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1

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This Page Intentionally Left Blank EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document describes the process used to derive a set of risk-based ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for many of the soil contaminants that are frequently of ecological concern for plants and animals at hazardous waste sites and provides guidance for their use. The Eco-SSL derivation process represents the group effort of a multi-stakeholder workgroup consisting of federal, state, consulting, industry, and academic participants led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). The

2

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil.

Friday, G. P.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 7188 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 71­88 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition. Spongberg Department of Earth, Ecological and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 for quantification of ecological impact of chemical contamination of soils. This study examined the effects

Neher, Deborah A.

4

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE-BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER EROSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE- BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER change and intensification have resulted in accelerated rates of soil erosion in many areas of the world quantification of accelerated soil erosion. Ecological site soil erosion Variation in the simulated erosion rates

5

Applied Soil Ecology 18 (2001) 3945 Demography of Paronychiurus kimi (Lee) (Collembola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied Soil Ecology 18 (2001) 39­45 Demography of Paronychiurus kimi (Lee) (Collembola Seokyoung Kang, Won II Choi, Mun II Ryoo Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering are important biological components of soil ecological systems (Crossley et al., 1992; Seastedt, 1984). Changes

Neher, Deborah A.

6

Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Service; Justin Klure, Oregon Wave Energy Trust; Greg McMurray, Oregon Department of Land Conservation

7

Research on Development of Solar Energy and Ecology Building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our countrys solar energy resources are extremely rich. This paper mainly introduces the research on development of solar energy and ecological building. Based on the literature ... the development and the appli...

Sheng Qingqing; Zhang Xuelai; Lv Leilei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Applied Soil Ecology 74 (2014) 2129 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Soil and Crop Science, Colorado State University, CO, USA b Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, CO, USA c Department of Biology, Colorado State University, CO, USA d Research, Switzerland e Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment & School of Science and Health, University of Western

Wall, Diana

9

Phytoremediation offers an ecologically and economically attractive remediation technique for soils contaminated with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decade, phytoremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, and ground water has emerged1439 Phytoremediation offers an ecologically and economically attractive remediation technique Kow 3­5) and are more water soluble and bioavailable than the high MW PAHs, and are thus moderately

10

A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil  

SciTech Connect

Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

Suter, G.W. II

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

Friday, G. P.

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Redefining ecological engineering to promote its integration with sustainable development and tighten its links with the whole of ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Redefining ecological engineering to promote its integration with sustainable development and tighten its links with the whole of ecology Frédéric Gosselin Institute for Agricultural and Environmental in "Ecological Engineering", vol. 32, n°3, pp.199-205 (doi: 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2007.11.007). Available at http

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Production-ecological modelling explains the difference between potential soil N mineralisation and actual herbage N uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We studied two different grassland fertiliser management regimes on sand and peat soils: above-ground application of a combination of organic N-rich slurry manure and solid cattle manure (SCM) vs. slit-injected, mineral N-rich slurry manure, whether or not supplemented with chemical fertiliser (non-SCM). Measurements of field N mineralisation as estimated from herbage N uptake in unfertilised plots were compared with (i) potential N mineralisation as determined from a standard laboratory soil incubation, (ii) the contribution of groups of soil organisms to N mineralisation based on production-ecological model calculations, and (iii) N mineralisation calculated according to the Dutch fertilisation recommendation for grasslands. Density and biomass of soil biota (bacteria, fungi, enchytraeids, microarthropods and earthworms) as well as net plant N-uptake were higher in the SCM input grasslands compared to the non-SCM input grasslands. The currently used method in Dutch fertilisation recommendations underestimated actual soil N supply capacity by, on average, 102kg Nha?1 (202 vs. 304kgha?1=34%). The summed production-ecological model estimate for N mineralisation by bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and enchytraeids was 87120% of the measured potential soil N mineralisation. Adding the modelled N mineralisation by earthworms to potential soil N mineralisation explained 98107% of the measured herbage N uptake from soil. For all grasslands and soil biota groups together, the model estimated 105% of the measured net herbage N uptake from soil. Soil biota production-ecological modelling is a powerful tool to understand and predict N uptake in grassland, reflecting the effects of previous manure management and soil type. The results show that combining production ecological modelling to predict N supply with existing soil N tests using aerobic incubation methods, can add to a scientifically based improvement of the N fertilisation recommendations for production grasslands.

Muhammad Imtiaz Rashid; Ron G.M. de Goede; Lijbert Brussaard; Jaap Bloem; Egbert A. Lantinga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development the capacity to harvest wave energy off its coast as a clean, renewable resource. An important part of moving this agenda forward must include understanding the potential effects of wave energy technology

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

15

Application and Development of the Ecological Environment Carrying Capacity Evaluation Information System on Coal Mining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some proper indexes, AHP method and GIS model are adopted for quantitative analysis and comprehensive evaluation of the ecological environment carrying capacity on coal mining. The ecological environment carrying capacity evaluation information system ... Keywords: coal mining, evaluation information system, ecological environment carrying capacity, GIS second development

Ying-chun Wei; Dai-yong Cao; Jian Wu; Chao Yu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Inverting sustainable development? Rethinking ecology, innovation and spatial limits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the years, two strands of thought on Sustainable Development (SD) have emerged, often identified as ecologism and environmentalism, respectively. This paper suggests that there exists a third rhetorically excluded option, namely large-scale industrial expansion into space. Access to raw materials found on the Moon as well as unfiltered solar energy would dramatically increase the stock of resources and energy while providing unlimited sinks for pollutants; thus satisfying two of the determining factors of sustainability. Traditionally, the dilemma of resource scarcity has been a concern for environmentalists calling for a reduction of energy and material flows. Correspondingly, the promise of space exploration has been limited to technological optimists whose economic framework rarely acknowledges any such scarcity. By reconciling the politics of scarcity with technological optimism, this paper proposes a unifying political vision for the 21st century.

Rasmus Karlsson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Excavated soil reuse Development of a French management framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Environment asked BRGM and INERIS to draft a methodological guidance document related to the off-site reuse values. Excavated soil off-site reuse methodology The presentation will focus on the main principlesTex, concerns groundwater risk assessment. It was developed to verify that the off- site reuse of excavated soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

Overall Roadmap for Ecological and Environmental Technology Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We should strive to build the science and technology support system of a harmonious society, by ... of Chinas ecological and environmental science and technology areas accurately, identify strategic focuses and ...

Jingzhu Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Departments - Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

departments > ecology departments > ecology Ecology Department Core Capabilities Advanced Technology Bioenergy Biofuels Human Health Soil Systems Water Resources People Facilities, Centers & Labs Publications Ecology Department Principal Investigators Gary Andersen Harry Beller Nicholas Bouskill Eoin Brodie Romy Chakraborty Eric Dubinsky Hoi-Ying Holman Christer Jansson Janet Jansson Nigel Quinn Tamas Torok Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Historical Background ecology comic In 1995 the Center for Environmental Biotechnology was set up as a multidivisonal center under the direction of Dr. Jennie Hunter-Cevera. In 1998, the Ecology Department was created within the Earth Sciences

20

Development of an ultrasonic process for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect

An ultrasonic process for the detoxification of carbon tetrachloride- (CCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) contaminated soil was investigated in the laboratory by using a batch irradiation reactor equipped with a 600-W ultrasonic power supply operated at a frequency of 20 kHz. Key parameters studied included soil characteristics, irradiation time, CCl{sub 4} concentration, steady-state operating temperature, applied ultrasonic-wave energy, and the ratio of soil to water in the system. The results of the experiments showed that (1) residual CCl{sub 4} concentrations could be decreased with longer irradiation periods and (2) detoxification efficiency was proportional to steady-state operating temperature and applied ultrasonic-wave energy. The characteristics of the contaminated soil were found to be an important factor in the design of an ultrasonic detoxification system. A soil-phase CCl{sub 4} concentration below 1 ppm (initial concentration of 56 ppm) was achieved through this process, indicating that the application of ultrasonic irradiation is feasible and effective in the detoxification of soil contaminated by organic compounds. On the basis of the experimental results, a schematic of a full-scale ultrasonic soil-detoxification system was developed. Improvements to this novel process are discussed.

Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Reusable Cutlery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation, transportation, energy consumption, and compostability. The economic assessment consists of a financial cost analysis while the social assessment discusses the ethical and human rights implications, social impacts

22

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Soils developed from alluvial and proluvial deposits in the Grndalselva River valley in West Spitsbergen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The genetic characterization of soils developed from alluvial and proluvial deposits in the Grndalselva River valley (West Spitsbergen) is presented. These soils are ... texture of the soils in the Grndalselva ...

V. N. Pereverzev; T. I. Litvinova

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991... Major Subject: Civil Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Approved as to style and content by: Stuart A. a terman (Co-chair of Committee) Andrew . cFa land (Member) Bill Batchelor (Co...

McQuown, Brian C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Soil loss: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's soil budget is analysed and the causes of loss and degeneration are described. The main efforts to solve the problems of soil los should be concentrated on: 1. (i) the preparation of international guidelines for conservation policy; 2. (ii) declaration of an International Soil Conservation Decade; 3. (iii) acceleration of and support for land assessment; 4. (iv) development of national planning for alternative land uses; 5. (v) research to establish ecologically sound policies for land use and conservation.

V.A. Kovda

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of an on-site ex-situ unsaturated-flow remediation process for trace metal contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Innovative means and methods were tested to develop an economical, pragmatic and environmentally sustainable soil remediation process for heavy metal contaminated soils. An unsaturated-flow soil (more)

Andrade, Marc-David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Developing a Soil Property Database for the Oklahoma Mesonet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study was to create a comprehensive database of soil hydraulic and physical properties of the Oklahoma Mesonet station soils. Replicate soil (more)

Scott, Bethany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

An ecological concept for the assessment of side-effects of agrochemicals on soil microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High quality data describing changes in the biotic compartments of soils are indispensable prerequisites for ecotoxicological characterization of chemicals. Numerous results from careful experimental work are ...

K. H. Domsch; G. Jagnow; Traute-Heidi Anderson

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Applied Soil Ecology 23 (2003) 187198 Species diversity and spatial distribution of enchytraeid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

communities in forest soils: effects of habitat characteristics and heavy metal contamination Pawel Kapusta but was not influenced by heavy metal content in soil. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords of anthropogenic impacts (such as pollution) upon the structure and ecosystem function of biotic communi- ties

Weiner, January

30

Ecology 2004 18, 584591  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional Ecology 2004 18, 584­591 © 2004 British Ecological Society 584 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. WEICHT,* D. L. MOORHEAD* and R. L. SINSABAUGH* *Department of Earth, Ecological and Environmental productivity, soil respiration Functional Ecology (2004) 18, 584­591 Introduction Net ecosystem responses

Neher, Deborah A.

31

Ecology 2005 93, 231243  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 231­243 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS Darkness visible: reflections on underground ecology A. H. FITTER Department of Biology Journal of Ecology (2005) 93, 231­243 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2005.00990.x Soil, science and civilization

Bruns, Tom

32

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Kevin Preston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Kevin Preston LCA of New ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;University of British Columbia LCA of New UBC Pharmacy Building Life Cycle

33

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Alex Biczok  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Alex Biczok LCA Study ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;1 Alex Biczok CIVL 498 LCA Study of Hennings #12;2 Executive Summary

34

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable RAPIDLY RENEWABLE MATERIALS: WOOL AND CORK Done by: Bin Ou-Yang David Tan Ritesh Bhan #12;i ABSTRACT This report presents an investigation into the feasibility of using two rapidly renewable materials, cork

35

UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LCA Totem Park Residence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LCA ­ Totem Park of a project/report." #12;March 18, 2009 LCA ­ TOTEM PARK RESIDENCES Abstract This study looks at the total an idea of what the total embodied impact of the building complex is. The goal and scope of an LCA must

36

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Analysis (LCA or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;LCA of Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Complex #12;2 LCA of Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre Submitted by

37

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Reusable Food Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by researching and utilizing various green and sustainable ideas. One of these ideas involves the installationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation..................................................................................................................................... 21 #12;2 Abstract With the future construction of the new Student Union Building (SUB), Alma Mater

38

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Sustainable Water Consumption -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in green building design projects. As part of the new Student Union Building project, the Alma MaterUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Sustainable Water Consumption - Water Bottles versus WaterFillz Units Alireza Tavassoli, Yee Chung Wong, Sina

39

UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report GHG Emissions Data Tracker User Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report GHG Emissions Data of a project/report." #12;GHG Emissions Data Tracker User Manual #12;Add/Edit vehicles Vehicles type addition field #12;Add New GHG Emissions Data This is the average CO2 data, distinguish by year, that user can

40

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% by 2015 and 80% by 2020, before achieving Zero Waste by 2030. The team modeled expected waste by 2020 would save UBC 4,750 tonnes of CO2 equivalents from 2014-2020 The Net Present Value, using the JaccardUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The socioeconomic effects of uranium development in south Texas: a human ecological approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and organizational effects of such developments. Finally, through a combination of participant observation and inter- viewing of community leaders, an attempt will be made to determine the socioeconomic ramifications of uranium de- velopments on communities...THE SOCIOECONOMIC FFFECTS OF URANIUM DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH TEXAS: A HUMAN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH A Thesis by PAMELA CHRIS HOPKINS Submitted to tne Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Hopkins, Pamela Chris

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Contact - Sliding and Separation Non-linear springs * Material ElasticPlastic * Non-linear soil behavior * Non-linear behavior between soil and structure (i.e. the...

43

Avoiding and Mitigating Soil Compaction Associated with Natural Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term impact of well drilling and pipeline instal- lation activities on your soils and their future and pipeline- laying activities; limit drilling activities to periods of expected drier soil conditions defined terms for repairs on dam

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

44

Development of the NIST Rocky Flats Soil Standard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Rocky Flats Soil-II Standard reference material (SRM) ... values and uncertainties for the radionuclides in the Rocky Flats Soil II SRM.

S. Nour; K. Inn; J. Filliben

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste, Conserving Natural Resources: Composting Toilets for the New SUB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................................................13 Designing for sustainability: green buildingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste­2008)........................................................................................................35 Appendix C: Maintenance manual for C.K. Choi Building at UBC .....................................41

46

Ecological improvement and sustainable development in European skiing resorts by adapting the EU-Eco-Audit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The range of environmental problems in European skiing resorts caused by winter sports, agriculture and summer tourism are all well known. The issues and management challenges relate to sensitive ecological conditions, construction activities, deficiencies in visitor management and an land use conflicts during summer. One new approach to manage these problems is the EU-Eco-Audit. In test sites in Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Austria a successful adaptation of the EU-Eco-Audit framework to ski resorts has been developed. The implementation of the Audit framework at these test sites led to positive effects concerning visitor and ecological management. One influencing factor for the future development is the positive public image concerning environmental aspects. Crucial to the implementation of the Eco-Audit-framework is whether it will assist ski resorts in their competition with other destiantions for hosting international events. Finally the acceptance of the certificates or awards by skiers is discussed. It will be argued that due to the increasing relevance of information provision and marketing of wintersport destinations via the internet, the auditing or award concept contributes to a positive image of these enterprises and destinations in the market place. 2

Ulrike Prbstl

47

A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND EROSION POLK COUNTY, NEBRASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as part of a much broader ecological system. This development is expressed in the expanded concept of soilA DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND EROSION IN POLK COUNTY, NEBRASKA A.E. Gadem1-based decision-support systems are powerful, new tools for assessing inherent soil productivity and potential

Reichenbach, Stephen E.

48

Greg Skupien | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecology, UGA Greg Skupien is currently pursuing a Masters in Conservation Ecology and Sustainable Development in the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia under...

49

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ahmed Attieh, Andrew Chutskoff, Brandon Clague, Jonathan Bridle, Tyler Hawkins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an example of UBC's commitment to sustainability, climate change action, and green building innovationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ahmed Attieh, Andrew to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings

50

Ecology 2002 90, 223234  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Ecology 2002 90, 223­234 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science Ltd and JILL LANCASTER Institute of Ecology and Resource Management, University of Edinburgh, Darwin Building-words: allometry, landscape pattern, peatland development, spatial processes Journal of Ecology (2002) 90, 223

51

Development of a Soil Conservation Standard and Guidelines for OHV Recreation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a Soil Conservation Standard and Guidelines for OHV Recreation Management (OHV) Recreation Management. Per state legislation, the 1991 standards were updated to establish Recreation Management also allowed for sustainability of trail systems and recreation opportunities. A key

Ahmad, Sajjad

52

Development of a method for determination of radon emanation from small soil samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADON EMANATION FROM S~ SOIL SAMPLES A Thesis by MICHAEL VINCENT MADONIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Health Physics DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADON EMANATION FROM SMALL SOIL SAMPLES A Thesis by MICHAEL VINCENT MADONIA Approved as to style and content by: Milton E. Mc...

Madonia, Michael Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Centre for Sustainable Information Management: A Business Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/documents management. #12;The Centre for Sustainable Information Management (CSIM): A Business Plan iii The design of the CSIM building will be Gold Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified. The facilityUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Centre for Sustainable

55

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into New SUB Rooftop Garden Irrigations Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the new SUB roof. When it comes to sustainability, having the building be as green as possible into sustainability. The amount of water saved within the 100 year life span of the new SUB building is crucialUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into New

56

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EMPOWERING EATERS TO MAKE CLIMATE-FRIENDLY CHOICES: A PUBLIC EDUCATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Website Interactive GameError! Bookmark not defined. #12;3 #12;4 ABSTRACT The UBC Food System Project stakeholders from the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems (CSFS) at UBC Farm and the 100-Mile Diet SocietyUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EMPOWERING EATERS TO MAKE

57

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report David Goertsen, Ehssan Ghahremani, Isaac Choi, Jackie Dang, Vineet Mahendru  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report David Goertsen, Ehssan the students of APSC 262 to research and identify a vehicle capable of delivering multiple orders throughout campus. The vehicle needed to handle a specific amount of food in a given time period, while being

58

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line assessment of transport options for the UBC farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line and analyzes viable vehicle options to be used at the UBC Farm using Triple bottom line assessment. These options include powering the vehicle with the traditional fossil fuels, natural gas, biodiesel, or use

59

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategies for Commercializing the Small Diameter Douglas-fir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategies the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;WOOD 465 ASSIGNMENT Marketing Strategies may think of this huge market and find a new way to commercialize our small diameter Douglas

60

Predictive ecology: systems approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the fluidity of science. Q. Rev. Biol...need for systems approaches. Phil. Trans...Ecology and resource management: a quantitative approach. New York, NY...to develop the science of ecoinformatics along with approaches specific to ecological...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Scale, shale, and the state: political ecologies and legal geographies of shale gas development in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent work on legal geographies has arguably paid far too little attention to the environment as both an object of governance and a terrain of struggle with respect to the law. Conversely, political ecology as a...

