BNL are available at the Environmental Protection Division's website.

178

Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Interpolation of 196197 Daily Temperature and Precipitation Data onto Alberta Polygons of Ecodistrict and Soil Landscapes of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil quality models developed for ecodistrict polygons (EDP) and the polygons of the soil landscapes of Canada (SLC) to monitor the concentration of soil organic matter require daily climate data as an important input. The objectives of this ...

Samuel S. P. Shen; Peter Dzikowski; Guilong Li; Darren Griffith

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

Entekhabi, Dara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Theory has been developed that examines the role of infectious disease in ecological invasions for particular natural systems. However, a general understanding of the role that shared disease may play in invasions is lacking. Here, we develop a strategic theoretical framework to determine the role of disease, in addition to competition, in ecological invasions and the expansion of species spatial range. We investigate the effect of different disease parameters on the replacement time of a native species by an alien invader. The outcome is critically dependent on the relative effects that the disease has on the two species and less dependent on the basic epidemiological characteristics of the interaction. This framework is also used to investigate the effect of disease on the spatial spread of the invader. Our results show an interesting phenomenon where a wave of disease spreads through the landscape ahead of the wave of replacement. Keywords Disease models. Spatial. Multi-species. Ecological invasions. Squirrelpox. Travelling waves

Sally S. Bell; Andrew White; Jonathan A. Sherratt; Mike Boots

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ecological predictive maintenance in urban fleets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor vehicles are one of the largest sources of air pollutants worldwide. Several studies had concluded that particulate matter (PM) are responsible for some respiratory, cardiovascular, lung diseases, increasing in death from heart and may cause lung ... Keywords: HMM, degradation, ecological, environmental, exploitation, maintenance, particulate emissions, pollutant emissions, predictive

Antnio Simes; Jos Torres Farinha; Incio Fonseca; Luis Ferreira

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Book Review Grasses and grassland ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Grasses and grassland ecology D.J. Gibson. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, and New-0198529187, and £34?95 / US $70 (paperback) ISBN 978-0198529194. The stated aim of this book is to provide a useful book for researchers and others with an interest in grassland. There can be few authors who have

Gibson, David

186

Ecological considerations of the solar alternative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main solar technologies are considered including solar thermal power, photovoltaic cells, ocean thermal power, wind energy, solar heating and cooling, bioconversion, and agricultural and process heat. The direct and indirect ecological and environmental impacts of these technologies are discussed. (WHK)

Davidson, M.; Grether, D.; Wilcox, K.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers improve soil carbon cycling models researchers improve soil carbon cycling models January 01, 2013 ORNL's new carbon cycling model could help scientists understand the role of soil microbes (MBC) in climate change by tracking extracellular enzymes (ENZ) that break down carbon-rich soil materials (SOC) into forms that microbes can respire (DOC). A more robust model of the soil carbon cycle developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves understanding of carbon residence time in soils and enables scientists to make more accurate climate predictions. The model does a better job than previous models of accounting for how microbes in the soil break down carbon-rich materials and release carbon dioxide. "Soil is a big reservoir of carbon," said co-author Melanie Mayes of the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science

188

Ecology 2006 2006 The Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plant growth forms has challenged the development of general models of plant growth. 2. A recent the ubiquity of the 3/4-power scaling of photosynthetic surface area in plants, but nevertheless show plant form and architecture. Key-words: 1/4 power, Agavaceae, allometry, Cactaceae, fractal Functional

Enquist, Brian Joseph

189

Soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the methodologies used to estimate the soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production is presented. Estimates of excess residue are developed for wheat in north-central Oklahoma and for corn and soybeans in central Iowa. These sample farming situations are analyzed in other research in the Analysis Division of the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Flaim, S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials Title Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its...

191

Applications of exergy to enhance ecological and environmental understanding and stewardship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods can be used which combine thermodynamics with environmental and ecological disciplines to understand ecological systems and environmental impact. Such assessments of ecological and environmental factors are better understood using the thermodynamic ... Keywords: ecology, efficiency, energy, environment, exergy, sustainability

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Investigation of ecosystems impacts from geothermal development in Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of three years of field ecological investigation in Imperial Valley Environmental Program is presented. The potential terrestrial habitat impacts of geothermal development are discussed for shorebirds and waterfowl habitat, the endangered clapper rail, powerline corridors, noise effects, animal trace element burdens, and the desert community. Aquatic habitats are discussed in terms of Salton Sea salinity, effects of geothermal brine discharges to the Salton Sea, trace element baselines, and potential toxicity of brine spills in freshwater. Studies of impacts on agriculture involved brine movement in soil, release of trace metals, trace element baselines in soil and plants, water requirements of crops, and H{sub 2}S effects on crop production in the presence of CO{sub 2} and ozone.

Shinn, J.H.; Ireland, R.R.; Kercher, J.R.; Koranda, J.J.; Tompkins, G.A.

1979-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 BYLAWS OF DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (Ratified February 2010) Preamble The shared goals of the faculty and administration of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation are to attain excellence

Watson, Craig A.

197

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

198

COINS: an integrative modelling shell for carbon accounting and general ecological analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is common for a range of models to be developed to investigate broadly similar ecological and environmental phenomena. This inevitably results in collections of models that, although individually possessing unique characteristics, also share a number ... Keywords: Carbon modelling, Model integration, Simulation modelling

S. H. Roxburgh; I. D. Davies

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

200

Washington State Department of Ecology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington State Department of Ecology Washington State Department of Ecology Jump to: navigation, search Name Washington State Department of Ecology Place Lacey, Washington State Zip 98503 References Washington State Department of Ecology[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Washington State Department of Ecology is an organization located in Lacey, Washington State . References ↑ "Washington State Department of Ecology" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Washington_State_Department_of_Ecology&oldid=696505" Categories: Government Agencies Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) 964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

202

IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depending on local availability. An automated version of the soil textural classification triangle shownNeill, J. (1994). Reclaiming disturbed land for forestry. Forestry Commission Bulletin 110. HMSO, London

203

SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), 2009-07-28 SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological Research Site in Colorado), 2010-12-14 ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News SUMMER 2011 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and services useful i n e n v i r o n m e n t a l research. The ORNL D A A C c u r r e n t l y archives and distributes greater than 900 prod- ucts categorized as Field Campaign, Land Validation, Regional and Global, or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive description of data, and tools available from the ORNL DAAC. Archived news can be found at http://daac.ornl.gov/ news.shtml. http://www.nasa.gov * Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Subsets

204

2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

Keneth Stedman

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of Different Soil Carbon Determination Methods  

SciTech Connect

Determining soil carbon (C) with high precision is an essential requisite for the success of the terrestrial C sequestration program. The informed choice of management practices for different terrestrial ecosystems rests upon accurately measuring the potential for C sequestration. Numerous methods are available for assessing soil C. Chemical analysis of field-collected samples using a dry combustion method is regarded as the standard method. However, conventional sampling of soil and their subsequent chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, these methods are not sufficiently sensitive to identify small changes over time in response to alterations inmanagement practices or changes in land use. Presently, several different in situ analytic methods are being developed purportedly offering increased accuracy, precision and cost-effectiveness over traditional ex situ methods. We consider that, at this stage, a comparative discussion of different soil C determination methods will improve the understanding needed to develop a standard protocol.

Chatterjee, Dr Amitava [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr R [Ohio State University; Wielopolski, Dr L [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Ebinger, Dr Michael H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships ISSN 0032-079X Plant Soil DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1353-x Seedling growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree species: implications for afforestation

Neher, Deborah A.

207

Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of graduate students in the sciences preparing for careers in academia has long included elements to advance students as science researchers, but recent emphasis is being placed on developing students as instructors and education researchers as well. As such, objectives of this study included assessments of seedling responses to hydrology typical of floods in urban settings, the role of created microtopography in community development of a bottomland hardwood forest, and the influence of geographic information systems (GIS) on student motivation and conceptual knowledge. Substantial losses of bottomlands in Texas necessitate restoration to regain the ecosystem services that they provide. Restoration of proper hydrology is the most important aspect of wetland restoration, but this can prove difficult in urbanizing environments where hydrology has been irreversibly altered. Microtopography has been shown to be an important component of bottomland hardwood forests, and its restoration may aid in hydrologic restoration as gradients are created that support a diverse community. Tree seedlings were subjected to experimental flooding regimes typical of floodplain forests in rural and urban settings. Growth rates of seedlings varied over time and differed depending on species and treatment. Created microtopography resulted in a spatially heterogeneous system similar to that of natural bottomlands and strongly influenced hydrology, soil properties, survival of planted seedlings, and abundance and distribution of colonizing species. Proper bottomland restoration in urbanizing environments should include species selection based on current and potential future hydrologic conditions. In addition, restoring microtopography may improve survival of a variety of species introduced during restoration, as well as enhance colonization of a diverse plant community under changing hydrologic regimes. Trends indicated a slight improvement in attitude and performance for students that used GIS. More important, the authenticity of the experience appeared to affect student attitude. The effective use of GIS in teaching may be scale-dependent. Smallscale phenomena may be assessed as easily in a field exercise as with GIS. Using GIS to assess large-scale, complex patterns may have a substantial impact on student understanding. Further studies are needed to determine direct benefits of teaching with GIS in undergraduate ecology classrooms.

Simmons, Matthew Earl

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmosphere which can be converted to ;Icitl nin. The precise nle;~sure~n~ntol'tllc. impact of acid nin must ~ be versatile A search committee has been setu p to find a new executive director ofUBC's 100" Michael Partridge, chairman of the search Dr. Iacono hases his support of the(;KT on the results

209

The development of high definition television : an ecology of games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is an analysis of the forces that shaped the overall character of a new US television system, high definition or HDTV, between the early 1980s and 2010, with a primary focus on the period leading up the Federal ...

Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project was aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of RMS and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. Restoration of disturbed land is followed by the application of nutrients to the soil to promote the vegetation development. Reclamation is important both for preserving the environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. Since reclamation treatments have significant influence on the rate of soil development, a study on subplots was designed with the objectives of assessing the potential of different biosolids on soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate, soil development, and changes in soil physical and water transmission properties. All sites are owned and maintained by American Electric Power (AEP). These sites were reclaimed by two techniques: (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover.

K. Lorenz; R. Lal

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

APPENDIX K: SOILS INFORMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

limitations affecting various uses. Soil scientists observed the steepness, length, and shape of the slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of crops and native plants;...

212

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs. Version 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8.

Friesen, H.N. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

Francis, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matthern, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

216

Modeling soil quality thresholds to ecosystem recovery at Fort Benning, GA, USA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. Artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training at military installations can produce soil disturbance and potentially create barren, degraded soils. Ecosystem reclamation is an important component of natural resource management at military installations. Four factors were important to the development of thresholds to recovery of aboveground biomass on degraded soils: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds for ecosystem recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning were generally below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils were apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization. Calculations with the model indicated that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determine the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Soil samples at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harmful pests or diseases. Examples of soil are: topsoil, forest litter, wood or plant compost, humus, and earthworm castings." 3. What is not soil? Materials free of organic...

218

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

219

Ecology, 79(8), 1998, pp. 26032615 1998 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RICHNESS AND AUTOTROPHIC BIOMASS SHAHID NAEEM1 AND SHIBIN LI Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior) biomass is sen- sitive to variation in initial consumer (nondecomposer, heterotrophic protistan) diversity biomass and consumer species richness. Additional microcosm ex- periments showed that this relationship

Minnesota, University of

220

Ecology, 84(6), 2003, pp. 14891505 2003 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seedlings of the invasive alien tree, Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) and an ecologically similar words: biological invasions; Celtis laevigata; Chinese tallow tree; Enemies Hypothesis; herbivory; plant that are already underway. Focal species The alien Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb., Euphorbiaceae

Siemann, Evan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

223

Soil Classification Using GATree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper details the application of a genetic programming framework for classification of decision tree of Soil data to classify soil texture. The database contains measurements of soil profile data. We have applied GATree for generating classification decision tree. GATree is a decision tree builder that is based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs). The idea behind it is rather simple but powerful. Instead of using statistic metrics that are biased towards specific trees we use a more flexible, global metric of tree quality that try to optimize accuracy and size. GATree offers some unique features not to be found in any other tree inducers while at the same time it can produce better results for many difficult problems. Experimental results are presented which illustrate the performance of generating best decision tree for classifying soil texture for soil data set.

Bhargavi, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

225

Digital Offshore Cadastre (DOC) - Pacific83 - Ecological Preserve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Preserve Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Digital Offshore Cadastre...

