National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for developing ecological soil

  1. Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management Liam Heneghan,1,2 Susan P. Miller that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms the outcomes of restoration despite this variability. Here, we propose that the usefulness of this soil

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AN INVESTIGATION INTO "BIOCHAR AND ITS POTENTIAL USE AS ORGANIC SOIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the pyrolysis of biomass. As sustainable and local sources of soil amendments are decreasing in availability INTO "BIOCHAR AND ITS POTENTIAL USE AS ORGANIC SOIL AMENDMENT" Royce Poon, Shivam Parmar, Seung Hyun (Peter) Kim INVESTIGATION INTO "BIOCHAR AND ITS POTENTIAL USE AS ORGANIC SOIL AMENDMENT" Submitted to Dr. Naoko Ellis

  3. Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late-than early-successional stage biological soil crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late- than early-successional stage biological soil crusts Brian J. Darby a,*, Deborah A. Neher a , Jayne Belnap b a Department of Plant and Soil; accepted 12 April 2006 Abstract Biological soil crusts are key mediators of carbon and nitrogen inputs

  4. The Nature of Urban Soils and Their Role in Ecological Restoration in Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    The Nature of Urban Soils and Their Role in Ecological Restoration in Cities Mitchell A. Pavao in and around cities. This article highlights the varied impacts of cities on soils and their implications for restora- tion planning and expectations of restoration ``success.'' Urban soils exist in different

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Water Management through Rain Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (4m x 5m) and can hold vast amounts of water at any given time. The bowl shaped rain garden must is an important parameter since the soil used effects the water absorption ability of the rain garden. The optimalUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Water Management through

  6. Roger Williams University Fall 2010 Course Syllabus BIO/NATSC 375: Soil Ecology with Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Loren

    readings will be provided as hand-outs or on Blackboard. Course description (from the catalog): This course-being and sustainability of human societies (e.g., agricultural production, clean water availability). Topics to be covered include soil food webs, microbial ecology, soil aggregate formation, carbon and nitrogen cycling

  7. Ecology problems associated with geothermal development in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Ireland, R.R.

    1980-08-04

    Geothermal power plants have the potential for supplying about 5% of the US electrical generating needs by 1985, and are even now supplying about one third of San Francisco's electricity. Investigations have shown that the typical geothermal field, such as the hot water resource of Imperial Valley, can be developed in an environmentally sound manner when proper considerations are made for ecosystem problems. Experimental evidence is presented pro and con for potential impacts due to habitat disturbance, powerline corridors, noise effects, trace element emissions from cooling towers, accidental brine discharges into aquatic or soil systems, competition for water and H/sub 2/S effects on vegetation. A mitigation and control strategy is recommended for each ecological issue and it is shown where effects are likely to be irreversible.

  8. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ......................................................................................................7 The Technology: Wave Energy Development on the West Coast Mirko Previsic, re vision consultingEcological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific

  9. Globalisation and sustainable development: a political ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ...................................................................................64 Free trade versus fair trade ........................................................................63 Globalisation and trade ecological justice into practice: guidelines for policy.............................68 A role for "fair trade

  10. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Service; Justin Klure, Oregon Wave Energy Trust; Greg McMurray, Oregon Department of Land Conservation

  11. Selecting indicators of soil, microbial, and plant conditions to understand ecological changes in Georgia pine forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Garten Jr, Charles T; Wolfe, Amy K; Sobek, Edward A

    2008-11-01

    Characterizing how resource use and management activities affect ecological conditions is necessary to document and understand anthropogenic changes in ecological systems. Resource managers on military installations have the delicate task of balancing the training needs of soldiers effectively with the need to maintain a high quality of ecological conditions. This study considers ways that ecological indicators can provide information on impacts that training has on environmental characteristics that occur at different scales and in different sectors of the environment. The characteristics examined include soil chemistry, soil microbes, and vegetation. A discriminant function analysis was conducted to determine whether ecological indicators could differentiate among different levels of military use. A combination of 10 indicators explained 90% of the variation among plots from five different military use levels. Results indicated that an appropriate suite of ecological indicators for military resource managers includes soil, microbial, and vegetation characteristics. Since many of these indicators are related, managers at this location potentially have freedom to choose indicators that are relatively easy to measure, without sacrificing information.

  12. Ecological Modeling with Soils Data: Semiparametric Stochastic Mixed Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , protozoa, mites, nematodes, worms, insects and insect larvae, larger animals, and plant roots · Soils buffer environmental change ­ regulating and partitioning water flow (infiltration vs. runoff smoothing parameter selection ­ results and extensions #12;Greenhouse Effect · Solar energy transmitted

  13. A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1997-05-01

    Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Eco-Friendly Office the current status of the subject matter of a project/report. #12;APSC 261 Final Report Eco-Friendly Office Supplies: Post-it Notes Andy Kwan Arjan Dhaliwal Emmanuel Augustine #12;i ABSTRACT The purpose of the Eco-Friendly

  15. Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development the capacity to harvest wave energy off its coast as a clean, renewable resource. An important part of moving this agenda forward must include understanding the potential effects of wave energy technology

  16. Development Of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes And Results Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes And Results Of Temperature Survey Conducted At Desert Peak, Nevada, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into UBC Farm Sustainability College: What Are the Social, Ecological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are the Social, Ecological and Economic Factors to Consider When Planning Sustainable Housing Options? RaymondUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into UBC Farm Sustainability College: What Are the Social, Ecological and Economic Factors to Consider When

  18. Ecological Assembly Rules and Soil Legacy Effects in the Restoration of an Invaded Plant Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilbig, Bridget Elise

    2015-01-01

    A . M . P ETERS . 1997. How soil-borne pathogens may affectCultivation legacies alter soil nutrients and differentially2008. The unseen majority: soil microbes as drivers of plant

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Electrical Energy Conservation Opportunities for Plug Loads and Lighting in UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Electrical Energy Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Electrical Energy Conservation Opportunities for plug loads and lighting in UBC Office Buildings Natalie Yao University of British Columbia Clean Energy

  20. Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Eric Scott

    1996-01-01

    A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

  1. Technique development for polarized pipe-to-soil potential measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1989-12-01

    Research project PR-200-513 was undertaken with the overall objective to develop practical techniques for determining the polarized pipe-to-soil potential of a buried pipeline. The importance of this project rests with the fact that pipe-to-soil potential measurements are the most commonly used means of assessing the level of cathodic protection on buried gas transmission pipelines. In the recent past years there has been a considerable amount of effort devoted to developing methods and instruments to correct measured pipe-to-soil potentials for IR drops that may occur from currents (from the cathodic protection system or stray sources) in the soil to obtain the polarized potential. However, many of the methods or instruments available are either time-consuming, cumbersome to use in the field, applicable to only certain types of cathodic protection systems and under particular circumstances, subject to influences from stray current sources or not fully developed as of yet. Thus, there is a need to develop a practical method of determining the polarized pipe potential free of IR drop errors. Hence, the objectives of the research program conducted were: (1) to test and evaluate comparatively existing polarized potential measurement approaches, and (2) to develop new approaches to determining the polarized potential.

  2. Phytoremediation offers an ecologically and economically attractive remediation technique for soils contaminated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In addition to the choice of plant decade, phytoremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, and ground water has emerged of fertilization and clipping on PAH dissipation in a nutrient-poor, aged PAH-contaminated soil, a 14-mo

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report SEEDS Gear Dryer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report SEEDS Gear Dryer Steven of a project/report". #12;i SEEDS Gear Dryer MECH 457 April 11th, 2011 Steven Baird Mike Dickson Jonathan Lau .................................................................................................................................................1 Design and Testing

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Orchard Garden Expanding the LFS Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Orchard Garden ________________________________________________________________________ The Orchard Garden Expanding the LFS Garden Group 7: Scenario 5 Lakhveer Aulakh Eric Hoo-Yin Cheng Nicole............................................................10 ii. Health Benefits of Urban Agriculture

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Stormwater Management of a project/report". #12;STORMWATER MANAGEMENT 3/27/2012 SYNTHESIS REPORT PREPARED BY: Adam Lai Judy Chang...................................................................................2 3.0 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT OPTIONS............................................................4 3

  6. SWS 4303/5305 Soil Microbial Ecology Course Description Lectures and laboratory exercises will cover the soil as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Soil and Water Science Department 2161 McCarty Hall Phone: (352)294-3138 Email: aogram that can be found at: https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info/attendance.aspx Grading System Current UF grading policies for assigning grade points: https://catalog

  7. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-03-05

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3?, and POx (representing the sum of PO43?, HPO42?, and H2PO4?)) and five potential competitors (plantmore »roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive) followed this order: (1) for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2) for NO3?, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3) for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among different nutrient consumers. Although we used as many observations as we could obtain, more nutrient addition experiments in tropical systems would greatly benefit model testing and calibration. In summary, the N-COM model provides an ecologically consistent representation of nutrient competition appropriate for land BGC models integrated in Earth System Models.« less

  8. Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuown, Brian C

    1991-01-01

    was also identical to the laboratory procedure except for the insulated housing. The stainless steel canister was left in place between sampling events without the flow system. Experimental Procedure ? Land Treatment Unit. Passive samplers were also...DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991...

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT -CENTER FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findingsUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report JIAN SUN LIFE CYCLE which has one of the largest life cycle inventory database in North America. Assumptions and According

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainability initiatives, working with UBC Food Services and AMS Food Services to develop and conduct marketUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability Mandy Cheng, Sara Harrison, Andria Lam, Cristina Machial, Lena Syrovy, Diana

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water, UBC Sustainability and affiliated organizations have made significant gains in developing resources or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Sustainable

  12. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2, one closely tied to conservation. Sustainable development has been famously defined by the Brundtland The Oxford English Dictionary defines `Sustainable' as, "able to be upheld or defended; able to be maintained

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Kevin Preston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Kevin Preston LCA of New ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;University of British Columbia LCA of New UBC Pharmacy Building Life Cycle

  14. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; SEDIMENTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL...

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Revealing Carbon in Hampton Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Revealing Carbon in Hampton Place Laiyi Chow Barry Jonat Martin Lewynsky University of British Columbia FRST 490/521C April at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Brigit Haley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Brigit Haley Planning for Water Resource Management Assignment 1. Water Consumption Data Analysis of The Ritsumeikan-UBC House Data Analysis of The Ritsumeikan-UBC House Due Date: October 10, 2014. Author: Brie Haley #12

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle AssessmentC: Life Cycle Assessment Report Thunderbird Old Arena Group Members: Dennis Fan, Sean Geyer, Hillary purposes. A life cycle assessment (LCA) was carried out on two of the event arenas built for the 2010

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment: Aspenware Biodegradable Cutlery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Life Cycle Assessment: Aspenware sustainable choice (SEEDS). In this report, a life cycle assessment was performed for one specific cutlery

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Transportation Solutions for UBC Athletics & Recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS 5 2.4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS 5 2.5 SOCIAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS 6 2.6 JURISDICTIONS 6 2.7 EFFECTS 7 3.0 SUSTAINABLE

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EXPLORING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EXPLORING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN Tabassum Firoz, Emily Kwan, Doris Lo, Cynthia Mak, Karyn Schnick, Sally Shum, Jia THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN AGSC 450 April 3, 2002 Group 12 Tabassum Firoz Emily Kwan Doris Lo Cynthia Mak Karyn

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Food System: Framework for Assessing Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Food System: Framework for Assessing Sustainability Alvina Lee, Ingrid Elisia, Barry Shin, Jackie Brown, Marina Rommel of a project/report". #12;UBC Food System: Framework for Assessing Sustainability Group 11 AGSC 450, Spring

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Reusable Container Food Outlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Investigation into Reusable Container Food Outlets The University of British Columbia APSC 261 ­ Technology into operating one of these as a `Bring your own container' (BYOC) outlet, in which students would not be served

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report "BEYOND ORGANIC @ BEATY'S CAF"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report "BEYOND ORGANIC @ BEATY or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;UBC FOOD SYSTEM PROJECT 2008 SCENARIO 6 "BEYOND ORGANIC @ BEATY'S CAFÉ" AGSC 450 GROUP 10 MEGHAN BERKYTO SAINA

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Analysis (LCA or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;LCA of Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Complex #12;2 LCA of Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre Submitted by

  5. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LCA Totem Park Residence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LCA ­ Totem Park of a project/report." #12;March 18, 2009 LCA ­ TOTEM PARK RESIDENCES Abstract This study looks at the total an idea of what the total embodied impact of the building complex is. The goal and scope of an LCA must

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report PARIA KARIMI, RICHARD BACKLUND, VIVEK SAHAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cycle will have the least environmental impact and the most positive social impact. Improving the collection environmental and social impact this solution would have, it best conforms to the goals that UBC hasUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report PARIA KARIMI, RICHARD

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Photovoltaic Technology For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    renewable and environmentally friendly energy sources. Photovoltaic technology is a power generation methodUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Rapidly Renewable Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a project/report". #12;Page 1 An Investigation into Rapidly Renewable Materials: Bamboo and Cotton Prepared of renewable resources. Renewable resources, whether it is energy or material, are the ones that canUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets Beyond Climate Neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for waste and energy reduction and the need for policies to assist UBC food outlets to move beyond climateUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets of a project/report". #12;AGSC 450 2008 Moving UBC Food Outlets Beyond Climate Neutral Group 30 Heather Allyn

  10. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System Project: Summary 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services (UBCFS), AMS Food and Beverage Department (AMSFBD), UBC Waste Management (UBCWM), CentreUBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System.Sc. Candidate for Dietetics in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and has served as Teaching Assistant in AGSC

  11. Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils M. Dall'Agnol, J. H. Bouton,* and W. A. Parrott ABSTRACT Soil acidity and aluminum (Al)toxicity are major problems different screening methods for selection of acid soil tolerant alfalfa germplasms in the greenhouse during

  12. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Scenic Streams Stormwater Management Cost-Benefit Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Scenic Streams of the roof water from the South Campus housing to the constructed stream. The results will be compared the potential to contribute to UBC's reputation as a leader in sustainability by adding social, ecological

  13. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01

    A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

  14. Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    techniques * "EFFECT ON NON-LINEAR SOIL- STRUCTURE INTERACTION DUE TO BASE SLAB UPLIFT ON THE SEISMIC RESPONSE OF A HIGH- TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR)" Kennedy,...

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into The Social, Ecological, and Economic Factors To Conisder When

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of energy and water consumption, waste management, and use of recyclable and rapidly renewable buildingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Impact of the Switch to Liquid Sugar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 SOCIAL IMPACTUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Impact of the Switch to Liquid Sugar Kristian Plakaris, Dhruv Raturi, Anuj Mehta University of British

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Gursimran Singh, Nikola Radoicic, Riley Marsh, Shruti Kapoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Gursimran Singh, Nikola Radoicic Gursimran Singh Riley Marsh Shruti Kapoor 1 #12;Abstract This report uses the triple bottom line

  18. Centrifuge Permeameter for Unsaturated Soils. I: Theoretical Basis and Experimental Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Centrifuge Permeameter for Unsaturated Soils. I: Theoretical Basis and Experimental Developments Jorge G. Zornberg, M.ASCE1 ; and John S. McCartney, A.M.ASCE2 Abstract: A new centrifuge permeameter the centrifuge permeame- ter for concurrent determination of the soil-water retention curve SWRC and hydraulic

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of UBC Food System Collaborative Project II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of UBC, indicators were developed to assess the sustainability of the food system. Furthermore, we developed of a project/report". #12;The Sustainability of UBC Food System Collaborative Project II Group Three

  20. Stress distribution and development within geosynthetic-reinforced soil slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    September 2011, accepted 2 December 2011 ABSTRACT: Numerical methods combined with centrifuge tests are used is evaluated using finite element analysis. Advanced models and an integration algorithm are implemented by centrifuge tests of two GRS slopes with different backfill densities. Numerical results indicate that soil

  1. Recent developments in the techniques of controlling and measuring suction in unsaturated soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre; Tarantino, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty of measuring and controlling suction in unsaturated soils is one of the reasons why the development of the mechanics of unsaturated soils has not been as advanced as that of saturated soils. However, significant developments have been carried out in the last decade in this regard. In this paper, a re-view of some developments carried out in the techniques of controlling suction by using the axis translation, the osmotic method and the vapour control technique is presented. The paper also deals with some recent de-velopments in the direct measurement of suction by using high capacity tensiometers and in the measurement of high suction by using high range psychrometers. The recent progresses made in these techniques have been significant and will certainly help further experimental investigation of the hydromechanical behaviour of un-saturated soils.