Eleanor Andrews; James McCarthy

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nuclear-energy complexes and the economic and ecological problems of nuclear power development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the long term, serious economic and ecological problems may arise if the required scale and rate of growth of power production is to be ensured while retaining the principle of dispersed location of ever large...

N. A. Dollezhal'; V. N. Bobolovich; I. Ya. Emel'yanov; A. I. Churin

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, temperatures measured at a depth of 2-meters is an efficient method for mapping thermal anomalies at a high level of detail. This is useful for augmenting deeper

64

Serological and Ecological Characteristics of a Nodule-Dominant Serotype from an Indigenous Soil Population of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2 Medford (bean) 67 0.6 0.9 Klamath Falls (alfalfa) 20 0.8 4.1 Soil under...AR23, and AS27. In contrast to the fall rhizosphere response, host-serotype...M. Means. 1963. Serological groups of Rhizobium japonicum recovered...

Kamtin Leung; Kathryn Yap; Narjes Dashti; Peter J. Bottomley

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011

66

CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION  

SciTech Connect

A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report APSC 261 Sustainability Project An Investigation Into the Use of Cob and/or Straw Bale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report APSC 261 Sustainability, Rebecca Guo, Zi Zhang Source: Green Building Elements Project An Investigation Into the Use of Cob and/or Straw Bale Construction in Non-residential Buildings

68

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practices from their suppliers in all three pillars of sustainability: social, ecological, and economical Methodology page 6 Findings page 7 Other Universities page 8 Sustainable Packaging page 13 Discussion page 15 the sustainability of food system at UBC Vancouver. By researching the current polices of other universities as well

69

Exploring the effects of local development regulations on ecological landscape structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological approach to land-use planning is essential to maintain the long-term sustainability of ecosystem benefits, services, and resources. Concern about environmental quality and the long-term livability of urban areas is now a driving force...

Kim, Jin Ki

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

71

Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site  

SciTech Connect

The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Cyanide leaching from soil developed from coking plant purifier waste as influenced by citrate  

SciTech Connect

Soils in the vicinity of manufactured gas plants and coal coking plants are often highly contaminated with cyanides in the form of the compound Prussian blue. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of citrate on the leaching of iron-cyanide complexes from an extremely acidic soil (pH 2.3) developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking plant. The soil contained 63 g kg{sup -1} CN, 148 g kg{sup -1} Fe, 123 g kg{sup -1} S, and 222 g kg{sup -1} total C. Analysis of the soil by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of Prussian blue, gypsum, elemental sulfur, jarosite, and hematite. For column leaching experiments, air-dried soil was mixed with purified cristabolite sand at a ratio of 1:3 and packed into chromatography columns. The soil was leached with dilute (0.1 or 1 mM) CaCl{sub 2} solutions and the effluent was collected and analyzed for total and dissolved CN, Ca, Fe, SO{sub 4}, pH, and pe. In the absence of citrate, the total dissolved CN concentration in the effluent was always below current drinking water limits (< 1.92 {mu}M), indicating low leaching potential. Adding citrate at a concentration of 1 mM had little effect on the CN concentrations in the column effluent. Addition of 10 or 100 mM citrate to the influent solution resulted in strong increases in dissolved and colloidal CN concentrations in the effluent.

Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Soil Science and Soil Ecology Group, Faculty of Geosciences

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ecology and Greater Prairie-Chicken  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology and Management of the Greater Prairie-Chicken Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University E-969E-969E-969 Ecology, Editor Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology and Management Department of Plant and Soil

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

75

Ecology 2005 93, 159167  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gradient, soil salinity, Spartina alterniflora, zonation Journal of Ecology (2005) 93, 159­167 doi: 10. Plant zonation in low-latitude salt marshes: disentangling the roles of flooding, salinity of flooding, salinity and competition indicated that the lower limit of Juncus was mediated by both flooding

Pennings, Steven C.

76

Ecology 2006 94, 342354  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

populations in impacted habitats. In recent decades the grass Phragmites australis has been aggressively, Phragmites australis, recruitment limitation, sedimentation, seedling establishment Journal of Ecology (2006. 2 Our objective was to quantify how P. australis modifies the abiotic (soil and light conditions

Bertness, Mark D.

77

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Ecology Impact of Human ecology Research Bonus Issue FROM SCHOLARSHIP TO POLICY MAKING OF HUMAN ECOLOGY APRIL 2005/VOLUME 33, NUMBER 1 #12;Human Ecology Volume 33, Number 1 April 2005 The New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph.D. Rebecca Q

Wang, Z. Jane

78

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002) Climate Change Mitigation in Developing Countries:climate change mitigation and adaptation in developing countries (climate change mitigation and adaptation programs in developing countries.

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Development of a Method for Predictively Simulating Penetration of a Low Speed Impactor into a Weak Cohesionless Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geotextile barrier system that utilizes soil as ballast to prevent ballistic or vehicular impacts LSTC Livermore Software Technology Corporation LS-DYNA A complex non-linear explicit FEA software package developed by LSTC to simulate complex high rate non...

Arrington, Dusty Ray

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Contaminated soil and sediments in a highly developed catchment-estuary system (Sydney estuary, Australia): an innovative stormwater remediation strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the current research was to provide a strategy to remediate stormwater from an old, high-developed catchment dominated (94%) by diffuse sources. Contaminated catchment soils, a dense road netw...

Gavin F. Birch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs. Composting by Helen Brennek, Landon the environmental footprint of paper towels used in the Student Union Building (SUB). This streamlined LCA provides

82

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Brandon Green, Jason Tam, Jeremy Jin, Kai Marder, Kevin Preston, Sam Eichenberger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Brandon Green, Jason Tam of sustainability, a concept embedded in the visions of UBC and UBCBG for greener buildings and infrastructure Research on Sustainability) Building. The system consists of the following: 1200 m2 roof to collect

83

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into sustainable transport options for the University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation maintenance is more costly than the purchase of a replacement. A replacement vehicle that is either a ten: joining a car co-op and sharing a vehicle over a longer period of time, purchasing a used vehicle

84

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Donna Wang, Mac McNicol, Vincent Tang, David Jacob, Isaiah Kim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Donna Wang, Mac Mc mainly on a sustainable vehicle to use for delivery, a few requirements were made clear from the start. A suitable delivery vehicle should: have 100 cubic feet of cargo space, be able to withstand Vancouver

85

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Use of Biodegradable Packing Materials in the New SUB: A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

businesses in the new SUB. For economic analysis, the unit selling price and market growth of both materials. Also, coal-fired power for PHA production and landfill disposal option for both types of bags haveUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation

86

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Raza Jaffery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA of construction - developed primarily in response to the challenge of creating a more sustainable society. The LCA Building in UBC, CIRS LCA study is a part of UBC wide academic building LCA data repository and would

87

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Travis Wade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GRYPHON: LCA of electric vs. diesel all-terrain vehicles CEEN 523 December 11, 2013 999 1453 University, Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report PROJECT GRYPHON: LCA of electric vs. diesel all-terrain vehicles ............................................................................................. 7 3 Diesel Vehicle

88

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Amir Mehdi Dehkhoda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ability to catalyze transesterification of vegetable oils (i.e., Canola Oil) and esterification of free for transesterification of triglyceride-based oils such as Canola Oil. The first step in catalyst development approach

89

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ponderosa Commons Energy Conservation Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sustainability criteria matrix that had been generated based on the three defining pillars of sustainability: Environmental, Social and Economic. Consequently, the option of a sustainability criteria matrix that had been developed for the purpose of this project

90

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report ZHENGXIANG QIU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA November 18, 2013 #12;2013 Henry Angus LCA 1 Executive Summary LCA aims to compilation and evaluation involved in the LCA analysis to improve their sustainability. The report would discuss how LCA methodology

91

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA Completed November 18th, 2013 as part of a continuing study, the UBC LCA Project #12;1 Executive Summary This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University

92

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Joshua Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA Summary This study, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the Earth Sciences Building (ESB) serves as a contribution to the on-going process of creating a LCA building database at UBC while also showing

93

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Allard Hall LCA Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LCA Study CIVL 498C November 18, 2013 1065 1529 University of British Columbia Disclaimer: "UBC SEEDS ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Allard Hall LCA Study Emma Brown CIVL 498C November 18, 2013 #12

94

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Malek Charif  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA.e. to conduct a limited Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), of assigned building. In this case, the object programs are the main tools used to complete the LCA study. Inputs in the IE model were re

95

other basic environmental resources. An ecological engi-neering approach can help encourage the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of World Energy. London: British Petroleum Corporate Communications Services. Brown LR (2006) Plan B 2. There is a critical need to alert the public worldwide to the serious issues of overpopulation and natural resource shortages. Certainly populations in developed countries could contribute to the conservation effort

Peterson, M. Nils

96

Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India  

SciTech Connect

Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Examining The Impact of Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) on Student Writing Developed Through Web-Based Ecological Inquiry Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inquiry report components using a grading criteria instrument and (2) explored how the revision process influenced the quality of ecological inquiry report components through text analysis. A web-based science inquiry project was implemented in a large...

Robledo, Denise

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However...

Duncan, Roxanne

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ecological Risks of Shale Oil and Gas Development to Wildlife, Aquatic Resources and their Habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

injecting water mixed with sand and chemicals into a well under high pressure to open fractures in shale and release gas; use of 1130 million liters of water per well, impoundments or tanks to store water, heavy truck traffic to transport water, sand extraction, trucks to transport sand, trucks with chemicals for fracking, frac control van, lights to enable activity 24 h per day, temporary storage for flowback water ... This will require an understanding of how development will impact ecosystems and a willingness to invest in the research, monitoring and management to reduce negative impacts. ... This case study identifies the need for further research to help understand the nature and the environmental impacts of hydrofracturing fluids to devise optimal, safe disposal strategies. ...

Margaret C. Brittingham; Kelly O. Maloney; Ada M. Farag; David D. Harper; Zachary H. Bowen

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

Woodland development and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics and storage in a subtropical savanna ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

succession over the past century to subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by C3 trees/shrubs. To elucidate mechanisms of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total N (STN) storage and dynamics in this ecosystem, I measured the mass and isotopic composition...

Liao, Julia Den-Yue

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential, human health respiratory effects, and fossil fuel use more than other assemblies. Also, columns: 5.60E+07 ecologically weighted kg Fossil fuel use: 1.08E+08 MJ After performing Sensitivity potential: 4.99E+04 kg NOx eq Human health respiratory effects: 4.14E+04 kg PM2.5 eq Weighted resource use

102

Successful Challenges during the Development and Application of Innovative Processes for the Bioremediation of Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation technology is selected for its ability to meet the desired cleanup goal. The conventional approach to soil cleanup has been incineration, solidification and excavation and disposal in a hazardous-w...

D. E. Jerger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

104

The ecological antecedents of terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The global 'war on terror' is wreaking havoc on the natural environment and involving increasing number of organisations. This paper invites sustainability and strategic management studies scholars to explore the relations between terrorism and ecology. In several terrorism prone areas of the world, the disruption of ecological systems that support human populations is an important antecedent to the economic and social conditions that breed terrorism. By examining the ecological and economic patterns in Somalia and Afghanistan, this paper reveals ecological antecedents of terrorism. The author concludes that we can deal with terrorism more effectively and at a lower cost by going beyond the current narrow military response. We need to further study relations between ecology and terrorism and engage policies for ecologically sustainable development of terrorism prone regions.

Paul Shrivastava

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (otherwise called the "Tri-Party Agreement", or "TPA") contains various enforceable milestones that apply to tank waste management activities. DOE is also required to comply with applicable requirements of

106

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ecology of Ecotourism Spring, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR 4934: Ecology of Ecotourism Spring, 2014 Room 106 Rogers Hall Monday Periods 6-8 (12:50 to 3 with an understanding of the management and planning of ecotourism opportunities. Specific learning outcomes include recreation and tourism development; · understand ecological impacts and ecotourism management approaches

Watson, Craig A.

108

Development of a quantitative method for the detection of enteroviruses in soil.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...viruses from soil beneath a wastewater land treatment site. Recovery...sewage. Land disposal of wastewater is popularly re- garded as...sewage treatment, for water recycling through crop ir- rigation...percentage of enteroviruses in wastewater ap- pear to be removed readily...

C J Hurst; C P Gerba

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Developing effective removal of caesium, strontium and uranium from contaminated soils and sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radioactively contaminated ground (1, 2) . An immediate priority is the remediation of high activity fission their migration from the source. One of the handful of contaminated soil and water remediation technologies being immobilise the radionuclides within the sediment (4, 5) . In order to remediate this sediment associated

Burke, Ian

110

CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology'' By Andruid Kerne dissertation submitted partial addresses browsing creatively, been co­developed with the metadisciplinary framework interface ecology, in addition inside them, open process without definite bounds. a metadiscipline, interface ecology brings

Mohri, Mehryar

111

Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid and Maria Fernandez-Gimenez This paper discusses developments in our understanding about rangeland ecology and rangeland dynamics in the last 20 years. Before the late 1980's, the mainstream view in range ecology was that livestock

112

CarbBirch (Kolbjrk): Carbon sequestration and soil development under mountain birch (Betula pubescens) in rehabilitated areas in southern Iceland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Understanding soil change when restoring severely degraded land is important to be able to determine when and if the ecosystem services that healthy soil (more)

Kolka-Jonsson, Pall Valdimar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ecological Exposure Limits and Guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ecological exposure limits and guidelines represent the maximum level of a chemical substance that is considered to be safe or acceptable in environmental releases or compartments. The ecological exposure limits are established to protect the ecosystems and environmental resources and may refer to the emissions, e.g., effluents, atmospheric emissions or discharges, or to the final concentration in the receiving body, e.g., water, sediment, or soil. There are two main methods for setting these limits. One focuses on the identification of best available practices for different sectors and processes; the other is a particular case of risk assessment, named by some authors as reverse risk assessment, which establishes the maximum level in the emission or receiving compartment maintaining an acceptable level of risk. The term exposure limit is rarely used in the ecological context; the most usual terms are criteria, standards, or objectives.

J.V. Tarazona

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Plant Ecology An Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

116

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi Ecological Network Programme (MENP) Ecological networks (ENs) reduce the isolation of populations helps to prevent ecological relaxation (the loss of ecological systems and interactions) and so prevents

Geldenhuys, Jaco

117

Soils and agricultural development in the region of Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The process of agricultural development and its related problems is. a serious economic difficulty facing the developing countries throughout the world. In Saudi Arabia such (more)

Al-Jerash, Mohammed Abdullah

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Forest ecology Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

Johnson, Edward A.

120

Ecology and environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

Sussex, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DESCRIBING PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATION ISSUES IN HANFORD SOILS: DEVELOPMENT OF A THERMODYNAMIC SURFACE COMPLEXATION MODEL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of remediation strategies for long-term site management requires knowledge of an actinide's geochemical behavior. Understanding this behavior can lead to the formation of (more)

Herr, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Valuation of ecological resources  

SciTech Connect

Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cyanide Leaching from Soil Developed from Coking Plant Purifier Waste as Influenced by Citrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Coking Plant Purifier Waste as Influenced by Citrate...developed from gas purifier waste was investigated. Without...developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking...for the iron and steel industries. Their gas was a by-product...2003). During coal gasification, hydrogen cyanide...

Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar

124

Complexity, Ecology, Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation to the Implementation of Rainwater Harvesting and Filtration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum Certification, which is the highest green building rating in North America, the design and construction of the New SUB will serve as a model for future sustainable development around the world. LEED promotes five key areas of sustainable approach, including sustainable site development

126

Ecology 2007 95, 482492  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIZA S. COMITA*, RICHARD CONDIT§ and STEPHEN P. HUBBELL Department of Plant Biology, University. Comita, Department of Ecology, Evolution & Behaviour, University of Minnesota, 100 Ecology Building, 1987

Bermingham, Eldredge

127

Effectiveness of GIS suitability mapping in predicting ecological impacts of proposed wind farm development on Aristazabal Island, BC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Like any industrial development, wind farms can have negative impacts on the ... environment. These can include impacts to airborne wildlife populations, loss of habitat for fish and wildlife, changes to riparian...

James C. Griffiths; William T. Dushenko

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-contaminated soils anexperimental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Soil and Water Science Department University of...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic contaminated soils Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Soil and Water Science Department University of...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali sodic soil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Renewable Energy 29 ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics Summary: of sodic soils in the Caspian region and India (Mishra and...

132

Nevada applied ecology group publications  

SciTech Connect

Since January 1972, the Nevada Applied Ecology Information Center (NAEIC), Information Research and Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has provided technical information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) relevant to the behavior of specific radionuclides, primarily plutonium and americium, in the environment, with special emphasis on pathways to man. This bibliography represents a summary of the biomedical and environmental studies conducted by the NAEG and its contractors. The bibliography focuses on research sponsored by the NAEG. Subject areas of the publications include cover studies of soil, vegetation, animals, microorganisms, resuspension, and meteorology. All references in this publication are stored in a computerized form that is readily available for searches upon request to NAEG and it contractors. 558 refs.