226

Spatial autocorrelation and red herrings in geographical ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000) Red-shifts and red herrings in geographical ecology.autocorrelation and red herrings in geographical ecologygenerates red herrings, such that virtually all past

Diniz, JAF; Bini, L M; Hawkins, Bradford A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Enhancing protection for unusually sensitive ecological areas from pipeline releases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECOLOGICAL AREAS FROM PIPELINE RELEASES Christina Sames;Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, DPS-10/ 400 7thof a hazardous liquid pipeline accident. Pipeline operators

Sames, Christina; Fink, Dennis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Steps 1-4, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 OVERVIEW The screening-level problem formulation and ecological effects evaluation is part of the initial ecological risk screening assessment. For this initial step, it is likely that site- specific information for determining the nature and extent of contamination and for characterizing ecological receptors at the site is limited. This step includes all the functions of problem formulation (more fully described in Steps 3 and 4) and ecological effects analysis, but on a screening level. The results of this step will be used in conjunction with exposure estimates in the preliminary risk calculation in Step 2. STEP 1: SCREENING-LEVEL PROBLEM FORMULATION AND ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS EVALUATION 1.1 INTRODUCTION Step 1 is the screening-level problem formulation process and ecological effects evaluation

229

A One-Dimensional Interactive Soil-Atmosphere Model for Testing Formulations of Surface Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model representing a soil-atmosphere column in a GCM is developed for off-line testing of GCM soil hydrology parameterizations. Repeating three representative GCM sensitivity experiments with this one-dimensional model demonstrates that, to ...

Randal D. Koster; Peter S. Eagleson

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

None

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage to lightly loaded structures, paving and service piping in areas of expansive clay soils has occurred throughout the world. The cause of this damage has been the inability to accurately model expansive soil movement so that foundations are adequately designed to withstand the movement. The amount and rate of differential soil movement for expansive soils is due to a combination of soil characteristics, namely: suction compression index, unsaturated permeability, and diffusivity. Currently, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a simple lack of understanding of the theory. The procedures delineating the step by step process used to calculate suction profiles and volume strains of expansive soils is presented. These procedures include the methodology to predict soil heave and shrink underneath shallow foundations which generate maximum center lift and maximum edge lift slab distortion modes. The main contributions of this research are: equations and procedures to calculate the equilibrium suction profile and depth to constant suction for a particular soil profile and location, equations to calculate the horizontal velocity flow of water in unsaturated soils, the methodology to predict differential soil movement shortly after a slab has been constructed and before the soil under the slab has reached an equilibrium moisture content, and the procedures to apply differential soil movement theory to soil profiles with shallow foundation design.

Naiser, Donald David

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reconsidering Sustainable Development: Urbanization, Political-Economy, and Deliberative Democracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. E. A steady state economy. Sustainable DevelopmentEcology: Environment and Political Economy. New York: Basil52 (2010): 22463-22468. Economy, Elizabeth. The River Runs

Roman-Alcal, Antonio M.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mathematical Models in Landscape Ecology: Stability Analysis and Numerical Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper a review of some mathematical models for the ecological evaluation of environmental systems is considered. Moreover a new model, capable to furnish more detailed information at the level of landscape units, is proposed. Numerical ... Keywords: 34D05, 92F05, Landscape ecology, Mathematical models, Stability analysis

Federica Gobattoni; Giuliana Lauro; Roberto Monaco; Raffaele Pelorosso

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An ecologically inspired simulation tool for managing digital ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an ecologically inspired multi-agent based simulation tool for finding and analysing networks of collaborations in a digital ecosystem. Digital ecosystems are defined as open, self-organising environments inside which digital ... Keywords: collaboration, complex networks, digital ecosystems, ecology, multi-agent systems, mutualism

Miguel Lurgi

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement  

SciTech Connect

At Livermore our hope and our intention is to make important contributions to global sustainability by basing both our scientific and technological research and our business practices on the principles of industrial ecology. Current efforts in the following fields are documented: global security, global ecology, energy for transportation, fusion energy, materials sciences, environmental technology, and bioscience.

Gilmartin, T.J.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida's 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in

239

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of radioactive material control deficiencies occurring at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) in September 1999. During the underlying event, SREL investigators transported radioactive environmental samples from the Ukraine to SREL and University of Georgia facilities without appropriate labeling, monitoring, and controls. These deficiencies were identified in September 1999; however, they were not formally reported to DOE via the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) until March 14, 2000. The Office

240

Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of radioactive material control deficiencies occurring at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) in September 1999. During the underlying event, SREL investigators transported radioactive environmental samples from the Ukraine to SREL and University of Georgia facilities without appropriate labeling, monitoring, and controls. These deficiencies were identified in September 1999; however, they were not formally reported to DOE via the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) until March 14, 2000. The Office

243

BIORETENTION SOIL MIX REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON Prepared for: Prepared by: Puget Sound Partnership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Executive Summary The soil mix used in bioretention systems is central for determining flow control and water quality treatment performance. The purpose of this study is to provide bioretention soil mix (BSM) guidelines that: 1) meet performance objectives; 2) include materials readily available in the Puget Sound region; 3) include materials that aggregate and compost suppliers can provide with adequate quality control and consistency; and 4) are affordable. The focus of this study is on the aggregate component of the BSM. Four candidate aggregate samples were collected from various suppliers and locations around Puget Sound. Laboratory analysis was conducted to determine aggregate gradation, as well as the organic matter content, hydraulic conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and available phosphorus of a specified aggregate compost bioretention soil mix. Hydraulic conductivity of bioretention soil mixes is strongly correlated to percent mineral aggregate passing the 200 sieve and that the fines should be less than five and ideally between two and four percent. Organic matter and cation exchange capacity of bioretention soil mixes meet or exceed Washington Department of Ecologys requirements for enhanced treatment.

Curtis Hinman; Wsu Extension Faculty

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

245

An evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions of West Lake on the Hanford site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

West Lake and its immediate surrounding basin represent a unique habitat that is dominated by highly saline water and soil. The basin offers a valuable research site for studies of a rare and complex wetland area in the desert. This report is an evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions at West Lake and describes how ground water influences site properties. The scope of this evaluation consisted of a sampling program in 1989 and a review of data from the perspective of assessing the impact of Hanford Site operations on the physical, chemical, and ecological conditions of West Lake and its surrounding basin. The water level in West Lake fluctuates in relation to changes in the water table. The connection between West Lake and ground water is also supported by the presence of {sup 3}H and {sup 99}Tc in the ground water and in the lake. There are relatively high concentrations of uranium in West Lake; the highest concentrations are found in the northernmost isolated pool. Analyses of water, sediment, vegetation, and soil indicate possible shifts of isotropic ratios that indicate a reduction of {sup 235}U. Uranium-236 was not detected in West Lake water; its presence would indicate neutron-activated {sup 235}U from fuel reprocessing at Hanford. Trace metals are found at elevated concentrations in West Lake. Arsenic, chromium, copper, and zinc were found at levels in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency water quality criteria. Levels of radiological and chemical contamination in the West Lake basin are relatively low. Concentrations of fission isotopes exceed those that could be explained by atmospheric fallout, but fall short of action levels for active waste management areas. 31 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs.

Poston, T.M.; Price, K.L.; Newcomer, D.R.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Literature Review: Asphalt Batching of MGP Tar-Containing Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites research effort, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is committed to developing and applying scientific and technological information to address the issues of remediation, treatment, and recycling of soils containing MGP tar and related organic compounds. This report deals with the issue of using MGP tar-containing soils in the manufacture of asphalt products.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing (ISESM) is a treatment technology that has been demonstrated and deployed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile organic volatile organic (VOCs). The technology has been developed by industry and has been demonstrated with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology and the Office of Environmental Restoration.

None

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the research and development work done until now in earthing analysis is devoted to cases where the soil can be modelled in terms of an homogeneous and isotropic semi-infinite continuous medium, being the soil resistivity an order of magnitude ... Keywords: grounding analysis, earthing analysis, underground substations

Ignasi Colominas; Jose Paris; Xesus Nogueira; Fermin Navarrina; Manuel Casteleiro

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ecology Environment Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Inc Environment Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecology & Environment, Inc. Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Product Environmental consulting firm serving corporate and government clients Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

New Ecology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name New Ecology Inc Address 130 Bishop Allen Drive Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02139 Sector Buildings Product Energy efficiency services for buildings, both in construction and existing Website http://www.newecology.org/ Coordinates 42.3666224°, -71.103596° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3666224,"lon":-71.103596,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Strategic Project Appraisal framework for ecologically sustainable urban infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actors in the built environment are progressively considering environmental and social issues alongside functional and economic aspects of development projects. Infrastructure projects represent major investment and construction initiatives with attendant environmental, economic and societal impacts across multiple scales. To date, while sustainability strategies and frameworks have focused on wider national aspirations and strategic objectives, they are noticeably weak in addressing micro-level integrated decision making in the built environment, particularly for infrastructure projects. The proposed approach of this paper is based on the principal that early intervention is the most cost-effective and efficient means of mitigating the environmental effects of development projects, particularly macro infrastructure developments. A strategic overview of the various project alternatives, taking account for stakeholder and expert input, could effectively reduce project impacts/risks at low cost to the project developers but provide significant benefit to wider communities, including communities of future stakeholders. This paper is the first exploratory step in developing a more systematic framework for evaluating strategic alternatives for major metropolitan infrastructure projects, based on key sustainability principles. The developed Strategic Project Appraisal (SPA) framework, grounded in the theory of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), provides a means of practically appraising project impacts and alternatives in terms of quantified ecological limits; addresses the neglected topic of metropolitan infrastructure as a means of delivering sustainability outcomes in the urban context and more broadly, seeks to open a debate on the potential for SEA methodology to be more extensively applied to address sustainability challenges in the built environment. Practically applied and timed appropriately, the SPA framework can enable better decision-making and more efficient resource allocation ensuring low impact infrastructure development.

Morrissey, John, E-mail: john.morrissey@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Design, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); Iyer-Raniga, Usha, E-mail: usha.iyer-raniga@rmit.edu.au [School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); McLaughlin, Patricia; Mills, Anthony [School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Applied Soil Ecology 18 (2001) 3945 Demography of Paronychiurus kimi (Lee) (Collembola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ml by using a potter spray tower at 10 psi (Burkard Manufacturing Co.) and held at 20C in constant darkness:1:3). The treated Petri-dishes were sprayed with 2 ml GA solution of 0, 50, 500, 5000, 10,000 or 50,000 g-dish was sprayed with 2 ml of 0, 50, 500, 5000, or 50,000 g/ml GA solution as de- scribed above and held at 20C

Neher, Deborah A.

257

Applied Soil Ecology 23 (2003) 165179 Effects of disturbance and ecosystem on decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production. The final selection of the 18 sites was completed in coordination with personnel from the Natural, soluble lignin, and insol- uble lignin content in balsa wood substrates placed in undisturbed forests forest sites. We did not observe changes in percentages of insol- uble lignin, soluble lignin

Neher, Deborah A.

258

Red herrings revisited: spatial autocorrelation and parameter estimation in geographical ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

autocorrelation and red herrings in geographical ecology. 2000. Red-shifts and red herrings in geographical ecology. email:bhawkins@uci.edu Red herrings revisited: spatial

Hawkins, Bradford A.; Diniz-Filho, Jose Alexandre F.; Bini, Luis Mauricio; De Marco, Paulo; Blackburn, Tim M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Final Report for DOE grant no. DE-FG02-04ER63883: Can soil genomics predict the impact of precipitation on nitrous oxide flux from soil  

SciTech Connect

Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that is released by microorganisms in soil. However, the production of nitrous oxide in soil is highly variable and difficult to predict. Future climate change may have large impacts on nitrous oxide release through alteration of precipitation patterns. We analyzed DNA extracted from soil in order to uncover relationships between microbial processes, abundance of particular DNA sequences and net nitrous oxide fluxes from soil. Denitrification, a microbial process in which nitrate is used as an electron acceptor, correlated with nitrous oxide flux from soil. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea correlated positively, but weakly, with nitrous oxide production in soil. The abundance of bacterial genes in soil was negatively correlated with gross nitrogen mineralization rates and nitrous oxide release from soil. We suggest that the most important control over nitrous oxide production in soil is the growth and death of microorganisms. When organisms are growing nitrogen is incorporated into their biomass and nitrous oxide flux is low. In contrast, when microorganisms die, due to predation or infection by viruses, inorganic nitrogen is released into the soil resulting in nitrous oxide release. Higher rates of precipitation increase access to microorganisms by predators or viruses through filling large soil pores with water and therefore can lead to large releases of nitrous oxide from soil. We developed a new technique, stable isotope probing with 18O-water, to study growth and mortality of microorganisms in soil.