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2 | P a g e Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building CIVL 498E

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Education Programs in the LFS Orchard Garden and Agora Caf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -day seminar that provides teachers with a professional development opportunity to learn how to strengthenUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Education Programs at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about

  4. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  5. Nature-Society and Development: Social, Cultural and Ecological Change in Nepal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Andrea J

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for analyzing human-environment issues that examines shifting, dialectical relationships between social and power relations, cultural beliefs and practices, and ecological ...

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Exploring the Food Garden Movement on the UBC Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Exploring the Food Garden Movement on the UBC Campus: Engaging with the Growers and Considering the Policy Opportunities Meredith the Food Garden Movement on the UBC Campus: Engaging with the Growers and Considering the Policy

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Eco-Friendly Office Supplies, Pens and Markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Eco-Friendly Office Science Sustainability Project Student Report APSC 261 Eco-Friendly Office Supplies, Pens and Markers eco-friendly office supplies project is to review and determine whether eco-friendly advertised office

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy Conservation and Behaviour Change Opportunities at UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this were used to recommend how best to motivate staff to decrease their energy conservation consumptionUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy Conservation or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Energy

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategies for Commercializing the Small Diameter Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategies the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;WOOD 465 ASSIGNMENT Marketing Strategies may think of this huge market and find a new way to commercialize our small diameter Douglas

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategy for Small Diameter Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategy the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Marketing Strategy for Small Diameter Columbia 11 April 2003 #12;ii Executive Summary "Marketing Strategy for Small Diameter Douglas

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

  12. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability: UBC Food System Educational Role of UBC Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability: UBC Food of a project/report". #12;Sustainability: UBC Food System Educational Role of UBC Farm Group 2 Barb De Cook to reach economic, environmental and social sustainability of the UBC Food System; the lack of awareness

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability Research Proposal for the UBC Food System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability Research of a project/report". #12;Sustainability Research Proposal for the UBC Food System AGSC 450 Group Members, UBC's Food Sustainability Project 1 of 25 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Abstract

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment: Neville Scarfe Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment: Neville Scarfe Building Aaron Mahiban University of British Columbia CIVL 498C March 28, 2010.sianchuk@gmail.com. #12;Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment Neville Scarfe Building Aaron Mahiban March 28,2010 #12

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Power to the People: New Student Union Building Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Power to the People: New green buildings in the world. To achieve this, many different types of energy saving systems are being to power a variety of low input power devices, such as lights or speakers without any additional help from

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Stormwater Management at UBC: An exploration of the South Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Stormwater of a project/report". #12;#12;1 Introduction -Current Stormwater Management Practices and Policy -Challenges of stormwater management at UBC presents several opportunities to contribute to the university's sustainability

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Use of Formaldehyde in Wood Paneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation products, which releases toxic vapors into the air over time. Due to the many different types of building-free paneling has no harmful side effects to human health as formaldehyde paneling does. It is therefore

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report THE UBC FOOD SYSTEM PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report THE UBC FOOD SYSTEM PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT 2012 Sophia Baker-French University of British Columbia LFS 450 June 2012 that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Waste Behaviour in UBC Food Services Residence Dining Halls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Behaviour in UBC Food Services Residence Dining Halls Group 3, Scenario 3 Brian Cheng, JoannaUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Waste Behaviour in UBC Food Services Residence Dining Halls Brian Cheng, Joanna Cheuk Stephanie Lau Shudan Liu Angel Ngan

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System Project (UBCFSP): Summary Report 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of AGSC 450 class), UBC Food Services, UBC Alma Mater Society Food and Beverage Department, UBC Waste and collaborators, including: UBC Food Services (UBCFS), AMS Food and Beverage Department (AMSFBD), UBC WasteUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ubc Food System Project: Food Waste Management The Hot Beverage Cup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Food Waste Management ­ The Hot Beverage Cup Vinci Ching, Paul Gazzola, Karen Juzkow, Kenrick Kan, Tina of a project/report". #12;AGSC 450 UBC FOOD SYSTEM PROJECT: FOOD WASTE MANAGEMENT ­ THE HOT BEVERAGE CUP GROUPUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ubc Food System Project

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Logistics of Using Fish from UBC Farm Integrated Aquaculture on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Logistics of Using Fish as the logistical aspects of processing fish. To complete these goals, our team organized interviews with key have determined are logistically feasible. Introduction Marine ecosystems are increasingly threatened

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The carbon sequestration potential of three common turfgrasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a project/report. #12;2 The carbon sequestration potential of three common turfgrasses: Lolium perenne1 UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The carbon sequestration potential of three common turfgrasses: Lolium perenne; Fescue rubra; and Poa pratensis Yihan Wu

  4. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Culturally Appropriate Building Designs for First Nations at UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Ecological) assessment was conducted for the Plank House, Pit-House, and Wigam. Special considerationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation different styles of Aboriginal housing design, with focus placed on designs that could be considered

  6. Pore pressure development in small-strain undrained loading of soils according to a simple model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José Jorge Nader

    2013-07-28

    This note discusses a simple equation that may be useful in the study of pore pressures generated in the undrained loading of soils. The equation is employed to describe the pore pressure development accompanying a small stress increment in the undrained triaxial compression test and in the undrained simple shear test. The cases of incompressible and compressible pore fluids are examined.

  7. Transpiration and Root Development of Urban Trees in Structural Soil Stormwater Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Transpiration and Root Development of Urban Trees in Structural Soil Stormwater Reservoirs Julia Abstract Stormwater management that relies on eco- system processes, such as tree canopy interception sustainable urban forests and stormwater management. We evaluated tree water uptake and root distribution

  8. Uncertainties and novel prospects in the study of the soil carbon dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4100, USA b Wetland Ecology Program, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee the component fluxes of the global carbon cycle and for studying the soil carbon cycle. Most significant development in the soil carbon cycle study is the application of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS

  9. Cyanide leaching from soil developed from coking plant purifier waste as influenced by citrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Soil Science and Soil Ecology Group, Faculty of Geosciences

    2004-07-01

    Soils in the vicinity of manufactured gas plants and coal coking plants are often highly contaminated with cyanides in the form of the compound Prussian blue. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of citrate on the leaching of iron-cyanide complexes from an extremely acidic soil (pH 2.3) developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking plant. The soil contained 63 g kg{sup -1} CN, 148 g kg{sup -1} Fe, 123 g kg{sup -1} S, and 222 g kg{sup -1} total C. Analysis of the soil by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of Prussian blue, gypsum, elemental sulfur, jarosite, and hematite. For column leaching experiments, air-dried soil was mixed with purified cristabolite sand at a ratio of 1:3 and packed into chromatography columns. The soil was leached with dilute (0.1 or 1 mM) CaCl{sub 2} solutions and the effluent was collected and analyzed for total and dissolved CN, Ca, Fe, SO{sub 4}, pH, and pe. In the absence of citrate, the total dissolved CN concentration in the effluent was always below current drinking water limits (< 1.92 {mu}M), indicating low leaching potential. Adding citrate at a concentration of 1 mM had little effect on the CN concentrations in the column effluent. Addition of 10 or 100 mM citrate to the influent solution resulted in strong increases in dissolved and colloidal CN concentrations in the effluent.

  10. Promoting the social, ecological, and economic sustainability of rangelands through the development and widespread use of the criteria & indicators for rangeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    Promoting the social, ecological, and economic sustainability of rangelands through the development on sustainability of rangelands. YEARLY UPDATE OF SRR SPRING 2005 Sustainable Rangelands Roundtable Criteria) Page 4 Sustainable Rangelands Roundtable Criteria and Indicators for Standardized Inventory, Monitoring

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Practicing Urban Agriculture Right Here: Integrating the LFS Garden with the Faculty of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Practicing Urban Urban Agriculture Right Here: Integrating the LFS Garden with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems Orchard Garden Committee..................................................24 LFS Orchard Garden

  12. Light, earthworms, and soil resources as predictors of diversity of 10 soil invertebrate groups across monocultures of 14 tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2016-01-01

    a mesocosm study. Applied Soil Ecology 8, 61e75. Mueller,and acidity in mineral soils at a common garden experiment.of Stasi n litter traits, soil biota, and soil chemistry on

  13. Exploring the effects of local development regulations on ecological landscape structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin Ki

    2005-08-29

    An ecological approach to land-use planning is essential to maintain the long-term sustainability of ecosystem benefits, services, and resources. Concern about environmental quality and the long-term livability of urban areas is now a driving force...

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). The UBCFSP has many partners including UBC Food Services, AMS Food and Beverage Department, UBC Waste of our high ecological footprint has caused an increased need for awareness and change in our food system. The University of British Columbia Food System Project (UBCFSP) is a research project addressing

  15. Development of an Fe efficiency screening procedure for sorghum based on realistic soil parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Francisco

    1987-01-01

    , are considered to be good indicators of Fe use efficiency in plants, and thus were the basis determining Fe-efficiency of the sorghum cultivars. Rodriguez de Cianzio et al. (1979) reported that visual chlorosis ratings weze highly correlated (r=0. 90...DEVELOPMENT OF AN FE EFFICIENCY SCREENING PROCEDURE FOR SORGHUH BASED ON REAl ISTIC SOIL PARAHETERS A Thesis by FRANCISCO HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  16. APBI 401 / SOIL 501: SOIL PROCESSES TERM 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APBI 401 / SOIL 501: SOIL PROCESSES TERM 1 ­ 2014 Instructor Sandra Brown, MCML 156c Office hour: M Rationale: Soils are a fundamental component of agro-ecological, forest and other land use systems; reflecting natural processes and the influence of human activities. Soil properties and processes regulate

  17. Development of an ArcGIS interface and design of a geodatabase for the soil and water assessment tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valenzuela Zapata, Milver Alfredo

    2004-09-30

    This project presents the development and design of a comprehensive interface coupled with a geodatabase (ArcGISwat 2003), for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). SWAT is a hydrologically distributed, lumped parameter model that runs on a...

  18. 2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    of natural resources that support urban centers, agriculture, fisheries, tourism, and natural areas. Major Program (Border 2012) are the development of effective water resource management strategies that balance compete with natural ecosystems for water resources. In addition, anthropogenic activities sometimes

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Collaborative Project III 2004: Scenario 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability the task of developing a model for evaluating the UBC food system in terms of its overall sustainability. They developed specific indicators to help determine the sustainability of the food system in terms of social

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Monitoring and Evaluation of the University of British Columbia Food System Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a project/report". #12;UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Monitoring was developed to monitor and evaluate the UBCFSP, as well as direct future projects. A focus group was held involving the UBCFSP partners in order to develop a series of priority actions for the project. Through

  1. Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

    2010-01-01

    change mitigation and sustainable development through carbonstewardship and sustainable development. Ecologicalcontribute to sustainable development. Tyndall Centre for

  2. TEOS 02 La Selva soil and root dynamics: What happens in soil, stays in soil Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    TEOS 02 La Selva soil and root dynamics: What happens in soil, stays in soil Team Members · Michael. This includes clay soils, high precipitation, and relatively constant warm temperatures. Another importance flux network, and a large database on ecological dynamics. Approach Soil AMR units and sensor networks

  3. Development of a method for determination of radon emanation from small soil samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madonia, Michael Vincent

    1990-01-01

    the optimization of statistical considerations was discussed and implemented into a computer code developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The evaluated system and computer code were used to measure radon emanation from a variety of Danish soil types... in the closed loop system is determined and the radon emanation power calculated. 'n 11 n 11 n n ' n The Rn-222 concentration in the Lucas cell during each measurement is calculated by counting the rate of light flashes enutted in the cell over a...

  4. Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

    2010-01-01

    the reach of the development project, and therefore thethat because development projects and associated financialthe form of resource and development projects—as a means to

  5. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01

    Office of Project Development and Environmental Review, 1200planning and project development. By creating and usingin the planning and project development processes enhances

  6. Development and Testing of a Multi-layer Soil-roller Interaction Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Daniel 1969-

    2010-10-06

    through back calculation of the soil modulus values. The model was able to reach convergence between the calculated and measured values of roller drum deflection through a regression analysis of soil stiffness and damping characteristics. The final values...

  7. Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Suzette

    2008-08-01

    Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

  8. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torn, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    of organic carbon from peat soils. Nature 412 , 785. Fried,Plant Litter. Standard Soil Methods for Long-Term Ecological2007). Role of proteins in soil carbon and nitrogen storage:

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Weicen Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Nick Gaguano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Devon Brownlee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA

  12. Predicting ecological roles in the rhizosphere using metabolome and transportome modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Collart, Frank R.; Dai, Yang; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-09-02

    The ability to obtain complete genome sequences from bacteria in environmental samples, such as soil samples from the rhizosphere, has highlighted the microbial diversity and complexity of environmental communities. New algorithms to analyze genome sequence information in the context of community structure are needed to enhance our understanding of the specific ecological roles of these organisms in soil environments. We present a machine learning approach using sequenced Pseudomonad genomes coupled with outputs of metabolic and transportomic computational models for identifying the most predictive molecular mechanisms indicative of a Pseudomonad’s ecological role in the rhizosphere: a biofilm, biocontrol agent, promoter of plant growth, or plant pathogen. Computational predictions of ecological niche were highly accurate overall with models trained on transportomic model output being the most accurate (Leave One Out Validation F-scores between 0.82 and 0.89). The strongest predictive molecular mechanism features for rhizosphere ecological niche overlap with many previously reported analyses of Pseudomonad interactions in the rhizosphere, suggesting that this approach successfully informs a system-scale level understanding of how Pseudomonads sense and interact with their environments. The observation that an organism’s transportome is highly predictive of its ecological niche is a novel discovery and may have implications in our understanding microbial ecology. The framework developed here can be generalized to the analysis of any bacteria across a wide range of environments and ecological niches making this approach a powerful tool for providing insights into functional predictions from bacterial genomic data.