Chilton, B.D.; Pfuderer, H.A.; Cox, T.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and management, aesthetic values, biodiversity, recreation, and many others) are sustained through time. Rangeland Ecology graduates are also well prepared to work in ecological restoration of drastically disturbed lands. Rangeland

134

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA Analysis (LCA) evaluates the environmental impacts of the inputs and outputs of a product system. 22 is to peek into LCA by investigating the environmental impacts of buildings using current LCA methods

135

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Albert Koenig, Alexander Jang, Lissa Zimmer, Mariah Bruinsma, Megan (Haesung) Chun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system sustainability. Our primary objectives were to discover what food skills development related literature review, we formed a working definition of food skills into three components: food knowledge, food practices, and food perception & conceptualization. With these pillars of food skills in mind, our team

136

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach M. Sperow Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 M. Eve US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit Fort Collins, Colorado 80522 K. Paustian Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 Abstract Field studies across the U.S. have been used to estimate soil C stock changes that result from changes in agricultural management. Data from these studies are not easily extrapolated to reflect changes at a national scale because soils and climate vary locally and regionally. These studies are also limited to addressing existing changes in

137

The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere model Manual, version 1.3, September 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handbook v 1.2 -2- Index The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere model................................................................................................................................. 3 Ecological and Physical Fundamentals................................................................................................................................. 29 #12;SPA handbook v 1.2 -3- Introduction The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere model (SPA, Williams et. al 1996

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - autumnal soil cultivation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Ecology 42 Top soil removal as a technique to speed up the restoration of low production plant Summary: of the top soil is expected to result in the exposure of less fertile...

139

Impact of Biochar Application to Soil on the Root-Associated Bacterial Community Structure of Fully Developed Greenhouse Pepper Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rhizosphere is well documented in the literature and is attributed to carbon-rich root...stimulation or induced plant resistance in the literature included Hydrogenophaga and Dechloromonas...soils in the tropics with charcoal-a review. Biol. Fertil. Soils 35 :219-230...

Max Kolton; Yael Meller Harel; Zohar Pasternak; Ellen R. Graber; Yigal Elad; Eddie Cytryn

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Impact of Biochar Application to Soil on the Root-Associated Bacterial Community Structure of Fully Developed Greenhouse Pepper Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strains in plant root environments, which in some cases...plant resistance in the literature included Hydrogenophaga...are found in soil environments, where they can oxidize...tropics with charcoal-a review. Biol. Fertil. Soils...gene diversity in any environment. Methods Mol. Biol...

Max Kolton; Yael Meller Harel; Zohar Pasternak; Ellen R. Graber; Yigal Elad; Eddie Cytryn

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lake Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Ecology Lake Ecology Name: Jody Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have a partically natural/ partially man-dug lake in our back yard. It is approximately 3 acres in size. The fish in this tiny like are plentiful and HUGE :) Bass up to 20" s (so far) and blue gill up to 10"s (so far). My question is this... we appear to have a heavy goose population and I was wondering if they are the cause of the green slimmy stuff that is all over the top of the water as well as the lighter green slime on the plants growing under the water? Are the fish being harmed by waste from the geese and if so, what can I put in the water to ensure their health? Additionally, I noticed hundreds of frogs during the mating period yet I've yet to see even one tad pole and I am at the lake atleast 5 out of the 7 days in a week. Is there a reason for this. The frogs are two toned.. light green with patches of darker shades of green on the head and body. I've never seen frogs like these before but then again, I've never lived in wet lands prior. The frogs are also very agressive... tend to attack fishing line and even leap up to 4' in the air to attack a fishing rod. Thank heavens they don't have teeth! . We do not keep the fish we catch, we always release.

142

ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

143

Ecology 2007 21, 455464  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional Ecology 2007 21, 455­464 455 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd The speed of ecological speciation ANDREW P. HENDRY*, PATRIK on ecological time-scales (contemporary evolution) and adaptive divergence can cause reproductive isolation

Rieseberg, Loren

144

Adaptation costs for sustainable development and ecological transitions: a presentation of the structural model M3ED with reference to French energy?economy?carbon dioxide emission prospects*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to assess the adaptation costs associated with the transition to a sustainable development path, taking the example of carbon dioxide emissions in the French economy. The model used is based on systems dynamics modelling and energy input-output analysis. This type of approach has the interesting property of precisely defining the nature of interactions between the different economic sectors, and between the economic sectors and the environment. This provides a framework within which to test different types of economic, technology and environment policy. In effect, according to our interests, it is necessary to measure problems of resources allocation or sequential choices between different alternatives why and how a particular solution comes to be selected from a multiplicity of alternatives. First, we characterise the methodological and conceptual specification of the model. Secondly, we locate specific properties of the model linked with both ecological sustainability and economic feasability constraints. Thirdly, a sensitivity test is applied concerning different control policy scenarios for the case of carbon dioxide emissions in the French economy.

Patrick Schembri

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials  

SciTech Connect

Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ecology or Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast Transcript: File this under "Statistics to the Rescue". Economy or ecology? Ecology or economy? Tough choice. Especially for China which is barreling recklessly ahead in its quest to become top consumer nation. A recent release from...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

NEON: a hierarchically designed national ecological network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEON: a hierarchically designed national ecological network 59 David Schimel, NEON Inc, Boulder, CO (such as fire or flooding), and recovery develop within the domains, constrained by the biophysical

Hargrove, William W.

148

RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division Biotype has changed its name to Ecotype! Following the re-organisation of Forest Research into five science Divisions and three Support Divisions, the former Woodland Ecology Branches to form the new Ecology Division. We decided to give the divisional newsletter a new name (and

149

Ecologically Significant Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys FINAL REPORT Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley Appendix 29b #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys JUNE 1, 1999 DEQ

150

Ecological Applications, 23(1), 2013, pp. 273286 2013 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sequestration; climate change research; data assimilation; Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA; process), and LTER (long-term ecological research sites) along with the extended satellite record, and data collation my data: quantifying the value of ecological data for the development of models of the terrestrial

Keenan, Trevor

151

A new landscape ecology mapping scheme for coastal environments: Galveston Island, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the landscape. This research combines the fundamental concepts of landscape ecology and geomorphological mapping to develop a landscape ecological mapping methodology. The mapping scheme has been developed to understand the landscape change of Galveston Island...

Lynch, Karen Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Microelectrodes in microbial ecology  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the microenvironment of bacteria has presented many challenges for the microbial ecologist. Simple intracellular capillary electrodes have been used in neurophysiology since the 1950s to measure action potentials in ion transport over biological membranes, and ion-selective electrodes were developed soon thereafter for the determination of H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}. However, these analytical techniques did not receive much attention until 1978, when Niels Peter Revsbech and Bo Barker Joergensen at the Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark, began using oxygen microelectrodes in their studies of the ecology and biogeochemistry of marine sediments and other microbial environments. Today, Revsbech and Joergensen use five types of microelectrodes, two types of oxygen microelectrodes, a combined microelectrode for nitrous oxide and oxygen, a sulfide microelectrode, and a pH microelectrode. The first three microelectrodes have diameters of about 10 {mu}m and the last two of about 50 {mu}m. Some of the electrodes actually contain two or three cathodes plus a reference electrode, all situated behind a polymer membrane. In situ experiments have been done for several years at a water depth of several meters, where the micromanipulator is operated by a diver. Recently measurements were obtained in the deep sea with the microelectrodes mounted on a free-falling vehicle or operated from a submersible vessel.

Boots, S.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Soil surface stabilization using an in situ plutonium coating techniuqe at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), in collaboration with the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR), has developed and is investigating an in situ plutonium treatment for soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concept, conceived by Dr. T. Tamura and refined at HAZWRAP, was developed during the Nevada Applied Ecology Program investigation. In analyzing for plutonium in soils, it was noted that the alpha emanation of plutonium was greatly attenuated if traces of iron or manganese oxides were present in the final electroplating stage. The technique would reduce resuspension of alpha particles into the air by coating the contaminants in soils in situ with an environmentally compatible, durable, and nontoxic material. The coating materials (calcium hydroxide, ferrous sulfate) reduce resuspension by providing a cementitious barrier against radiation penetration while retaining soil porosity. This technique not only stabilizes plutonium-contaminated soils, but also provides an additional protection from worker exposure to radiation during remediation activities. Additionally, the coating would decrease the water solubility of the contaminant and, thus, reduce its migration through soil and uptake by plants.

Lew, J.; Snipes, R. [Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tamura, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ecology and environment What ecology and environment course is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology and environment Essentials What ecology and environment course is there? Ecology 01273 876787 Why ecology and environment at Sussex? · You will be taught by lecturers who are leaders in research, with a broad range of experience and expertise including plant, bird and insect ecology, climate

Sussex, University of

156

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

157

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

158

Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001 Population ecology is the discipline in ecology that deals with the structure and dynamics (e.g. growth interacting populations. Population ecology is closely related to other ecological disciplines, e

159

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and management, recreation, and many others) are sustained through time. Rangeland Ecology graduates are also well prepared to work in ecological restoration of drastically disturbed lands. Rangeland ecologist often work closely

160

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assessment of the viability and sustainability of an integrated waste management system for the city of Campinas (Brazil), by means of ecological cost accounting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The population growth of cities increases the generation of construction building waste (CBW) and wastewater and, respectively, their environmental impacts. The present study shows a new technology to manage of the sewage and construction wastes from Campinas city, Brazil, based on the ecological cost accounting theory. In this way, the treatment of the crude sewage from Anhumas Wastewater Treatment Plant was made by decantation using the construction building waste. The organic amendment was obtained from the decanted sludge, which has been used in the recovery of a poor soil. From the supernatant liquid was obtained the reusing water, which has been tested in irrigation process. The efficiencies of the organic amendment and reusing water have been assessed by the quantity of the germinated bean seeds on the poor soil. Results show that the best condition to organic amendment production was the one in which a total soil layer of 2cm and 100mL/L of CBW were used, which yielded a gain in soil fertility of 11.11%. It was verified that 85% of bean seeds have been germinated on soil, when it irrigated these seeds with the reusing water, being 6% larger than control water. All parameters of lower water quality were reduced above of 90%, keeping the water in according to Brazilian standards. The cost evaluation of reusing water and organic amendment production shows a saving of US$ 81.1 million, indicating the social, ecological and economical viabilities of the new technology developed and demonstrated in this work. In that sense, this work provided a possible environmental solver based on the ecological cost accounting theory for the city of Campinas, Brazil.

Kely Cristina Passarini; Maria Aparecida Pereira; Thiago Michel de Brito Farias; Felipe Arajo Calarge; Carlos Curvelo Santana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they develop over unconsolidated weathering materials ofthin soils derived from unconsolidated material and lacking

Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A near-infrared reflectance sensor for soil surface moisture measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil moisture is an important soil property that has important functions in various studies and applications, such as agricultural practices, hydrological processes and ecological issues. A near-infrared (NIR) reflectance sensor designed for moisture ... Keywords: Light-emitting diode, Near-infrared reflectance, Relative absorption depth, Soil moisture

Zhe Yin; Tingwu Lei; Qinghong Yan; Zhanpeng Chen; Yuequn Dong

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.005 Ecological Applications 11(2): 343-355 (2001) R. Conant, K. Paustian, and E. Elliot Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorada State University Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory logo Sponsor: US Environmental Protection Agency, Ruminant Livestock Efficiency Program Abstract Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component for sustaining production in grassland ecosystems is the maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM), which can be strongly influenced by management. Many management techniques intended to increase forage production may potentially increase SOM, thus sequestering atmospheric

165

Ultrasound enhanced soil washing  

SciTech Connect

The development of an ultrasonic enhanced soil-washing process requires a comprehensive, well-designed experimental program, with the results carefully analyzed on the basis of known ultrasonic cleaning mechanisms. There has been no systematic work carried out to develop information on the important variables that can affect the efficacy of ultrasonic enhancement of contaminant removal from soil. The goal of this study is to examine the potential of ultrasonic energy to enhance soil washing and to optimize conditions. Ultrasonic energy potentially can be used in enhancing contaminant removal from the entire soil mix, or it can be used as a polishing operation on the fines portion of the soil mixture after traditional soil washing operations. The research study was designed to demonstrate that ultrasonic energy can: improve process performance, e.g., remove contaminants to lower residual concentrations; and improve process economics, e.g., shorter treatment (residence) times, less surfactant use. This process was demonstrated using soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Meegoda, J.; Ho, W.; Bhattacharajee, M.; Wei, C.F.; Cohen, D.M.; Magee, R.S. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Frederick, R.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Enter Keyword(s) Today's Ecology Top  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enter Keyword(s) Today's Ecology Top News OMG's Business Ecology Initiative BEI Reaches 250 Member Advertisement Ecology Topics Botany Climate Research Ecology Environment Environmental Microbiology Environmental Monitoring Environmental Research Fisheries Research Marine Biology Meteorology Molecular Ecology

167

Distinguishing technology from biology: a critical review of the use of GPS telemetry data in ecology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...movements: behaviour shapes a trophic cascade in Yellowstone National Park. Ecology...before and during development of a natural gas field. J. Wildl. Manage. 70...Animals Animals, Wild Conservation of Natural Resources methods Ecology methods...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

169

Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Experimental Study of Bridge Scour in Cohesive Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bridge scour depths in cohesive soil have been predicted using the scour equations developed for cohesionless soils due to scarce of studies about cohesive soil. The scour depths predicted by the conventional methods will result in significant...

Oh, Seung Jae

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Soil washing treatability study  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

Krstich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

3, 11851214, 2006 Landscape ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HESSD 3, 1185­1214, 2006 Landscape ecology meets catchment hydrology B. Schr¨oder Title Page, and function in landscape ecology and catchment hydrology ­ how can quantitative landscape ecology support¨oder (boschroe@uni-potsdam.de) 1185 #12;HESSD 3, 1185­1214, 2006 Landscape ecology meets catchment hydrology B

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

175

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing that might guide management decisions. We tested whether ideas from landscape ecology (local vs. landscape-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than

Holl, Karen

176

Journal of Animal Ecology 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Animal Ecology 2002 71, 23­31 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science Ltd TONI LAAKSONEN, ERKKI KORPIM?KI and HARRI HAKKARAINEN Section of Ecology, Department of Biology of Animal Ecology (2002) 71, 23­31 Introduction An understanding of age-dependent reproductive out- put

Laaksonen, Toni

177

Journal of Animal Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 342­352 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing VALKAMA and VILLE P?YRI Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, reproductive value, sex allocation, sex-dependent mortality, varia- ble environment. Journal of Animal Ecology

Laaksonen, Toni

178

Ecology 2006 20, 491499  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, PO Box 14, 9750 AA Haren, the Netherlands of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen, the Netherlands, and Behavioral Biology, University of Groningen

Williams, Jos. B.

179

Examining Earth's Ecological Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examining Earth's Ecological Problems ... In "Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit," Sen. Al Gore (D.-Tenn.) ... However, nearly all of it is a fluffy recapitulation of the doomsday theories of those members of a modern environmentalist group who see nothing but disaster and catastrophe in store for the human race, and perhaps all other forms of life on Earth, unless people change their wicked waysat once. ...

PHILLIP J. WINGATE

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

TR-003 Ecology March 2000 Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-003 Ecology March 2000 Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pinniped ecology in Santa Monica Bay, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bight. Anderson JW e d . Ecology of the Southern 2005 .347 - 359. 1998 . Behavioral ecology and demography of seals3 % 4 ) : Population Ecology of California Press Stewart B

Bearzi, Maddalena; Saylan, Charles A.; Barroso, Celia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EDITORIAL Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and successof areas in theoretical ecology. Among the highlights areyear represent theoretical ecology from around the world: 20

Hastings, Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

Watson, Craig A.

184

Rapid responses of soil microorganisms improve plant fitness in novel environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...76-L) pot filled with steam-sterilized (121 C...change impacts across natural systems . Nature 421 : 37 42 . 6...Artificial selection: A powerful tool for ecologists . Ecology 84...Vilgalys R Jackson RB ( 2005 ) Assessment of soil microbial community...

Jennifer A. Lau; Jay T. Lennon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

SciTech Connect

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite  

SciTech Connect

Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010. _ 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/ S. Accepted

Boyer, Edmond

188

Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 Fall 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 ­ Fall 2013 Course Syllabus NRE 687: Landscape Planning (preferable immediately before or after class times) Course Overview The Landscape Planning + Analysis Studio is a core studio in the landscape architecture curriculum. This course provides an opportunity to develop

Awtar, Shorya

189

Modeling soil salinity distribution along topographic gradients in tidal salt marshes in Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil salinity plays a very important role in determining the distribution of vegetation, plant productivity, and biogeochemical processes in coastal marsh ecosystems. Salinity gradients and salinityvegetation associations in salt marshes have often been observed but rarely explained. A quantitative and systematic study on the soil salinity distribution in salt marshes is not only important to the understanding of coastal marsh ecosystems but also to the development of a potentially useful ecological and environmental indicator. In this research, we developed a salt marsh soil salinity model based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features to examine the impacts of tidal forcing, climate, soil, vegetation, and topography on soil salinity distributions of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal marshes. This model was calibrated and validated using field observations from the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) of northwestern Florida, USA. The results showed that the model had good agreement (r2=0.84, n=15, Psalinity maximum in a coastal salt marsh. Simulations indicate that tidal irregularity primarily controls the width of the salinity maximum band. Evapotranspiration, temperature, hydraulic conductivity, and incoming tidal salinity significantly affect the salinity maximum band, which may lead to the formation of salt barrens/flats when reaching a threshold level.