Egbert Schwartz

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

262

Intertidal Ecology of Riprap Jetties and Breakwaters: Marine Communities Inhabiting Anthropogenic Structures along the West Coast of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine EcologyMexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine Ecology

Pister, Benjamin A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Intertidal ecology of riprap jetties and breakwaters : marine communities inhabiting anthropogenic structures along the west coast of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine EcologyMexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine Ecology

Pister, Benjamin Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Straw Compost and Bioremediated Soil as Inocula for the Bioremediation of Chlorophenol-Contaminated Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straw compost and bioremediated soil as inocula for the bioremediation of chlorophenol-contaminated soil.

M M Laine; K S Jorgensen; M. Minna; Laine; Kirsten S. Jrgensen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Soil mechanics and analysis of soils overlying cavitose bedrock  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the residual soils existing at the West Chestnut Ridge Site, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, was evaluated. The weathered bedrock below this residual soil contains numerous solution cavities, and several karst features were identified. The West Chestnut Ridge site was evaluated with respect to deformation and collapse of the residual soil into the bedrock cavities. A finite element analysis investigated the effects of bedrock cavity radius, thickness of soil overburden, and surface surcharge upon the deformational and stability characteristics of the residual soil. The results indicate that for small cavity radii, the thickness of the soil cover has little effect on the zone of yielded soil. For large cavity radii, a smaller zone of distressed soil occurs under thick soil cover than under thin soil cover. Dimensionless curves are presented to enable the prediction of the vertical extent of the zone of yielded soil for a range of site geometries. Although the thick soil deposits (100 feet or greater) typically found on the ridges result in high stresses adjacent to the cavity, the area of the distressed or yielded soil is small and unlikely to extend to the surface. In addition, the surface deformation or subsidence is expected to be minimal. Thus, the siting of waste facilities on the ridges where the overburden is maximum would tend to reduce the effects of deformation into the cavities. 29 refs., 37 figs., 7 tabs.

Drumm, E.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hygrothermal Simulation of Foundations: Part 1 - Soil Material Properties  

SciTech Connect

The hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is a complicated process. A computational approach for heat transfer through the ground has been well defined (EN ISO 13370:2007, 2007), and simplified methods have been developed (Staszczuk, Radon, and Holm 2010). However, these approaches generally ignore the transfer of soil moisture, which is not negligible (Janssen, Carmeliet, and Hens 2004). This study is divided into several parts. The intention of the first part is to gather, comprehend and adapt soil properties from Soil Science. The obtained information must be applicable to related tasks in Building Science and validated with hygrothermal calculation tools. Future parts of this study will focus on the validation aspect of the soil properties to be implemented. Basic changes in the software code may be requested at this time. Different types of basement construction will be created with a hygrothermal calculation tool, WUFI. Simulations from WUFI will be compared with existing or ongoing measurements. The intentions of the first part of this study have been fulfilled. The soil properties of interest in Building Science have been defined for 12 different soil textures. These properties will serve as input parameters when performing hygrothermal calculations of building constructions coupled to soil materials. The reliability of the soil parameters will be further evaluated with measurements in Part 2.

Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ecological correlates of secondary sexual dimorphism in Salix glauca (Salicaceae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species (Keoleian and Volk, 2005), S. glauca propagatesprojects: as biomass crops (Volk et al. , 2004), in soil

Dudley, Leah S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils, Comprehensive Report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system.

Altman, D.J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

New Soil Property Database Improves Oklahoma Mesonet Soil Moisture Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture data from the Oklahoma Mesonet are widely used in research efforts spanning many disciplines within Earth Sciences. These soil moisture estimates are derived by translating measurements of matric potential into volumetric water ...

Bethany L. Scott; Tyson E. Ochsner; Bradley G. Illston; Christopher A. Fiebrich; Jeffery B. Basara; Albert J. Sutherland

271

Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ecological Compliance Assessment Project: 1994 Summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) began full operation on March 1, 1994. The project is designed around a baseline environmental data concept that includes intensive biological field surveys of key areas of the Hanford Site where the majority of Site activities occur. These surveys are conducted at biologically appropriate times of year to ensure that the data gathered are current and accurate. The data are entered into the ECAP database, which serves as a reference for the evaluation of review requests coming in to the project. This methodology provided the basis for over 90 percent of the review requests received. Field surveys conducted under ECAP are performed to document occurrence information for species of concern and to obtain habitat descriptions. There are over 200 species of concern on the Hanford Site, including plants, birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and invertebrates. In addition, Washington State has designated mature sagebrush-steppe habitat as a Priority Habitat meriting special protective measures. Of the projects reviewed, 17 resulted or will result in impacts to species or habitats of concern on the Hanford Site. The greatest impact has been on big sagebrush habitat. Most of the impact has been or will be within the 600 Area of the Site.

Brandt, C.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American...

274

The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission: Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. Its mission design consists of L-band ...

O'Neill, Peggy

275

Evaluation of technologies for volume reduction of plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in plutonium (Pu) contamination of the soil over an area of several thousands of acres. The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential of five different processes to reduce the volume of Pu-contaminated soil from three different areas, namely Areas 11, 13, and 52. Volume reduction was to be accomplished by concentrating the Pu into a small but highly contaminated soil fraction, thereby greatly reducing the volume of soil requiring disposal. The processes tested were proposed by Paramag Corp. (PARAMAG), Advanced Processing Technologies Inc. (APT), Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT), Nuclear Remediation Technologies (NRT), and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG). Because of time and budgetary restraints, the NRT and SEG processes were tested with soil from Area 11 only. These processes typically included a preliminary soil conditioning step (e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), followed by a more advanced process designed to separate Pu from the soil, based on physiochemical properties of Pu compounds (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, specific gravity). Analysis of the soil indicates that a substantial fraction of the total Pu contamination is typically confined in a relatively narrow and small particle size range. Processes which were able to separate this highly contaminated soil fraction (using physical methods, e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), from the rest of the soil achieved volume (mass) reductions on the order of 70%. The advanced, more complex processes tested did not enhance volume reduction. The primary reason why processes that rely on the dependence of settling velocity on density differences failed was the very fine grain size of the Pu-rich particles.

Papelis, C.; Jacobson, R.L.; Miller, F.L.; Shaulis, L.K.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Savannah River Ecology Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research Draft submitted July 31, 2001 Final submitted August 17,2001 Supported under Cooperative Agreement between The University of Georgia and the U.S. Department of Energy for The University of Georgia fiscal year ending June 30,2001 DE-F609-96SR18546 Paul M. Bertsch, Director Prepared by Laura Janecek and Brenda Rosier Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Drawer E Aiken, SC 29801 PH (803) 725-2472 FX 725-3309 E-mail: Rosier @srel.edu This report is provided for information only and is not to be considered formally contained herein without the express consent of the investigator. published literature. We request that no citations be made of information TABLE OF CONTENTS

278

Enforcement Letter, Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 Enforcement Letter, Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 October 24, 2011 Enforcement Letter issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation related to Two Radiological Contamination Events at the Separations Process Research Unit at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight conducted an evaluation of the two contamination events at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) in Niskayuna, New York. On August 24, 2010, contaminated sludge leaked from two pumps inside the Building H2 Tank Farm Weather Enclosure after excessive pressure was applied to clear a clogged nozzle. The sludge contained radioisotopes from nuclear fuel reprocessing

279

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corporation - Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 June 14, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation related to a 10 CFR Part 708 Violation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Project This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) involving a contractor employee protection issue at the Portsmouth site. 10 CFR 708, "DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program," has been designated a nuclear safety regulation by DOE and, thus, it is enforceable under the Price-Anderson Amendments Act [See 64 FR 12861,12863 (1999)]. Pursuant to the structure of the regulation, a finding of contractor retaliation

280

Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

T. Haney R. VanHorn

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

Paul M. Bertsch

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

"Ecological Lessons Learned 30 Years After Mount Saint Helens...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBG AUDITORIUM "Ecological Lessons Learned 30 Years After Mount Saint Helens", Dr. Virginia Dale, Oak Ridge National Laboratory http:mediacentral.princeton.eduid0bi7ab6iz...

284

1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability, Spring 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment.. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic ...

McLaughlin, Dennis B.

285

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

286

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Performance of Drought Indices for Ecological, Agricultural, and Hydrological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors provide a global assessment of the performance of different drought indices for monitoring drought impacts on several hydrological, agricultural, and ecological response variables. For this purpose, they compare the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguera; Jorge Lorenzo-Lacruz; Jess Julio Camarero; Juan I. Lpez-Moreno; Cesar Azorin-Molina; Jess Revuelto; Enrique Morn-Tejeda; Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

264 September 2013 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 31.3 Ecological Restoration Vol. 31, No. 3, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--produce similar results. Mulch (a high carbon:nitrogen [C:N] material) may reduce reinvasion by stimulating soil of undetected and newly recruited individuals. Keywords: Age structure, carbon addition, root:shoot ratio, seed plants: vegetative reproduction (via stump resprouting) and prolific seed production (Ingold and Cray

Illinois at Chicago, University of

289

Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models  

SciTech Connect

In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Spatial analysis and delineation of ecological landtype phases for the Hoosier National Forest, Indiana, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Forest Service adopted the National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units in 1993 with the ecological landtype (ELT) and ecological landtype phase (ELTP) forming the lowest levels of the hierarchy. This study examines the potential of computer ... Keywords: Ecological landtypes, Forest ecosystems, Forest management, GIS, Landform mapping, Landscape analysis

Andriy V. Zhalnin; George R. Parker

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of Soil Moisture Changes in Europe during a Single Growing Season in a New ECMWF Soil Moisture Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims at stimulating the development of soil moisture data assimilation systems in a direction where they can provide both the necessary control of slow drift in operational NWP applications and support the physical insight in the ...

Bart van den Hurk; Janneke Ettema; Pedro Viterbo

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2008 Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast with a force stronger than the category 2 storm at which it was rated. With a 3.8 m (12.5 ft) storm surge, the agricultural industry in the area was devastated. The goal of this research was to determine the length of time required to reduce the salt levels brought by the storm surge to near pre-hurricane levels. To do this, four sets of samples were taken across two years and analyzed for salinity using the saturated paste extract method. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 79% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 30% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In April 2009, 38% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 13% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 71% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 39% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By December 2009, none of the soils sampled in the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 21% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 33% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By October 2010, all soils sampled had leached sufficient salts to be classified as non-saline to very slightly saline soils. Utilizing the November 2008 data set, 28 random samples were selected for exchangeable Na percent (ESP) in order to develop the ESP-SAR (Na adsorption ratio) predictive equation, ESP= 1.19(SAR)^0.82. The SAR-ESP relationship is statistically significant (95% confidence level), with a correlation coefficient of 0.964 (df=26).

Mueller, Ryan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Change Detection Algorithm for Retrieving High-Resolution Soil Moisture From SMAP Radar and Radiometer Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A change detection algorithm has been developed in order to obtain high-resolution soil moisture estimates from future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) L-band radar and radiometer observations. The approach combines ...

Piles, Maria

294

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the following topics; Global distribution of the major soils and land cover types, Geographic quantification of soil and changes on their properties, Sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, Partitioning of solar energy, Soils, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Carbon dioxide, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Methane.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? July 1, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis Lindsay Gsell After a harvest is over, crops can be sold, shipped, canned or consumed. But what happens to the parts of the crops that are inedible-the corn stover, stalks or cobs? Selling crop residues for bioenergy could provide farmers with an extra source of income. Yet, leaving some residue on the fields helps reduce soil erosion and maintain healthy levels of soil carbon and other nutrients. So how can land managers find this balance? Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing the Residue Removal Tool -- new software designed to simulate sustainability criteria -- to help find this balance of what to remove and what to leave behind. The software will

297

In situ enhanced soil mixing. Innovative technology summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing (ISESM) is a treatment technology that has been demonstrated and deployed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The technology has been developed by industry and has been demonstrated with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Science and Technology and the Office of Environmental Restoration. The technology is particularly suited to shallow applications, above the water table, but can be used at greater depths. ISESM technologies demonstrated for this project include: (1) Soil mixing with vapor extraction combined with ambient air injection. [Contaminated soil is mixed with ambient air to vaporize volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The mixing auger is moved up and down to assist in removal of contaminated vapors. The vapors are collected in a shroud covering the treatment area and run through a treatment unit containing a carbon filter or a catalytic oxidation unit with a wet scrubber system and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter.] (2) soil mixing with vapor extraction combined with hot air injection [This process is the same as the ambient air injection except that hot air or steam is injected.] (3) soil mixing with hydrogen peroxide injection [Contaminated soil is mixed with ambient air that contains a mist of diluted hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) solution. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution chemically oxidizes the VOCs to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water.] (4) soil mixing with grout injection for solidification/stabilization [Contaminated soil is mixed as a cement grout is injected under pressure to solidify and immobilize the contaminated soil in a concrete-like form.] The soils are mixed with a single-blade auger or with a combination of augers ranging in diameter from 3 to 12 feet.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Influence of Soil Cap Depth and Vegetation on Reclamation of Phosphogypsum Stacks in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study quantified environmental parameters to develop reclamation strategies for phosphogypsum stacks. Research was conducted on phosphogypsum stack experimental plots established in 2006 (6 soil (more)

Turner, Elizabeth Lenore

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interior Alaska as Social-Ecological System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

firewood river access / shallower #12;Social concerns · Oil development in ANWR · Outsiders harvesting

Ruess, Roger W.