  13. Predicting ecological roles in the rhizosphere using metabolome and transportome modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Collart, Frank R.; Dai, Yang; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-09-02

    The ability to obtain complete genome sequences from bacteria in environmental samples, such as soil samples from the rhizosphere, has highlighted the microbial diversity and complexity of environmental communities. New algorithms to analyze genome sequence information in the context of community structure are needed to enhance our understanding of the specific ecological roles of these organisms in soil environments. We present a machine learning approach using sequenced Pseudomonad genomes coupled with outputs of metabolic and transportomic computational models for identifying the most predictive molecular mechanisms indicative of a Pseudomonad’s ecological role in the rhizosphere: a biofilm, biocontrol agent, promoter ofmore »plant growth, or plant pathogen. Computational predictions of ecological niche were highly accurate overall with models trained on transportomic model output being the most accurate (Leave One Out Validation F-scores between 0.82 and 0.89). The strongest predictive molecular mechanism features for rhizosphere ecological niche overlap with many previously reported analyses of Pseudomonad interactions in the rhizosphere, suggesting that this approach successfully informs a system-scale level understanding of how Pseudomonads sense and interact with their environments. The observation that an organism’s transportome is highly predictive of its ecological niche is a novel discovery and may have implications in our understanding microbial ecology. The framework developed here can be generalized to the analysis of any bacteria across a wide range of environments and ecological niches making this approach a powerful tool for providing insights into functional predictions from bacterial genomic data.« less

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Ubc Farm: Essential To The Sustainability Of The Food System At The University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Ubc Farm: Essential To The Sustainability Of The Food System At The University Of British Columbia Laureen Cesar, Amy Fung, Craig Hewett TO THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE FOOD SYSTEM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA March 31, 2004 AGSC 450/001 Group 14

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project: A Sustainable Business Plan for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project: A Sustainable Business Plan for Agora David Coney, Sandra Jacob, Yee Wah Lee the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;1 The Sustainability of the UBC Food System

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into A Grocery Store in the New Student Union Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation. CARLA PATERSON AND DR. NAOKO ELLIS An Investigation into A Grocery Store in the New Student Union will be operating a variety of food outlets, shops and services. A student grocery store has been proposed

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Streamlined LCA of Paper LCA of Paper Towel End of Life Options for UBC SEEDS Recycling vs. Composting by Helen Brennek, Landon the environmental footprint of paper towels used in the Student Union Building (SUB). This streamlined LCA provides

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Use of Wood in Construction: A Triple Bottom Line Assessment of the use of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis, the economical impact analysis, and the social impact analysis. The analysis on the environmental. The social impact analysis addresses two health issues --- one physical and another mentalUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Use of Wood

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple Bottom Line Impact of Local vs. Non-local Procurement Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple Bottom Line Impact.4 Conclusion 5. Final assessment of environmental and social impact on local sourcing 17 17 19 24 25 26 #12;3 1, functionality) but also the environmental, social, and ethical impacts of these goods and services - at local

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cheryl Gomes, Danielle Salvatore, David Chan, Fraser Howatson, Jan Laesecke, Jesse Hudkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , recycled cooking oils. It is renewable, energy-efficient and can displaceUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cheryl Gomes, Danielle that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Raza Jaffery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA of construction - developed primarily in response to the challenge of creating a more sustainable society. The LCA Building in UBC, CIRS LCA study is a part of UBC wide academic building LCA data repository and would

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Amir Mehdi Dehkhoda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Biochar-Based Catalyst for Biodiesel Production CHBE 599 August 01, 2010 126 1061 University the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Developing Biochar-Based Catalyst for Biodiesel Production by Amir Mehdi Dehkhoda B.Sc., Sharif University of Technology, 2008 A THESIS SUBMITTED

  3. Ecology, 93(8), 2012, pp. 18671879 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    of soil bacteria and fungi along a soil moisture gradient. On average, soil microorganisms had relatively with metabolism restricted to less-negative water potentials. These contrasting ecological strategies had microorganisms is highly conserved. In addition, variation in microbial responses along the moisture gradient

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2013 CIVL498 C Ian Eddy LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF THE FOREST SCIENCE CENTER This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Malek Charif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA.e. to conduct a limited Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), of assigned building. In this case, the object programs are the main tools used to complete the LCA study. Inputs in the IE model were re

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Travis Wade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRYPHON: LCA of electric vs. diesel all-terrain vehicles CEEN 523 December 11, 2013 999 1453 University, Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report PROJECT GRYPHON: LCA of electric vs. diesel all-terrain vehicles .............................................................................................................................. 4 1.2 Purpose of LCA

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report ZHENGXIANG QIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA November 18, 2013 #12;2013 Henry Angus LCA 1 Executive Summary LCA aims to compilation and evaluation involved in the LCA analysis to improve their sustainability. The report would discuss how LCA methodology

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Jericho Velarde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA Cycle Analysis (LCA) of the H.R. MacMillan building is done in order to assess the environmental impact of the building. The intended audience of this LCA study are for those involved in building related policy making

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Allard Hall LCA Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LCA Study CIVL 498C November 18, 2013 1065 1529 University of British Columbia Disclaimer: "UBC SEEDS ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Allard Hall LCA Study Emma Brown CIVL 498C November 18, 2013 #12

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Patio Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems provide clean energy which can be stored for later use. Excess can also be sold to BC Hydro Workshop. Chiyi stated that the solution would require little to no structural implications as the solution on several different technologies and applications that could potentially be developed into a functional

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cayley Van Hemmen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;i Life Cycle Assessment of The Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Cycle Assessment of The Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building CIVL 498C November 18, 2013 1065 1531

  12. The socioeconomic effects of uranium development in south Texas: a human ecological approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Pamela Chris

    1982-01-01

    in which the resident population per- ceives the impacts. In general, this study shows that a multiplicity of factors determine the way in which a rural community is impacted by and adjusts to industrial develop- ment. It may be concluded from... of uranium ore may thus occur in Texas in the coming years. Presently, this activity is concentrated primarily in a seventeen thousand square mile region in the Southern Coastal Plains of Texas. This South Texas Uranium District is composed of Atascosa...

  13. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  14. Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Roxanne

    2012-10-19

    East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However...

  15. Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

  16. Master of Science in Ecology (Plan A) Graduate Degree Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    section of the catalog or http://catalog.colostate.edu/front/courses-of-instruction.aspx to see the course Advanced Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4 FW662 Wildlife Population Dynamics 3 HORT571 Soil Plant Water

  17. PhD in Ecology Graduate Degree Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    of the catalog or http://catalog.colostate.edu/front/courses-of-instruction.aspx to see the course prerequisites Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4 FW662 Wildlife Population Dynamics 3 #12;HORT571 Soil Plant Water Relations 3

  18. Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Sarah L.; Iversen, Colleen M

    2009-01-01

    The soil environment remains one of the most complex and poorly understood research frontiers in ecology. Soil organic matter (SOM), which spans a continuum from fresh detritus to highly processed, mineral-associated organic matter, is the foundation of sustainable terrestrial ecosystems. Heterogeneous SOM pools are fueled by inputs from living and dead plants, driven by the activity of micro- and mesofauna, and are shaped by a multitude of abiotic factors. The specialization required to measure unseen processes that occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales has led to the partitioning of soil ecology research across several disciplines. In the organized oral session 'Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum' at the annual Ecological Society of America meeting in Albuquerque, NM, USA, we joined the call for greater communication and collaboration among ecologists who work at the root-soil interface (e.g. Coleman, 2008). Our goal was to bridge the gap between scientific disciplines and to synthesize disconnected pieces of knowledge from root-centric and soil-centric studies into an integrated understanding of belowground ecosystem processes. We focused this report around three compelling themes that arose from the session: (1) the influence of the rhizosphere on SOM cycling, (2) the role of soil heterotrophs in driving the transformation of root detritus to SOM, and (3) the controlling influence of the soil environment on SOM dynamics. We conclude with a discussion of new approaches for gathering data to bridge gaps in the root-SOM continuum and to inform the next generation of ecosystem models. Although leaf litter has often been considered to be the main source of organic inputs to soil, Ann Russell synthesized a convincing body of work demonstrating that roots, rather than surface residues, control the accumulation of SOM in a variety of ecosystems. Living roots, which are chemically diverse and highly dynamic, also influence a wide range of soil processes, from the exudation of labile C compounds to the development of fungal associations. For example, Zoe Cardon demonstrated that the root-mediated redistribution of deep soil water to relatively dry shallower soil, increased soil CO{sub 2} efflux and nutrient cycling near the surface in an arid ecosystem. Andrew Kulmatiski also discussed the importance of rooting distribution throughout the soil profile for strategies of water uptake by different species in an African savanna. Later, Julie Jastrow demonstrated that living roots shape soil physical structure by promoting the formation of soil aggregates, which facilitated accrual of SOM in restored grasslands. Taken together, the evidence is compelling that living roots, and organic matter derived from root detritus, are important parts of the continuum of organic matter in the soil. Larger soil organisms (i.e. 50 {micro}m to many cm in body size) play an important role in the root-SOM continuum by grazing on roots and microbes, comminuting organic matter and aggregating soil in fecal pellets. However, litterbag and soil incubation studies necessarily exclude invertebrates, and research on faunal activity and trophic dynamics tends to be independent from research on the biogeochemistry of SOM cycling. Tim Filley used plant-derived biomarkers in invertebrate residues to bridge the gap between larger soil organisms, such as earthworms and beetle larvae, and SOM distribution. He found that larger soil organisms help to stabilize root-derived organic matter in soil aggregates. Similar coupling of biogeochemistry with food web studies could prove fruitful for describing mechanisms that underlie critical ecosystem processes. Despite considerable research efforts, the breadth of the microbial role in the root-SOM continuum remains unresolved. Using advanced pyrosequencing techniques, David Nelson demonstrated the importance of archea as nitrifiers in agricultural systems exposed to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. Rising atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and other changing environmental factors add a layer of complexity t

  19. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  20. Saving our soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandy, A. Stuart; Billings, Sharon A.; Richter Dan

    2010-05-01

    Saving our soils 171 A Stuart Grandy Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI GUEST EDITORIAL GUEST EDITORIAL GUEST EDITORIAL © The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Although the US healthcare system is among the best... in the world at treating disease, it is frequentlycriticized for not doing enough to prevent disease. Similarly, soil management, while effectively address- ing acute problems, is less successful at preventing chronic degradation. This analogy becomes clear...

  1. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignasiak, B.; Ignasiak, T.; Szymocha, K.

    1990-01-01

    Three major topics are discussed in this report: (1) Upgrading of Low Rank Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Test data, procedures, equipment, etc., are described for co-upgrading of subbituminous coals and heavy oil; (2) Upgrading of Bituminous Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Experimental procedures and data, bench and pilot scale equipments, etc., for beneficiating bituminous coals are described; (3) Soil Clean-up and Hydrocarbon Waste Treatment Process. Batch and pilot plant tests are described for soil contaminated by tar refuse from manufactured gas plant sites. (VC)

  2. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

  3. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  4. Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Microbial Ecology Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils Roberta M. Veluci1,2 , Deborah A. Neher1,3 and Thomas R. Weicht1,3 (1) Department of Earth, FL 32611-0760, USA (3) Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 105 Carrigan Dr

  5. Designing for ecology : the ecological park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Andres M

    2006-01-01

    This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

  6. Development of Enhanced Remedial Techniques for Petroleum Fuel and Related Contaminants in Soil and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-10

    Western Research Institute (WRI) in conjunction with Earth Tech and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was to identify proper sites with soils and/or groundwater contaminated by petroleum constituents and MTBE. Biodegradation rates would have been quantitatively assessed in both laboratory and field tests to achieve the optimal destruction of contaminants of concern. WRI and Earth Tech identified a site contaminated with high concentrations of methanol associated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The site was assessed and a remediation project plan was prepared; however, the site was soon acquired by a new company. An agreement between Earth Tech, WRI, and the new site owners could not be reached; therefore, a work was performed to identify a new project site. Task 33 was terminated and the available funding was redeployed to other Tasks after receiving approval from the U.S. DOE task manager.

  7. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-05-15

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  8. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-03-19

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  9. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  10. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  11. The purpose of this survey is to gather information needed to develop guidelines for ecological restoration project planning in Minnesota. We are asking you to provide cost and time estimates for site preparation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    1 The purpose of this survey is to gather information needed to develop guidelines for ecological indicate which services & supplies are provided in-house, purchased/ hired out, or not offered or performed to page 7. Provided In-House Purchased/ Hired out Not Offered/ Not Performed A. Project Management

  12. NRES 725 PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    1 NRES 725 ­ PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006 Reading List ­ Water Balance of Plants I) Water Balance of Plants A) Water potential B) Soil, plant, air continuum C) Physiological control 1 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 16-41 & 42-83 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 201-256 *Steudle (01) Ann Rev Plant Phy Mol

  13. Valuation of ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

  14. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Running head: Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block CIVL 498 ­ Life Cycle Assess Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block Minge Weng November 18

  16. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-11-18

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  17. Development of a Method for Predictively Simulating Penetration of a Low Speed Impactor into a Weak Cohesionless Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrington, Dusty Ray

    2013-04-29

    . These soils could be simulated in advanced finite element simulations; however, traditional modeling techniques will not allow for the simulation of these complex behaviors. Due to the complex nature of these simulations, new modeling techniques need...

  18. Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1 David G. Tarboton,1 June 2009; published 29 October 2009. [1] Soil depth is an important input parameter in hydrological and ecological modeling. Presently, the soil depth data available in national soil databases (STATSGO and SSURGO

  19. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 10141022 Influence of earthworm activity on aggregate-associated carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 1014­1022 Influence of earthworm activity on aggregate of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA b Institute of Ecology and Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University regulators of soil structure and soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics, however, quantifying their influence

  20. Artificial Soiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pigments found in soils throughout the United States roughly following the USDA soil taxonomy 11. Ensuring a repeatable test formulation was straightforward when using...

  1. Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugoretz, S.M. [Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (United States); Rineer, K.C. [Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (United States); Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-26

    Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

  2. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience of SignaturesSoft0 Soils Soil Series and

  3. Developments in bioremediation of soils and sediments polluted with metals and radionuclides: 2. Field research on bioremediation of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    , contain, or transform to be- nign products contaminants present in soils, sedi- ments, water, or air of contaminants to which bioremediation is being applied, including solvents, explosives, poly- cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and poly- chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (McCullough et al. 1999; NABIR 2004). Now

  4. --SOILS SUSTAIN LIFE --SOIL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, John F.

    -- SOILS SUSTAIN LIFE -- SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA 677 South Segoe Road · Madison WI 53711 a PDF file only for $100. TOTAL: $ Invoice no. Shipping (to be added) $ * If you have a subscription;-- SOILS SUSTAIN LIFE -- SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA 677 South Segoe Road · Madison WI 53711 · (608

  5. Soil surface stabilization using an in situ plutonium coating techniuqe at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, J.; Snipes, R. [Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tamura, T.

    1996-12-31

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), in collaboration with the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR), has developed and is investigating an in situ plutonium treatment for soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concept, conceived by Dr. T. Tamura and refined at HAZWRAP, was developed during the Nevada Applied Ecology Program investigation. In analyzing for plutonium in soils, it was noted that the alpha emanation of plutonium was greatly attenuated if traces of iron or manganese oxides were present in the final electroplating stage. The technique would reduce resuspension of alpha particles into the air by coating the contaminants in soils in situ with an environmentally compatible, durable, and nontoxic material. The coating materials (calcium hydroxide, ferrous sulfate) reduce resuspension by providing a cementitious barrier against radiation penetration while retaining soil porosity. This technique not only stabilizes plutonium-contaminated soils, but also provides an additional protection from worker exposure to radiation during remediation activities. Additionally, the coating would decrease the water solubility of the contaminant and, thus, reduce its migration through soil and uptake by plants.