Hongqing Wang; Y. Ping Hsieh; Mark A. Harwell; Wenrui Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Big data and the future of ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ecological research. Ecology 91: 253639. Ernest SKM,opportunities of open data in ecology. Science 331: 70305.Stokstad E. 2011. Open-source ecology takes root across the

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

1808 METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 7 Ecology, 85(7), 2004, pp. 18081810  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forum 1808 METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 7 Ecology, 85(7), 2004, pp. 1808­1810 2004 by the Ecological Society of America CAN FUNCTION AT THE ORGANISMAL LEVEL EXPLAIN ECOLOGICAL of chemistry, physics, and biology'' can be used to link the function of individual organisms to ecological pro

Koehl, Mimi

193

Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Resources and Systems Ecological Resources and Systems Argonne develops and applies innovative approaches and tools to integrate environmental compliance and environmental performance into an organization's structure in a cost-effective manner. Argonne knows that our world exists in a delicate balance with technology. Our research focuses on measuring advanced energy and technology's effects on the world's ecological systems, creating preventive strategies to protect the Earth from harm and inventing new ways to preserve green resources for all. Highlights Kayakers and boats traverse the branch of the Chicago River in the downtown area. Every river contains a population of microbes; scientists at Argonne are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to map how the River's inhabitants change over the months and years. Click to enlarge.

194

Effects of cropping-system, irrigation method, and soil properties on soil nitrogen and organic matter dynamics in the Big Horn Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns interact to create a need for better understanding of production efficiency and ecological impacts and maintenance of the resource base; and 2) evaluating long-term impacts of farming systems on the resource baseEffects of cropping-system, irrigation method, and soil properties on soil nitrogen and organic

Norton, Jay B.

195

The behavior of soil-applied cyclotri- and cyclotetraphosphate in Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclotriphosphate (C3P) is of interest to soil scientists because it demonstrates little or no retention by soil constituents. Non-sorption is desirable in the development of mobile P fertilizers. Work was expanded to include cyclotetraphosphate...

Trostle, Calvin Lewie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Derek Guo, Drew Willms, Kliment Kuzmanovski, Ralph Mercado, Stuart Armstrong, Thomas Denton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Kliment Kuzmanovski, Ralph Mercado, Stuart Armstrong, Thomas Denton UBC Botanical Garden Development Plan Plan CIVL 445 Engineering Design and Analysis I Group 19 Stuart Armstrong Thomas Denton Derek Guo

197

Journal of Applied Ecology 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species distribution modelling. In particular, ecological niche models based on machine-learning advances in machine-learning techniques for statistical pattern recognition might be used to overcome many Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Modelling ecological niches with support vector machines JOHN M

198

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

199

Journal of Animal Ecology 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Animal Ecology 2007 76, 1045­1052 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Climatechangecanaltercompetitiverelationshipsbetween resident and migratory birds MARKUS P. AHOLA, TONI LAAKSONEN, TAPIO EEVA and ESA LEHIKOINEN Section of Ecology

Laaksonen, Toni

200

The evolutionary ecology of metacommunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolutionary ecology of metacommunities Mark C. Urban1* , Mathew A. Leibold2* , Priyanga Vellend12 and Michael J. Wade13 1 National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara, CA Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California­Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Hochberg, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS  

SciTech Connect

The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

880 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 3 Ecology, 83(3), 2002, pp. 880881  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

880 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 3 Ecology, 83(3), 2002, pp. 880­881 2002 by the Ecological Society of America COMMUNITY ECOLOGY--IN SPANISH Jaksic A., Fabia´n. 2000. Ecologi´a de comunidades. Edi ecology. Few branches of ecology have gone through such a shocking process of redefinition of paradigms

Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

203

ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.arlettaz@iee.unibe.ch www.conservation.unibe.ch Grassland management: designing tomorrow's farmland for biodiversity 1ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Prof. Dr Raphaël Arlettaz Head of the division of Conservation Biology Office: Erlachstrasse 9a Mail: Baltzerstrasse 6 CH­3012 Bern +41 31 631 31 61 +41 79 637

Richner, Heinz

204

Environmental Sciences and Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abella, Scott R. - School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada at Las Vegas Abouheif, Ehab - Department...

205

RUTGERS ECOLOGICAL PRESERVE POSTALPLAZA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RUTGERS ECOLOGICAL PRESERVE Solar Farm METLARSLN ETHELRDW REDBUDRD GO R DO N RD RD 3 RD 2 SUTTONS Material Services Central Receiving/Rutgers Computer Store Security Technologies Shop/University Facilities Operations & Services Asian American Cultural Center/Day Care Center Bainton Field NN N N S LLSSNNNNS OOOON

Hanson, Stephen José

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecology monitoring Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a wide variety of research and development efforts supported by many different partners. Broad-based Summary: Vertebrate Ecology Research Interests: aquatic population and...

207

Effects of Cattle Feeding Regimen and Soil Management Type on the Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Manure, Manure-Amended Soil, and Lettuce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Hurd. 1995. Management factors related...microbial ecology. Science 292: 1119-1122...Integrated approaches to root disease management in organic farming...diet and soil management are important...Department of Plant Sciences, Wageningen...

Eelco Franz; Anne D. van Diepeningen; Oscar J. de Vos; Ariena H. C. van Bruggen

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Soils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soils Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoils&oldid612253" Category: NEPA Resources...

209

Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes...

Joshi, Champa

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Spatial pattern and uncertainty of soil carbon and nitrogen in a subtropical savanna landscape in southern Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants could have impacts on regional and global biogeochemistry. To understand large-scale ecological and policy implications of woody invasion, it is critical to understand the spatial pattern and uncertainty of soil C and N and their relationship...

Liu, Feng

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Soil Sterilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... received the notice they deserved. Among them is soil sterilization as a factor in food production. How to produce the greatest amount of good food has become an urgent problem ... proper consideration. Pests and diseases, for example, not only cause serious losses in food production, but they also waste time, labour and materials. Thus, by employing measures for ...

W. J. C. L.

1944-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

212

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

213

Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.  

SciTech Connect

Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradientsi.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin; et al, et al

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology? Asking the question, What is tropical ecology? may seem akin to asking questions such as, Who is buried in Grant's tomb? Tropical ecology is the study of the ecology of tropical regions. But so what? Consider these questions: First, what is ecology? What are its

Landweber, Laura

215

The ecology of mutualism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 62, 87, 146, 147, 257). Plants benefit most when soil nutrient concentrations are low. In some circumstances, normally mutualistic fungi can be parasitic, and in rare instances of high phosphate levels the increased uptake caused by mycor- rhizae can... it is valuable [e.g. protection in areas of high predation pressure (15), nodulation under competition for soil nitrogen (40)] and when it is cheap and efficient [e.g. extrafloral nectaries when ants and sunlight are abundant (170)]. What is still lacking is a...

Boucher, D. H.; James, Samuel W.; Keeler, K. H.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ecological Modelling xxx (2005) xxxxxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on simulated NEE. Finally 17 parameters, linked to photosynthesis, vegetative respiration and soil water are used to create a set of 17,000 simulations, where the values of the 17 key parameters are randomlyEcological Modelling xxx (2005) xxx­xxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest Part I

Boyer, Edmond

217

Research | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SREL scientists pursue a wide variety of ecological research, from molecular to landscape-scale processes, field and laboratory focused, basic and applied. Such an integrated...

218

Fermilab | Sustainability | Nature/Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content Sustainability Nature and Ecology Sustainability Tips Electronics Stewardship Energy and Water...

219

TR-017 Ecology March 2002 Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-017 Ecology March 2002 Technical Report Forest Research Vancouver Forest Region 2100 Labieux Region Coarse Woody Debris Working Group Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology

220

PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology? Allan Konopka Biological Sciences Division for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include by a `microbial community' and identification of important characteristics specific to community ecology. What

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The ecology of coral-microbe interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algal symbioses. Molecular Ecology 18:1823-1833. Webster, N.F. Rohwer. 2008. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls inin Caribbean coral reefs. Ecology Letters 9:818-826. Porter,

Marhaver, Kristen Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

commentary: A Darwinian approach to community ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plant ecol- ogy. Journal of Ecology, 55, 247-270. Kress, W.The merging of community ecology and phylogenetic biology.Ecology Let- ters, 12, 693-715. Freckleton, R. P. & Harvey,

Freckleton, Robert P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Landscape pattern Landscape ecology, if not ecology in general, is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VAL006- Landscape pattern metrics Landscape ecology, if not ecology in general, is largely founded structure [14]. A disrup- tion in landscape patterns may therefore compromise this structure's functional and the maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem health [36]. For these and other rea- sons, much emphasis has been

McGarigal, Kevin

224

Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cometabolic oxidation of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil with a surfactant-based field application vector.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...over- come these limitations. Surfactant-based soil washing systems have been developed for...hydrophobic contam- inants from soils (1, 29). The coupling of surfactant-based FAVs with soil washing systems may be effective for both...

C A Lajoie; A C Layton; G S Sayler

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gulf ecology hit by coastal development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Sea-front projects ranging from desalination plants to artificial islands in the gulf between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran have transformed ...

Daniel Cressey

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Home | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmental Outreach...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the public about the diverse ecological research conducted by scientists at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Today, the Outreach Program continues to provide a great variety...

228

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

Halverson, N.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

SRS ecology: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Ecological Impact of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

Kammen, Daniel M.

231

Kiyoko Yokota 100 Ecology Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Kiyoko Yokota 100 Ecology Building Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior University: Michael Mullan, Fiona Crawford, and Daniel Paris, 1999-2001 #12;2 Oral presentations Yokota, K. and R. W and Oceanography Aquatic Sciences Meeting. Santa Fe, New Mexico. Yokota, K. and R. W. Sterner. 2006. Long

Sterner, Robert W.

232

Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22: Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22nd , 2010, Economic Sustainability: Room to Move? Workshop Hosted by Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Walden

233

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

SciTech Connect

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling, estimation, and control of robot-soil interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the development of hardware, theory, and experimental methods to enable a robotic manipulator arm to interact with soils and estimate soil properties from interaction forces. Unlike the majority of ...

Hong, Won, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Baseline ecological risk assessment Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

The Salmon Site (SS), formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site, located in Mississippi was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion tests conducted between 1964 and 1970. A consequence of these testing activities is that radionuclides were released into the salt dome, where they are presently contained. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. As part of the remedial investigation effort, a Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted at the SS. The purpose is to gauge ecological and other environmental impacts attributable to past activities at the former test facility. The results of this facility-specific baseline risk assessment are presented in this document.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Biophysical Controls on Soil Respiration in the Dominant Patch Types of an Old-Growth, Mixed-Conifer Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ho¨gberg et al. 2001). These processes are interrelated and affected by multiple biophysical factors). Soil respiration is related to many ecological processes, such as photosyn- thesis, root respiration in an ecosys- tem. Soil respiration is also associated with physical CO2 diffusion processes affected

Chen, Jiquan

237

ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology Samuel M. Scheiner & Michael R. Willig Received: 9 of ecology have existed for the past half century; ecologists simply have failed to explicitly recognize them. We present a general theory of ecology and show how it relates to ecology's numerous constituent

Willig, Michael

238

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

Maxwell, Bruce D.

239

Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Ecology Volume 2012, Article ID 939862, 17 pages doi:10.1155/2012/939862 Review Article Parallel Ecological Speciation in Plants? Katherine L speciation, known as parallel ecological speciation, is one of several forms of evidence for ecology's role

Rieseberg, Loren

240

ECOLOGY LIFE 320 Spring Semester 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECOLOGY LIFE 320 Spring Semester 2011 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Liba Pejchar Office: 234 Wagar E-mail: liba to the fundamental principles of ecology. You will learn about the mechanisms that generate ecological patterns the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature. We will spend most of the semester studying ecology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed ConiferAssumptions Mixed conifer forests are a collection of different species, each with different ecologic requirements

242

Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 769779 2006 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

769 Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 769­779 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ECOLOGICAL and phenotypic plasticity in promoting ecological character displacement (i.e., trait evolution stemming from resource competition between species). Because ecological character displacement generates new populations

Behe, Michael J.

243

Guide for ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Ecological risk assessment evaluates the likelihood that adverse ecological effects may occur or are occurring as a result of exposure to one or more stressors. Ecological risk assessment provides a critical element for environmental decision making by giving risk managers an approach for considering available scientific information along with the other factors they need to consider (e.g., social, legal, political, or economic) in selecting a course of action. The primary audience for this document is risk assessors and risk managers at EPA, although these Guidelines also may be useful to others outside the Agency.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecological risk Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: aquatic ecological risk Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions Summary: Aquatic Ecology...

245

Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Panasonic Ecology Systems (formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co) Place Kasugai, Aichi, Japan Zip 468-8522 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Japanese manufacturer of energy efficient residential and commercial electronic goods such as air conditioners, fans, and 'hybrid tower' which uses wind and solar power as street lights. Coordinates 35.277859°, 137.011215° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.277859,"lon":137.011215,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

International Summer School 2013 Ecological Management in the Man -Environment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Summer School 2013 Ecological Management in the «Man - Environment» System 16 of the Environment, Geography, Environmental Management, Geo-ecology, Land-use Planning or Environmental Planning pollution. Thus, an effective environmental management is vitally important for sustainable development

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

247

Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arq172  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arq172 Forum: Invited Review The fusion of behavioral ecology and ecology Deborah M. Gordon Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA Behavioral ecology and ecology have projects in common. Community ecology can provide behavioral ecology

Gordon, Deborah

248

Book Reviews Ecology, 92(8), 2011, p. 1705  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Reviews Ecology, 92(8), 2011, p. 1705 ? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Advances in community ecology Gido, Keith B., and Donald A. Jackson, editors. 2010. Community ecology of stream fishes: community ecology; fish ecology; long-term studies; stream ecology. It is rare that a book has a 25-year

Mangel, Marc

249

Assessment of ecological risks in weed biocontrol: Input from retrospective ecological analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of the outcomes of natural enemy introductions remains the most fundamental challenge in biological control. Quantitative retrospective analyses of ongoing biocontrol projects provide a systematic strategy to evaluate and further develop ecological risk assessment. In this review, we highlight a crucial assumption underlying a continued reliance on the host specificity paradigm as a quantitative prediction of ecological risk, summarize the status of our retrospective analyses of nontarget effects of two weevils used against exotic thistles in North America, and discuss our prospective assessment of risk to a federally listed, threatened species (Cirsium pitcheri) based on those studies. Our analyses quantify the fact that host range and preference from host specificity tests are not sufficient to predict ecological impact if the introduced natural enemy is not strictly monophagous. The implicit assumption when such use is made of the host specificity data in risk assessment is that population impacts are proportional to relative preference and performance, the key components of host specificity. However, in concert with shifting awareness in the field, our studies demonstrate that the environment influences and can alter host use and population growth, leading to higher than expected direct impacts on the less preferred native host species at several spatial scales. Further, we have found that straightforward, easily anticipated indirect effects, on intraguild foragers as well as on the less preferred native host plant species, can be both widespread and significant. We conclude that intensive retrospective ecological studies provide some guidance for the quantitative prospective studies needed to assess candidate biological control agent dynamics and impacts and, so, contribute to improved rigor in the evaluation of total ecological risk to native species.

Svata M. Louda; Tatyana A. Rand; F. Leland Russell; Amy E. Arnett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ecology of Owens Valley vole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little current data exist concerning the status and ecology of Owens Valley vole (OVV; Microtus californicus vallicola), despite its California Department of Fish and Game listing as a Species of Special Concern. No formal studies have been...

Nelson, Fletcher Chris

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ethylene and soil fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SMITH1 has reported that ethylene is a causative agent of soil fungistasis, that its production in soil varies with ... earlier work3; more recent observations4 suggest that soil anaerobiosis is necessary to mobilise substrates3 for ethylene formation by soil microorganisms.

J. M. LYNCH; S. H. T. HARPER

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe in Coastal British.W. Negrave. 2007. Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe in Coastal British

253

Innovative technologies for soil cleanup  

SciTech Connect

These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

255

Feeding on Phytoestrogens: Implications of Estrogenic Plants for Primate Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change. Journal of Tropical Ecology 21: 31-45. Chapman, C. ,success in a mammal. Ecology 90: Dixon, R. 2004.physiology, and feeding ecology. Evolutionary Anthropology

Wasserman, Michael David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Empirical and theoretical challenges in abovegroundbelowground ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in abovegroundbelowground ecology Wim H. van der Putten Interactions, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology, NetherlandsInstitute of Ecology NIOO-KNAW, Boterhoeksestraat 48, 6666

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dolphins and African apes: comparisons of sympatric socio-ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of sympatric ecology among dolphins and African apesA. 1998. Gorilla ecology and behaviour. EvolutionaryVolume 2: be- haviour, Ecology, and Conservation.Tokyo:

Bearzi, Maddalena; Stanford, Craig B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Behavior, Ecology and Genetics of Geoffroy's Tamarin (Saguinus geoffroyi)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of landscapes for conservation. Ecology Letters 11: 78-91. LSystematics, behaviour and ecology. Oxford University Press,The evolutionary ecology of the major histocompatibility

Diaz-Munoz, Samuel Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford October 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Emerald Laija, EPA Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov 509-376-4919 Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov 509-372-7954 RICHLAND, Wash. -The Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with the Washington Department of Ecology, have made plans for remediating contaminated soil at four locations in the center of the Hanford Site. The agencies have chosen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Adsorption and transport of pyrithiobac in soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adsorbents (Gonzales bentonite, Georgia kaolinite, goethite, and Michigan peat) and four soils (Houston Black c, Hidalgo sl, Orelia scl, and Ships sic) having a wide range of physical and chemical properties. Adsorption isotherms were developed...