300

Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive contaminants. Final report September 1992--October 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research and development project to remove uranium and related radioactive contaminants from soil by an ultrasonically-aided chemical leaching process began in 1993. The project objective was to develop and design, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale experimental studies, a cost-effective soil decontamination process to produce a treated soil containing less than 35 pCi/g. The project, to cover a period of about thirty months, was designed to include bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to remove primarily uranium from the Incinerator Area soil, at Fernald, Ohio, as well as strontium-90, cobalt-60 and cesium-137 from a Chalk River soil, at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario. The project goal was to develop, design and cost estimate, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale ex-situ soil treatment studies, a process to remove radionuclides form the soils to a residual level of 35 pCi/g of soil or less, and to provide a dischargeable water effluent as a result of soil leaching and a concentrate that can be recovered for reuse or solidified as a waste for disposal. In addition, a supplementary goal was to test the effectiveness of in-situ soil treatment through a field study using the Chalk River soil.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

DeLucia, Evan H.

302

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

309

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ecological Interactions Between Metals and Microbes That Impact Bioremediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples have been obtained from (a) soil highly contaminated with Cr (tannery site) and (b) soils contaminated with petroleum, Cr, and Pb (Seymour, IN). Microcosm experiments with the tannery site soil indicated that microbial biomass (assayed as phospholipid-phosphate) and activity (assayed as carbon dioxide evolution) were primarily determined by organic carbon availability, but not total Cr concentration. The toxicity of metals to the indigenous microbial populations of the Seymour soils was determined by measuring microbial activity (incorporation of tritiated leucine into protein) of cells extracted from soil particles in solutions of increasing metal concentration. Although total Cr concentration varied 100-fold in these soils, the inhibition constant for Cr toxicity varied < 3-fold. Of additional interest in one soil was the dose-response function; the response suggests the soil contains a complex mixture of microbes with different Cr resistance levels. Cr and Pb resistant bacteria have been isolated from these soil samples. In Arthrobacter sp. Cr15, Cr resistance was spontaneously lost at a frequency of ca. 0.5% after growth for 20 generations in non-selective medium. The wild-type contained a 60 kb plasmid. In two Cr sensitive strains, restriction fragment analysis has shown that 15 kb of the plasmid have been lost. Matings between the wild type and cured strains result in transfer of the Cr resistance phenotype at a frequency of 1%.

Konopka, Allan E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Maryland) (Maryland) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Departments of the Environment and Natural Resources are authorized to develop regulations to combat soil erosion and control the addition of sediment to waters of the state. As part of the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Program, an approved plan is required for any earth disturbance of

312

Salinization of Irrigated Urban Soils: A Case Study of El Paso, TX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to assess soil salinity levels in large landscape areas, such as golf courses, parks, and school grounds which were developed on various soil types in El Paso, Texas. The survey encompassed the East, the Central, the Northwest, and the Upper and Lower Valleys, covering 16 fairways at seven golf courses, 37 city parks, 30 school grounds, and 13 apartment landscapes on the Westside. The highest soil salinity (6 to 11 dS m-1) was found in the clayey soils of the Upper and Lower valleys, even when water of low salinity (650 to 750 ppm) had been used for irrigation. Spadoratic soil salinization was also observed in loamy soils of the South Central irrigated with city potable water, and topdressed soils of the Northwest after conversion to reclaimed water. Soil salinization was not observed in deep sand along I-10, and seldom in sandy calcic soils in the East and North Central, even though these soils contain a layer of caliche. Soil types play a role on soil salinization as much as does water quality.

Miyamoto, S.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

313

The behavior of soil-applied cyclotri- and cyclotetraphosphate in Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclotriphosphate (C3P) is of interest to soil scientists because it demonstrates little or no retention by soil constituents. Non-sorption is desirable in the development of mobile P fertilizers. Work was expanded to include cyclotetraphosphate (C4P), a larger but commercially unavailable cyclic P compound that is more stable than C3P in solution. High-purity C4P was prepared by ethanol precipitation of the hydrolysis products Of P4010. Improved methods of ion chromatography were applied to the analysis of cyclic P and all hydrolysis products extracted from soil using a water/0-5 M H2SO4/1 .0 M NAOH extraction procedure developed for this work. Separation and direct quantitative analysis of linear and cyclic polyphosphates were accomplished in less than 15 minutes. The rapidity and ease of these analyses represent a vast improvement over previous methods of polyphosphate analysis. Four diverse Texas soils received 1 00 and 400 gg cyclic P g-1 soil as either C3P or C4P and were incubated under different water, temperature, biological activity, and time regimes. The larger C4P was not appreciably sorbed in soil and was more stable than C3P under all conditions. Rate constants and the time to one half of initial P concentration were determined for each P. Kinetic data suggested that the hydrolysis of cyclic P in soils is complex, but cyclic P hydrolysis most likely follows first-order kinetics. The mechanism of C4P hydrolysis- particularly at low P application rates-may involve direct conversion of C4P to diphosphate and triphosphate (in addition to tetraphosphate), possibly due to phosphatase action in C4P hydrolysis. Temperature dependency of C3P and C4P hydrolysis was examined. All treatments showed Qlo treatments on Branyon clay). Nineteen soil parameters were examined for correlation with C3P and C4P hydrolysis. Numerous significant correlations (P < 0.05) were reported, but high intercorrelation among related soil factors was suspected, thus reducing the value of correlation analysis.

Trostle, Calvin Lewie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area-integrated properties within the sensor footprint. Therefore, the soil moisture values derived from these measurements are an area average. The variability in soil moisture within the footprint is introduced by inherent spatial variability present in rainfall, and geophysical parameters (vegetation, topography, and soil). The geophysical parameters/variables typically interact in a complex fashion to make soil moisture evolution and dependent processes highly variable, and also, introduce nonlinearity across spatio-temporal scales. To study the variability and scaling characteristics of soil moisture, a quasi-distributed Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) modeling framework is developed to simulate the hydrological dynamics, i.e., the fluxes and the state variables within the satellite-based soil moisture footprint. The modeling framework is successfully tested and implemented in different hydroclimatic regions during the research. New multiscale data assimilation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques in conjunction with the SVAT modeling framework are developed to quantify subpixel variability and assess multiscale soil moisture fields within the coarse-scale satellite footprint. Reasonable results demonstrate the potential to use these techniques to validate multiscale soil moisture data from future satellite mission e.g., Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission of NASA. The results also highlight the physical controls of geophysical parameters on the soil moisture fields for various hydroclimatic regions. New algorithm that uses SVAT modeling framework is also proposed and its application demonstrated, to derive the stochastic soil hydraulic properties (i.e., saturated hydraulic conductivity) and surface features (i.e., surface roughness and volume scattering) related to radar remote sensing of soil moisture.

Das, Narendra Narayan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Monitoring field soil suction using a miniature tensiometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental device was developed to monitor the field soil suction using miniature tensiometer. This device consists of a double tube system that ensures a good contact between the tensiometer and the soil surface at the bottom of the testing borehole. This system also ensures the tensiometer periodical retrieving without disturbing the surrounding soil. This device was used to monitor the soil suction at the site of Boissy-le-Ch\\^atel, France. The measurement was performed at two depths (25 and 45 cm) during two months (May and June 2004). The recorded suction data are analyzed by comparing with the volumetric water content data recorded using TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer) probes as well as the meteorological data. A good agreement between these results was observed, showing a satisfactory performance of the developed device.

Cui, Yu-Jun; Mantho, Altin Theodore; De Laure, Emmanuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A correlation between soil descriptions and {sup 226}Ra concentrations in Florida soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soil radium content in Florida is highly variable. The range in radium concentrations, where the samples involved in this study are concerned, is from 0.1 pCi/g to 18.5 pCi/g. Low {sup 226}Ra concentrations (0.1 to 5 pCi/g) are evidenced in sands, moderate concentrations (5 to 11 pCi/g) are found in silt and gravel, and high {sup 226}Ra concentrations (>11 pCi/g) are found in soil horizons with shell, clay, and strata with phosphate. Strata containing phosphate yields a high concentration of {sup 226}Ra. The information obtained in this study, soil descriptions with their corresponding {sup 226}Ra concentrations, comes from geological cores drilled by geotechnical consultants with gamma spectrometry analysis performed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy. Concentration; of {sup 226}Ra generally increase with depth. These cores are usually terminated at 20 feet deep, with some cores being shallower than this due to hitting bedrock or encountering the water table. These frequency distributions give the core-logging geologist an approximate concentration of {sup 226}Ra based on the description of the soil. Since the correlation of {sup 226}Ra and soil descriptions can be used as a tool in assigning indoor radon potential, this study is of importance to land managers, contractors, developers, and regulating agencies who are attempting to place standards on tracts of land with {sup 226}Ra concentration used as a criterion.

Harrison, D.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber - Oak Ridge National ...  

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber ... A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural

318

The effects of chronic nitrogen fertilization on alpine tundra soil microbial communities: implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that changes in nitrogen (N) availability affect primary productivity in a variety of terrestrial systems, but less is known about the effects of the changing N cycle on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We used a variety of techniques to examine the effects of chronic N amendments on SOM chemistry and microbial community structure and function in an alpine tundra soil. We collected surface soil (0-5 cm) samples from five control and five long-term N-amended plots established and maintained at the Niwot Ridge Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Samples were bulked by treatment and all analyses were conducted on composite samples. The fungal community shifted in response to N amendments, with a decrease in the relative abundance of basidiomycetes. Bacterial community composition also shifted in the fertilized soil, with increases in the relative abundance of sequences related to the Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes, and decreases in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobia. We did not uncover any bacterial sequences that were closely related to known nitrifiers in either soil, but sequences related to archaeal nitrifiers were found in control soils. The ratio of fungi to bacteria did not change in the N-amended soils, but the ratio of archaea to bacteria dropped from 20% to less than 1% in the N-amended plots. Comparisons of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, two broad categories of soil carbon compounds, revealed no between treatment differences. However, G-lignins were found in higher relative abundance in the fertilized soils, while proteins were detected in lower relative abundance. Finally, the activities of two soil enzymes involved in N cycling changed in response to chronic N amendments. These results suggest that chronic N fertilization induces significant shifts in soil carbon dynamics that correspond to shifts in microbial community structure and function.