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report David Chen, Della Anggabrata, Emma Brown, Haney Wang, Rocky Zhang, Zachary Bailey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the design of the project. The following designs are delivered in this report: A site stratigraphy and soil on the serviceability under static and seismic conditions PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION A proposed implementation plan

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into 30% Post-Consumer Recycled Wood Fiber Paper and Wheat Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Canada's pulp and paper industry was investigated by determining the availability of wheat straw along pulp and paper processes were explored. The ecological footprint of each resource was found along in the farming sector along with the social impact wheat paper would have on the current wood pulp and paper

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AGSC 450: Scenario 8 Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Food System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -consumer food packaging waste. Our methods of data collection include these social, economic, and ecological compostable post-consumer food and food packaging waste on campus. As part of our research model, we propose that this paper will address are the ethnic diversity of options, post-consumer food packaging waste

  9. Development of Alternate Soil Clean-Up Goals for Hanford Waste Sites Using Fate and Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, J.D. [Fluor Hanford, Inc. (United States); McMahon, W.J. [CH2M Hill Hanford Group (United States); Leary, K.D. [DOE/RL (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Remedial Action Goals (RAGs) for soil contaminant levels that are protective of groundwater have been determined for the Removal/Treatment/Disposal (RTD) sites at the 200-UW-1 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site. The RAG values were determined using a methodology involving the back-calculation of soil contaminant levels protective of groundwater (i.e., resulting groundwater concentrations are {<=} MCLs) in conjunction with the fate and transport modeling as a risk-based alternative to the currently prescribed use of background or detection limit default values. This methodology is important for waste management activities at the Hanford Site because it provides risk-based metrics and a technical basis for determining the levels of contamination 'left in place' in the Hanford Site vadose zone that are protective of human health and the environment. The methodology and the use of fate and transport modeling described here comply with federal guidelines for the use of environmental models. This approach is also consistent with one of several allowable methods identified in State guidelines for deriving soil concentrations for ground water protection. Federal and state guidelines recommend the use of site-specific information and data in risk-based assessments of risk and/or protectiveness. The site-specific characteristics of the Hanford Site, which include consideration of the semi-arid climate, an unsaturated zone thickness of over 80 m (262 feet), and associated/other site features and processes, are integral for the risk-based assessments associated with the protection of groundwater pathway. This methodology yields soil cleanup values (RAGs) for the 200-UW-1 OU waste sites selected for the removal/treatment/disposal (RTD) remedy. These proposed RAGs for uranium, nitrate, and technetium-99 are derived from soil concentrations calculated not to cause contamination of groundwater at levels that exceed the ground water MCLs, and are 40 to 200 times greater than currently prescribed default values. The proposed RAG soil concentration values derive from the results of the fate and transport modeling for a reference volume of contaminated soil extending to a depth of 15 feet, and also for a depth extending from 15 feet to 30 feet. The site-specific parameters for the 200-UW-1 OU RTD waste sites used to calculate the proposed RAG values, and the fate and transport modeling are also described. The assessment of uncertainties, assumptions, and model limitations indicate that the model is capable of adequately representing the Hanford vadose zone system and that the estimated soil cleanup levels are conservatively biased toward over-estimation of groundwater impacts. The risk-based metrics provided by this methodology can potentially greatly reduce the amount of excavation needed at the hundreds of RTD waste sites, and also have significant implications for deeper vadose zone applications. These implications include an improved technical basis for remedy selection, decisions, characterization, and stakeholder communication and cost savings in the range of hundreds of millions of dollars. (authors)

  10. Modifying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to Simulate Cropland Carbon Flux: Model Development and Initial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, Jeffrey; Williams, Jimmy R.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2013-10-01

    Climate change is one of the most compelling modern issues and has important implications for almost every aspect of natural and human systems. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been applied worldwide to support sustainable land and water management in a changing climate. However, the inadequacies of the existing carbon algorithm in SWAT limit its application in assessing impacts of human activities on CO2 emission, one important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that traps heat in the earth system and results in global warming. In this research, we incorporate a revised version of the CENTURY carbon model into SWAT to describe dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM)- residue and simulate land-atmosphere carbon exchange.

  11. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

  12. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several...

  13. ELSEVIER AppliedSoilEcology4 (1996) 147-160 Soil Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkin, Steve

    1996-01-01

    present at sites close to the smelter where Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea caliginosa and Allolobophora

  14. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

  15. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 342­352 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, reproductive value, sex allocation, sex-dependent mortality, varia- ble environment. Journal of Animal Ecology manipulation in kestrels © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 73, 342­352 van

  16. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than@ucsc.edu). #12;923 Riparian forest restoration © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology, 41

  17. Journal of Applied Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2002 39, 960­970 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science- tion, succession. Journal of Applied Ecology (2002) 39, 960­970 Introduction Efforts to reclaim@ucsc.edu). #12;961 Vegetation on reclaimed mines © 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology

  18. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trexler, Joel C.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2005 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd Everglades, Moran effect, spatial synchrony. Journal of Animal Ecology (2005) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-mail: cruetz@sigmaxi.org #12;2 C. R. Ruetz et al. © 2005 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology

  19. Master programme in Ecology & Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    of Ecology and Evolution, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern save form print form #12;Master programme in Ecology of Ecology and Evolution, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern #12;Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern #12;Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly organized by the Institute

  20. Ecological Engineering 14 (2000) 157167 Influence of chemical amendments on phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    2000-01-01

    Ecological Engineering 14 (2000) 157­167 Influence of chemical amendments on phosphorus of Florida, Gaines6ille, FL 32611-0510, USA b En6ironmental Engineering Sciences Department, Uni6ersity was to evaluate the efficacy of selected chemical amendments in immobilizing the soluble soil P. Soil used

  1. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Polluted with Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation of selenium-contaminated sediments and water.soils, sediments, water, or air. Bioremediation is not a new

  2. 245Copyright ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 245250, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    245Copyright © ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 245­250, 2013 Background, An- drewartha and Birch 1954, Odum 1959). Indeed, the relation between environmental gradients

  3. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 6272 (3 credits) Fall 2014 Course Description, behavior, population dynamics, and community structure in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Prerequisite will have: · Examined how ecological processes operate in the marine environment · Compared how ecological

  4. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-02-05

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore »this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  5. Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

  6. The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    processes can contribute to reaching ecosystem goals. We draw primarily on information developed31 The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range Thomas A. Spies twelve major ecological themes (regional environment, ecosystem types and patterns, vegetation

  7. Ecological Indicators 11 (2011) 304310 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    2011-01-01

    Ecological Indicators 11 (2011) 304­310 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Ecological.g., number of canals, dams), and human development (e.g., road and railroads density, pollution sites

  8. Ecology 2003 91, 240252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    Journal of Ecology 2003 91, 240­252 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-words: above-ground biomass change, carbon cycle, dry living above-ground bio- mass, tropical rain forest

  9. Ecology 2004 18, 212222

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Functional Ecology 2004 18, 212­222 © 2004 British Ecological Society 212 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd of California, Berkeley 94720-3140, CA, and Stable Isotope Ratio Facility for Environmental Research (SIRFER) examine if cultural conditions have an effect on instantaneous gas exchange and time-integrated carbon

  10. Ecology 2005 93, 10851093

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 1085­1093 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd G. WHITHAM Department of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research on ecosystems and ecosystem processes. Projected changes include increased levels of carbon dioxide, elevated

  11. Ecology 2006 20, 678688

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Carotenoid accumulation strategies for becoming a colourful HouseFunctional Ecology 2006 20, 678­688 678 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British. CRINO School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287­4501, USA Summary 1. Male House

  12. Ecology 2006 20, 491499

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Functional Ecology 2006 20, 491­499 491 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Physiological and behavioural correlates of life-history variation: a comparison between tropical and temperate zone House Wrens B. I. TIELEMAN,* T. H. DIJKSTRA,§ J

  13. Baltimore Harbor's Ecological and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    1 State of Baltimore Harbor's Ecological and Human Health 2010 E. Caroline Wicks, R. Heath Kelsey of Baltimore Harbor's ecological and human health, 2011. IAN Press, Cambridge, Maryland. Science communication to thank all the data providers: Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

  14. Ecology 2004 92, 168173

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    in these islands. Key-words: Canary Islands, colonization, endemism, interspecific competition, Macaronesia, niche et al. 1994) and the Canary Islands (e.g. Francisco-Ortega et al. 1996), and these show that most.Oxford, UKJECJournal of Ecology0022-04772004 British Ecological SocietyFebruary 2004921ForumPhylogeny of island

  15. Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

    2013-11-29

    Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

  16. Journal of Animal Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2002 71, 23­31 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science Ltd, cyclic variation in food abundance, differential mortality, reproductive effort, senescence. Journal@utu.fi #12;© 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 71, 23­31 24 T. Laaksonen, E

  17. Journal of Animal Ecology 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2003 72, 1015­1026 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, positive interactions, rarefaction. Journal of Animal Ecology (2003) 72, 1015­1026 Introduction After Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 72, 1015­1026 available to other colonizing species (Gallagher et al

  18. Tree Species Traits Influence Soil Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties in High Elevation Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    : This research was funded by an Early Career Project Grant from the British Ecological Society awarded to EA of aspen. Soil carbon and N content, ammonium concentration, and microbial biomass did not differ among

  19. Soil organisms are the catalysts that link elemen-tal exchange among the lithosphere,biosphere,and at-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Soil organisms are the catalysts that link elemen- tal exchange among the lithosphere any pool, is becoming increasingly crucial to understanding soil processes and to sus- tainable diffi- cult task in the study of soil ecological processes. The nutri- ent transformations that take

  20. Effect of elevated CO2 and N fertilisation on soil nematode abundance and diversity in a wheat field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Author's personal copy Effect of elevated CO2 and N fertilisation on soil nematode abundance). The soil food chain response to elevated CO2 can indicate the changes in soil ecological processes s t r a c t An experimental platform of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) was established in mid June

  1. Communications Ecological Applications, 23(3), 2013, pp. 515522

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Communications Ecological Applications, 23(3), 2013, pp. 515­522 Ó 2013 by the Ecological Society to develop statistical models to quantify three different aspects of aggregate regional forest harvest agents of tree mortality. Disturbance theory provides a useful framework for integrating the impacts

  2. CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS By John M. Anderies B are developed and analyzed in an attempt to better un- derstand the interaction of culture, economic structure, and the dynamics of human ecological economic systems. Speci cally, how does the ability of humans to change

  3. Factors influencing swelling and shrinking in soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Steve Edwin

    1956-01-01

    in the laboratory on top of a soil sample compacted inside the Proctor mold followed by plate tests. That way, a soil modulus versus water content curve is developed which parallels the approach for the dry density versus water content. The soil modulus versus water...

  4. A Genetic Study of the Development of Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae): Ecological, Evolutionary, and Forensic Importance of the Secondary Screwworm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos III, Ernesto

    2015-07-24

    of this species, an artificial selection experiment was performed on three Texas populations. After 23 generations of selection at 25°C, all experimental populations selected for faster development exhibited approximately a 1.5 days decrease in mean development...

  5. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  6. Ecology, 82(4), 2001, pp. 10231039 2001 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    , CHRISTER BRO¨ NMARK, AND WILHELM GRANE´ LI Department of Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, S-223

  7. Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2010-01-01

    Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010. _ 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/ S. Accepted

  8. LIFE IN THE SOIL SOIL BIODIVERSITY: ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    LIFE IN THE SOIL SOIL BIODIVERSITY: ITS IMPORTANCE TO ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES Report of a Workshop Held vision Literature cited Workshop participants EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Soils are one of the most poorly the soil physico- chemical environment and the soil's species through activities such as: inputs

  9. APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

    2003-01-07

    The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

  10. Ecology 2004 18, 584591

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    organic matter also increases (Curtis et al. 1996; Reynolds et al. 1996). Thus soil processes may and the mineralization of nutrients in the detrital food web, both of which may be affected by change in carbon, nematodes are particularly convenient for investigating impacts of CO2 on soil food webs (Bongers & Ferris

  11. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: TotalofSupplySurface Soil Surface Soil We

  12. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience of SignaturesSoft CostsSoil &Soil0

  13. The science of global soil change: Networking for our future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Sharon A.

    2008-04-01

    Eos, Vol. 89, No. 16, 15 April 2008 Some of the most important scientific ques- tions today concern the future of Earth’s soil. Understanding the biological, ecological, chemical, and physical processes governing soil functions is directly..., and workshop organizers invite interested sci- entists, students, and the public to join this international effort. Organizers have funding support from the U.S. National Science Foun- dation’s Research Coordination Network Pro- gram and Critical Zone...

  14. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Polluted with Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01

    biosolids mixed with wood ash resulted in significant1 ) in combination with wood ash (220 tons ha -1 ) was ablebyproducts such as wood ash (to make soil calcareous and

  15. 44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 4453.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 44­53. Accepted 13 May 2009 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 agricultural landscape on local bird communities. ­ Web Ecol. 9: 44­53. This study assesses whether Alcalá de Henares, Spain. #12;45WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 multifunctional systems are common in southern Europe

  16. 74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 7483.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 74­83. Accepted 2 June 2008 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 experimental environments. ­ Web Ecol. 8: 74­83. Living organisms respond both to current and previous;75WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 previous environments on the future performance. This type of experiments

  17. 120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120131.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120­131. Accepted 27 December 2007 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quer- cus coccifera. ­ Web, Spain. #12;121WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 have important economic consequences because large amounts of public

  18. Gurven, M. 2006. "Human Behavioral Ecology". In: H. Birx (Ed). Encyclopedia of Anthropology. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurven, Michael

    Gurven, M. 2006. "Human Behavioral Ecology". In: H. Birx (Ed). Encyclopedia of Anthropology variation within and among populations. Its intellectual roots stem from developments in biology (evolutionary biology, animal behavior, population and community ecology, life history theory), anthropology

  19. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2014-10-30

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous OC stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global C cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil OC stocks to changing climatic conditions. In this review,more »we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of OC stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this OC to permafrost thaw under a warming climate.« less

  20. Plant and Soil 212: 7583, 1999. 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    . Görres1,, Mary C. Savin1, Deborah A. Neher2, Thomas R. Weicht2 and Jos´e A. Amador1 1Soil Ecology of microorganisms by soil microfauna ac- celerates nutrient mineralization (Elliott et al., 1980; Ingham et al of microorganisms and microbial grazers must overlap (Elliott et al., 1980; Hassink et al., 1993). Hab- itat

  1. A strong speciesarea relationship for eukaryotic soil microbes: island size matters for ectomycorrhizal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTER A strong species­area relationship for eukaryotic soil microbes: island size matters. In this study, we examine the species richness of a dominant group of eukaryotic soil microbes, ectomycorrhizal-Becking, biogeography, competition, dispersal, ectomycorrhiza, fungi, microbe, species­area, trade-off. Ecology Letters

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Soil aggregates in a tropical deciduous forest: effects on C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Larry J.

    within soil micro- and macro-aggregates in a tropical deciduous forest in Me´xico. We measured, for three nutrients dynamics. Keywords Macro-aggregates Á Micro-aggregates Á Mexico Á Soil bacteria Á t, Instituto de Ecologi´a, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Me´xico, D.F., Me´xico L. J. Forney

  3. Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide 2014-2015 #12;2 #12;Student Responsibilities in Ecological Engineering as administered by Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering (BEE carefully review the College of Engineering and the BEE Department policies for admission, student

  4. Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;2 #12;Student Responsibilities in Ecological Engineering as administered by Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering (BEE carefully review the College of Engineering and the BEE Department policies for admission, student

  5. Journal of Applied Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2007 44, 748­759 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British, distribution, edge, marbled murrelets, model transferability, old-growth Journal of Applied Ecology (2007) 44-nesting Alcid © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied

  6. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 4270 (3 credits) Fall 2012 Course Description The course covers the ecology of marine organisms and habitats with focus on how general ecological principles and those unique to the marine environment drive patterns and processes. Prerequisite: Two

  7. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06

    Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, ...