Matocha, Christopher John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

Entekhabi, Dara

264

The Analysis of Ecological Ethics in the Low-carbon Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The low-carbon economy, a major advance in human history, is required by the environment in which human beings inhabit. This economic development model, which centers on energy technology innovation, system innovation and the fundamental change of human survival concept, has an obvious orientation of ecological ethics and is in accordance with the requirements of ecological harmony in China's scientific development concept. The low-carbon characteristic of the scientific development concept is a systematic relationship reflected in the social, economic and ecological aspects of coordinated development. These three aspects are complementary with each other, and check each other based on social, economic, ecological sustainability. In a low-carbon economy society, the development of high-tech industry is considered as a strategic goal, enhancing the competitiveness of manufactured products. As a result, the nation should carry out low-carbon industry strategies and the citizens should foster the low-carbon awareness and lead a low-carbon life.

QIAN Tongzhou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Research Focus Marine ecology warms up to theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in marine biodiversity and conservation, as well as to understand the response of marine organisms]. Marine biodiversity research lags behind that on land, with only 10% of overall biodiversity research devoted to marine biodiversity [2] and exhibits a general neglect of developments in general ecological

Bruno, John F.

266

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair Evan Siemann Professors of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyoffersabroadrangeofcoursesinthebiosciences:animalbehavior,animal biology, bioinformatics, conservation biology, diseases, ecology, evolutionary biology, field ecology, genetics, genomics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

267

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Aquatic Sciences OVERVIEW Ecology of freshwater shore zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Freshwater shore zones are among the most ecologically valuable parts of the planet, but have been heavily damaged by human activities. Because the management and rehabilitation of freshwater shore zones could be improved by better use of ecological knowledge, we summarize here what is known about their ecological functioning. Shore zones are complexes of habitats that support high biodiversity, which is enhanced by high physical complexity and connectivity. Shore zones dissipate large amounts of physical energy, can receive and process extraordinarily high inputs of autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter, and are sites of intensive nutrient cycling. Interactions between organic matter inputs (including wood), physical energy, and the biota are especially important. In general, the ecological character of shore zone ecosystems is set by inputs of physical energy, geologic (or anthropogenic) structure, the hydrologic regime, nutrient inputs, the biota, and climate. Humans have affected freshwater shore zones by laterally compressing and stabilizing the shore zone, changing hydrologic regimes, shortening and simplifying shorelines, hardening shorelines, tidying shore zones, increasing inputs of physical energy that impinge on shore zones, pollution, recreational activities, resource extraction, introducing alien species, changing climate, and intensive development in the shore zone. Systems to guide management and restoration by quantifying ecological services provided by shore zones and balancing multiple (and sometimes conflicting) values are relatively recent and imperfect. We

D. L. Strayer; S. E. G. Findlay

269

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ecologic Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ecologic Institute Name Ecologic Institute Address Pfalzburger Strasse 43/44 Place Berlin, Germany Year founded 1995 Phone number +49 (30) 86880-0 Website http://ecologic.eu/ Coordinates 52.493143445°, 13.3453845978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.493143445,"lon":13.3453845978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecologic Analytics Ecologic Analytics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecologic Analytics Place Bloomington, Minnesota Zip 55425 Product Minnesota-based meter data management company. Coordinates 42.883574°, -90.926122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.883574,"lon":-90.926122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers improve soil carbon cycling models researchers improve soil carbon cycling models January 01, 2013 ORNL's new carbon cycling model could help scientists understand the role of soil microbes (MBC) in climate change by tracking extracellular enzymes (ENZ) that break down carbon-rich soil materials (SOC) into forms that microbes can respire (DOC). A more robust model of the soil carbon cycle developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves understanding of carbon residence time in soils and enables scientists to make more accurate climate predictions. The model does a better job than previous models of accounting for how microbes in the soil break down carbon-rich materials and release carbon dioxide. "Soil is a big reservoir of carbon," said co-author Melanie Mayes of the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science

273

Space Ecological Systems 19601975  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There appears to be a great deal of varied opinions in regard to the types of ecological systems required in manned space vehicles. In order to logically discuss designs of various ecological systems we must firs...

Eugene B. Konecci

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

RECONSTRUCTING CLIMATE ON THE GREAT PLAINS FROM BURIED SOILS: A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that buried soils can provide, this study presents the Buried Soil Reconstruction Model (BuSCR), a method for reconstructing paleoclimate based on properties of buried soils. The model was developed based on a study of modern analogue soils and climate...

Zung, Ashley B.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Ecology, 92(12), 2011, pp. 21592166 2011 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports Ecology, 92(12), 2011, pp. 2159­2166 ? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America plant parasites is widespread. Yet, understanding the ecological determinants of evolutionary divergence such a trade-off has been reported, this study provides further ecological bases for the coexistence of closely

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The primary mission of the Graduate Program in Ecology & Environmental Science is to offer a graduate program

Thomas, Andrew

277

Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams J. B. Johnson (jerry.johnson@byu.edu), S. M. Peat and B. J. Adams, Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Dept, molecular techniques have had a more limited impact in ecology. This discrepancy is surprising. Here, we

Pfrender, Michael

278

Ecology, 91(10), 2010, pp. 29412951 2010 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology, 91(10), 2010, pp. 2941­2951 ? 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Origin Integrative Ecology Group, Estacio´n Biolo´gica de Do~nana, CSIC, 41092 Sevilla, Spain 6 Northwestern interactions--and on the food web's degree of compartmentalization. Despite its ecological importance

Newman, Mark

279

Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 1 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102 DOE is to provide a summary of the literature on the physiology and molecular ecology of bacteria and in particular to be a comprehensive review. Excellent current detailed reviews are available on the physiology and molecular ecology

280

Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems Why is Integration Needed in Ecology?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems #12;Why is Integration Needed in Ecology? Great advances have been made by dividing ecology into subdisciplines. But too much focus on subdisciplines has also hindered ecology · too little study of the interface between disciplines · tended to narrow focus

Hansen, Andrew J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Case Studies of Ecological Integrative Information Systems: The Luquillo and Sevilleta Information Management Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thirty-year-old United States Long Term Ecological Research Network has developed extensive metadata to document their scientific data. Standard and interoperable metadata is a core component of the data-d...

Inigo San Gil; Marshall White; Eda Melendez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Rapid Assessment Method Examining the Ecological Health of Tidal Marine Wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been lost since 1950, due primarily to coastal development and declines in water quality. Restoration of wetlands is essential to reestablish lost functions, but there is no standard method to assess the ecological health of restored salt marshes...

Staszak, Lindsey Ann

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Long-term ecological dynamics: reciprocal insights from natural and anthropogenic gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1969The strategy of ecosystem development. Science...sequestration by forest ecosystems in a CO2-enriched...theory and community restoration ecology. Restor...biological invaders in aquatic ecosystems. Ecol. Lett. 7...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

285

74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 7483.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Villar-Salvador and Pedro Jáuregui Rey Benayas, J. M., Cuesta, B., Villar-Salvador, P. and Jaúregui, P.rey@uah.es), B. Cuesta and P. Villar-Salvador, Univ. de Alcalá, Dept de Ecología, ES­28871 Alcalá de Henares

Villar-Salvador, Pedro

286

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact or flowing water. They seal the soil surface, reduce the rate of water infiltration, and can into individual particles that clog soil pores, seal the surface, and form a layer that is dense when dry of physical crust with many small, unconnected air pockets or spaces similar to those in a sponge

288

Ecological indicators for stream restoration success  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of freshwater resources is essential for sustenance of human existence and alteration of rivers, lakes and wetlands has facilitated economic development for centuries. Consequently, freshwater biodiversity is critically threatened, with stream ecosystems being the most heavily affected. To improve the status of freshwater habitats, e.g. in the context of the European Water Framework Directive and the US Clean Water Act, it is essential to implement the most effective restoration measures and identify the most suitable indicators for restoration success. Herein, several active and passive bioindication approaches are reviewed in light of existing legal frameworks, current targets and applicable implementation of river restoration. Such approaches should move from the use of single biological indicators to more holistic ecological indicators simultaneously addressing communities, multiple life stages and habitat properties such as water quality, substrate composition and stream channel morphology. The proposed Proceeding Chain of Restoration (PCoR) can enable the integration of natural scientific, political and socioeconomic dimensions for restoration of aquatic ecosystems and associated services. Generally, an analysis that combines target species-based active bioindication with community-based passive bioindication and multivariate statistics seems to be most suitable for a holistic evaluation of restoration success, as well as for the monitoring of stream ecosystem health. Since the response of biological communities to changing environmental conditions can differ between taxonomic groups and rivers, assessments at the ecosystem scale should include several levels of biological organisation. A stepwise evaluation of the primary factors inducing disturbance or degradation is needed to integrate increasing levels of complexity from water quality assessments to the evaluation of ecological function. The proposed \\{PCoR\\} can provide a step-by-step guide for restoration ecologists, comprising all planning steps from the determination of the conservation objectives to the use of ecological indicators in post-restoration monitoring.

Joachim Pander; Juergen Geist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The industrial ecology of metals: a reconnaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Washington, DC 20036, USA Industrial ecology involves a systems...products to landfills. The industrial ecology of metals...Audrey Webber4 1 Belfer Center for Science and International...Washington, DC 20036, USA Industrial ecology involves a systems...Office of Technology Assessment 1992, based on personal...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Ecology of Malware Jedidiah R. Crandall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ecology of Malware Jedidiah R. Crandall University of New Mexico Dept. of Computer Science Mail of ecological systems have begun to emerge. This may include competition between malware, fa- cilitation, parasitism, predation, and density-dependent population regulation. Ecological principles will likely

Forrest, Stephanie

291

Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896 Popul Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10144-012-0352-3 Impacts of enemy of Population Ecology and Springer Japan. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall not be self of Population Ecology and Springer Japan 2012 Abstract In this study, we used data from both experi- ments

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

292

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Undergraduate Programmes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Undergraduate Programmes BSc ConsEcol Would you like, with an emphasis on socio-ecological systems, equips you to work at solving conservation challenges. The areas and freshwater), restoration ecology, game farm management, ecotourism, community-based natural resource

Geldenhuys, Jaco

293

Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world://bee.oregonstate.edu/ecoe Ecological Engineering is: · Ecosystem restoration and habitat design at multiple scales · Watershed · Phytoremediation and bioremediation · Industrial ecology · Constructed wetlands and tidal marshlands · Mitigation

Tullos, Desiree

294

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Dr James Pryke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Dr James Pryke My academic career began with an MSc on landscape ecology issues. After receiving my PhD, I undertook a two month fellowship at the Universiti. This position primarily involved conducting research into improving the design and management of ecological

Geldenhuys, Jaco

295

Plant Ecology -Chapter 2 Photosynthesis & Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Plant Ecology - Chapter 2 Photosynthesis & Light Photosynthesis & Light Functional ecology - how the structural context of their anatomy and morphology Photosynthesis & Light Functional ecology - closely-plant responses to their environment Photosynthesis & Light Photosynthesis is a "package deal" How much light

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

296

Ecological risk of heavy metal hotspots in topsoils in the Province of Golestan, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Human activities, such as agriculture or mining, are a continuous source of risk for heavy metal pollution that seriously disturbs the soil environment. Massive efforts are being made to identify the tools to determine indicators of soil quality condition. This study characterises and evaluates the heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) contents in the Province of Golestan (northern Iran). Pollution was assessed using the pollution index (PI) and the integrated pollution index (IPI). The potential harmful effects of these heavy metals were evaluated by the Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI) Method. Kernel density estimation (KDE) and Local Moran's I were used for the hotspot analysis of soil pollution from a set of observed hazard occurrences. In all, 346 topsoils were examined, which represent three areas, approximately including the middle-south, west and north-east areas in this region. The heavy metal concentrations in the analysed samples did not generally present high values, despite anthropic heavy metal input. However, the potential ecological risk indexes (RI) indicated that approximately 68% and 5% of the study samples had medium and high pollution levels, respectively. Multiple hotspots for the above five heavy metals were located in the middle-south and west study areas. This anthropic heavy metal input is related to mining, agricultural practices and vehicle emissions. It was concluded that a moderate and high potential ecological risk covered about 90% of this province. In contrast, the natural origin input became more marked on a long spatial scale.

Rouhollah Mirzaei; Hadi Ghorbani; Naser Hafezi Moghaddas; Jos Antonio Rodrguez Martn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Predictive systems ecology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...developed, at least in part, to refine the terrestrial carbon cycle subroutines of general circulation models and the Earth System Models, and to improve the predictive ability of these models [67]. Models like SORTIE, FORMIND, PPA, PICUS and...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

SYSTEMKOLOGIE ETHZ SYSTEMS ECOLOGY ETHZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but most efficient method is the common application of the dependence function to mean values. Condensing are linear in the observed temperature range, or low precision but very high efficiency is required. Given of ecological models. For the sake of simplicity and efficiency, the temperature dependencies in many models

Fischlin, Andreas

299

Ambient Ecologies in Smart Homes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......waters the plant and she leaves her house, a taxi is waiting her outside in...across different ecology boundaries. Energy efficiency in UbiComp environments is crucial...sensors operated by battery. To sustain energy efficiency, we plan to extend our middleware......

C. Goumopoulos; A. Kameas

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Parallel ecological networks in ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interactions|ecosystem engineers|ecological stoichiometry...organisms with their environment (Haeckel 1869...concept of ecosystems engineers (Jones et al...strong species-environment feedbacks in almost...including species-environment interactions...importance of ecosystem engineers has been recognized...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Genomics in the ecological arena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...meeting-report Meeting reports 1001 60 69 70 129 Genomics in the ecological arena Luisa Orsini...Dame, IN 46556, USA 4 The Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Indiana University...emerging model system in environmental genomics. Daphnia has been a model species in...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Soil sorption characteristics of imidacloprid in different Croatian regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Croatia, imidacloprid is increasingly used in olive growing areas against the olive fruit fly. Experiments were conducted to examine the relationship between soil properties, imidacloprid concentration and soil sorption capacity. The linear and the Freundlich model adequately described the imidacloprid sorption. Better sorption was observed at lower imidacloprid concentrations and in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content, but organic carbon content was predominant factor influencing sorption. Thus, for soils with lower sorption capacity a greater potential mobility of imidacloprid in the soil profile is expected, indicating a need for regular monitoring and strategy development against groundwater pollution.

Dalibor Brozni?; Jelena Marini?; Marin Tota; Gordana ?anadi Jureši?; ?edomila Milin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A soil moisture availability model for crop stress prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is composed of three major components, which are, a) calcul ation of evapotranspiration, b) infiltration of moisture into the soil, c) redistribution of the soil moisture. Other edaphic models have been developed by Hill [1974], Bai er and Robertson... inputs could result in the development of moist layers in the lower soil layer that would not be accounted for if the moisture were uniformly redistributed. As the cycle progesses, redistribution and moisture depletion do occur, until there 1s less...

Gay, Roger Franklin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A numerical solution to three-dimensional multiphase transport of volatile organic compounds in unsaturated soils -- with an application to the remedial method of in-situ volatilization. Part I: Theoretical development  

SciTech Connect

Part I of this paper presents the development and application of a numerical model for determining the fate and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in the unsaturated zone resulting from forced volatilization and gaseous advection-dispersion of organic vapor in a multipartitioned three-dimensional environment. The model allows for single-component transport in the gas and water phases. The hydrocarbon is assumed to be in specific retention and, therefore, immobile. Partitioning of the hydrocarbon between the oil, water, gas, and soil is developed as rate-limited functions that are incorporated into sink/source terms in the transport equations. The code for the model was developed specifically to investigate in-situ volatilization (ISV) remedial strategies, predict the extent of cleanup from information obtained at a limited number of measurement locations, and to help design ISV remedial systems. Application of the model is demonstrated for a hypothetical one-dimensional ISV system. Part II of this paper will present the analysis of an existing ISV system using the full three-dimensional capability of the model.

Filley, T.; Tomasko, D.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

306

Ecology 2006 20, 670677  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of development (Ewert 1985; Gutzke & Packard 1987) and an increase in temperature, within Author to whom investigated the influence of duration of inundation-induced diapause, incubation temperature and clutch of origin on incubation duration and survivorship of eggs of the Snake-Necked Turtle, Chelodina rugosa, from

Canberra, University of

307

A study of the homogenization of soils  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, areas of land that have been contaminated must be returned to an environmental condition that permits less restrictive forms of use. In anticipation of being listed as an EPA Superfund Site, the United States Department of Energy`s (US DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is evaluating existing the technologies, and supporting the development of new technologies, for the removal of plutonium contaminants from soils. During the 1950s, DOE conducted a series of tests on the NTS wherein attempts were made to detonate nuclear weapons by igniting charges of high explosives packed around the weapons` warheads. While the warheads never achieved criticality, each test disseminated particulate plutonium over several square miles, principally in Area 11 of the NTS.DOE`s Nevada Operations Office has committed to a Plutonium In Soils Integrated Demonstration Project (PuID) to evaluate existing and developmental technologies for the safe removal of plutonium contamination from soils. It is DOE`s intention to provide approximately one ton of Area 11 soil, traced with a non-radioactive plutonium surrogate, to each of several companies with expertise in the removal of soil contaminants. These companies have expressed an interest in contracting with DOE for remediation of NTS soils. DOE wishes to evaluate each company`s process in an unbiased and statistically justifiable manner. For this reason, DOE must provide to each company a large sample of soil for prototype testing. The soil must be homogenized such that the representativeness of each split is well documented and defensible. The process of uniformly mixing large volumes of soil has not been addressed, to our knowledge, in the hydrogeologic, soil science or mining literature. Several mixing devices are currently being evaluated by DOE for use in the PuID. This report describes the results of some initial experimentation with a small cement mixer.

Giovine, L.R.S.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Technique Development to Support Clean-up and/or Disposal of Actinide Contaminated Soils and Sediments: Coupling Fission Tract Analysis with Synchroton X-ray Microprobe Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to develop quantitative FTA to provide images of the microscale spatial distributions of high fissile actinides sorbed to environmental particles such as sediments and colloids. We developed methods to provide absolute actinide surface concentrations on the particles, regardless of particle size. We are also working to provide particle size information by our approach. We also coupled our newly devised FTA methods with the quantitative determination of stable element distributions in the same particles using synchrotron x-ray microprobe analysis.