Nemergut, Diana R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Townsend, Alan R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Taylor, John [University of California, Berkeley; Sattin, Sarah R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Freeman, Kristen R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Fierer, Noah [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Neff, Jason [University of Colorado, Boulder; Bowman, William D [University of Colorado, Boulder; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Weintraub, Michael N [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

320

The ecology of dust: local- to global-scale perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Emission and redistribution of dust due to wind erosion in drylands drives major biogeochemical dynamics and provides important aeolian environmental connectivity at scales from individual plants up to the global scale. Yet, perhaps because most relevant research on aeolian processes has been presented in a geosciences rather than ecological context, most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes. To bridge this disciplinary gap, we provide a general overview of the ecological importance of dust, examine complex interactions between wind erosion and ecosystem dynamics from the plant-interspace scale to regional and global scales, and highlight specific examples of how disturbance affects these interactions and their consequences. Changes in climate and intensification of land use will both likely lead to increased dust production. To address these challenges, environmental scientists, land managers and policy makers need to more explicitly consider dust in resource management decisions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UA; Belnap, Jayne [NON LANL; Breshears, David D [UA; Neff, Jason [CU; Okin, Gregory S [UCLA; Painter, Thomas H [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Ravi, Sujith [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Reheis, Marith C [UCLA; Reynolds, Richard L [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Systematic Variability of Soil Hydraulic Conductivity Across Three Vertisol Catenas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil hydraulic properties, such as saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), have high spatial variation, but little is known about how to vary a few measurements of Ks over an area to model hydrology in a watershed with complex topography and multiple land uses. Variations in soil structure, macropores (especially in soil that shrink and swell), land use, and soil development can cause large variations in Ks within one soil type. Characterizing the impacts of soil properties that might vary systematically with land use and terrain attributes on Ks rates would provide insight on how management and human activity affect local and regional hydrology. The overall objective of this research was to develop a strategy for using published infiltration and Ks measurements by the Natural Resources Conservation Service for watershed hydrology applications in a Vertisol, and to extend this knowledge toward developing recommendations for future infiltration measurements. To achieve this goal, soil infiltration measurements were collected across three catenas of Houston Black and Heiden clays (fine, smectitic, thermic Udic Haplusterts) under three land uses (improved pasture, native prairie, and conventional tillage row crop). Measurement locations were selected to account for variation in terrain attributes. Overall, Ks values were not significantly different across different landscape positions; however, in fields under similar land uses, Ks values were found to be lower in the footslope positions and higher in the backslope positions. The pedotransfer function, ROSETTA, provided estimates of 64 percent of the overall variability in Ks while also providing accurate estimates of the mean of Ks when particle size distribution and bulk density are used as inputs in the model. Through the use of multiple regression analysis, soil antecedent water content, bulk density, clay content, and soil organic carbon along with two indicator variables for the catenas were highly correlated (r2 = 0.59) with Ks. The indicator variables explained 17 percent of the variation in Ks that could not be explained by measured soil properties. It is recommended that when NRCS measures Ks on benchmark soils, especially high clay soils, that they collect particle size distribution, bulk density, organic carbon, and antecedent water content data.

Rivera, Leonardo Daniel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

326

A Physically Based Model of Soil Freezing in Humid Climates Using Air Temperature and Snow Cover Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional heat flow model is developed to estimate depths of soil freezing and thawing using a daily time step. This physically based model assumes near-saturated soil moisture conditions and simulates freezing under bare soil and sod ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Environmental research needs for geothermal resources development. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis was conducted to determine the adequacy of the total research efforts regarding the potential environmental impacts related to the exploration, drilling, production, and transmission stages of vapor-dominated, liquid-dominated, geopressured, and hot-dry-rock geothermal resources. The following environmental considerations were selected and analyzed in detail: air emissions (hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, mercury, boron, radon, etc.); liquid emissions (brine, and toxic chemicals); land subsidence; seismic activity; and noise. Following the definition of the problem and the assessment of the past and ongoing research efforts, environmental research needs were then recommended based on: (1) the severity of the environmental problems as perceived by literature and contacts with the research community; (2) probability of occurrence; (3) and the research dependency for a solution to that particular problem. The recommended research needs consisted of: (1) an evaluation of the past and ongoing research efforts to ascertain gaps in knowledge for a particular pollutant, process, or control technology; (2) baseline studies of air, soil, water, and ecology around the existing geothermal facilities and in the locations scheduled for future geothermal development; (3) need for the development of appropriate models for predicting concentration and dispersion of pollutants; (4) development of predictive models for potential health and environmental effects associated with geothermal operations; and (5) development of appropriate control technology to destroy, remove or reduce harmful emissions in order to prevent the occurrence of environmental and health hazards and to comply with existing standards and criteria.

Carstea, D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbo-contaminated soils, comprehensive report, December 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU), Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. A major focus of this program has been the demonstration of bioremediation techniques to cleanup the soil and sediment associated with a waste lagoon at the Czechowice Oil Refinery (CZOR) in southern Poland. After an expedited site characterization (ESC), treatability study, and risk assessment study, a remediation system was designed that took advantage of local materials to minimize cost and maximize treatment efficiency. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system. The CZOR, our industrial partner for this project, was chosen because of their foresight and commitment to the use of new approaches for environmental restoration. This program sets a precedent for Poland in which a portion of the funds necessary to complete the project were provided by the company responsible for the problem. The CZOR was named by PIOS (State Environmental Protection Inspectorate of Poland) as one of the top 80 biggest polluters in Poland. The history of the CZOR dates back more than 100 years to its establishment by the Vacuum Oil Company (a U.S. company and forerunner of Standard Oil). More than a century of continuous use of a sulfuric acid-based oil refining method by the CZOR has produced an estimated 120,000 tons of acidic, highly weathered, petroleum sludge. This waste has been deposited into three open, unlined process waste lagoons, 3 meters deep, now covering 3.8 hectares. Initial analysis indicated that the sludge was composed mainly of high molecular weight paraffinic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The overall objective of this full-scale demonstration project was to characterize, assess and remediate one of these lagoons. The remediation tested and evaluated a combination of U.S. and Polish-developed biological remediation technologies. Specifically, the goal of the demonstration was to reduce the environmental risk from PAH compounds in soil and to provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. The site was characterized using the DOE-developed Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) methodology. Based on the results of the ESC, a risk assessment was conducted using established U.S. procedures. Based on the results of the ESC and risk assessment, a 0.3-hectare site, the smallest of the waste lagoons, was selected for a modified aerobic biopile demonstration. This Executive Summary and the supporting report and appendices document the activities and results of this cooperative venture.

Hazen, Terry

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Appendix C and D, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH APPENDIX C SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH A literature search is conducted to obtain information on contaminants of concern, their potential ecological effects, and species of concern. This appendix is separated into two sections; Section C-1 describes the information necessary for the literature review portion of an ecological risk assessment. Topics include information for exposure profiles, bioavailability or bioconcentration factors for various compounds, life-history information for the species of concern or the surrogate species, and an ecological effects profile. Section C-2 lists information sources and techniques for a literature search and review. Topics include a discussion of how to select key words on which to base a search

330

Why Sequence Permafrost Soil Microbiota?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Research Principal Investigators: Mark Waldrop, US Geological Services Program: CSP 2010 Home > Sequencing > Why Sequence Permafrost Soil Microbiota? UC logo DOE logo...

331

Why sequence soil bacterial communities?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as part of this project. Principal Investigators: Stephanie Eichorst, Los Alamos National Laboratory Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence soil bacterial communities...

332

Carbon Sequestration in European Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments...

333

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids...

334

Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS`s capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories.

Patten, J.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach that utilizes various characterization technologies has been developed for the Uranium Soil Integrated Demonstration program. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation site near Cincinnati, Ohio, was selected as the host facility for this demonstration. Characterization of background, untreated contaminated, and treated contaminated soils was performed to assess the contamination and the effect of treatment efforts to remove uranium from these soils. Carbonate minerals were present in the contaminated soils (added for erosion control) but were absent in the nearby background soils. Because of the importance of the carbonate anion to uranium solubility, the occurrence of carbonate minerals in these soils will be an important factor in the development of a successful remediation technology. Uranium partitioning data among several particle-size fractions indicate that conventional soil washing will be ineffective for remediation of these soils and that chemical extraction will be necessary to lower the uranium concentration to the target level (52 mg/kg). Carbonate-based (sodium carbonate/bicarbonate) and acid-based (sulfuric and citric acids) lixiviants were employed for the selective removal of uranium from these soils. Characterization results have identified uranium phosphate minerals as the predominant uranium mineral form in both the untreated and treated soils. The low solubility associated with phosphate minerals is primarily responsible for their occurrence in the posttreated soils. Artificial weathering of the treated soils caused by the treatments, particularly acid-based lixiviants, was documented by their detrimental effects on several physicochemical characteristics of these soils (e.g., soil pH, particle-size distribution, and mineralogy).

Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Timpson, M.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Event:Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South...

337

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stress, reactive oxygen species (ROS; e.g., hydrogen peroxide) and ROS-scavenging molecules (e.g., APX that together make these organisms of central ecological and economic importance. On the one hand, as oxygenic photosynthesizers, about 50% of the known species play a vital role in oxygen evolution and ocean primary production

Bermingham, Eldredge

338

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs and benefits of a robust but possibly inappropriate response and a sensitive but possibly costly one. Such costs and benefits arise from the ecology of a particular system. Here, I consider how the nest mound and for- aging trails before foraging begins. Foragers find food and #12;510 The American

Tyler, Charles

339

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Romanian e-learning experience in ecological agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecolearning is the first research project to test the methodology for e-learning training to organic producers in Romania. Given the necessary equipment (computer + software properly) and opportunities for farmers in Romania, Ecolearning address to: ... Keywords: e-learning, ecological agriculture, training courses

Daniela Cristiana Alexandrescu; Ion Toncea; Valentina Ofelia Robescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Empirical characterisation of agent behaviours in socio-ecological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-based modelling has become an important tool to investigate socio-ecological processes. Its use is partially driven by increasing demand from decision makers to provide support for understanding the potential implications of decisions in complex ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling

Alex Smajgl; Daniel G. Brown; Diego Valbuena; Marco G. A. Huigen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Point Probability Distributions of Frozen Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some areas of the Pacific Northwest, frozen soils play a major role in surface runoff, soil erosion and sedimentation, but quantitative descriptions of the frequency and severity of soil frost are lacking.

J. F. Zuzel; J. L. Pikul Jr.; R. N. Greenwalt

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site.

Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

ARM - Evaluation Product - Critical soil quantities for describing land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land properties Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Critical soil quantities for describing land properties 1994.01.01 - 2012.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The ARMBELAND is a subset of the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) products for supporting community land-atmospheric research and land model developments. It contains several critical soil quantities that ARM has been measuring for many years for describing land properties. The quantities in ARMBE-Land are averaged over one hour time interval, consistent with other ARMBE datasets. It is recommended to use with other ARMBE data products such as ARMBECLDRAD (cloud and radiative fluxes) and ARMBEATM (surface

347

Soil Density/Moisture Gauge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil Density/Moisture Gauge Soil Density/Moisture Gauge Soil Density/Moisture Gauge This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 - Radioactive). This exercise manual is one in a series of five scenarios developed by the Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP). Responding agencies may include several or more of the following: local municipal and county fire, police, sheriff and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel; state, local, and federal emergency response teams; emergency response contractors; and other emergency response resources that could potentially be provided by the carrier and the originating facility (shipper).

348

Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO{sub 2}). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

International Scholarly Research Network ISRN Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1978 through identification of Areas of Concern (AOC), sites within the Great Lakes that had impairment referring to fish (see Table 1). Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) were developed for each AOC, in order. There are 8 AOC sites throughout the Lake Ontario shoreline, with differing problems and losses of beneficial

McMaster University

350

Proceedings: Second Thermal Ecology and Regulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a recent thermal discharge issues workshop that examined recent developments and future trends. Thermal discharge issues are receiving increasing attention from government agencies and electric power companies. The report will be of particular value to power company environmental staff, government regulators, and water resource managers.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes in the land-atmosphere continuum. Presence of soil moisture in the root zone is vital for the crop and plant life cycle. Soil moisture distribution is highly non-linear across time and space. Various geophysical factors (e.g., soil properties, topography, vegetation, and weather/climate) and their interactions control the spatio-temporal evolution of soil moisture at various scales. Understanding these interactions is crucial for the characterization of soil moisture dynamics occurring in the vadose zone. This dissertation focuses on understanding the spatio-temporal variability of near-surface soil moisture and the associated physical control(s) across varying measurement support (point-scale and passive microwave airborne/satellite remote sensing footprint-scale), spatial extents (field-, watershed-, and regional-scale), and changing hydro-climates. Various analysis techniques (e.g., time stability, geostatistics, Empirical Orthogonal Function, and Singular Value Decomposition) have been employed to characterize near-surface soil moisture variability and the role of contributing physical control(s) across space and time. Findings of this study can be helpful in several hydrological research/applications, such as, validation/calibration and downscaling of remote sensing data products, planning and designing effective soil moisture monitoring networks and field campaigns, improving performance of soil moisture retrieval algorithm, flood/drought prediction, climate forecast modeling, and agricultural management practices.