  8. Ecology 2006 94, 276284

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2006 94, 276­284 © 2006 The Authors Journal compilation © 2006 British of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research, Northern Arizona University and Cupressaceae that are dependent on the host plant for water and mineral nutrients and a portion of their carbon

  9. Ecology 2007 95, 13941403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    EvolutionResearchGroup(CSIC-IPNA),C/AstrofísicoFranciscoSánchez3,38206LaLaguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation (Canary Islands). 2. Seeds from all three plant species studied (Lycium intricatum, Rubia fruticosa probably in the colonization of other subtropical islands. Key-words: Badlands, Canary Islands, diplochory

  10. Science and technology for industrial ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

    1996-07-10

    Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

  11. SOIL EROSION MODELING USING RUSLE AND GIS ON CAMERON HIGHLANDS, MALAYSIA FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    SOIL EROSION MODELING USING RUSLE AND GIS ON CAMERON HIGHLANDS, MALAYSIA FOR HYDROPOWER DEVELOPMENT Soo Huey Teh ______________________________________________________ #12;SOIL EROSION MODELING USING of Akureyri Akureyri, February 2011 #12;Soil Erosion Modeling using RUSLE and GIS on Cameron Highlands

  12. Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudvig, Lars A.; Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.; et al, et al

    2014-01-23

    Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradients–i.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

  13. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

  14. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  15. Mass Transport within Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Nature and Properties of Soils 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall,Exchange of PCBS betweetl Soil and the Atmosphere in theChemicals Residing below the Soil Surface” Water Resources

  16. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics in naturally salt an imprint on salt accumulation and distribution patterns. We explored how the conversion of native grasslands to oak plantations affected the abundance and distribution of salts on soils and groundwater

  17. NRES 725 PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Reading List Water Balance of Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    1 NRES 725 ­ PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Fall 2008 Reading List ­ Water Balance of Plants I) Water Balance of Plants A) Water potential B) Soil, plant, air continuum C) Physiological control 1) Roots-256 *Steudle (01) Ann Rev Plant Phy Mol Biol 52:847-875 Kirkham (05) pp 207-216 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 115

  18. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

  19. Thermal properties of soils and soils testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-17

    The thermal properties of soils are reviewed with reference to the use of soils as heat sources, heat sinks, or thermal storage. Specific heat and thermal conductivity are discussed. (ACR)

  20. Compost Science and Utilization, 9(4):274-283 (2001) BIOREMEDIATION OF A PCB-CONTAMINATED SOIL VIA COMPOSTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Jr., Frederick C.

    2001-01-01

    Compost Science and Utilization, 9(4):274-283 (2001) BIOREMEDIATION OF A PCB-CONTAMINATED SOIL VIA COMPOSTING Frederick C. Michel Jr.1 , John Quensen, C.A.Reddy NSF Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan and composted in field scale piles to determine the effect of soil to amendment ratio on PCB degradation

  1. Cliff T. Johnston Professor of Soil Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    in Academic, Professional and Scholarly Societies American Chemical Society Clay Minerals Society Awarded a Fulbright Senior Specialist Grant ­ Brazil. Publications - Journal Articles and Invited Reviews developments in soil science research, L.L. Boersma (ed.), Soil Sci. Soc. of Am. Publications, Madison, WI

  2. The ecology of mutualism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, D. H.; James, Samuel W.; Keeler, K. H.

    1982-11-01

    , Quebec, Canada H3C 3P8 Sam James Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 48109 Kathleen H. Keeler School of Life Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA 68588 INTRODUCTION....annualreviews.org/aronline Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 1982.13:315-347. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 316 BOUCHER, JAMES & KEELER species" without evoking group selection. Two definitions have...

  3. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  4. Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguero, Tania

    2003-01-01

    changes in the Rocky Mountains, global warming, and severalReview: Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective ByJill S. Baron (Ed. ). Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological

  5. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, N.V.; Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

  6. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Bonter DN. 2010. Citizen science as an ecological researchand ecology Panel 2. Citizen science – crowd-sourcing bigspecies (NABCI 2011). Citizen science is a form of data

  7. Journal of Applied Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

  8. ISSUES IN ECOLOGY TECHNICAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    ISSUES IN ECOLOGY TECHNICAL REPORT Ecological Applications, 21(6), 2011, pp. 1902­1924 Ó 2011 for carbon benefits, environmental and monetary costs, risks and trade-offs for a variety of activities co-benefits such as biodiversity, water, and economic opportunities. Each strategy also has trade

  9. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2007 76, 1045­1052 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British-words: density effect, Ficedula hypoleuca, long-term trend, Parus major, timing of breeding. Journal of Animal@utu.fi #12;1046 M. P. Ahola et al. © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society

  10. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  11. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

  12. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2006 75, 456­465 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British-words: correlated random walk, first-passage time, search paths, spatial scale. Journal of Animal Ecology (2006) 75-mail: h.bailey@abdn.ac.uk #12;457 Movementpatterns and foraging © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation

  13. ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a way that preserves the greatest possible knowledge base, while making the most efficient and effectiveORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological effectively for planning, restoration, and management. Arranging the various elements within the ecosystem

  14. The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

    2010-06-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

  15. A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

    2013-01-01

    Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

  16. Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis -Chemistry Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (see map in Appendix 1). Sustainability Street is in an urban location and the microclimate) will be useful in diagnosing management issues at this site. History of Site Urban soils can be expected as grazing land, has had an orchard planted on it, and has been developed for building. Proximity to storage

  17. Managing Soil Salinity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2001-07-13

    oceans and lakes. Fertilizers and organic amendments also add salts to the soil. Effects of salts on plants As soils become more saline, plants become unable to draw as much water from the soil. This is because the plant roots contain varying... and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt The terms salt and salinity are often used...

  18. The development and testing of technologies for the remediation of mercury-contaminated soils, Task 7.52. Topical report, December 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepan, D.J.; Fraley, R.H.; Charlton, D.S.

    1994-02-01

    The release of elemental mercury into the environment from manometers that are used in the measurement of natural gas flow through pipelines has created a potentially serious problem for the gas industry. Regulations, particularly the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), have had a major impact on gas companies dealing with mercury-contaminated soils. After the May 8, 1993, LDR deadline extension, gas companies were required to treat mercury-contaminated soils by designated methods to specified levels prior to disposal in landfills. In addition, gas companies must comply with various state regulations that are often more stringent than the LDR. The gas industry is concerned that the LDRs do not allow enough viable options for dealing with their mercury-related problems. The US Environmental Protection Agency has specified the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) as thermal roasting or retorting. However, the Agency recognizes that treatment of certain wastes to the LDR standards may not always be achievable and that the BDAT used to set the standard may be inappropriate. Therefore, a Treatability Variance Process for remedial actions was established (40 Code of Federal Regulations 268.44) for the evaluation of alternative remedial technologies. This report presents evaluations of demonstrations for three different remedial technologies: a pilot-scale portable thermal treatment process, a pilot-scale physical separation process in conjunction with chemical leaching, and a bench-scale chemical leaching process.

  19. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694707 Plain strain soilstructure interaction model for a building supported by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    2006-01-01

    Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694­707 Plain strain soil­structure interaction, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 3 January 2006 Abstract A simple theoretical model for soil­structure interaction in water saturated poroelastic soils is presented, developed to explore if the apparent building­foundation­soil

  20. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2015-05-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recentlymore »developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth.« less

  1. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stegen, James; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan E.

    2015-05-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recently developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth.

  2. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

  3. Adsorption and transport of pyrithiobac in soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, Christopher John

    1996-01-01

    adsorbents (Gonzales bentonite, Georgia kaolinite, goethite, and Michigan peat) and four soils (Houston Black c, Hidalgo sl, Orelia scl, and Ships sic) having a wide range of physical and chemical properties. Adsorption isotherms were developed...

  4. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  5. Data management system for organic soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinnette, P.

    1999-07-01

    A Data Management System for Organic Soil (DMSOS) has been developed that enables the acquisition, management and analysis of organic soil data as well as the presentation of results to be conducted effectively through a common interface. This development was in response to the data management needs of research investigating the engineering properties of organic soil and its extension to the stabilization of organic soil through dynamic replacement (DR). It is shown how the above functions are implemented efficiently using Windows-based software to perform comprehensive data management and analysis of data gathered from both laboratory and field tests. When the engineering properties of a given organic soil deposit are needed, a build-in Computer Advisor for Organic Soil Projects (CAOSP) predicts the properties from DMSOS based correlations. A unique and useful feature of the CAOSP is its ability to estimate the anticipated ultimate settlement of an organic soil deposit given the loading conditions and the moisture or organic content. Also incorporated in the DMSOS is a quality control system that utilizes computerized data acquisition/data management techniques in order to evaluate the degree of improvement of an organic soil layer at a given stage of treatment using DR.

  6. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson. J.D.

    energy reserves during the drought, S. pygaea reproduced with the same frequency and fecundity during to rebound rapidly from the stresses of prolonged drought is due in part to their reproductive ecology

  7. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    * *Evolutionary Ecology Group, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Behavioural, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Tel: +41 31 631 30 21, Fax: +41 31 631 30

  8. ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy programs in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The EES Graduate Program includes studying a wide range of challenging problems in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy

  9. Generation and mobility of radon in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, A.W.; Jester, W.A.; Ciolkosz, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    This study has confirmed large seasonal and daily variations of Rn in soil gas, developed models for the effects of temperature and moisture on air-water Rn partition, inhibited Rn diffusion from wet soil into sparse large air-filled pores and effects of diffusion into bedrock, demonstrated that organic matter is a major host for 226Ra in soils and that organic-bound Ra largely determines the proportion of 222Rn emanated to pore space, shown that in contrast 220Rn is emanated mainly from 224Ra in Fe-oxides, detected significant disequilibrium between 226Ra and 238U in organic matter and in some recent glacial soils, demonstrated by computer models that air convection driven by temperature differences is expected in moderately permeable soils on hillsides.

  10. Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 3148 Effects of mulching and fertilization on soil nutrients, microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    2002-01-01

    such as recycled, ground wood pallets and composted yard waste are widely used in landscapes to suppress weeds communi- ties. In a field microcosm study, we compared effects of mulching with composted yard waste mulched with composted yard wastes (17.2 and 15.3 mg CO2 kg-1 per day for non-fertilized and fertilized

  11. Distribution and toxigenicity of Aspergillus species isolated from maize kernels from three agro-ecological zones in Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    -ecological zones in Nigeria Joseph Atehnkeng a,b , Peter S. Ojiambo a , Matthias Donner c , T. Ikotun b , Richard A (IITA), PMB 5320, Ibadan, Nigeria b Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria c University of Bonn, Institute for Plant Diseases, Phytopathology and Nematology in Soil

  12. Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

  13. Information Analysis of a Spatial Database for Ecological Land classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Information Analysis of a Spatial Database for Ecological Land classification Frank W. Davis:An ecologicalland classification was developed for a complex region in southern California using geographic. The analysis was weakened by map errors, especially errors in the digital elevation data. Nevertheless

  14. CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water contaminated with radioactive waste: towards the development of bioremediation options for the nuclear industry A N D R E A G E I S S L E R , S O N J A S E L E via a number of mechanisms which are potentially useful for scalable, cost-effective bioremediation

  15. The Emphasis on Ecological Design for High-rise Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, F.; Zhang, G.; Xie, M.

    2006-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of urbanization, there are more and more high-rise buildings in cities. Meanwhile, the negative impacts of high-rise buildings on the urban environment have become more and more serious. The ecological design of high...

  16. Fog and Soil Weathering as Sources of Nutrients in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    265 Fog and Soil Weathering as Sources of Nutrients in a California Redwood Forest Holly A. Ewing,1. Firestone,4 and Vanessa K.S. Boukili5 Abstract Fog water deposition is thought to influence the ecological from fog and rain, as well as the fate of these inputs, within a Sonoma County, California, coast

  17. Ecologic and geographic distribution of filovirus disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Bauer, John T.; Mills, James N.

    2004-01-01

    We used ecologic niche modeling of outbreaks and sporadic cases of filovirus-associated hemorrhagic fever (HF) to provide a large-scale perspective on the geographic and ecologic distributions of Ebola and Marburg viruses. We predicted...

  18. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  19. 2578 Ecology, Vol. 79, No. 7BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, 79(7), 1998, p. 2578

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    2578 Ecology, Vol. 79, No. 7BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, 79(7), 1998, p. 2578 1998 by the Ecological and challenging ecological issues associated with human expansion and global change. This issue has led, muskrat, house finch, gypsy moth, cheatgrass, rinderpest, etc. But this book does not pinpoint specific

  20. Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink The impact and benefits of soil science have only partly been documented. Here I highlight four noteworthy soil science achievements from the state of Wisconsin that took place between 1870 and the early 1980s: (i) the first soil

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Soil order and management practices control soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Soil order and management practices control soil phosphorus fractions in managed in wetland rice soils. In this study we evaluated 71 wetland soils in the Sacramento Valley, California, consisting of different soil orders (Alfisols, Entisols, Mollisols and Verti- sols) and different management

  2. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Ecological Archives, iPlant, NatureServe, Dryad, the National Oceanographic Data Center). Some of these repositories house

  3. SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Mike

    SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

  4. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  5. Disturbed core Undisturbed soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Batch Disturbed core Undisturbed soil column Pedon Field Watershed Multi-scale modeling .001-1 m3 1-10 m3 10-10,000 m3 >10,000 m3 Unraveling the influence of scale on organic C transport Soil through deep soil profiles may be the "missing" C flux in global budgets. Jardine, P.M., M.A. Mayes, J. R

  6. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    B. The vertical distribution of soil organic carbon and itsA. S. & Whitmore, A. P. Soil organic matter turnover isorganic matter in a cultivated soil. Org. Geochem. 33, 357–

  7. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01

    soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

  8. Mass Transport within Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    large fraction of the sewage sludge produced in many regionsharmful microorganisms. Sewage sludge contains contaminantsdisposal of sewage and industrial sludge. Soil contamination

  9. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Fangliang

    and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK between species of different colonization status. Indeed, virtually all variation about the bivariate distribution, spatial variance, Taylor's power law. Journal of Animal Ecology (2006) 75, 646­656 doi: 10.1111/j

  10. Zoology 4413 TROPICA L ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fincke, Ola M.

    2/22/2013 1 Zoology 4413 TROPICA L ECOLOGY FIELD COURSE In Veracruz and Chiapas, Mexico At Los rainforest left in Mexico Mahogany tree The forest provided a sense of history . . . Casa de Cortez, La to Chajul Solar panels power Chajul Clinics provide free family planning but also saw some solutions #12

  11. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    of distribution due to thermal stratification during the summer. However, plaice from the northern North Sea did, spatial dynamics, thermal stratification. Journal of Animal Ecology (2004) 73, 377­385 Introduction Long non-breeding season. Two clusters were in warm, thermally mixed water in the eastern and western North

  12. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engen, Steinar

    on the dynamics of central European great and blue tit popula- tions. This generates synchronous fluctuations Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd The extended Moran effect and large-scale synchronous, Bauernstrasse 14, D-38162 Cremlingen, Germany Summary 1. Synchronous fluctuations of geographically separated

  13. Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management Fabián Menalled menalled@montana.edu 406-994-4783 Montana State #12;http://ipm.montana.edu/cropweeds #12;#12;· Biology and identification of brome species secalinus Not found in MT #12;Cheatgrass Japanese brome #12;Pictures from Interactive Encyclopedia of North

  14. Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of populations include the mallard ducks in the Central flyway of the United States, the Daphnia laevis(t) - e(t), (2) where b(t), d(t), i(t), and e(t) are the instantaneous rates of birth, death, immigrationPopulation Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001

  15. Industrial Ecology Master of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Cycles · Resource Scarcity · Agent Based Modelling of Complex Adaptive Systems · Renewable energy systems. An interdisciplinary approach, integrating technical, environmental and social frames of reference, is essential and profit Industrial Ecology is inspired by nature. The analogy between natural and technical systems

  16. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  17. Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps PAUL M. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological, Suite 100, Overland Park, KS 66211 Key Terms: Engineering Properties, Soils, Hazards, Mapping INTRODUCTION For many applications, `engineering soils maps' may be preferable to comprehensive engineering

  18. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and Internationaland Ecologically Sustainable Development: How Will We KnowFoster, John Bellamy. “Sustainable Development of What? ”

  19. Sustainable Development & Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and Internationaland Ecologically Sustainable Development: How Will We KnowFoster, John Bellamy. “Sustainable Development of What? ”

  20. X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

    2011-12-31

    Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

  1. communications in soil scienceand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje was conducted to determine the changes in soil properties and the availability and leachability of nutrients.13) increased water holding capacity increases supply of water to plants. However, the results from coal ash

  2. communications in soil scienceand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje-0290 ABSTRACT Forest application of boiler ash is fast becoming a popular alternative to landfilling. Boiler ash following the application of large quantities of boiler ash in a sandy soil (with a spodic horizon). Two

  3. Free Standing Soil Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Free Standing Soil Sample Kiosks Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto of Richland County, Jackie Kopack Jordan has partnered with local garden centers to provide free standing soil sample collections sites. The free standing kiosks are located at three local garden centers. Woodley

  4. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  5. Minimization of effluent discharge to the Soil Column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dronen, V.R.; Hydzik, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987, the US Congress mandated that the US Department of Energy (DOE), cease discharge of contaminated effluents to the soil column at the Hanford Site by calendar year 1995. The plan and schedule for this activity can be found in The Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquid into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site, (WHC 1987). Coupled with this mandate and DOE`s intent to cleanup Hanford (remediate and restore to the extent practicable), DOE entered into an agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The agreement is called the ``Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order`` (Ecology et al. 1992) otherwise known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The Tri-Party Agreement established schedules and legally enforceable milestones for the Hanford cleanup mission. One such milestone was to cease discharge of effluent to Hanford`s 300 Area process trenches located approximately 100 m from the Columbia River, north of Richland, Washington.