Sue Clark

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the load- settlement behavior of single piles in cohesionless soils is addressed. The available data on instrumerted piles load-tested vertically in sands is collected and analyzed to determine the load transfer characteristics of the soil. A... the distribution of residual stresses in the piles, and methods of obtaining residual stresses from load test results are discussed. Correlations with the results of the Standard Penetration Test are presented and are used to develop a new design procedure which...

Tucker, Larry Milton

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miscellaneous Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master...

311

Application of diversity to regional ecological assessment: a review with recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Species diversity is frequently considered a primary indicator of ecosystem health, stability, and resilience. As such, species diversity is commonly the major criterion upon which environmental impact statements and ecological assessments are based. This report describes the theoretical development and refinement of the concept of ecological diversity and the various mathematical expressions of diversity. Advantages and disadvantages of each diversity expression are discussed. The application and interpretation of diversity indices for different spatial scales (e.g., specific sites and regional assessments) and variables (e.g., species diversity, habitat diversity, landscape diversity) are contrasted. Recommendations indicate the appropriate diversity indices for regional ecological assessments.

Levenson, J.B.; Stearns, F.W.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

313

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Radio-Ecological Situation in the Area of the Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association - 13522  

SciTech Connect

'The Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association' (hereinafter referred to as PPMCA) is a diversified mining company which, in addition to underground mining of uranium ore, carries out refining of such ores in hydrometallurgical process to produce natural uranium oxide. The PPMCA facilities are sources of radiation and chemical contamination of the environment in the areas of their location. In order to establish the strategy and develop criteria for the site remediation, independent radiation hygienic monitoring is being carried out over some years. In particular, this monitoring includes determination of concentration of the main dose-forming nuclides in the environmental media. The subjects of research include: soil, grass and local foodstuff (milk and potato), as well as media of open ponds (water, bottom sediments, water vegetation). We also measured the radon activity concentration inside surface workshops and auxiliaries. We determined the specific activity of the following natural radionuclides: U-238, Th-232, K-40, Ra-226. The researches performed showed that in soil, vegetation, groundwater and local foods sampled in the vicinity of the uranium mines, there is a significant excess of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th content compared to areas outside the zone of influence of uranium mining. The ecological and hygienic situation is as follows: - at health protection zone (HPZ) gamma dose rate outdoors varies within 0.11 to 5.4 ?Sv/h (The mean value in the reference (background) settlement (Soktui-Molozan village) is 0.14 ?Sv/h); - gamma dose rate in workshops within HPZ varies over the range 0.14 - 4.3 ?Sv/h. - the specific activity of natural radionuclides in soil at HPZ reaches 12800 Bq/kg and 510 Bq/kg for Ra-226 and Th-232, respectively. - beyond HPZ the elevated values for {sup 226}Ra have been registered near Lantsovo Lake - 430 Bq/kg; - the radon activity concentration in workshops within HPZ varies over the range 22 - 10800 Bq/m{sup 3}. The seasonal dependence of radon activity concentration is observed in the air of workshops (radon levels are lower in winter in comparison with spring-summer period). - in drinking water, intervention levels by gross alpha activity and by some radionuclides, in particular by Rn-222, are in excess. Annual effective dose of internal exposure due to ingestion of such water will be 0.14-0.28 mSv. (authors)

Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Kiselev, S.M.; Titov, A.V. [FSBI SRC A.I. Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [FSBI SRC A.I. Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)] [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation); Marenny, A.M. [Ltd 'Radiation and Environmental Researches' (Russian Federation)] [Ltd 'Radiation and Environmental Researches' (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Surfactant-enhanced extraction of hazardous wastes from soils. First report  

SciTech Connect

Through combined efforts, researchers at Clark Atlanta University and Savannah River Site propose to develop improved soil washing techniques for decontaminating soils containing organic, inorganic and radioactive wastes. This project encompasses several tasks including (1) identification of organic, inorganic and radioactive pollutants in selected soils, (2) separation of soils into various fractions and the determination of wastes in each fraction, (3) soil decontamination by washing with surfactants and evaluation of the effectiveness of various types of surfactants in removing contaminants from soils, (4) determination of soil remediation and the effects of the surfactant concentration and wash solution-to-soil ratio on the desorption and removal of organic wastes from soils, (5) assessment of soil particle size distribution on waste efficiency, (6) evaluating the effects of temperature, mixing rates, and extraction times on waste solubilization and extraction, and (7) determination of the influence of surface charge properties and the pHs of the souls slurries on the decontamination efficiency.

Abotsi, G.; Davies, I.; Saha, G.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a...

Naiser, Donald David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Managing Soil Salinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is high enough, the plants will wilt and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt... The terms salt and salinity are often used inter- changeably, and sometimes incorrectly. A salt is sim- ply an inorganic mineral that can dissolve in water. Many people associate salt with sodium chloride? common table salt. In reality, the salts that affect...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

EMSL - soil organic matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

soil-organic-matter en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the CDM: Opportunities and Challenges for Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines soil carbon sequestration in developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa ... that could increase agricultural productivity and sequester soil carbon. During the first five-year commitment perio...

Lasse Ringius

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

323

Ecology, 77(5),1996, pp. 1367-1378 O 1996 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology, 77(5),1996, pp. 1367-1378 O 1996 by the Ecological Society of America PALEOBIOLOGY, COMMUNITY ECOLOGY, AND SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL PATTERN1 DAVIDJABLONSKIAND J. JOHNSEPKOSKI,JR. Department that some biotic interactions influence large-scale ecological and evolutionary patterns, albeit in more

Boyce, C. Kevin

324

Friend or foe? Ecological modernisation in Brazil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ecological modernisation (EM) is a theory that proposes participation in decision-making, trust in science and technology, and preference for preventative measures, as strategies to simultaneously (more)

Milanez, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Kimberly Andrews | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrews with kingsnake Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Kimberly Andrews Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803)...

326

Kurt Buhlmann | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buhlmann Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Kurt A. Buhlmann Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5293 office...

327

J. Whitfield Gibbons | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gibbons Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology J. Whitfield Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5852 ...

328

Justin D. Congdon | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Congdon Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Justin D. Congdon Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5341 office...

329

Conference Center | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Center front view UGA-SREL Conference Center large conference room Large conference room small conference room Small conference room The Savannah River Ecology...

330

Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The effects of landscape, demographic and behavioral factors on kin-structure: Testing ecological predictions in a mesopredator with high dispersal capability. Animal...

331

Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

populations now exceed 5 million animals in the U.S. alone, causing causing billions in ecological and agricultural damages annually. In addition, vehicle collisions with feral...

332

Ethylene and soil fungistasis (reply)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... research1. We have shown clearly that spore-forming anaerobic bacteria are the major producers of ethylene in soil; that ... in soil; that ethylene is produced in anaerobic microsites in even (relatively dry soil; that the anaerobic microsites ...

SMITH

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ecological ranking of Phanerozoic biodiversity crises: ecological and taxonomic severities are decoupled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological ranking of Phanerozoic biodiversity crises: ecological and taxonomic severities extensive analyses of the taxonomic severity of major biodiversity crises in geologic time. In contrast, we propose here an alternative analysis of the ecological severity of biodiversity crises. It is clear

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

334

Ecological Applications, 21(3), 2011, pp. 619639 2011 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Applications, 21(3), 2011, pp. 619­639 ? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America University of Minnesota, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, Saint Paul, Minnesota 55108 USA 4 activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption, home energy use, landscape, pets

Nelson, Kristen C.

335

DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION  

SciTech Connect

This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging obstacles is not within the scope of this work, as it would require a more elaborate sensor than is practical within the HDD head.

Maximillian J. Kieba

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Why study Ecology at Auckland? Long-standingstrengthsinmarineecology,evolution,behaviour,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why study Ecology at Auckland? ·Long? Formoreinformationabouttheprogrammeandtherequirements ofthefourspecialisations,visitwww.ecology.auckland.ac.nz. Adviceisavailablefromthe: +6493737599ext88199 Fax:+6493737431 Email: scifac@auckland.ac.nz Web: www.ecology.auckland.ac.nz BSc

Sun, Jing

337

TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise for the inventory of dead wood in Coastal-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

338

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology and Environmental Sciences This cross of ecology and environmental sciences, within the unparalleled natural laboratory that is the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Particular program strengths include terrestrial and aquatic ecology, environmental

Lawrence, Rick L.

339

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Spring Semester 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Spring Semester 2013 All Hilu February 28 Robert Cox University of Virginia The ecology and physiology Christine May James Madison Unv. Disturbance ecology: linking stream communities

Virginia Tech

340

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 June 14, 2005 Issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing Karen S. Baker@scu.edu Abstract. An information ecology provides a conceptual framework to consider data, the creation Ecological Research (LTER) community, presents some manifestations of traditionally unreported `invisible

Bowker, Geoffrey C.

342

John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

343

DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED AGENTS Master's Thesis Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED AGENTS Master's Thesis Proposal November 5, 1997 Revised Lab #12; #12; Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Ecologies of Programs of Computational Ecologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.5 Summary of Expected Contributions

344

The effect carbohydrate consumption on Argentine ants' nutritional ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 18, 111-an invasive mealybug. Ecology, 83, 2425-2438. Helms, K.R. &invasions. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, Kaplan,

Chou, Cheng T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Insidious Island Invasion: An exploration of Falcataria moluccana stand ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1997) 21:1-16. APPENDIX A:plantation forestry. Forest Ecology and Management (2006)Seychelles. Functional Ecology (2008) 22:359- Little, E.L.

Minnich, Amanda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

update: Emerging research opportunities in global urban ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

populations. Global Ecology and Bio? geography,20,Global change and the ecology of cities. Science,ratesinurbanareas. EcologyLetters,12,1165 LaSorte,

La Sorte, Frank A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Food Web Ecology of a Leafminer-Parasitoid Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the timing of species interactions. Ecology Letters 13:1-10.The Netherlands. Landscape Ecology 23:595-602. Biesmeijer,there general patterns? Ecology Letters 11:499-515. Sala, O.

Blitzer, Eleanor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Ecology and Evolution of Soritid Foraminifera with Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates. Molecular Ecology 16:5326-5340. Zohary, T. , Z.in a host individual. Marine Ecology Progress Series 195:93-from Taiwan. Marine Ecology-Progress Series 295:113-121.

Fay, Scott Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Watershed Governance as a vehicle for fostering social, ecological and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watershed Governance as a vehicle for fostering social, ecological units; social-ecological systems; units of natural resource management, administration"... à `Ecological'? but where are the Ecosystems? #12; How to reflect watershed, health

Northern British Columbia, University of

350

communications in soil scienceand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje-0290 ABSTRACT Forest application of boiler ash is fast becoming a popular alternative to landfilling. Boiler ash following the application of large quantities of boiler ash in a sandy soil (with a spodic horizon). Two

Ma, Lena

351

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

352

Reappraisal of the Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ions of the solid phase of the soil system...liquid and gaseous phases of the soil system...solid and non-solid phases of the system show...than that of fine sand. 187 Oxidation...and to formation of hydrates and hydrated sec-ondary...brief review of the behavior of carbon in the...

C. C. Nikiforoff

1959-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Soil Studies with Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... reference are even strained to include the use of steam from nuclear reactors for the desalination of water. The proceedings are divided into five sections dealing respectively with equipment and ... moisture profile; soil water movement ; the interaction between soil, vegetation and water; and desalination of water for agriculture. Among the most valuable contributions are comparisons between the performance ...

E. C. CHILDS

1968-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ethylene in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... we have confirmed earlier reports that heat8 and even autoclaving9 can stimulate the production of ethylene by soils (Table 1). The effect of heat at 100 C on the ... soils (Table 1). The effect of heat at 100 C on the release of ethylene from pure cultures of M. hiemalis was therefore investigated. No ...

J. M. LYNCH

1975-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

356

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

357

EQPT: Ecological Quality Profiling Tool  

SciTech Connect

EQPT uses"Habitat Value Units" to assess the ecological quality of selected areas. A Habitat Value Unit is equal to one unit area of pristine or desired habitat. The proximity of waste reduces the value of the habitat. The GIS uses a proximity-based iterative algorithm to aggregate similarly classified waste sites. A variable size buffering algorithm is then used to approximate the effects of the waste on the environmental quality of the surrounding areas. The user designated areas are analyzed, and the resulting quality profiles are presented quantitatively in tabular summaries and graphically as grids on vector base maps.

Tzemos, Spyridon (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sackschewsky, Michael R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bilyard, Gordon R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...it does not. Three countries are in...the ecological sustainability of wild fish...These ecological sustainability concerns have...over economic sustainability, with an emphasis...metaphorical three pillars of sustainable development...

Stephen J. Hall; Ray Hilborn; Neil L. Andrew; Edward H. Allison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Design-with-Nature for Multifunctional Landscapes: Environmental Benefits and Social Barriers in Community Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McHargs Ecological Determinism design approach. The Woodlands, TX, USA, an ecologically designed community development under McHargs approach, is compared with two adjacent communities that follow the conventional design approach. Using national...

Yang, Bo; Li, Ming-Han; Li, Shujuan

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Spatial Ecology of the Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens): A Test of Species Distribution Models as Ecological Revealers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:141-148. Kremen,simple habitat models. Ecology Letters 8:993-1009. Krebs, C.2008. Ecology: the experimental analysis of distribution and

Bean, William Timothy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

363

Event:Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation: on 2012/07/20 China Ecological Forum will host a special session, in which keynote speeches will be presented by Ms. Amina Mohamed, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP and UN Assistant Secretary-General, and Prof. Yanhua Liu, Counsellor at the Counsellors' Office of the State Council of China. The special forum, titled "Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation", is focused on the new opportunities and challenges for South-South Cooperation and the way China cooperates with other developing countries in a post Rio+20 era. The forum also aims to inspire the science community to enhance its support

364

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS RIPARIAN WOODLAND AND SHRUBLAND ECOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS RIPARIAN WOODLAND AND SHRUBLAND ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT Draft of June 29, 2007 Prepared by: Karin Decker Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State

366

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS CLIFF, OUTCROP AND SHALE BARREN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS CLIFF, OUTCROP AND SHALE BARREN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT Draft of June 29, 2007 Prepared by: Karin Decker Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State

367

Ecology and Evolution of Flowering Plant Dominance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DEP AGR FOR ( 1973 ). GATES, D.M., ENERGY, PLANTS, AND ECOLOGY, ECOLOGY 46...so the flight capa-bilities, high-energy requirements, and hence the foraging...number of other individ-uals within the ambit of a given individual (for occupied quadrats...

Philip J. Regal

1977-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Why study Ecological and Environmental Sciences at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ecological management or environmental science; or alternatively maintain a broad mix of subject choices, land use and water resources and environmental modelling. Recent graduates have followed careers Sciences with Management This degree programme provides the opportunity for Ecological and Environmental

Schnaufer, Achim

369

MEIOFAUNA MARINA Biodiversity, morphology and ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEIOFAUNA MARINA Biodiversity, morphology and ecology of small benthic organisms 17 pfeil #12;MEIOFAUNA MARINA Biodiversity, morphology and ecology of small benthic organisms Volume 17·March 2009 pages-3937 E-mail: andreas.schmidt-rhaesa@uni-hamburg.de Pedro Martinez Arbízu Deutsches Zentrum für Marine

Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.

370

FrontiersinEcology and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DHA) (Meyer et al. 2003). Numerous studies show that consumption of fatty fish and fish oils can lead.frontiersinecology.org). © The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Please note: This article was downloaded from version in case any changes have been made. esaesa #12;© The Ecological Society of America www

Gerber, Leah R.

371

Assessment and Management of Ecological Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12.1 INTRODUCTION Assessing and understanding the impacts of human activities on aquatic ecosystems, and resilient to disturbance. Aquatic ecosystem level objectives may focus on management for habitat quality of restoration ecology. The term ecosystem health is often raised in discussions of ecological integrity. Per

Kwak, Thomas J.

372

Spirograph inspired visualization of ecological networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ecological networks are directed weighted graphs for representing direct and indirect relationships between species in ecosystems. These complex cyclic networks play an important role in understanding an ecosystem's dynamics. In this paper, we present ... Keywords: ecological network, visualization, weighted directed graph

Katayoon Etemad; Sheelagh Carpendale; Faramarz Samavati

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

374

Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

Pringle, Anne

375

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-3897) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

376

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

377

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-2635) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

378

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class

Gray, Matthew

379

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

380

December 2006 Spatial Autocorrelation and Pseudoreplication 107 Practices and Applications in Fire Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology SPATIAL AUTOCORRELATION AND PSEUDOREPLICATION IN FIRE ECOLOGY Amanda L. Bataineh1 , Brian P the traditional statistical assumption of observational independence. What, if anything, can the fire ecology fire ecology researchers. Key Words: nearness, experimental design, ecology, landscape

Hung, I-Kuai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida's 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in

382

Analysis of soil and water for TATB content  

SciTech Connect

A reverse-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the analysis of TATB in soil samples. The soil samples were extracted with dimethylformamide (DMF). The extract was analyzed to determine the TATB content in the soil. The detection limit using this procedure was 2 parts/million (ppm) for TATB in the soil. An organic free sample of water was saturated with TATB. The water was filtered through a 0.2-{mu} filter, then injected into both a reverse-phase and normal-phase liquid chromatograph system. No peaks were detected. Therefore, the solubility of TATB in water is less than the detection limits of the chromatograph methods.

Schaffer, C.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Human behaviour and ecosystem services in sustainable farming landscapes : an agent-based model of socio-ecological systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on agents interactions at smaller scale. This approach is better suited to understanding and modelling complex socio-ecological systems, which emerge from individual actions, and therefore for developing tools which improve policy effectiveness. In recent...