Joshi, Champa

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

White, G.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production of organic matter and its decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops. Conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels. Disruption of soil matrix structure by cultivation leads to lowered physical protection of organic matter resulting in an increased net mineralization rate of soil carbon. Climate change is another perturbation that affects the amount and composition of plant production, litter inputs, and decomposition regimes but does not affect soil structure directly. Nevertheless, large changes in soil carbon storage are probable with anticipated CO2 induced climate change, particularly in northern latitudes where anticipated climate change will be greatest (MacCracken and Luther 1985) and large amounts of soil organic matter are found. It is impossible, given the current state of knowledge of soil organic matter processes and transformations to develop detailed process models of soil carbon dynamics. Largely phenomenological models appear to be developing into predictive tools for understanding the role of soil organic matter in the global carbon cycle. In particular, these models will be useful in quantifying soil carbon changes due to human land-use and to anticipated global climate and vegetation changes. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Post, W.M. III

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Determining uranium speciation in contaminated soils by molecular spectroscopic methods: Examples from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s former uranium production facility located at Fernald, OH (18 mi NW of Cincinnati) is the host site for an Integrated Demonstration for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. A wide variety of source terms for uranium contamination have been identified reflecting the diversity of operations at the facility. Most of the uranium contamination is contained in the top {approximately}1/2 m of soil, but uranium has been found in perched waters indicating substantial migration. In support of the development of remediation technologies and risk assessment, we are conducting uranium speciation studies on untreated and treated soils using molecular spectroscopies. Untreated soils from five discrete sites have been analyzed. We have found that {approximately}80--90% of the uranium exists as hexavalent UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} species even though many source terms consisted of tetravalent uranium species such as UO{sub 2}. Much of the uranium exists as microcrystalline precipitates (secondary minerals). There is also clear evidence for variations in uranium species from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale. However, similarities in speciation at sites having different source terms suggest that soil and groundwater chemistry may be as important as source term in defining the uranium speciation in these soils. Characterization of treated soils has focused on materials from two sites that have undergone leaching using conventional extractants (e.g., carbonate, citrate) or novel chelators such as Tiron. Redox reagents have also been used to facilitate the leaching process. Three different classes of treated soils have been identified based on the speciation of uranium remaining in the soils. In general, the effective treatments decrease the total uranium while increasing the ratio of U(IV) to U(VI) species.

Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of soil samples from California. Additional data came from soil surveys of Italy, Greece, Iran, Thailand, Vietnam, various tropical Amazonian areas, and U.S. forests and from...

356

Sustainability or Sustainable Development: An Anthropological Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, drinking water and electricity and some offices also established. During the process of development Kuma!s lost about 70 percent of their land, traditional pottery occupation, forest and clay resources and traditional practices. The new migrants were... . An unpublished M. Phil.. thesis submitted to Social Anthropology Department, University of Bergen, Norway: Moran, E., 1979 Human Adaptability: An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology. Colorado: Westview press. Milton, K., 1997 "Ecologies: anthropology, culture...

Kattel, Shambhu Prasad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

HO #10 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Lambers et al. (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HO #10 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Lambers et al. (2008) CO2 #12;HO #11 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Lambers et al. (2008) From Sage (1994) Photosynthesis Research 27:605-617 #12;HO #12 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Larcher (1995) Fom Lambers et al. (2008) #12

Nowak, Robert S.

358

From Theory to Application: Extreme Fire, Resilience, Restoration, and Education in Social-Ecological Disciplines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptual and theoretical advancements have been developed in recent years to break down the assumptions and traditional boundaries that establish seemingly independent disciplines, and the research outlined in this dissertation aspires to build on these advancements to provide innovative solutions to a broad array of modern problems in social-ecological. I used a variety of techniques to address challenges ranging from disconnections between theory and application, perceived versus realized roles of prescribed fire in resprouting shrublands, and the need for broader participation in research as part of undergraduate education. The chapters in this dissertation serve as a case-study approach across multiple scientific disciplines that overcome the traditions and assumptions that conflict with our ability to develop innovative solutions to modern social-ecological problems. First, I bridge theoretical and applied concepts by showing how recent theoretical advancements in resilience can be integrated into a predictive framework for environmental managers. Second, experimental data from multiple experiments were collected in two ecological regions of Texas to assess the potential for using extreme fire, in isolation and in combination with herbicide, as a novel intervention approach in resprouting shrublands of the southern Great Plains. The findings from these experiments demonstrate the importance of moving past traditional assumptions of when prescribed fire should be applied to demonstrate new patterns of woody plant responses to the applications of more extreme prescribed fires while not causing undesirable invasions by exotic grasses and exotic insects. Finally, I initiated a PhD instructed course on undergraduate research that sought to increase undergraduate participation while lowering the costs of conducting research. This chapter shows how traditional approaches of supporting undergraduate research are incapable of meeting the broader goals established by society and reveal a novel approach that can provide an additional pathway for supporting undergraduate student participation at large, research-based universities. Ultimately, this research suggests that our capacity to enhance services in social-ecological systems ultimately hinges upon the integration of theoretical and applied concepts that drive policy and governance and overcoming the assumptions and traditions that limit their integration.

Twidwell, Dirac

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

360

Reducing Uncertainty in Fisheries Management: The Time for Fishers' Ecological Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation work presents a novel method for addressing system uncertainty to improve management of a small-scale fishery in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Using fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK), this research examines existing perspectives and biases through the Q-Method to identify regulatory inefficiencies in the management framework and strengthen the rationale for including fishers into the management process, develops a coupled behavior-economics model to predict the likelihood of fishing the preferred grounds under a range of physical and regulatory conditions, establishes a baseline assessment of a spawning aggregation of mutton snapper following sixteen years of protection through a no-take marine protected area, and conducts a discrete choice method test to examine likely public support for FEK-based proposed regulatory alternatives. This work contributes to an under-studied and much-needed area of fisheries management, that of incorporating socioeconomic motivations within an ecosystem-based framework. As fisheries management efforts begin to embrace ecosystem-based approaches, the need for understanding and incorporating the knowledge and behavior of fishers into management has never been greater. Ecological goals of fishery sustainability and continued habitat function cannot be achieved without first understanding how fishers view and respond to any regulatory environment and then developing a framework that achieves the greatest support for those regulations. The time has come for incorporating FEK into ecosystem-based fisheries management.

Carr, Liam

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Third Thermal Ecology and Regulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a 2011 workshop on thermal discharge issues that examined recent developments and future trends. Thermal discharge issues are receiving increased attention from government agencies and electric power companies; consequently, the report will be of particular value to power company environmental staff, government regulators, water resource managers, and the general public.BackgroundIn October 2011, more than 100 people met at Great River ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Field Studies of Soil Vapor Intrusion at a Vacant Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Site in Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive two-phase field-based research program was completed at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site located in Wisconsin during the summer of 2008. The purpose of this ongoing research study is to develop improved approaches and methodologies for characterizing the potential for vapor intrusion (VI) at MGP sites. This report describes the methods, results, and limited data interpretation of Phase I (Passive Soil Gas Survey) and Phase II (Soil, Groundwater, and Soil Gas Sampling) at the vac...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine scaling properties of surface soil moisture using passive microwave remote sensing. The study was divided into two parts. For the first study, a root zone soil moisture assessment tool (SMAT) was developed in the ArcGIS platform by fully integrating a one-dimensional vadose zone hydrology model (HYDRUS-ET) with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation capability. The tool was tested with dataset from the Southern Great Plain 1997 (SGP97) hydrology remote sensing experiment. Results demonstrated that SMAT displayed a reasonable capability to generate soil moisture distribution at the desired resolution at various depths of the root zone in Little Washita watershed during the SGP97 hydrology remote sensing experiment. To improve the model performance, several outstanding issues need to be addressed in the future by: including "effective" hydraulic parameters across spatial scales; implementing subsurface soil properties data bases using direct and indirect methods; incorporating appropriate hydrologic processes across spatial scales; accounting uncertainties in forcing data; and preserving interactions for spatially correlated pixels. The second study focused on spatial scaling properties of the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-based remotely sensed surface soil moisture fields in a region with high row crop agriculture. A wavelet based multi-resolution technique was used to decompose the soil moisture fields into larger-scale average soil moisture fields and fluctuations in horizontal, diagonal and vertical directions at various resolutions. The specific objective was to relate soil moisture variability at the scale of the PSR footprint (800 m X 800 m) to larger scale average soil moisture field variability. We also investigated the scaling characteristics of fluctuation fields among various resolutions. The spatial structure of soil moisture exhibited linearity in the log-log dependency of the variance versus scale-factor, up to a scale factor of -2.6 (6100 m X 6100 m) irrespective of wet and dry conditions, whereas dry fields reflect nonlinear (multi-scaling) behavior at larger scale-factors.

Das, Narendra N.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Perennial grasses for energy and conservation: Evaluating some ecological agricultural, and economic issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; Walsh, M.; McLaughlin, S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Coupled Soil Moisture and Surface Temperature Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for soil moisture and soil surface temperature prediction for bare soil is considered in this paper. In describing evaporation rate. soil structure and moisture were taken into account as much as possible. Soil moisture prediction was ...

F. cs; D. T. Mihailovi?; B. Rajkovi?

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The evolutionary ecology of dwarfism in three-spined sticklebacks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U(VI) com- plexation by SHA in these experiments is small. The Windemere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM, E. (1994). WHAM--A chemical equilibrium model and computer code for waters, sediments, and soils

Nottingham, University of

368

Michael Scott Robeson II Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Continuous Trapping-Magnetic Activated Cell Sorter (CT-MACS) with the merits of handling a small amount, on the surface of low acid fruits and vegetables, and as spores in soil. These toxins are known

Colorado at Boulder, University of

369

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

Francis, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

(SCOPE workshop on Landscape boundaries: Consequences for biotic diversity and ecological flows): Foreign trip report, December 12--15, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the foreign travel of R.H. Gardner of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), who attended the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) workshop, ''Landscape Boundaries: Consequences for Biotic Diversity and Ecological Flows,'' at the SCOPE headquarters in Paris, France. R.H. Gardner was invited by SCOPE, which paid expenses excluding salary, to participate in the presentation and discussion of the theoretical and empirical evidence of boundary effects on ecosystem dynamics. Ecotones, the transition zones between landscape elements, appear important in mediating the structure and functioning of ecological systems. The participants of the workshop represented a diverse array of scientists; they were invited to synthesize existing information, formulate theory, and develop management strategies. The Paris meeting concentrated on the theoretical and empirical means of measuring ecotone effects and the possible climate-mediated change in the structure and functioning of ecotones.

Gardner, R.H.

1988-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2005 Math-Science-Technology Institute Oak Ridge, Tennessee Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area ARC Participants Darin Baugess Ben Mordan Debi Owens Yvonne Shafer Mentors Larry Pounds Harry Quarles Final Presentations Pollard Auditorium July 22, 2005 Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area Introduction: The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of approximately 33,000 to 36,000 acres. This large forested area of land contains numerous unique habitats and communities that are disappearing from other areas in Tennessee and the Southeast US. In 2004 John Devereux Joslin, Jr. investigated one community in the north end of the Oak Ridge Reservation called the East

374

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Researchers of Plants, Roots, and Soil Shed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Researchers of Plants, Roots, and Soil Shed National Laboratory Researchers of Plants, Roots, and Soil Shed Light on Arctic Ecosystem Polygon formations in Alaska provide researchers with a unique natural laboratory with which to study the Arctic and, by extension, the Earth's climate. Image credit: NGEE-Arctic Polygon formations in Alaska provide researchers with a unique natural laboratory with which to study the Arctic and, by extension, the Earth's climate. Image credit: NGEE-Arctic (hi-res image) This feature describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory research presented at the 98th annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. The theme of the meeting, held Aug. 4-9 in Minnesota, is "Sustainable Pathways: Learning From the Past and Shaping the Future." Despite the enormity of climate research in the past couple of decades, one

375

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks An array of pioneering research, dealing with various aspects of soil chemistry, has appeared in Soil Science for the past 90 years. In this review, two papers others that he published in Soil Science established the importance of variable or pH- dependent surface

Sparks, Donald L.

376

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

Cathy A. Wills

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Experimental Study of Bridge Scour in Cohesive Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bridge scour depths in cohesive soil have been predicted using the scour equations developed for cohesionless soils due to scarce of studies about cohesive soil. The scour depths predicted by the conventional methods will result in significant errors. For the cost effective design of bridge scour in cohesive soil, the Scour Rate In COhesvie Soil (SRICOS) for the singular circular pier in deep water condition was released in 1999, and has been developed for complex pier and contraction scour. The present study is the part of SRICOS-EFA method to predict the history of contraction scour, and local scours, such as abutment scour and pier scour. The main objective is to develop the prediction methods for the maximum and the uniform contraction scour depth, the maximum pier scour depth and the maximum abutment using flume test results. The equations are basically composed with the difference between the local Froude number and the critical Froude number. Because the scour happens when the shear stress is bigger than the critical shear stress, which is the maximum shear stress the channel bed material can resist from the erosion, and continues until the shear stress becomes equal to the critical shear stress. All results obtained from flume tests for pier scour have been conducted in Texas A&M University from 1997 to 2002 are collected and reanalyzed in this study. Since the original pier scour equation did not include soil properties. The effect of water depth effect, pier spacing, pier shape and flow attack angle for the rectangular pier are studied and correction factors with respect to the circular pier in deep water condition were newly developed in present study. For the abutment scour, a series of flume tests in large scale was performed in the present study. Two types of channel - rectangular channel, and compound channel - were used. The effect of abutment length, shape and alignment of abutment were studied and the correction factors were developed. The patterns of velocity and of scour were compared, and it was found that the maximum local scour occurred where the maximum turbulence was measured. For the contraction scour, the results obtained from a series of flume tests performed in 2002 and a series of flume tests for the abutment scour in the present study are analyzed. The methodologies to predict the maximum contraction scour and the uniform contraction scour in the compound channel was developed. Although all prediction methods developed in the present study are for the cohesive soils, those methods may be applicable to the cohesionless soils because the critical shear stress is included in the methods. All prediction methods were verified by the comparison with the databases obtained from flume test results and field data.