  6. Hazen, T. C., A. J. Tien, A. Worsztynowicz, D. J. Altman, K. Ulfig, and T. Manko. 2003. Biopiles for Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Soils: A Polish Case Study. NATO Advanced Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    on The Utilization of Bioremediation to Reduce Soil Contamination: Problems and Solutions. V. Sasek, J. Glaser, and P Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas of Poland demonstrated bioremediation to destroy oil sludges [6]. By applying oil to the soil surface, adding fertilizer (P & N), water

  7. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01

    crop P response, evaluate crop response to P fertilizer placement and rate, and compare extractable P levels from TAEX, Bray 1, Olsen, TAEX 1, TAEX 2, and TAEX 3 in selected Blackland Prairie soils. Five field locations were established with replicated...

  8. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  9. Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

  10. Soil Profile Rebuilding Specification (Full Version)--1 Soil Profile Rebuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    for Restoration of Graded and Compacted Soils that will be Vegetated CSI Div 2 CSICode-02910-Plant Preparation or addition of topsoil, and subsequent planting with woody plants. The soil preparation portion of Soil-Soil Preparation CONTENTS 1. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION 2. PROCEDURE 3. DEFINITIONS 4. SUBMITTALS REFERENCES

  11. Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components Patrick D@sandia.gov Abstract--Effective evaluation and prediction of photovoltaic performance loss due to soiling requires types. I. INTRODUCTION Soiling is a significant source of energy loss in photovoltaic (PV) systems [1

  12. APBI 403 / SOIL 503 SOIL SAMPLING, ANALYSES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APBI 403 / SOIL 503 SOIL SAMPLING, ANALYSES AND DATA INTERPRETATION TERM 1 ­ 2015/16 Instructors measurement procedures and techniques in soil science. Course Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of APBI 403 readings will be drawn from a variety of sources. Course Marks: APBI 403 ­ Soil Sampling, Analyses and Data

  13. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  14. Department: SOIL Course No.: 2120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    :George Elliott Content Area: CA3 Science and Technology Catalog Copy: SOIL 2120. Environmental Soil Science (251 products) spend a significant amount of time in soils. This, in turn, impacts water quality. The production it has on our everyday lives, and the interdependency of the various natural environments. Soil formation

  15. Development Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

  16. Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world incorporate a broad range of biological systems as components, and emphasize mutual improvement of both human

  17. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  18. ADVANCING A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    environmental issues: deforestation, desertification, biodiversity use and climate change. These discourses ecology, global environmental change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, climate change #12;1 1

  19. Variability of magnetic soil properties in Hawaii Remke L. van Dam*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Variability of magnetic soil properties in Hawaii Remke L. van Dam*a , J. Bruce J. Harrisona , Jan Hawaiian Islands: O'ahu, Kaho'olawe, and Hawaii. The data show a strong negative correlation between mean oxides, magnetic soils, soil development, Hawaii 1. INTRODUCTION Electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic

  20. Soil protozoa--An intensive study of population dynamics and community structure in an upland grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil protozoa--An intensive study of population dynamics and community structure in an upland intensive investigation of soil protozoan diversity sponsored by the Natural Environment Research Council within the context of the fractal character of the soil. We developed methods for estimating

  1. www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 11072010, Vol. 9 Understanding Vineyard Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 11072010, Vol. 9 Understanding Vineyard Soils Robert E. White. Oxford developing and cultivating vineyards, soil properties and their variations are often not considered with a particular wine. As a hydrogeolo- gist, I find the sensitivity of wine grape expression to climatic and soil

  2. Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, Paris 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    , considering soil hydraulic conductivity. The models deal with erosion of levees, dams and embankments due centrifuge have been used to calibrate the models. Previous models did not consider soil hydraulic with breach times. The new models developed consider soil hydraulic conductivity, and produce good agreement

  3. Experimental evidence for the interacting effects of forest edge, moisture and soil macrofauna on leaf litter decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    , Oxford OX2 7DE, UK d Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford radiation and wind at forest edges reduces soil moisture, which in turn affects leaf litter decomposition 12% today, and 75% of the patches are now less than 2 ha (Watts, 2006). Such small forests

  4. Final Report for DOE grant no. DE-FG02-04ER63883: Can soil genomics predict the impact of precipitation on nitrous oxide flux from soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egbert Schwartz

    2008-12-15

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that is released by microorganisms in soil. However, the production of nitrous oxide in soil is highly variable and difficult to predict. Future climate change may have large impacts on nitrous oxide release through alteration of precipitation patterns. We analyzed DNA extracted from soil in order to uncover relationships between microbial processes, abundance of particular DNA sequences and net nitrous oxide fluxes from soil. Denitrification, a microbial process in which nitrate is used as an electron acceptor, correlated with nitrous oxide flux from soil. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea correlated positively, but weakly, with nitrous oxide production in soil. The abundance of bacterial genes in soil was negatively correlated with gross nitrogen mineralization rates and nitrous oxide release from soil. We suggest that the most important control over nitrous oxide production in soil is the growth and death of microorganisms. When organisms are growing nitrogen is incorporated into their biomass and nitrous oxide flux is low. In contrast, when microorganisms die, due to predation or infection by viruses, inorganic nitrogen is released into the soil resulting in nitrous oxide release. Higher rates of precipitation increase access to microorganisms by predators or viruses through filling large soil pores with water and therefore can lead to large releases of nitrous oxide from soil. We developed a new technique, stable isotope probing with 18O-water, to study growth and mortality of microorganisms in soil.

  5. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  6. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ã, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  7. Human Development Major Career Tree 2014-2015 This document is intended as a SUPPLEMENT to Human Ecology college requirements and the HD curriculum sheet for your matriculation year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    seminar course in addition to HD laboratory course (3) Take research methods (4) Complete a practicum seminar Essential Foundations: (1) Human Development First Year Classes (HD1150, HD1160, HD1170); (2Human Development Major Career Tree 2014-2015 This document is intended as a SUPPLEMENT to Human

  8. Design-with-Nature for Multifunctional Landscapes: Environmental Benefits and Social Barriers in Community Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Bo; Li, Ming-Han; Li, Shujuan

    2013-10-28

    McHarg’s Ecological Determinism design approach. The Woodlands, TX, USA, an ecologically designed community development under McHarg’s approach, is compared with two adjacent communities that follow the conventional design approach. Using national...

  9. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-31

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

  10. Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, RhodeEchols County,EU (SmartEcofysEcoleEcologic

  11. Hygrothermal Simulation of Foundations: Part 1 - Soil Material Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is a complicated process. A computational approach for heat transfer through the ground has been well defined (EN ISO 13370:2007, 2007), and simplified methods have been developed (Staszczuk, Radon, and Holm 2010). However, these approaches generally ignore the transfer of soil moisture, which is not negligible (Janssen, Carmeliet, and Hens 2004). This study is divided into several parts. The intention of the first part is to gather, comprehend and adapt soil properties from Soil Science. The obtained information must be applicable to related tasks in Building Science and validated with hygrothermal calculation tools. Future parts of this study will focus on the validation aspect of the soil properties to be implemented. Basic changes in the software code may be requested at this time. Different types of basement construction will be created with a hygrothermal calculation tool, WUFI. Simulations from WUFI will be compared with existing or ongoing measurements. The intentions of the first part of this study have been fulfilled. The soil properties of interest in Building Science have been defined for 12 different soil textures. These properties will serve as input parameters when performing hygrothermal calculations of building constructions coupled to soil materials. The reliability of the soil parameters will be further evaluated with measurements in Part 2.

  12. Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1993-08-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods.

  13. Metapopulation Ecology Saskya van Nouhuys, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nouhuys, Saskya

    of natural and experimental systems. Metapopulation ecology is used in conservation biology and in population Nouhuys, Saskya (December 2009) Metapopulation Ecology. In: Encyclopedia of

  14. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18 Pedro Quintana 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering

  15. MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound Tension Leg Platform for Deep Water Wind Farms MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

  16. Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Journal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundations Division,of critical state soil mechanics and bounding surfacewith critical state soil mechanics principles; it renders

  17. Crop and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________ ID Intensive (SOIL 325) (3) _______ HHS 231 ­ Lifetime Fitness for Health (2. Global Issues (3) (*soil science electives meeting requirement) _______ Science

  18. Pennsylvania Soil Survey Edward J. Ciolkosz,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Pennsylvania Soil Survey History by Edward J. Ciolkosz, Robert L. Cunningham, and Joseph J ............................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2 Pennsylvania Soil Characterization ......................................... 10 CHAPTER 4 Soil Survey Committee History

  19. Controls on black carbon storage in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Masiello, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Physical and chemical protection of soil organic carbonin three agricultural soils with different contents ofcalcium carbonate, Aust. J. Soil Res. , 38, 1005 – 1016.

  20. EVALUATION OF HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by Mobrand Biometrics, Inc. 2004 "Active given the likely measures at hand and the economic, social and ecological constraints of the Subbasin

  1. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Peggy

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. Its mission design consists of L-band ...

  2. Quantifying landscape pattern in the Ouachita National Forest: an ecological application of GIS-based spatial analysis and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Delayne Marie

    1998-01-01

    Human induced land use changes are contributing to raphics. serious ecological impacts in National Forests. Although these types of human activities are being looked upon with great concern, the contribution of human development and disturbance...

  3. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  4. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  5. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  6. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  7. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    , Diorhabda elongata (Chrysomelidae; Dudley 2005), as a biocontrol agent for tamarisk. Beetle releasesFrontiersinEcology and the Environment Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States: ecological are reported to result in up to REVIEWS REVIEWS REVIEWS Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States

  8. Nordic Society Oikos Phylogenetic Approaches in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nylin, Sören

    Nordic Society Oikos Phylogenetic Approaches in Ecology Author(s): Hans-Erik Wanntorp, Daniel R. Brooks, Thomas Nilsson, Soren Nylin, Fredrik Ronquist, Stephen C. Stearns, Nina Wedell Source: Oikos, Vol cited.A summaryis required. Phylogeneticapproachesin ecology Hans-Erik Wanntorp, Daniel R. Brooks

  9. Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

    2013-02-25

    Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

  10. Dynamic Simulation of Unsteady Flow of Water in Unsaturated Soils and its Application to Subirrigation System Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiler, E. A.; Bhuiyan, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    Two computer programs were developed. One simulated vertical unsteady infiltration through the surface into a homogeneous unsaturated soil. Simulation results were obtained for three different soils--Yolo light clay, ...

  11. Development, Topography, and Identity: The Dougherty Valley and the New Suburban Metropolis [Research and Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, Rene'

    2008-01-01

    the author. Davids / Development, Topography, and IdentityDevelopment, Topography, and Identity: The Dougherty Valleymore considerate of topography and ecological imperatives

  12. Ecological

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I551 - g 7 sEZrZ, -

  13. Ecology, 79(4), 1998, pp. 12941304 1998 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostertag, Rebecca

    greater on the infertile (residual) soil type than the fertile (alluvial) type but were unrelated to gap, regardless of soil type or trenching treatment (trench lined with root restriction cloth, trench open in the canopy gaps on the infertile soil. The differences between the two soil types in the amount of root

  14. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan. Topical report, October 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastorfer, J.R.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zellmer, S.D.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1995-04-01

    This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth wetland sites mapped Lenawee soils were selected in Midland County, Michigan: Site 1, a younger stand subjected to recent selective logging, and Site 2, a more mature stand. The collection of ecological data to analyze plant succession on the right-of-way (ROW) and the effects of the developing ROW plant communities on adjacent forest communities was initiated in 1989. Cover class estimates were made for understory and ROW plant species on the basis of 1 {times} 1{minus}m quadrats. Individual stem diameters and species counts were recorded for overstory plants in 10{minus}m quadrats. Although long-term studies have not been completed, firm baseline data were established for comparative analyses with future sampling. Current data indicate that vegetation became well-established on the ROW within one year and subsequently increased in coverage. About 65% of the species were wetland indicators, and the dominants included seeded and natural invading species; nevertheless, some elements of the original flora regenerated and persist. The plants of the ecotone understories of both sites changed from their original composition as a result of the installation of the gas pipeline. Although some forest species persist at both sites, the ecotone of Site I was influenced more by the seeded species, whereas the natural invaders were more important at Site 2.

  15. Efficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable Buildings M. Kostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    existing buildings, and to develop a proposal for funding of a model "Energy Efficient Building" on NIU and practices and develop new ones. The new "Energy Efficient Building" could be a Model Energy LandmarkEfficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable

  16. Generation and mobility of radon in soil. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, A.W.; Jester, W.A.; Ciolkosz, E.J.

    1993-05-01

    This study has confirmed large seasonal and daily variations of Rn in soil gas, developed models for the effects of temperature and moisture on air-water Rn partition, inhibited Rn diffusion from wet soil into sparse large air-filled pores and effects of diffusion into bedrock, demonstrated that organic matter is a major host for 226Ra in soils and that organic-bound Ra largely determines the proportion of 222Rn emanated to pore space, shown that in contrast 220Rn is emanated mainly from 224Ra in Fe-oxides, detected significant disequilibrium between 226Ra and 238U in organic matter and in some recent glacial soils, demonstrated by computer models that air convection driven by temperature differences is expected in moderately permeable soils on hillsides.