Guillem, Elonore E.

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

384

Backtothefuture: a fresh policy initiative for fisheries and a restoration ecology for ocean ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...developments in ecosystem modelling, and...science-based restoration ecology aimed...fisheries and aquatic ecosystems (Pitcher et al...process for the restoration of fisheries and aquatic ecosystems. (Modified from...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Prediction methods for capacity of drag anchors in clayey soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A drag anchor is a marine foundation element, which is penetrated into the seabed by dragging in order to generate a required capacity. The holding capacity of a drag anchor in a particular soil condition is developed by soil resistance acting...

Yoon, Yeo Hoon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Towards sustainable consumption: do green households have smaller ecological footprints?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for households in rich countries to develop more sustainable consumption patterns is high on the political agenda. An increased awareness of environmental issues among the general public is often presented as an important prerequisite for this change. This article describes how the study team compared the ecological footprints of ''green'' and ''ordinary'' households. These footprint calculations are based on a number of consumption categories that have severe environmental consequences, such as energy and material use in the home, and transport. The comparison is based on a survey of 404 households in the city of Stavanger, where 66 respondents were members of the Environmental Home Guard in Norway. The analysis suggests that, even if the green households have a smaller ecological footprint per household member, this is not caused by their participation in the Home Guard. It merely reflects the fact that green households are larger than ordinary households.

Erling Holden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002 Efficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line intersec  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002 Efficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

388

Ecological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- Consequences of Nuclear Testing Amcl~itka isln,zd has a Iristory of disturbnnce by nroder~r matt, i,rclr~ding US. military operatio~ts on the isla~rd drrring Il'orld ll'nr % n~rterlnthrg the a~tder.qou~rd nuclear tests Nilrow nrrd Cannikin, for which preparation begntr in 1966. nlarry of the. terrestrial distarbnrrces resttlti,tg from ,taclear testing were superimposed o n scars remai~tirrg from the nrilitnry occt~pntiotz. Constrriction, road hirprouement, and the hlilrow an(/ Cnrrnikbt nt~clenr deto~rntions resulted bt the loss or deterioratio,t of about 420 Ira (1040ncres) of terrestrial hnbitnt, or less thmr 1.5% of the total area of An~clritka. A few streams and lakes were pollicted by drilling effluettts or human wastes; nornlalflrislting action is expected t

389

Kinetics of Ni Sorption in Soils: Roles of Soil Organic Matter and Ni Precipitation  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of Ni sorption to two Delaware agricultural soils were studied to quantitatively assess the relative importance of Ni adsorption on soil organic matter (SOM) and the formation of Ni layered double hydroxide (Ni-LDH) precipitates using both experimental studies and kinetic modeling. Batch sorption kinetic experiments were conducted with both soils at pH 6.0, 7.0, and 7.5 from 24 h up to 1 month. Time-resolved Ni speciation in soils was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) during the kinetic experiments. A kinetics model was developed to describe Ni kinetic reactions under various reaction conditions and time scales, which integrated Ni adsorption on SOM with Ni-LDH precipitation in soils. The soil Ni speciation (adsorbed phases and Ni-LDH) calculated using the kinetics model was consistent with that obtained through XAS analysis during the sorption processes. Under our experimental conditions, both modeling and XAS results demonstrated that Ni adsorption on SOM was dominant in the short term and the formation of Ni-LDH precipitates accounted for the long-term Ni sequestration in soils, and, more interestingly, that the adsorbed Ni may slowly transfer to Ni-LDH phases with longer reaction times.

Shi, Zhenqing; Peltier, Edward; Sparks, Donald L. (Delaware); (Kansas)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

An ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified point-centered quarter sampling technique (Kooser and Rankin). The survey was conducted to identify community types and the presence of areas with the potential to be identified as wetlands. The survey was cross-referenced with topographical maps for Waverly, Waverly South, Lucasville, and Wakefield (Department of Interior, 1987), with Wetlands Identification: Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands (Government Institutes, 1989)' and with the endangered and threatened species lists for Ohio. Additionally, the Division of Natural Areas and Preserves, Department of Natural Resources, was consulted. The Pike County Soil Conservation District Office was consulted to determine

391

Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

392

Oil degradation in soil.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...homa, and Corpus Christi, Texas. The...fractionation, gas chromatography...depended upon the natural soil flora to...except at Corpus Christi (Table 13...recovered at Corpus Christi. Bean and turnip...extracts to gas chromatographic...

R L Raymond; J O Hudson; V W Jamison

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan. Topical report, October 1990--August 1992  

SciTech Connect

This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth wetland sites mapped Lenawee soils were selected in Midland County, Michigan: Site 1, a younger stand subjected to recent selective logging, and Site 2, a more mature stand. The collection of ecological data to analyze plant succession on the right-of-way (ROW) and the effects of the developing ROW plant communities on adjacent forest communities was initiated in 1989. Cover class estimates were made for understory and ROW plant species on the basis of 1 {times} 1{minus}m quadrats. Individual stem diameters and species counts were recorded for overstory plants in 10{minus}m quadrats. Although long-term studies have not been completed, firm baseline data were established for comparative analyses with future sampling. Current data indicate that vegetation became well-established on the ROW within one year and subsequently increased in coverage. About 65% of the species were wetland indicators, and the dominants included seeded and natural invading species; nevertheless, some elements of the original flora regenerated and persist. The plants of the ecotone understories of both sites changed from their original composition as a result of the installation of the gas pipeline. Although some forest species persist at both sites, the ecotone of Site I was influenced more by the seeded species, whereas the natural invaders were more important at Site 2.

Rastorfer, J.R. [Chicago State Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zellmer, S.D.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Facility EcoCampus PV Sector Solar Facility Type Solar PV Facility Status In Service Owner Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Developer Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Energy Purchaser Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Address Kibbutz Lotan Location Israel, Zip 88855 Coordinates 29.987877559303°, 35.085187554359° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.987877559303,"lon":35.085187554359,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 93(7), 2012, pp. 1527­1539 ? 2012 by the Ecological Society of America Uses and misuses of bioclimatic envelope, they can be applied to a variety of questions in ecology, evolution, and conservation. However, some have

Hammerton, James

397

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 87(6), 2006, pp. 1345­1358 ? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ANALYTIC WEBS SUPPORT THE SYNTHESIS OF ECOLOGICAL DATA SETS AARON M. ELLISON,1,3 LEON J. OSTERWEIL,2 LORI CLARKE,2 JULIAN L. HADLEY,1 ALEXANDER WISE

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

398

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

399

What can I do with a degree in Ecology?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What can I do with a degree in Ecology? Science Planning your career Choosing a career involves.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Ecology? Ecology is the scientific study of the interactions between organisms and the environment. In reality, modern ecology is much broader than this, encompassing studies on individuals

Hickman, Mark

400

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 11241134  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1124 SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 1124­1134 2005 by the Ecological Society of America STATISTICS OF EXTREMES: MODELING ECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES RICHARD W. KATZ,1,3 GRACE S. BRUSH,2 AND MARC B ecological disturbances is the central theme of this paper. The statistics of extremes have played only

Gilleland, Eric

402

Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 15 Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back Roie Levy and Elhanan Borenstein the environments in which they evolved and are adapted to. Re- verse Ecology--an emerging new frontier's ecology. The Reverse Ecology framework facilitates the translation of high-throughput genomic data

Borenstein, Elhanan

403

SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574577  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

574 SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574­577 2003 by the Ecological Society of America WHAT that genetics should be incorporated into ecological explanations (Collins 1986). C. C. Adams (1915) sug- gested. Evolutionary ecology emerged in the 1960s, driven by empirical results in three areas (Collins 1986

Antonovics, Janis

404

SpecialFeature Ecology, 83(6), 2002, pp. 15371552  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emergence represent the vehicle by which ecology moves forward. Emerging paradigms force scientists1537 SpecialFeature Ecology, 83(6), 2002, pp. 1537­1552 2002 by the Ecological Society of America that has rekindled most of the major conflicts in ecology, creating a sense of de´ja` vu. These conflicts

Minnesota, University of

405

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

406

Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Abigail Golden, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Mentor: Dr. Joshua Drew, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abigail Golden, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Mentor: Dr. Joshua Drew, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Advisor: Dr. Elisa Bone, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution their fishing practices, which species they targeted most heavily, and aspects of their traditional ecological

408

Journal of Mediterranean Ecology vol.3, No 2-3 2002 Ecology is increasingly being asked to address  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35 Journal of Mediterranean Ecology vol.3, No 2-3 2002 Preface Ecology is increasingly being asked advising on these issues, ecologists rely on two central concepts in ecology, the concept of ecosy- stem concepts are translated into two separate approaches for land planning and management is new. Most ecologi

409

HO #19 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Barbour et al. (1999) Terrestrial Plant Ecology, 3rd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HO #19 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Barbour et al. (1999) Terrestrial Plant Ecology, 3rd Edition. #12;HO #20 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Larcher (1995) #12;HO #21 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 Osmond et al. (1982) IN Encyclopedia of Plant

Nowak, Robert S.

410

The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission: Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. Its mission design consists of L-band ...

O'Neill, Peggy

411

Ecology, 91(11), 2010, pp. 31463152 2010 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range of interrelated ecological concepts, such as the causes of succession, coexistence via unified understanding of the evolutionary processes that structure communities. Competition

Miller, Thomas E.

412

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

Smith, M.H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Technical report for the alkali lake ecological assessment, phase 1 reconnaissance (FY 91 and FY 92)  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes the results of three field survey trips (June and September 1991, May 1992) taken to investigate the ecological effects associated with the release of over a million gallons of hazardous waste from herbicide production on the Alkali Lake playa. Sampling of soil, sediment, groundwater, soil-dwelling invertebrates and vegetation confirmed that hazardous materials from the waste disposal area are migrating westerly within the shallow aquifer to West Alkali Lake. Two areas of dead vegetation were identified and permanently marked to determine if these areas are changing in size and location. Preliminary calculations using a linear food-chain model suggested that small mammalian herbivores would probably not display adverse effects due to dietary exposures to the contaminants. However, nestling shorebirds may be exposed to concentrations potentially associated with adverse biological effects.

Linder, G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Linda Lee | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lee Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Linda Lee Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5883 office (803) 725-3309 fax lee(at)srel.uga.edu I have a...

415

Peter Stangel | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stangel Senior Vice President, U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities co Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (404)-915-2763 (803) 725-8158...

416

James Beasley | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beasley Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home James Beasley Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5113 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

417

Robert A. Kennamer | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kennamer Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Robert A. Kennamer Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-0387 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

418

Gary Mills | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mills Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Gary Mills Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5368 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

419

Judith L. Greene | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greene Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Judith L. Greene Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-7637 office (803)...

420

Thomas G. Hinton | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hinton Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Thomas G. Hinton Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-7454 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

David E. Scott | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scott Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5747 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

422

Larry Bryan | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bryan Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Larry Bryan Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-2907 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

423

John Seaman | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seaman Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home John Seaman Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-0977 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

424

Domy C. Adriano | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adriano Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Domy C. Adriano Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5834 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

425

Shem D. Unger | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unger Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Shem D. Unger Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5324 office (765) 414-5435 cell...

426

Ecological effects of invasive alien insects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A literature survey identified 403 primary research publications that investigated the ecological effects of invasive alien insects and/or the mechanisms underlying these effects. The majority of these studies...

Marc Kenis; Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators July 21-25, 2014 CI 5540-003 (86282) 3 Credits Science and Earth Science curricula in Minnesota public schools. It is designed primarily for middle

Amin, S. Massoud

428

Industrial ecology: engineered representation of sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactive components of a system in the steady-state of sustainability may be classified by three domains: society, economy, and ecology. In literature, these three domains are often called pillars. A triangle...

Michael von Hauff; Peter A. Wilderer

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The comparative ecology and biogeography of parasites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ecology and biogeography of parasites Robert Poulin 1 * Boris R. Krasnov 2 David Mouillot...Author for correspondence ( robert.poulin@otago.ac.nz ). 1 Department of...marine; filled circles) (data from Poulin et al. [89]). Acknowledgements We...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY BACKGROUND MATERIAL HSU WILDLIFE 531 Dr. Matt Johnson;39 #12;HSU Matt Johnson CHI-SQUARE GOODNESS-OF-FIT TESTS OF WILDLIFE HABITAT SELECTION In a nutshell

Johnson, Matthew

431

Ecological macroeconomics: An application to climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ecological economics has not paid sufficient attention to the macroeconomic level both in terms of theory and modeling. Yet, key topics debated in the field of ecological economics such as sustainable consumption, reduction in working time, the degrowth debate, the energyexergy link, and the rebound effect require a holistic and macro perspective. While this deficiency has been identified before and Keynesian economics has been generally suggested as a potent vehicle to establish economic systemic thinking, very little concrete theorizing and practical suggestions have been put forward. We give further credence to this suggestion and demonstrate the value of tackling key concerns of ecological economics within a Keynesian growth framework. Contextualized by an application to climate change we suggest that policy relevant recommendations need to be based on a consistent view of the macroeconomy. We end with laying out key building blocks for a Keynesian model framework for an ecological macroeconomics.

Armon Rezai; Lance Taylor; Reinhard Mechler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, ...

Rusconi, Roberto

433

Ecoviews Archives | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNUSUAL PHENOMENA Jul 20 2014 WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT TORTOISES? Jul 13 2014 TURTLE RESEARCH CAN LEAD TO INTERESTING FINDINGS Jul 06 2014 THE PRIMROSE PATH OF ECOLOGY CAN...

434

Upcoming Seminars | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upcoming Seminars Seminars will be held at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Bldg. 737-A, in the Cypress Room, at 3:30 PM. Snacks will be provided at 3:15. DATE SPEAKER TITLE...

435

Rebecca Sharitz: Teaching | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teaching book cover I co-teach a graduate course in wetlands ecology (PBIO 8150) with Dr. Darold Batzer of the UGA Department of Entomology. The course objective is to describe...

436

Ettringite formation and behaviour in clayey soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failures in soil stabilization have been reported previously as being due to the formation of ettringite, an expansive mineral which develops in the presence of sulfate, calcium, and aluminum compounds of clay fraction in high pH levels between 10.36 and 14. By comparing the pattern of formation of ettringite, formed from different possible sources and specifically in stabilized soil, it is expected that a clearer picture of the kinetics of ettringite formation from different sources will be obtained. In this paper, a set of physico-chemical experiments and XRD tests were performed to investigate the process of ettringite formation and to explore its possible performance in clayey soils. The growth of the ettringite XRD peaks was used as a measure of the rate and its formation pattern. It is shown that the rate of ettringite formation in soil stabilization is much slower than that of artificial ettringite. Furthermore, it is shown that ettringite swells to the order of 50% and its fluid retention is significantly higher (by as much as 400%) than that of the soil sample studied in this research.

Vahid R. Ouhadi; Raymond N. Yong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Gender essentialisms and ecological feminist philosophies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENDER ESSENTIALISMS AND ECOLOGICAL FEMINIST PHILOSOPHIES A Thesis by JASON LEONARD MALLORY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS... August 2001 Major Subject' Philosophy GENDER ESSENTIALISMS AND ECOLOGICAL FEMINIST PHILOSOPHIES A Thesis by JASON LEONARD MALLORY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS...

Mallory, Jason Leonard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Environmental Planning and Ecology Program Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

development and power plant operation. - Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling. * Validate the 2 meter probe technology as a...

440

Accounting for soil carbon sequestration in national inventories: a soil scientist's  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As nations debate whether and how best to include the agricultural sector in greenhouse gas pollution reduction schemes, the role of soil organic carbon as a potential large carbon sink has been thrust onto center stage. Results from most agricultural field trials indicate a relative increase in soil carbon stocks with the adoption of various improved management practices. However, the few available studies with time series data suggest that this relative gain is often due to a reduction or cessation of soil carbon losses rather than an actual increase in stocks. On the basis of this observation, we argue here that stock change data from agricultural field trials may have limited predictive power when the state of the soil carbon system is unknown and that current IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) accounting methodologies developed from the trial results may not properly credit these management activities. In particular, the use of response ratios is inconsistent with the current scientific understanding of carbon cycling in soils and response ratios will overestimate the netnet sequestration of soil carbon if the baseline is not at steady state.

Jonathan Sanderman; Jeffrey A Baldock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Theoretical ecology: a successful first year and a bright future for a new journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 EDITORIAL Theoretical ecology: a successful first year andvolume 2 of Theoretical Ecology. Looking back, this has beenfocusing on theoretical ecology can play an expanding role

Hastings, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ecology and environments of an extreme faunal turnover in topical American scallops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paleobiology, community ecology, and scales of ecologicalpattern. Ecology 77: 1367-1378. Jablonski, D. , K.W. Flessa,naturalist 108: . 1988. Does ecology matter? Paleobiology

Smith, James Travis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Organizational ecology and population dynamics in politics : an agent-based model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.3 Organizational Ecology and PopulationOrganizational Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2Chapter 3 An Agent Based Model of Organizational Ecology 3.1

Jung, Danielle Fitzpatrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ecology and Management of Canyon Flies (Fannia benjamini complex) in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. W. 1976. Mosquito Ecology: Field sampling methods. Newin southern Israel. J. Vector Ecology. 36(1): S212-S218.control from chemical ecology. Agriculture, Ecosystems &

Ekanayake, Panchali Kumari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

E-Print Network 3.0 - adopting ecological principles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lornd University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 Introduction to Landscape Ecology By Kevin McGarigal Summary: . In addition, landscape ecology involves the...