Oh, Seung Jae

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under mass. The model includes both sediment transport and chemical denudation. A simplified two-phase model is developed; the two phases are a chemically immobile phase, which has far lower solubility than the bulk soil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Rigorous evaluation of a soil heat transfer model for mesoscale climate change impact studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of Climate Change on plant development as well as on carbon and nitrogen cycling in soils is an important research topic for Global Change impact assessment at the regional scale. These changes affect the availability and quality of ground ... Keywords: Energy balance, GLOWA-Danube, Land surface, Mesoscale, Soil temperature

Markus Muerth; Wolfram Mauser

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Why Sequence an Alaskan Soil?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the soil community examined through the lens of one function. Bringing to bear the sequencing power of JGI on this project will enable researchers to obtain a good test of the...

383

Modeling Soil Quality Thresholds to Ecosystem Recovery at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil C and N dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. The model calculates aboveground and belowground biomass, soil C inputs and dynamics, soil N stocks and availability, and plant N requirements. A threshold is crossed when predicted soil N supplies fall short of predicted N required to sustain biomass accrual at a specified recovery rate. Four factors were important to development of thresholds to recovery: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Thresholds to ecosystem recovery predicted by the model should not be interpreted independent of a specified recovery rate. Initial soil C stocks influenced the predicted patterns of recovery by both old field and forest ecosystems. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds to recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning generally lie below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass (18000 versus 360 g m{sup -2} for forests and old fields, respectively). Calculations with the model indicated that reestablishment of vegetation on barren sites to a level below the desired future condition is possible at recovery rates used in the model, but the time to 100% recovery of desired future conditions, without crossing a nutrient threshold, is prolonged by a reduced rate of forest growth. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils are apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization in more sandy soils. Calculations with the model indicate that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determines the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Accumulation and replacement of exchangeable sodium in soils of Southeast Texas under turfgrass and its effect on soil infiltration rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many municipal water supplies in Southeast Texas have a relatively high level of Ne and low total dissolved solids. Smectitic clays which respond to wetting by swelling, especially when wetted with high Na waters of low salinity are the major clays in soils of this area. This study assessed the degree of Na accumulation on cation exchange sites as affected by gypsum treatments in soils that support turfgrass (bermudagrass) and the response of soil infiltration rate to different rates of gypsum amendment by using rainfall simulation. A field experiment was conducted on a sodic, non-saline Boonville soil (fine, montmorillonitic, thennic Ruptic Vertic Albaqualf) amended with gypsum at rates equivalent to 5 0%, I 00% and 200% of the exchangeable Na in the soil to a depth of 15 cm. Application of gypsum resulted in similar infiltration rates (IR) which were lower than the untreated plots suggesting a significant difference between treated and untreated soils 9 wk after application. However, at 36 wk after application, treated and untreated soils had similar IR with no statistical difference between treatments. Soils of the study area varied somewhat in textural class, but generally had more than 20 % clay within the 0-IO cm depth. Clay content in the 0-10 cm depth was not correlated with IR at the 20-min measurement. These results suggest the channels developed by roots may enable water to enter the soil in spite of clay content and degree of sodic character. The gypsum treatments statistically affected the levels of extractable Ca and Na in some plots and some depths. Treated plots had higher extractable Ca than untreated plots for the 01 0 cm depth for all sites, but treatment rates did not show a significant difference for each site in the same depth. Levels of extractable Na were statistically lower for treated plots than untreated ones for the 0-I 0 cm depth at all sites. For all sites gypsum application did not have significant effects on levels of extractable Mg and K at all depths and times. Even though the pH of the soils tended to decrease with application of gypsum, untreated soils also showed a decrease in pH over the course of the study and pH was not statistically significant.

Aydemir, Salih

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Method for Creating anA Method for Creating an Ecological Site Extent MapEcological Site Extent Map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

067XY150WY.R067XY150WY. 1.1. Enter theEnter the Ecological Site IDEcological Site ID 2.2. Enter aEnterMapArcMap Open Arc Toolbox and use the searchOpen Arc Toolbox and use the search function for the termfunction for the term Merge.Merge. Double clickDouble click thethe MergeMerge tool under thetool under the Data

386

Book review: Basic and Applied Ecology 4, pp. 281 (2003). Gibson DJ: Methods in comparative plant population ecology. Oxford University Press,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book review: Basic and Applied Ecology 4, pp. 281 (2003). Gibson DJ: Methods in comparative plant-19-850562-0 In recent years a number of useful books on methods in plant ecology have been published, e.g. Hendry). However, most of them deal with specialised aspects and a more general book aimed at intermediate students

Gibson, David

387

Moisture retention properties of a mycorrhizal soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water relations of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants have been compared often, but virtually nothing is known about the comparative water relations of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal soils. Mycorrhizal symbiosis typically affects soil structure, and soil structure affects water retention properties; therefore, it seems likely that mycorrhizal symbiosis may affect soil water relations. We examined the water retention properties of a Sequatchie fine sandy loam subjected to three treatments: seven months of root growth by (1) nonmycorrhizal Vigna unguiculata given low phosphorus fertilization, (2) nonmycorrhizal Vigna unguiculata given high phosphorus fertilization, (3) Vigna unguiculata colonized by Glomus intraradices and given low phosphorus fertilization. Mycorrhization of soil had a slight but significant effect on the soil moisture characteristic curve. Once soil matric potential (\\11m) began to decline, changes in \\II m per unit change in soil water content were smaller in mycorrhizal than in the two nonmycorrhizal soils. Within the range of about-1 to-5 MPa, the mycorrhizal soil had to dry more than the nonmycorrhizal soils to reach the same \\11m. Soil characteristic curves of non mycorrhizal soils were similar, whether they contained roots of plants fed high or low phosphorus. The mycorrhizal soil had significantly more water stable aggregates and substantially higher extraradical hyphal densities than the nonmycorrhizal soils. Importantly, we were able to factor out the possibly confounding influence of differential root growth among mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal

Robert M. Augel; Ann L. W. Stodola; Layme E. Tims; Arnold M. Saxton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Daily Soil Temperature Dataset and Soil Temperature Climatology of the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although affected by atmospheric circulations, variations in soil temperature result primarily from the radiation and sensible and latent heat exchanges at the surface and heat transfer in the soils of different thermal properties. Thus, soil ...

Qi Hu; Song Feng

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Using a Soil Hydrology Model to Obtain Regionally Averaged Soil Moisture Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soil Hydrology Model (SHM) was modified, and daily simulations of soil volumetric water content were made at 38 Oklahoma Mesonet sites for July 1997. These model results were compared with soil moisture observations made at the mesonet sites ...

Todd M. Crawford; David J. Stensrud; Toby N. Carlson; William J. Capehart

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 21382149 Heterogeneity of soil nutrients and subsurface biota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Acid-neutralizing potential (ANP, the combina- tion of soil constituents/Mn, ANP) and K availability, N (total ARTICLE IN PRESS Table 2 Soil chemistry by soil crust and microsite

Neher, Deborah A.

391

Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple soil heat transfer model is used together with an adaptive Kalman filter to estimate the daily averaged soil volumetric water contents from diurnal variations of the soil temperatures measured at different depths. In this method, the ...

Shu-Wen Zhang; Chong-Jian Qiu; Qin Xu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Comments on Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scheme was proposed by Zhang et al. to estimate soil water content from soil temperature measurements by using an adaptive Kalman filter. Their scheme is based on the fact that soil heat capacity and thermal conductivity are a monotonic ...

Kun Yang; Toshio Koike

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite this important role, many recent studies show that explicitly including the hydrologic effects of soil ice in land surface models degrades the ...

Guo-Yue Niu; Zong-Liang Yang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 2. Ecological sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in Environment, Health, and Safety conducted during fiscal year 1979 is reported. This volume consists of project reports from the Ecological Sciences research department. The reports are grouped under the following subject areas: National Environmental Research Park and land use; Alaskan resource research; shale oil; synfuels; nuclear waste; fission; marine research programs; statistical development of field research; nuclear fusion; pumped storage and hydroelectric development; pathways modelling, assessment and Hanford project support; electric field and microwave research; and energy research for other agencies. (ACR)

Vaughan, B.E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Appendix G: Quality Assurance/Quality Control InformationAppendix G.1 Investigating VOC Losses During Postdemonstration Soil Core Recovery and Soil Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field procedures for collecting soil cores and soil samples from the steam injection plot were modified in an effort to minimize VOC losses that can occur when sampling soil at elevated temperatures (Battelle, 2001). The primary modifications included: (1) additional personnel safety equipment, such as thermalinsulated gloves for core handling; (2) the addition of a cooling period to bring the soil cores to approximately 20C before collecting samples; and (3) capping the core ends while the cores were cooling. Concerns were raised about the possibility that increased handling times during soil coring, soil cooling, and sample collection may result in an increase in VOC losses. An experiment was conducted using soil samples spiked with a surrogate compound to investigate the effectiveness of the field procedures developed for LC34 in minimizing VOC losses. Materials and Methods Soil cores were collected in a 2-inch diameter, 4-foot long acetate sleeve that was placed tightly inside a 2-inch diameter stainless steel core barrel. The acetate sleeve was immediately capped on both ends with a protective polymer covering. The sleeve was placed in an ice bath to cool the heated core to below ambient groundwater temperatures (approximately 20C). The temperature of the soil core was monitored during the cooling process with a meat thermometer that was pushed into one end cap (see Figure G-1). Approximately 30 minutes was required to cool each 4-foot long, 2-inch diameter soil core from 50-95C to below 20C (see Figure G-2). Upon reaching ambient temperature, the core sleeve was then uncapped and cut open along its length to collect the soil sample for contaminant analysis (see Figure G-3).

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Vineyard nutrient needs vary with rootstocks and soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drain nutrients from sandy soils. CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE Chardonnay on Egbert clay (sandy loam variant) soils at onewas Zinfandel on a Sierra sandy loam soil. At all three

Lambert, Jean-Jacques; Anderson, Michael M; Wolpert, J A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Global Soils Data, Sept. 5, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soils Data, Sept. 5 Soils Data, Sept. 5 The ORNL DAAC expanded its global data holdings to include the three additional data sets related to soil characteristics. "Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)" This data set consists of homogenized data for 1125 soil profiles, including soil classification, site data, soil horizon data, source of data, and methods used for determining analytical data. The profiles were derived from the World Inventory of Soil Emissions Potentials (WISE) project. The data set contains a selection of 665 profiles from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, 250 profiles from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and 210 profiles from the reference collection of the International Soil Reference and Information

398

Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

Luxmoore, R.J.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays Laura A. Wendling,* James B) on rhizosphere soil as compared with bulk soil. This study The strongest association between Cs and the soil

Flury, Markus

400

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

Unknown

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Soil fixative study progress report aerial application test:  

SciTech Connect

A soil fixative has been developed (a simple wheat flour paste mixture) and tested in the laboratory that appears suitable for the temporary fixation of radioactive dusts in case of an accidental spill. A limited field test was made and the feasibility of aircraft delivery examined. A videotape was made of the operations. 3 figs.

Teter, A.C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Parameterization of Evaporation from Bare Soil Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model of evaporation from a bare soil surface is developed. This model combines two processes of water vapor transport: one is the vapor transport in air expressed by the bulk formula, and the other is molecular diffusion of vapor in the ...