  17. Soil cracking modelling using the mesh-free SPH method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bui, H H; Kodikara, J; Sanchez, M

    2015-01-01

    The presence of desiccation cracks in soils can significantly alter their mechanical and hydrological properties. In many circumstances, desiccation cracking in soils can cause significant damage to earthen or soil supported structures. For example, desiccation cracks can act as the preference path way for water flow, which can facilitate seepage flow causing internal erosion inside earth structures. Desiccation cracks can also trigger slope failures and landslides. Therefore, developing a computational procedure to predict desiccation cracking behaviour in soils is vital for dealing with key issues relevant to a range of applications in geotechnical and geo-environment engineering. In this paper, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method will be extended for the first time to simulate shrinkage-induced soil cracking. The main objective of this work is to examine the performance of the proposed numerical approach in simulating the strong discontinuity in material behaviour and to learn about the crack ...

  18. In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

  19. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

  20. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

  1. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  2. What is microbial community ecology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-11-11

    The activities of complex communities of microbes affect biogeochemical transformations in natural, managed and engineered ecosystems. Meaningfully defining what constitutes a community of interacting microbial populations is not trivial, but is important for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include the analysis of functional pathways for nutrient resource and energy flows, mechanistic understanding of interactions between microbial populations and their environment, and the emergent properties of the complex community. Some emergent properties mirror those analyzed by community ecologists who study plants and animals: biological diversity, functional redundancy and system stability. However, because microbes possess mechanisms for the horizontal transfer of genetic information, the metagenome may also be considered a community property.

  3. Multimodel inference in ecology and evolution: challenges and solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Ian

    landscape ecol- ogy, behavioural ecology, life history evolution, phylog- enetics and population genetics

  4. Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive contaminants. Final report September 1992--October 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    A research and development project to remove uranium and related radioactive contaminants from soil by an ultrasonically-aided chemical leaching process began in 1993. The project objective was to develop and design, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale experimental studies, a cost-effective soil decontamination process to produce a treated soil containing less than 35 pCi/g. The project, to cover a period of about thirty months, was designed to include bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to remove primarily uranium from the Incinerator Area soil, at Fernald, Ohio, as well as strontium-90, cobalt-60 and cesium-137 from a Chalk River soil, at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario. The project goal was to develop, design and cost estimate, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale ex-situ soil treatment studies, a process to remove radionuclides form the soils to a residual level of 35 pCi/g of soil or less, and to provide a dischargeable water effluent as a result of soil leaching and a concentrate that can be recovered for reuse or solidified as a waste for disposal. In addition, a supplementary goal was to test the effectiveness of in-situ soil treatment through a field study using the Chalk River soil.

  5. LIVING SOIL Master Gardener College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    LIVING SOIL Master Gardener College George W. Bird, Professor, MSU (June 9, 2012) #12;#12;Living Soil References G. W. Bird, Professor Michigan State University birdg@msu.edu http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/bird/tabid/133/Default.aspx · Brady, N. and R. Weil. 2002. Nature and Properties of Soils (13th ed) Prentice Hall

  6. Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates Interpreting Your Heavy Metals Test Results Olivia quantities. Soils have often been the landing spot for heavy metals, chemicals, and wastes as byproducts of industrial and agricultural pollutants. Many of these metals are present in soils natu- rally, usually

  7. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

  8. SOIL INFORMATION Last Lime Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    production. Send samples, forms, and payment to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Industrial Lawns - Bermudagrass Routine (soil pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and estimated CEC) $10, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE SOIL TEST DESIRED AND FEES SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION Your

  9. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

  10. Ecological Characterization Data for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Simmons, Mary A.; Stegen, Jennifer A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Tiller, Brett L.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Zufelt, Rhett K.

    2004-11-01

    A composite analysis is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 to ensure public safety through the management of active and planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities associated with the Hanford Site. The original Hanford Site Composite Analysis of 1998 must be revised and submitted to DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in 2004 because of revisions to waste site information in the 100, 200, and 300 Areas, updated performance assessments and environmental impact statements (EIS), changes in inventory estimates for key sites and constituents, and a change in the definition of offsite receptors. Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 to support ecological site assessment modeling for the 2004 Composite Analysis. This work was conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project (formerly the Groundwater Protection Program) managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. The purpose of this report is to provide summaries of the characterization information and available spatial data on the biological resources and ecological receptors found in the upland, riparian, aquatic, and island habitats on the Hanford Site. These data constitute the reference information used to establish parameters for the ecological risk assessment module of the System Assessment Capability and other assessment activities requiring information on the presence and distribution of biota on the Hanford Site.

  11. Evaluation of technologies for volume reduction of plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papelis, C.; Jacobson, R.L.; Miller, F.L.; Shaulis, L.K.

    1996-06-01

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in plutonium (Pu) contamination of the soil over an area of several thousands of acres. The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential of five different processes to reduce the volume of Pu-contaminated soil from three different areas, namely Areas 11, 13, and 52. Volume reduction was to be accomplished by concentrating the Pu into a small but highly contaminated soil fraction, thereby greatly reducing the volume of soil requiring disposal. The processes tested were proposed by Paramag Corp. (PARAMAG), Advanced Processing Technologies Inc. (APT), Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT), Nuclear Remediation Technologies (NRT), and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG). Because of time and budgetary restraints, the NRT and SEG processes were tested with soil from Area 11 only. These processes typically included a preliminary soil conditioning step (e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), followed by a more advanced process designed to separate Pu from the soil, based on physiochemical properties of Pu compounds (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, specific gravity). Analysis of the soil indicates that a substantial fraction of the total Pu contamination is typically confined in a relatively narrow and small particle size range. Processes which were able to separate this highly contaminated soil fraction (using physical methods, e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), from the rest of the soil achieved volume (mass) reductions on the order of 70%. The advanced, more complex processes tested did not enhance volume reduction. The primary reason why processes that rely on the dependence of settling velocity on density differences failed was the very fine grain size of the Pu-rich particles.

  12. Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1994-08-01

    This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

  13. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils, Comprehensive Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, D.J.

    2001-01-12

    The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system.

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

  15. The Basicity of Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1929-01-01

    mixture of nitrate of soda and sulphate of ammonia in proper proportions will not affect the acidity of the soil. THE BASICITY OF TEXAS SOILS 7 The importance of these characteristics of sulphate of ammonia and nitrate of soda depencls upon various... to the effect of fertilizer an the reaction of soils. Some fertilizer materials, such as sulphate of ammonia, have a tendency to cause the soil to become acid. Sulphate ,of ammonia reacts with the replaceable bases in the soil silicates; the ammonia replaces...

  16. Ungulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007). Forest biodiversity, energy flow, nutrient cycling, and regeneration are significantly affectedUngulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create Biogeochemical Hotspots in Forest. Vucetich, Rolf O. Peterson, Joshua M. Shields, and Matthew D. Powers School of Forest Resources

  17. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 30: 19­36, 2002 Published November 27 INTRODUCTION consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 30: 19­36, 2002 Hodson 1977, Azam et al. 1983). Net DOC

  18. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 38: 295­307, 2005 Published March 18 INTRODUCTION Resale or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 38

  19. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 183­193, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01192 Published Microb Ecol 51: 183­193, 2008 ous study, we found that cdca-like genes are com- mon in diatoms

  20. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 31: 33­47, 2003 Published February 13 INTRODUCTION@princeton.edu #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 31: 33­47, 2003 tions. There is evidence that the geologic history of the East

  1. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 54: 35­44, 2009 doi: 10.3354/ame01253 Published be taken up. It also applies to some phagotrophic particle feeders, such as radiolari- ans

  2. Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusconi, Roberto

    Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, ...

  3. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

  4. Monitoring field soil suction using a miniature tensiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yu-Jun; Mantho, Altin Theodore; De Laure, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    An experimental device was developed to monitor the field soil suction using miniature tensiometer. This device consists of a double tube system that ensures a good contact between the tensiometer and the soil surface at the bottom of the testing borehole. This system also ensures the tensiometer periodical retrieving without disturbing the surrounding soil. This device was used to monitor the soil suction at the site of Boissy-le-Ch\\^atel, France. The measurement was performed at two depths (25 and 45 cm) during two months (May and June 2004). The recorded suction data are analyzed by comparing with the volumetric water content data recorded using TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer) probes as well as the meteorological data. A good agreement between these results was observed, showing a satisfactory performance of the developed device.

  5. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, K.

    2010-01-01

    wave method for soil water content measurement: Hydrologicalfor estimating soil water content during irrigation andvariations of the soil water content in an agro-ecosystem

  6. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    G. An integrated model of soil, hydrology, and vegetatione n v Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implicationsfor soil response to climate change Zhaosheng Fan a, ? ,

  7. Setting regional ecological goals for roadside management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schutt, Jim

    2001-01-01

    goal. Insects form the base of an intricate food web thatflowering food plants as well as open soil for some insect

  8. Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

  9. Nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. ASTM special technical publication 1350

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.A.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of the symposium was to highlight recent developments in nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. Speakers present results of recent research in these areas that have practical application for the rapid and economical testing of soil and rock. Authors were encouraged to identify which testing equipment and methods have sufficient practical application to warrant standards development.

  10. Digitally controlled simple shear apparatus for dynamic soil testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duku, Pendo M; Stewart, Jonathan P; Whang, Daniel H; Venugopal, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Techniques in Soil Mechanics,” Soils Found. , Vol. 23, No.Experimental Unsaturated Soil Mechanics, A. Taran- tino, E.

  11. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  12. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  13. Ecology, 89(6), 2008, pp. 17231732 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarnelle, Orlando

    on Daphnia clearance rate at low food levels, i.e., evidence of an overall Type III functional responseEcology, 89(6), 2008, pp. 1723­1732 Ó 2008 by the Ecological Society of America TYPE III FUNCTIONAL Aquacultures, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 USA Abstract. The functional response of Daphnia

  14. Water in a Changing World IssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber9,Spring2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    , recreation, and waste disposal. In many regions of the world, the amount and quality of water available-based ecosystems that influence water quality. · At least 90 percent of river flows in the United StatesWater in a Changing World IssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber9,Spring2001

  15. Ecology, 92(5), 2011, pp. 11151125 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Ecology, 92(5), 2011, pp. 1115­1125 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Terrestrial understanding of basal resource use by consumers is limited, because describing trophic pathways in complex food evident. Zooplankton relied on terrestrial and pelagic primary production, while zoobenthos and fishes

  16. Ecology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 21082116 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    succession with climax communities being relatively uncommon. The effects of disturbance frequency mayEcology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 2108­2116 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Wave disturbance pressure (top-down), and storm waves (disturbance) in determining the standing biomass and net primary

  17. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  18. In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, A.H.; Roybal, W.T.; Ortega, R.; Palomares, M.; Rees, D.E.; Tischler, D.

    1996-06-01

    Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors have developed an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants. The authors have conducted a number of benchtop experiments involving RF/microwave energy deposition and vapor extraction on controlled contaminated soil samples with successful removal of the contaminants. This paper will describe the experimental hardware utilized, the experiments performed, the chemical analysis performed pre- and post-energy application, and results. In the experiments, two different halogenated liquids were used to contaminate the soil: carbon tetrachloride and 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

  19. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

  20. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

  1. THE FTL CURRICULUM DEMONSTRATES: 1. The ecological benefits of LID with respect to protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE FTL CURRICULUM DEMONSTRATES: 1. The ecological benefits of LID with respect to protection using Green Infrastructure for stormwater management. In addition, the FTL curriculum demonstrates management context. The FTL curriculum was developed in partnership with the Nonpoint Education for Municipal

  2. HUMAN-AUTOMATION COLLABORATION IN DYNAMIC MISSION PLANNING: A CHALLENGE REQUIRING AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, John D.

    HUMAN-AUTOMATION COLLABORATION IN DYNAMIC MISSION PLANNING: A CHALLENGE REQUIRING AN ECOLOGICAL City, IA The US Navy is funding the development of advanced automation systems to plan and execute unmanned vehicles missions, pushing towards a higher level of autonomy for automated planning systems

  3. ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Developmental Database for Phenology Models: Related Insect and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Developmental Database for Phenology Models: Related Insect and Mite Species of phenology models, we merged a previously published database of thermal requirements for insects, gathered control the development of ectotherms and are used in phenology models to predict time at which

  4. Ecological consequences of dead wood extraction in an arid Diego P. Vzquez,a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez, Diego

    -nesting bees Introduction Extraction activities such as mining, fisheries, logging and harvesting are amongEcological consequences of dead wood extraction in an arid ecosystem1 Diego P. Vázquez,a,b * Juan A development, storing nutrients and water, providing a major source of energy and nutrients, serving

  5. Ecological restoration is increasingly being regarded as one of the primary means of repairing environmen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suski, Cory David

    of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois in Urbana. © 2008 American to the field of restoration ecology. Physiological metrics (e.g., gas exchange, energy transfer and metabolism the development and implementation of effective restoration strategies that recognize the role of habitat quality

  6. Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics CHN F 29.1 Universitätstrasse 16 8092 Zürich dani.or@env.ethz.ch +41 44 633 60 15 Dr. Peter Lehmann Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics Objectives of soil protection major · understand composition and structure of soil · study

  7. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  8. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brouns, Richard A. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Bonner, William F. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  9. Rehabilitating Damaged Urban SoilsRehabilitating Damaged Urban Soils to OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Functionto OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Rehabilitating Damaged Urban SoilsRehabilitating Damaged Urban Soils to OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Functionto OptimizeTree Establishment and Growth & Improve Soil Function Rachel of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences This project is funded in part by theTree Research and Education

  10. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11

    THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Urban and Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form See sampling procedures and mailing instructions on the back of this form. (PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH) SU07 E-444... (7-07) Results will be mailed to this address ONLY Address City Phone County where sampled Name Laboratory # (For Lab Use Only) State Zip Payment (DO NOT SEND CASH). Amount Paid $ SUBMITTED BY: Check Money Order Make Checks Payable to: Soil...

  11. How Does Your Soil Rate? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Jack H.; Mills, J. F.

    1956-01-01

    ~SERVICE G. G. GIBSON. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS THE C $acb . Soil and Water Conservation ! Texas Agricultural Extensio~ 8. Assistant rrotessc 1 Department of A A. & M. College Texas A. & M. College aysrey ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This bulletin has... been written with the desire to give a better understanding of the soil. It is designed as a guide toward a more uniform method of teaching land evaluation. The advice, consultations and suggestions of the agronomists and soil scientists...

  12. Organic Constituents of the Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    materials. As might be expected, those in the excrement are the most resistant to the action of the soil bacteria. Other experiments were made, but the results were similar to this one. SUGARS BY HYDROLYSIS OF SOILS The reducing sugars formed by heating... sheep excrement. The amount of reducing substance, calculated as sugars, produced by heating the soil with la per cent. sulphuric acid varied from .OO2 to .215 per cent. with the average of .058 for 7'7 soils. The nitrogen insoluble in permanganate...

  13. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stands to improve climate modeling Environmental microbiology In 2009, the Department of Energy established the Los Alamos Science Focus Area in Soil Metagenomics & Carbon Cycling...

  14. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  15. Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale GUO-YUE NIU) ABSTRACT The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite computes soil ice content and its modifications to soil hydrologic and thermal properties. However

  16. LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the Marcellus region. Some of those species, such as the green salamander and the snow trillium, have all or most of their populations in areas with a high probability of...

  17. The development of high definition television : an ecology of games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

    2010-01-01

    This study is an analysis of the forces that shaped the overall character of a new US television system, high definition or HDTV, between the early 1980s and 2010, with a primary focus on the period leading up the Federal ...