446

Opportunities to Develop an Interagency Spatial Hierarchy for ESD Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are interrelated. Find a certain type of soil and a certain type of plant and you will find a certain type of rock and processes occurring across larger areas affect and often override those of smaller ecosystems. Moreover, environmental gradients affecting ecological patterns and processes change at different spatial

447

Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and GeomorphologyMinerals, and Geomorphology · Soil is unconsolidated material). ·· SoilSoil is unconsolidated material at the surface of the Earth thatis unconsolidated material

448

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? July 1, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis Lindsay Gsell After a harvest is over, crops can be sold, shipped, canned or consumed. But what happens to the parts of the crops that are inedible-the corn stover, stalks or cobs? Selling crop residues for bioenergy could provide farmers with an extra source of income. Yet, leaving some residue on the fields helps reduce soil erosion and maintain healthy levels of soil carbon and other nutrients. So how can land managers find this balance? Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing the Residue Removal Tool -- new software designed to simulate sustainability criteria -- to help find this balance of what to remove and what to leave behind. The software will

449

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Savannah Harris | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah Harris SREL Graduate Program UGA Crop & Soil Savannah Harris Masters Student Seaman Lab Savannah Harris joined SREL as a research technician in John Seamans lab in...

451

Educational Materials | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmenta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiocesium in Pond B Soil Remediation Using In Situ Immobilization Techniques Wetlands, Birds, and Airports Phytoremediation Research Radiocesium in White-tailed Deer on...

452

Ecology, 85(12), 2004, pp. 32673276 2004 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. There was no evidence for self-incompatibility, and fitness was dramatically lower in selfed compared to outcrossed3267 Ecology, 85(12), 2004, pp. 3267­3276 2004 by the Ecological Society of America EFFECTS OF SELF of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 USA Abstract. The costs of self-fertilization were evaluated

Washburn, Libe

453

Ecological Modelling 120 (1999) 6573 Artificial neural networks as a tool in ecological modelling,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Modelling 120 (1999) 65­73 Artificial neural networks as a tool in ecological modelling-34032 Montpellier cedex 1, France Abstract Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are non-linear mapping), genetic algorithms (d'Angelo et al., 1995; Golikov et al., 1995) and artificial neural networks, i.e. ANN

Roche, Benjamin

454

Ecology, 88(11), 2007, pp. 28212829 2007 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology, 88(11), 2007, pp. 2821­2829 ? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America BIODIVERSITY. BRUNO,3 AND J. EMMETT DUFFY 2 1 Institute of Marine Sciences, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Morehead City, North Carolina 28557 USA 2 School of Marine Sciences, The College of William

Duffy, J. Emmett

455

Ecological Applications, 18(2), 2008, pp. 321334 2008 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects, and herbicide-induced habitat changes could not explain the P. maniculatus response. Treatment a management tool for mitigating exotic impacts on a native species. We evaluate the effectiveness of the toolEcological Applications, 18(2), 2008, pp. 321­334 ? 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

456

Ecological Applications, 17(8), 2007, pp. 23652376 2007 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Applications, 17(8), 2007, pp. 2365­2376 ? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America of nitrate to nitrogen gas. An important factor in this process is the interaction of river water to this study, the site had been leveed, drained, and farmed for more than 50 years. In late fall 2002

Stanley, Emily

457

March 2014 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 32:1 59 Ecological Restoration Vol. 32, No. 1, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

knowledge. Keywords: aquatic restoration, exotics, introduced species, Oncorhynchus clarkii, protected areas decide to restore the native ecosystems by eliminating introduced salmonid populations. GillnettingMarch 2014 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 32:1 � 59 Ecological Restoration Vol. 32, No. 1, 2014 ISSN 1522

Fraser, Dylan J.

458

Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

Sandercock, Brett K.

459

Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils, Comprehensive Report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system.

Altman, D.J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

Spruce roots under heavy machinery loading in two different soil types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the influence of soil compaction by heavy machinery (two-wheeled trailer with 0.2MPa pressure) on spruce roots at two sites in the Moravian Highlands with different soil properties to determine whether soil compaction by loading affects root water uptake. We also analysed the effects of the soil type and water-holding capacity with regards to root structure development. Site Jedovnice has a loamy to sandyloamy soil texture with a shallow groundwater table at approximately 1m in depth. The roots are mostly distributed in deeper layers. Site Mravenit? has shallow, sandyloamy soil overlying a granodiorite. This site has no access to groundwater and a higher proportion of shallow roots. To evaluate the effect of soil compaction, we installed heat-field-deformation sap flow sensors in the superficial roots and stem bases of trees close to machinery trails. Our results showed that loading mainly affected soils with a high proportion of shallow roots (33% of shallow roots at site Mravenit?; 22% at site Jedovnice). The number of roots treated by loading, verified after root opening with an air spade, depended on root positioning in soil. Acropetal sap flow occurred in roots in soil layers with sufficient available soil water. Some of the sampled trees exhibited decreased daytime sap flow after loading. In the shallower site Mravenit? the root responses to loading were also accompanied by water redistribution among the roots and between the roots and soil. Basipetal (reverse) flow was recorded in roots in dryer soil layers. Soil compaction due to loading substantially increased the magnitude and duration of redistributed flow between soil layers with different water contents. Determining the soil type and soil water content is recommended before choosing the machinery type for a given forest because the predicted tree root structure can be used to assess possible damage due to loading.

Nadezhda Nadezhdina; Alois Prax; Jan ?ermk; Valerij Nadezhdin; Radomr Ulrich; Jind?ich Neruda; Adolf Schlaghamersky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Soil Segregation Methods for Reducing Transportation and Disposal Costs - 13544  

SciTech Connect

At Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where the selected alternative for contaminated soil is excavation and off-site disposal, the most significant budget items of the remedial action are the costs for transportation and disposal of soil at an off-site facility. At these sites, the objective is to excavate and dispose of only those soils that exceed derived concentration guideline levels. In situ soil segregation using gross gamma detectors to guide the excavation is often challenging at sites where the soil contamination is overlain by clean soil or where the contaminated soil is located in isolated, subsurface pockets. In addition, data gaps are often identified during the alternative evaluation and selection process, resulting in increased uncertainty in the extent of subsurface contamination. In response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District is implementing ex situ soil segregation methods. At the remediated Painesville Site, soils were excavated and fed through a conveyor-belt system, which automatically segregated them into above- and below-cleanup criteria discharge piles utilizing gamma spectroscopy. At the Linde Site and the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site, which are both in the remediation phase, soils are initially segregated during the excavation process using gross gamma detectors and then transported to a pad for confirmatory manual surveying and sampling. At the Linde Site, the ex situ soils are analyzed on the basis of a site-specific method, to establish compliance with beneficial reuse criteria that were developed for the Linde remediation. At the SLDA Site, the ex situ soils are surveyed and sampled based on Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) final status survey guidance to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels. At all three sites, the ex situ soils that meet the site- specific DCGLs are retained on-site and used as backfill material. This paper describes the ex situ soil segregation methods, the considerations of each method, and the estimated cost savings from minimizing the volume of soil requiring transportation and off-site disposal. (authors)

Frothingham, David; Andrews, Shawn; Barker, Michelle; Boyle, James; Buechi, Stephen; Graham, Marc; Houston, Linda; Polek, Michael; Simmington, Robert; Spector, Harold [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Elliott, Robert 'Dan' [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States)] [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites Data Research Facilities Low Dose Irradiation Facility Tritium Irrigation Facility Microsatellite Development Education...

464

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Acceptable examples of courses at CSUF that meet the ecology and quantitative methods ENST Program prerequisites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of change in response to environmental factors; population and community ecology; energy and material flow and pesticides, climate change, forestry and fishing, endangered species, and appropriate development. SOCIOLOGY interaction with the earth, including environmental ethics, public policy and technology. SOCIOLOGY 303

de Lijser, Peter

466

The Primate Life History Database: a unique shared ecological data resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Primate Life History Database: a unique shared ecological data resource Karen B. Strier1 of the collaborative life history database developed by our Working Group at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center scientists that collaborative databases can facilitate these activities. 2. We provide a detailed description

Bronikowski, Anne

467

Aspects of the ecology and systematics of the lizards Coleonyx brevis and Coleonyx reticulatus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edward Dial, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James R. Dixon N 1 hi y d' f ~C1 1* ' ' 1 d ly- sis of the reproductive and thermal ecology, diet composition, and behavior of the species. Data on the thermal ecology, diet... and mensural data from each species were recorded and geographic variation in C. brevis was analyzed. The reproductive cycle of C. brevis involves cyclic gonadal development in males and females. Males emerge from hibernation with enlarged testes...

Dial, Benjamin Edward

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect

Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

Edwards, N.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Maryland) (Maryland) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Departments of the Environment and Natural Resources are authorized to develop regulations to combat soil erosion and control the addition of sediment to waters of the state. As part of the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Program, an approved plan is required for any earth disturbance of

470

Ecological approaches and the development of truly integrated pest management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This conclusion extends to assessing the risks of biopesticides against nontarget species...services with external inputs to provide insurance against collapse. Moreover...possible only with appropriate economic and political support. Figure 6 Conceptual framework...

Matthew B. Thomas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The development of high definition television : an ecology of games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is an analysis of the forces that shaped the overall character of a new US television system, high definition or HDTV, between the early 1980s and 2010, with a primary focus on the period leading up the Federal ...

Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

Giles, John R; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

473

Benthic diatoms in lakes: environmental drivers and ecological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment Uppsala DoctoralBenthic diatoms in lakes: environmental drivers and ecological assessment Steffi Gottschalk Faculty #12;Benthic diatoms in lakes: environmental drivers and ecological assessment Abstract In order

474

The Food System and a Role for Ecological Ethics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food System & Ecological Ethics Strom, Stephanie (2012, JulyD A ROLE FOR ECOLOGICAL ETHICS By Isaac Kreisman The ethicalfor a certain role for ethics to play in the transformation

Kreisman, Isaac de Araujo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

INVITED TECHNICAL REVIEW Sunflower genetic, genomic and ecological resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and religion, sunflow- ers represent solar deities, power, nuclear nonproliferation, longevity and mortality tool kit, important economic impacts and fascinating ecology, it is an ideal taxon for many ecological

Burke, John M.

476

Lizards in the ecology of salmonellosis in Panama.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lizards in the ecology of salmonellosis in Panama. M Kourany S R Telford Enteropathogenic...Lizards in the ecology of salmonellosis in Panama. | Enteropathogenic bacteria was isolated...Article | Animals Lizards microbiology Panama Salmonella isolation & purification Salmonella...

M Kourany; S R Telford

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Applicability of 10 CFR 851 to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Letter from Bruce Diamond, Assistant General Counsel for Environment, DOE, dated November 24, 2007 to Mr. Bertsch, Director and Professor, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, regarding Savannah Riber Ecology Laboratory's Request for Interpretive Ruling under 10 CFR 851.

478

START HERE 2013 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2013 Annual Report Sections...

479

Upton Reserve Ecological Research and Internships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Internships Research and Internships Every year, ecological and wildlife research is conducted to assist in understanding how the natural environment works. The information gained from these projects is used to make management decisions at the Laboratory. Many of these projects are conducted with the assistance of interns. Interns are high school or undergraduate students participating in the BNL's Office of Education summer programs. During 10 weeks, the students conduct experiments, population surveys, ecological monitoring, and other natural resource investigations. Students are required to complete a paper and/or poster as part of their internship. Examples of past research projects completed at BNL are available at the Environmental Protection Division's website.

480

Distributed Delays Stabilize Ecological Feedback Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the effect of distributed delays in predator-prey models and ecological food webs. Whereas the occurrence of delays in population dynamics is usually regarded a destabilizing factor leading to the extinction of species, we here demonstrate complementarily that delay distributions yield larger stability regimes than single delays. Food webs with distributed delays closely resemble nondelayed systems in terms of ecological stability measures. Thus, we state that dependence of dynamics on multiple instances in the past is an important, but so far underestimated, factor for stability in dynamical systems.

Christian W. Eurich; Andreas Thiel; Lorenz Fahse

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory- June 7, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site

482

A correlation between soil descriptions and {sup 226}Ra concentrations in Florida soils  

SciTech Connect

The soil radium content in Florida is highly variable. The range in radium concentrations, where the samples involved in this study are concerned, is from 0.1 pCi/g to 18.5 pCi/g. Low {sup 226}Ra concentrations (0.1 to 5 pCi/g) are evidenced in sands, moderate concentrations (5 to 11 pCi/g) are found in silt and gravel, and high {sup 226}Ra concentrations (>11 pCi/g) are found in soil horizons with shell, clay, and strata with phosphate. Strata containing phosphate yields a high concentration of {sup 226}Ra. The information obtained in this study, soil descriptions with their corresponding {sup 226}Ra concentrations, comes from geological cores drilled by geotechnical consultants with gamma spectrometry analysis performed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy. Concentration; of {sup 226}Ra generally increase with depth. These cores are usually terminated at 20 feet deep, with some cores being shallower than this due to hitting bedrock or encountering the water table. These frequency distributions give the core-logging geologist an approximate concentration of {sup 226}Ra based on the description of the soil. Since the correlation of {sup 226}Ra and soil descriptions can be used as a tool in assigning indoor radon potential, this study is of importance to land managers, contractors, developers, and regulating agencies who are attempting to place standards on tracts of land with {sup 226}Ra concentration used as a criterion.

Harrison, D.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

484

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Doing political ecology inside and outside the academy Simon Batterbury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doing political ecology inside and outside the academy Simon Batterbury University of Melbourne www.simonbatterbury.net For: Bryant R, ed. 2015. International Handbook of Political Ecology. Edward Elgar. Abstract The chapter presents a survey of political ecology (PE) scholarship in, and beyond, academic institutions

Batterbury, Simon

486

TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY OF THE BAHAMAS Version 1.2. April 2006 #12;TOOLS AND METHODS IN COASTAL ECOLOGY 2006 2 Copyright 2006 K Sullivan Sealey Contributing Authors Kathleen Semon for Coastal Ecological Studies of The Bahamas. University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fl. 33124. 111 pp. #12;TOOLS

Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

487

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Fall Semester 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Fall Semester 2013 All seminars except dates labeled alters female behavior and physiology in feral horses Sept. 19 Noah Fierer Univ Colorado Boulder Ecology. Dept. of Biological Sci. The influence of ecological conditions on helping behavior

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

488

Managing the Ecology of Interaction Computing Department, Lancaster University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing the Ecology of Interaction Alan Dix Computing Department, Lancaster University Lancaster to accommodate the contingencies of the situation. This rich ecology of work is often seen as opposed to more of phenomena related to ecological settings and show how they can be incorporated within formal models. It also

Dix, Alan

489

Offered Credit Prerequisites LIFE 320 Ecology F, S 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advisor: Offered Credit Prerequisites _______ LIFE 320 Ecology F, S 3 BZ 120 or similar, MATH 141 credits NR 440 Applications in Conservation Planning F 3 NRRT 340 _______ F 311 Forest Ecology F, S 3 Ecology FW 477 Habitat for Wildlife F 3 FW 260 FW 400 Conservation of Fish in Aquatic Ecosystems F 3 LIFE

490

How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

Canet, Léonie

491

EN-006 Ecology March 2001 Effects of Alternative Silvicultural Treatments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EN-006 Ecology March 2001 Effects of Alternative Silvicultural Treatments on the Diversity and protecting the ecological diversity of the forest. STUDY AREA The Roberts Creek Study Forest was established a previous forest. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

492

DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED AGENTS Nelson Minar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED AGENTS by Nelson Minar B.A. Mathematics (1994) Reed College, Departmental Committee on Graduate Students Program in Media Arts and Sciences #12; #12; DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY is an organizing principle for documents. This thesis introduces the idea of an ecology of distributed agents

493

DIVERSIFY -Ecology-inspired software evolution for diversity emergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVERSIFY - Ecology-inspired software evolution for diversity emergence Benoit Baudry, Martin are essential to provide adaptive capacities to many forms of complex systems, ranging from ecological in software systems. In particular, we are inspired by bipartite ecological relationships to investigate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

494

Ecology-basics and applications Planned activities 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology- basics and applications Planned activities 2013 Last update 2013-04-23 Anna-Sara Liman Activities Approximate dates Contact persons Advances in Basic Ecology Nov ­February 2013 Pär Forslund of Ecological Ideas January 2013 Jan.Bengtsson@slu.se Statistical programming in R 22-26th April 2013 Matt

495

Forest Ecology (3 credits) FOR 3153C Section: 2265  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Ecology (3 credits) FOR 3153C Section: 2265 Lectures and Discussion Thursday (periods 3 Ecological principles and their application to the management of forests; major sections include tree students with an overview of 1) ecological principles at four major scales of biological organization

Florida, University of

496

ECOLOGY ABIO 320 FALL 2013 DR. CARACO BIOLOGY 253  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ECOLOGY ABIO 320 FALL 2013 DR. CARACO BIOLOGY 253 Course Web Page: www Scores Links to Lectures #12;2 Texts Gotelli, NJ. A Primer of Ecology. 4 th Edit., 2008 (Required ) Alstad, D. Basic Populus Models of Ecology. 2001 [Rec ] Link to Download Populus on Course Web Page

Caraco, Thomas

497

RACKHAM SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RACKHAM ­ SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology Subplan Requirements SubPlan: CONECOL RG 11066 CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) RQ 7287 Conservation Ecology Core Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) LN 0010 Aquatic Sciences Specialization LN 0020 Conservation

Eustice, Ryan

498

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems CNRS Institut ?cologie et scales. This book provides an overview of current sensors for ecology and makes a strong case of practical ecological applications, this text is meant to be an invaluable resource for students, researchers

van Tiggelen, Bart

499

NRE 509: Ecology: Science of Context and Interaction (2012) Instructors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NRE 509: Ecology: Science of Context and Interaction (2012) Instructors William S. Currie in the MS program in NRE. It covers a wide range of topics in ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change some prior instruction in these areas. It covers basic ecological concepts and processes including

Awtar, Shorya

500

Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools Kevin landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools" will soon be published. It will expand on the basic information on Forest Research's work on landscape ecology contact: Kevin Watts Alice Holt Tel: 01420 526200 E