Junsei Kondo; Nobuko Saigusa; Takeshi Sato

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Review and model-based analysis of factors influencing soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. A simple, multi-compartment model was developed to predict soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) plantations in the southeastern United States. Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of sustainable switchgrass production for bioenergy because soil organic matter promotes water retention, nutrient supply, and soil properties that minimize erosion. A literature review was included for the purpose of model parameterization and five model-based experiments were conducted to predict how changes in environment (temperature) or crop management (cultivar, fertilization, and harvest efficiency) might affect soil carbon storage and nitrogen losses. Predictions of soil carbon sequestration were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass production, and temperature. Predictions of ecosystem nitrogen loss were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the soil C/N ratio, and nitrogen remobilization efficiency (i.e., nitrogen cycling within the plant). Model-based experiments indicated that 1) soil carbon sequestration can be highly site specific depending on initial soil carbon stocks, temperature, and the amount of annual nitrogen fertilization, 2) response curves describing switchgrass yield as a function of annual nitrogen fertilization were important to model predictions, 3) plant improvements leading to greater belowground partitioning of biomass could increase soil carbon sequestration, 4) improvements in harvest efficiency have no indicated effects on soil carbon and nitrogen, but improve cumulative biomass yield, and 5) plant improvements that reduce organic matter decomposition rates could also increase soil carbon sequestration, even though the latter may not be consistent with desired improvements in plant tissue chemistry to maximize yields of cellulosic ethanol.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Ecological Interactions Between Metals and Microbes That Impact Bioremediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous work showed the correlation between bacterial biomass, population structure and the amount of lead, chromium and aromatic compounds present along a 21.6 m transect in which the concentrations of both heavy metals (Pb and Cr) and aromatic compounds varied 2-3 orders of magnitude. This work suggested that (a) biomass level was better correlated to the level of biodegradable organic C than the level of heavy metals, (b) microbial community composition differed between highly contaminated soils and uncontaminated ones, and (c) substantial microbial activity was found even in the highly contaminated soils. One confounding factor in these analyses was that the contaminated soils contained Pb, Cr, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Therefore, it was difficult to determine which factors were most important in the shifts of microbial community composition. Therefore, experiments were conducted in microcosms in which individual factors could be systematically varied. In this case, soils were used from the Seymour, IN site which had low levels of contamination, and the microbial community had little chance to adapt to heavy metals or aromatic compounds.

Konopka, Allan E.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microscopic characterization of radionuclide contaminated soils to assist remediation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of optical, scanning, and analytical electron microscopies have been used to describe the nature of radionuclide contamination at several sites. These investigations were conducted to provide information for remediation efforts. This technique has been used successfully with uranium-contaminated soils from Fernald, OH, and Portsmouth, OH, thorium-contaminated soil from a plant in Tennessee, plutonium-contamination sand from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and incinerator ash from Los Alamos, NM. Selecting the most suitable method for cleaning a particular site is difficult if the nature of the contamination is not understood. Microscopic characterization allows the most appropriate method to be selected for removing the contamination and can show the effect a particular method is having on the soil. A method of sample preparation has been developed that allows direct comparison of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, enabling characterization of TEM samples to be more representative of the bulk sample.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Soil carbon model Yasso07 graphical user interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present a graphical user interface software for the litter decomposition and soil carbon model Yasso07 and an overview of the principles and formulae it is based on. The software can be used to test the model and use it in simple applications. Yasso07 is applicable to upland soils of different ecosystems worldwide, because it has been developed using data covering the global climate conditions and representing various ecosystem types. As input information, Yasso07 requires data on litter input to soil, climate conditions, and land-use change if any. The model predictions are given as probability densities representing the uncertainties in the parameter values of the model and those in the input data - the user interface calculates these densities using a built-in Monte Carlo simulation.

Tuomi, Mikko; Repo, Anna; Vanhala, Pekka; Liski, Jari

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Proceedings of the symposium on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Ecology Programs  

SciTech Connect

The symposium covered all aspects of ecological research being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site in southeastern Idaho. Entries wer made for the individual papers.

Markham, O.D.; Arthur, W.J. (eds.)

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The ecology of chemical defence in a filamentous marine red alga.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I investigated the ecological functions of halogenated secondary metabolites from the red alga Asparagopsis armata, their localisation in specialised cells and also their cost of (more)

Paul, Nicholas Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Of fish and people: Managerial ecology in Newfoundland and Labrador cod fisheries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation aims to understand the history of, and possible alternatives to, managerial responses to socio-ecological issues by examining one of the largest natural resource (more)

Bavington, Dean Louis Yelwa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The United States Regional Association of the International Association for Landscape Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from a meeting on landscape ecology. Topics include: conservation, climatic change, forest management, aquatic, wetland, rural and urban landscapes, land use, and biodiversity.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The United States Regional Association of the International Association for Landscape Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from a meeting on landscape ecology. Topics include: conservation, climatic change, forest management, aquatic, wetland, rural and urban landscapes, land use, and biodiversity.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

CURRICULUM VITAE, LAWREN SACK Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Tel: 310-825-6525  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest, Petersham, MA. 4. Sack L, Holbrook NM. 2002. Leaf `hydrology': linking hydraulic conductance Forest Ecology Symposium, Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA. 2. Sack L. 2001. Temperate woody seedling

Grether, Gregory

415

update: Beyond taxonomical space: large?scale ecology meets functional and phylogenetic diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

andfunctionaldiversity. FunctionalEcology,25, Gaston,Beyond taxo? nomic diversity patterns: how do ?, ?andphylogenetic diversity respond to environmental

Cianciaruso, Marcus V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary, March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study identified 59 waste sites at 14 DOE facilities across the nation that exhibit radionuclide contamination in excess of established limits. The rapid and efficient characterization of these sites, and the potentially contaminated regions that surround them represents a technological challenge with no existing solution. In particular, the past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of surface and subsurface soils. Such contamination commonly occurs within waste burial sites, cribs, pond bottom sediments and soils surrounding waste tanks or uranium scrap, ore, tailings, and slag heaps. The objective of the Uranium In Soils Integrated Demonstration is to develop optimal remediation methods for soils contaminated with radionuclides, principally uranium (U), at DOE sites. It is examining all phases involved in an actual cleanup, including all regulatory and permitting requirements, to expedite selection and implementation of the best technologies that show immediate and long-term effectiveness specific to the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and applicable to other radionuclide contaminated DOE sites. The demonstration provides for technical performance evaluations and comparisons of different developmental technologies at FEMP sites, based on cost-effectiveness, risk-reduction effectiveness, technology effectiveness, and regulatory and public acceptability. Technology groups being evaluated include physical and chemical contaminant separations, in situ remediation, real-time characterization and monitoring, precise excavation, site restoration, secondary waste treatment, and soil waste stabilization.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

418

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the present status and future trends concerning the effect of soils and their cover on the fluxes of greenhouse gases, the surface energy balance and the water balance. Comprising the proceedings of the conference on soils and the greenhouse effect, the book reviews the background of existing research in the field, while also identifying significant gaps in our understanding of the scientific issues and pointing the way to future work. In addition, the contributors discuss a wide range of topics, including geographic quantification of soil properties involved in fluxes of greenhouse gases; measurement of fluxes and extrapolation to smaller scales; remote sensing of land use; and regional estimation of evaporation and energy fluxes. Throughout, the emphasis is on quantification of greenhouse gas fluxes, evapotranspiration, and energy fluxes.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.

Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Risk Reduction and Soil Ecosystem Restoration in an Active Oil Producing Area in an Ecologically Sensitive Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The empowerment of small independent oil and gas producers to solve their own remediation problems will result in greater environmental compliance and more effective protection of the environment as well as making small producers more self-reliant. In Chapter 1 we report on the effectiveness of a low-cost method of remediation of a combined spill of crude oil and brine in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Osage County, OK. Specifically, we have used hay and fertilizer as amendments for remediation of both the oil and the brine. No gypsum was used. Three spills of crude oil plus produced water brine were treated with combinations of ripping, fertilizers and hay, and a downslope interception trench in an effort to demonstrate an inexpensive, easily implemented, and effective remediation plan. There was no statistically significant effect of treatment on the biodegradation of crude oil. However, TPH reduction clearly proceeded in the presence of brine contamination. The average TPH half-life considering all impacted sites was 267 days. The combination of hay addition, ripping, and a downslope interception trench was superior to hay addition with ripping, or ripping plus an interception trench in terms of rates of sodium and chloride leaching from the impacted sites. Reductions in salt inventories (36 months) were 73% in the site with hay addition, ripping and an interception trench, 40% in the site with hay addition and ripping only, and < 3% in the site with ripping and an interception trench.

Kerry L. Sublette; Greg Thoma; Kathleen Duncan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Deriving soil moisture with the combined L-band radar and radiometer measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we develop a combined active/passive technique to estimate surface soil moisture with the focus on the short vegetated surfaces. We first simulated a database for both active and passive signals under SMAP's ...

Shi, Jiancheng

422

Regional Modeling of Ammonia Emissions from Native Soil Sources in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a new emissions inventory of ammonia volatilization from native soil sources (excluding direct emissions from fertilizer application sources) for the state of California is discussed. Because a comprehensive measurement dataset ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Charles Krauter

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

An AirSoil Layer Coupled Scheme for Computing Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airsoil layer coupled scheme is developed to compute surface fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat from data collected at the Oklahoma Atmospheric Radiation MeasurementCloud and Radiation Testbed (ARMCART) stations. This new scheme ...

Qin Xu; Binbin Zhou; Stephen D. Burk; Edward H. Barker

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ecological Applications, 18(4), 2008, pp. 911927 2008 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability globally, through changes to the Earth's energy budget (Houghton et al. 2001). In the southwestern), Juni- perus osteosperma (Torr) Little (Utah juniper), Ephedra viridis Cov. (Mormon tea), and Purshia-developed biological crusts indicating minimal grazing pressure. The majority of the biomass was P. edulis and J

Ehleringer, Jim

425

BIOREMEDIATION OF URANIUM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND WASTES.  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (i) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (ii) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na released into solution are removed, thus reducing the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

FRANCIS,A.J.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Global Soil Data Release, Dec. 20, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Data Available The ORNL DAAC has released a data set entitled "Global Gridded Surfaces of Selected Soil Characteristics (IGBP-DIS)." The data surfaces were generated by the...

427

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

428

The Global Soil Moisture Data Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture is an important variable in the climate system. Understanding and predicting variations of surface temperature, drought, and flood depend critically on knowledge of soil moisture variations, as do impacts of climate change and ...

Alan Robock; Konstantin Y. Vinnikov; Govindarajalu Srinivasan; Jared K. Entin; Steven E. Hollinger; Nina A. Speranskaya; Suxia Liu; A. Namkhai

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils According to 20 NMAC 9.1.704 704. REQUIRED), or other applicable statutes. Page 1 of 1Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils 4

430

Maryland Soil Conservation Districts Law (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to conserve the soil, water, and related resources of the state through establishing regulations for land-use practices related to soil erosion. This legislation...

431

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World 1 ­ 6 August 2010, Brisbane, Australia. Published on DVD. 160 Nickel Speciation in Serpentine Soils using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques Matthew Siebecker and Donald L Sparks 152 Townsend Hall, Department of Plant and Soil

Sparks, Donald L.

433

Soil Interfaces in a Changing World International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Interfaces in a Changing World 6th ISMOM International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with Organic Components and Microorganisms 3rd InterCongress of Commission 2.5 IUSS Soil chemical Ginder-Vogel, and Gautier Landrot Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil

Sparks, Donald L.

434

Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Soil Moisture: Empirical Data and Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique dataset of soil moisture in the upper 1-m soil layer at sites with natural plant cover in the Soviet Union is compared to simulations of soil moisture for the present climate by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Oregon State ...

K. Ya Vinnikov; I. B. Yeserkepova

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

437

SOILS--------Bacillus thuringiensis were spliced into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOILS-------- Bacillus thuringiensis were spliced into a maize hybrid, known as Bt corn, to create.geotimes.org Donald L. Sparks N oW is an exciting time to be a soil scientist. We face many chal lenges, the wise use of soil and ecosystems will become ever more important in meet ing food production needs

Sparks, Donald L.

438

A Soil Moisture Climatology of Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years of soil moisture measurements (biweekly from March through September and monthly during winter) within the top 1 m of soil at 17 grass-covered sites across Illinois are analyzed to provide a climatology of soil moisture for this ...

Steven E. Hollinger; Scott A. Isard

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Numerical simulation of unsaturated soil behaviour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils is one of the challenging topics in the field of geotechnical engineering. The use of finite element techniques is considered to be a promising method to solve settlement and heave problems, which are associated ... Keywords: FEM, constitutive modelling, finite element method, geotechnical engineering, mechanical behaviour, shallow foundation, shallow foundations, soil behaviour, suction variation, unsaturated soils

Ayman A. Abed; Pieter A. Vermeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z