  18. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Development and Life Table of Acalymma vittatum (Coleoptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    populations. Studies directed at management have considered rhizobacteria (Zehnder et al. 1997), plastic mulch

  19. Microsatellite DNA Development Service | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillionStockpileEqual EmploymentElectricity & Fuel

  20. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbo-contaminated soils, comprehensive report, December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry

    2000-04-01

    The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU), Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. A major focus of this program has been the demonstration of bioremediation techniques to cleanup the soil and sediment associated with a waste lagoon at the Czechowice Oil Refinery (CZOR) in southern Poland. After an expedited site characterization (ESC), treatability study, and risk assessment study, a remediation system was designed that took advantage of local materials to minimize cost and maximize treatment efficiency. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system. The CZOR, our industrial partner for this project, was chosen because of their foresight and commitment to the use of new approaches for environmental restoration. This program sets a precedent for Poland in which a portion of the funds necessary to complete the project were provided by the company responsible for the problem. The CZOR was named by PIOS (State Environmental Protection Inspectorate of Poland) as one of the top 80 biggest polluters in Poland. The history of the CZOR dates back more than 100 years to its establishment by the Vacuum Oil Company (a U.S. company and forerunner of Standard Oil). More than a century of continuous use of a sulfuric acid-based oil refining method by the CZOR has produced an estimated 120,000 tons of acidic, highly weathered, petroleum sludge. This waste has been deposited into three open, unlined process waste lagoons, 3 meters deep, now covering 3.8 hectares. Initial analysis indicated that the sludge was composed mainly of high molecular weight paraffinic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The overall objective of this full-scale demonstration project was to characterize, assess and remediate one of these lagoons. The remediation tested and evaluated a combination of U.S. and Polish-developed biological remediation technologies. Specifically, the goal of the demonstration was to reduce the environmental risk from PAH compounds in soil and to provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. The site was characterized using the DOE-developed Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) methodology. Based on the results of the ESC, a risk assessment was conducted using established U.S. procedures. Based on the results of the ESC and risk assessment, a 0.3-hectare site, the smallest of the waste lagoons, was selected for a modified aerobic biopile demonstration. This Executive Summary and the supporting report and appendices document the activities and results of this cooperative venture.

  1. Soils | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough HeatMccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)Soils

  2. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  3. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  4. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  5. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  6. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  8. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  9. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  10. In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil benchtop experiment overview and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T.

    1996-06-01

    The authors have developed an in-situ process that combines RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove soil contaminants. They have conducted a number of benchtop experiments involving RF/microwave energy deposition and vapor extraction on controlled contaminated soil samples with successful removal of the DNAPL contaminants. This paper will describe the experiments performed and present results.

  11. Determination of diffusion coefficient for unsaturated soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Eeshani

    2005-08-29

    The structures constructed on unsaturated soils are damaged by the movement of the soil underneath. The movement is basically due to the flow of moisture in and out of the soil. This change in moisture also affects the ...

  12. Climatic influences on hillslope soil transport efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schurr, Naomi D. (Naomi Danika)

    2014-01-01

    The soil transport coefficient D represents the relationship between local topographical gradient and soil flux in the landscape evolution model. This work presents new estimates of the soil transport coefficient D at 9 ...

  13. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences ___________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction: This 2007 collection policy review for the Department of Crops and Soil Sciences comes several the Department of Atmospheric and Earth Sciences. Since then, Crops and Soil Sciences has reorganized into three

  14. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an ...

  15. FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

  16. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

  17. DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules June 14, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis...

  18. Ecological Engineering and Sustainability: A New Opportunity for Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stouffer, Daniel B.

    Ecological Engineering and Sustainability: A New Opportunity for Chemical Engineering Daniel B Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, and Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Keywords: ecological engineering, food webs, contaminant

  19. Ecologic niche modeling and spatial patterns of disease transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2006-12-01

    Ecologic niche modeling (ENM) is a growing field with many potential applications to questions regarding the geography and ecology of disease transmission. Specifically, ENM has the potential to inform investigations concerned ...

  20. START HERE 2013 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2013 Annual Report Sections...

  1. START HERE 2014 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2014 Annual Report Sections...

  2. Applicability of 10 CFR 851 to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letter from Bruce Diamond, Assistant General Counsel for Environment, DOE, dated November 24, 2007 to Mr. Bertsch, Director and Professor, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, regarding Savannah Riber Ecology Laboratory's Request for Interpretive Ruling under 10 CFR 851.

  3. Amigo Bob Cantisano: Organic Farming Advisor, Founder, Ecological Farming Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the Ecological Farming Conference at that point? Cantisano:the speakers at that conference? Cantisano: Miguel Altieri.it the Ecological Farming Conference. I can’t remember if it

  4. Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arn084

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendry, Andrew

    stud- ies of ecologically based divergence in mating signals have focused on nonbehavioral traits own size'' rule (Wood and Foote 1996; McKinnon et al. 2004). Another possibility is that ecologically

  5. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14 A willow island 19 April 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #14

  6. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 July 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  7. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 March 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  8. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 January 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  9. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 26 May 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status

  10. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12 Willow sapling 15 February 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #9

  11. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17 Pedro Quintana;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering the time period from

  12. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 June 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  13. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 September 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  14. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 May 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  15. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 11 November 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  16. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 April 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  17. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 December 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  18. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16 Pedro Quintana, Florida 32816 15 June 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report

  19. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 14 February 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  20. Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

    2011-01-04

    Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

  1. The Impact of Soil Sampling Errors on Variable Rate Fertilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Hoskinson; R C. Rope; L G. Blackwood; R D. Lee; R K. Fink

    2004-07-01

    Variable rate fertilization of an agricultural field is done taking into account spatial variability in the soil’s characteristics. Most often, spatial variability in the soil’s fertility is the primary characteristic used to determine the differences in fertilizers applied from one point to the next. For several years the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) to determine the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field, based on existing soil fertility at the site, predicted yield of the crop that would result (and a predicted harvest-time market price), and the current costs and compositions of the fertilizers to be applied. Typically, soil is sampled at selected points within a field, the soil samples are analyzed in a lab, and the lab-measured soil fertility of the point samples is used for spatial interpolation, in some statistical manner, to determine the soil fertility at all other points in the field. Then a decision tool determines the fertilizers to apply at each point. Our research was conducted to measure the impact on the variable rate fertilization recipe caused by variability in the measurement of the soil’s fertility at the sampling points. The variability could be laboratory analytical errors or errors from variation in the sample collection method. The results show that for many of the fertility parameters, laboratory measurement error variance exceeds the estimated variability of the fertility measure across grid locations. These errors resulted in DSS4Ag fertilizer recipe recommended application rates that differed by up to 138 pounds of urea per acre, with half the field differing by more than 57 pounds of urea per acre. For potash the difference in application rate was up to 895 pounds per acre and over half the field differed by more than 242 pounds of potash per acre. Urea and potash differences accounted for almost 87% of the cost difference. The sum of these differences could result in a $34 per acre cost difference for the fertilization. Because of these differences, better analysis or better sampling methods may need to be done, or more samples collected, to ensure that the soil measurements are truly representative of the field’s spatial variability.

  2. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community...

  3. FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips 7922 NW 71st Street the biology and ecology of aquatic algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e

  4. FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: Mondays 4pm-5pm Course Description: The biology and ecology of aquatic algae on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral reefs, rocky

  5. Bird diversity indicates ecological value in urban home prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    have been proven to benefit housing values with little need for nuanced ecological assessmentBird diversity indicates ecological value in urban home prices Michael C. Farmer & Mark C. Wallace are equally valuable. Also some ecologically valuable space appears on private residences, not only public

  6. Advanced Mathematical Ecology -Fall 2013 Math/EEB 681

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics Dr. Chris Remien, NIMBioS Postdoctoral Fellow Meeting Methods for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology by Marc Mangel, Cambridge University Press 2006 We the mathematical aspects of the text, and by a few essays from the recent Encyclopedia of Theoretical Ecology (Alan

  7. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    545 CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 86 could be achieved in that model by assuming that the large amounts of ingested proteins and car to all organisms with implications ranging from energy metabolism, behav- ioral ecology, senescence

  8. Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba Joseph R. Pawlik, Charles D.Amsler, Raphael Ritson chemists have been interested in the novel chemical structures and biological activities of marine natural by diverse marine organisms. Chemi- cal ecology, the study of the natural ecological functions

  9. Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J. ); Ainsworth, Calvin C. ); Driver, Crystal J. ); Cataldo, Dominic A. )

    1998-12-01

    The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control in tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.

  10. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  11. Ecology, 83(8), 2002, pp. 20912096 2002 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, Declan

    1989), species nestedness (Patterson and At- mar 1986), and trait­environment associations (Keddy colonization and were competition-free. These ex- changes touched off a debate in community ecology that has

  12. Ecology, 91(11), 2010, pp. 31893200 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    of a grassland ecosystem to an experimental manipulation of a keystone rodent and domestic livestock ANA D (Cynomys spp.), a keystone burrowing rodent. Understanding the ecological relationships between cattle; grasshoppers; grassland; grazing; herbivores; keystone species; prairie dogs; vegetation. INTRODUCTION

  13. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates was larger than 18 micron. Inter-aggregate pores continued to be the dominant flow pathways even at much smaller spacing; intra-aggregate flow was less than 10% of the total flow when the inter- and intra-aggregate pore sizes were comparable. Such studies are making it possible to identify which model upscaling assumptions are realistic and what computational methods are required for detailed numerical investigation of microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil systems.

  14. The Composition and Properties of Some Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1907-01-01

    What Constitutes Soil Fertility; Causes of Small Crops; Maintaining Soil Fertitlity; Increasing Soil Fertility; Chemical Analysis of Soils; Value of Chemical Analysis; Pot Experiments; The United States Soil Survey; General ...

  15. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  16. Montana State University 1 Department of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    leading to Master of Science degrees in biological sciences. The Master's degree generally requires the Master's and Doctoral level the following areas of study are available: terrestrial and aquatic ecologyBT is required for admission. All qualified students must secure an agreement from a faculty member who

  17. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 22: 301­313, 2000 Published October 26 of the phytoplankton community. This community was dominated by cells, which averaged 77% (range 41 to 98, and might contribute to fueling planktonic communities with the limiting nutrient through regeneration. KEY

  18. Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Cause

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Ecology 22:55-63. Beggs, J. R. , J. S. Rees, R.and Systematics 38:567-593. Beggs, J. R. , R. J. Toft, J. P.Control 44:399-407. Beggs, J. R. , E. G. Brockerhoff, J. C.

  19. Predicting species invasions using ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Vieglais, David A.

    2001-05-01

    ) and commission (including niche space not ,lctually occupied by the 'pecies). Each algorithm for modeling specIes' ecological niches involves a specific com binatiol1 of errors of omission ,md commission. A rel.ltively new approach, called the (;enetic...

  20. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 117­128, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01180 Published and mortality rates of microbes in Lake Erie during thermal stratification and determined how they varied consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 51: 117­128, 2008 1999, DeBruyn et al. 2004), autotrophic

  1. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 195­208, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01190 Published May 19 INTRODUCTION Over the last 20 yr, extensive studies have revealed the crucial roles of microbes of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 51: 195­208, 2008 phylogenetic diversity of microbes (Breitbart et al. 2002

  2. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 64: 51­67, 2011 doi: 10.3354/ame01509 Published to the historic view that microbes are not dispersal-limited (reviewed in Finlay 2002, Foissner 2006). Molecular closely related microbes and such studies do indicate that dispersal of microbial forms can be global (e

  3. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 55­65, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION on the phylogeography of eukaryotic microbes (protists). The first maintains that all microbes, including ciliates, have or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 41: 55­65, 2005 ing

  4. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 49­54, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION Microbial species appear to have cosmopolitan distribution. With respect to eukaryotic microbes of the Earth provided that particular habitat requirements are met. The distribution of microbes does

  5. Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Ecosystem Science Reserve; East Bethel, MN (approx. 35 miles north of the Twin Cities). For more information ecology and environmental issues. Topics include a survey of general ecosystem and community level Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve located approximately 35 miles north of the Twin Cities in East Bethel

  6. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 45: 181­194, 2006 Published November 24.g. by maximizing their energy gain or avoiding harmful food. It is well documented that selective predation in pelagic habi- tats structures the microbial community (Pernthaler 2005). Less is known of interactions

  7. Introduction to Theme "Genomics in Ecology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Introduction to Theme "Genomics in Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics" H. Bradley Shaffer1, Los Angeles, California 90095; email: brad.shaffer@ucla.edu 2 Center for Genomics and Systems Biology.1146/annurev-ecolsys-081913-123118 Copyright c 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords genome

  8. INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

  9. Five Differences Between Ecological and Economic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2011-08-29

    Ecological and economic networks have many similarities and are often compared. However, the comparison is often more apt as metaphor than a direct equivalence. In this paper, five key differences are explained which should inform any analysis which compares the two.

  10. Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE 1982-83 EL NINO 30602 ABSTRACT Duffy, D.C., 1989. Seabirds and the 1982-1984 El Nino-Southern Oscillation The 1982-1984 El Nino and associated events affected seabirds in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Effects ranged

  11. Environmental science and ecology involve studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    Environmental science and ecology involve studies of the biosphere, hydro- sphere, and lithosphere in environmental science is conducted on spatial scales varying from a single algal cell to the Earth as a whole's environmental scientists require investigation by an interdisciplinary team, including members from several

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis; Anderson, David; Derek, Hall; Greger, Paul; Ostler, W. Kent

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  13. Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    11/19/2014 1 Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands Example Some Historical;11/19/2014 2 Charadriformes: gulls, terns Anseriformes: marine ducks, geese and swans Other birds Location of island Distant photo of island #12;11/19/2014 3 Western Gull The gull colony on the marine terrace

  14. Relationship between Anisotropy in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is saturation-dependent. Accurate characterization of soil anisotropy is very important in simulating flow and contaminant (e.g., radioactive nuclides in Hanford) transport. A recently developed tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept describes the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the unsaturated anisotropic soils as the product of a scalar variable, the symmetric connectivity tortuosity tensor, and the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation. In this study, the TCT model is used to quantify soil anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The TCT model can describe different types of soil anisotropy; e.g., the anisotropy coefficient, C, can be monotonically increase or decrease with saturation and can vary from greater than unity to less than unity and vice versa. Soil anisotropy is independent of soil water retention properties and can be characterized by the ratio of the saturated hydraulic conductivities and the difference of the tortuosity-connectivity coefficients in two directions. ln(C) is linearly proportional to ln(Se) with Se being the effective saturation. The log-linear relationship between C and Se allows the saturation-dependent anisotropy to be determined using linear regression with the measurements of the directional hydraulic conductivities at a minimum of two water content levels, of which one may be at full saturation. The model was tested using measurements of directional hydraulic conductivities.

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  16. Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs. Version 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, H.N. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8.

  17. Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under mass. The model includes both sediment transport and chemical denudation. A simplified two-phase model is developed; the two phases are a chemically immobile phase, which has far lower solubility than the bulk soil

  18. Tenax as sorption sink for in vitro bioaccessibility measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Tenax as sorption sink for in vitro bioaccessibility measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils Chao Li a , XinÀYi Cui a, * , YingÀYing Fan a , Ying Teng b , ZhongÀRen Nan c , Lena Q based in vitro methods have been developed to measure bioaccessibility of organic contaminants in soils

  19. 1 INTRODUCTION Expansive soils have a major source of damages to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    on the per- formance of the geosynthetic reinforcements as a technique to mitigate the development research studies have been conducted to predict the behavior of ex- pansive soils, the field behavior control, ac- cess to water for expansive soils in the field is very uncertain (Coduto 2001

  20. ECOLOGICAL JUSTICE IN THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    for inclusion of nuclear power as a GHG mitigation option. We regard current proposals for emission trading, joint implementation and `clean development' to be examples of airy politics in which Annex I profit of nuclear power as a GHG mitigation alternative are characterized as oxymoronic policy that will mean little