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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites Mike Duniway USGS-Southwest Biological Science of vegetation? Why do sites differ in response to disturbance & management? #12;Ecological Sites & Soil Properties ∑ Within a climatic zone (e.g. MLRA), differentiation of ecological sites based on soil

2

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 7188 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 71­88 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition. Spongberg Department of Earth, Ecological and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 for quantification of ecological impact of chemical contamination of soils. This study examined the effects

Neher, Deborah A.

3

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on management (states) (1) (2) (3) (4) (6) (5) #12;State and transition models, by definition, include soil #12;Part II. Ecological sites and state and transition models: A framework for soil and vegetation dynamics and management #12;The soil survey is the foundation of the ecological site inventory process

4

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Survey Part II. A Framework for Soil and Vegetation Dynamics Arlene Tugel, Soil Scientist Liaison to ARS, USDA-NRCS Las Cruces, NM and the Soils-ESD Advisory Group #12;What makes a site a site? Soil forming factors: climate, parent, material, biotic factors

5

Managing Our Grandchildren's Forests: The Role of Soil Biology and Soil Ecology1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter and energy, water and nutrients, organic matter, and gases. Soils within forest ecosystems supportManaging Our Grandchildren's Forests: The Role of Soil Biology and Soil Ecology1 James R. Boyle2 The papers of this volume provide some "nuggets" of insight into the complexity of soil biology and its

Standiford, Richard B.

6

Soil Survey and Ecological Sites: Integrated Map Unit Design and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensity Methods Map units Order 1 Grid mapping 2 (detailed) Confirm boundary and components 3 (broad) Confirm dominant components 4 Reconnaissance #12;Intensity Methods Map units Order 1 Grid mapping SingleSoil Survey and Ecological Sites: Integrated Map Unit Design and Interpretation Arlene J. Tugel

7

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE-BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER EROSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE- BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER change and intensification have resulted in accelerated rates of soil erosion in many areas of the world quantification of accelerated soil erosion. Ecological site soil erosion Variation in the simulated erosion rates

8

Applied Soil Ecology 18 (2001) 3945 Demography of Paronychiurus kimi (Lee) (Collembola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Soil Ecology 18 (2001) 39­45 Demography of Paronychiurus kimi (Lee) (Collembola Seokyoung Kang, Won II Choi, Mun II Ryoo Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering are important biological components of soil ecological systems (Crossley et al., 1992; Seastedt, 1984). Changes

Neher, Deborah A.

9

Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late-than early-successional stage biological soil crusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late- than early-successional stage biological soil crusts Brian J. Darby a,*, Deborah A. Neher a , Jayne Belnap b a Department of Plant and Soil; accepted 12 April 2006 Abstract Biological soil crusts are key mediators of carbon and nitrogen inputs

Neher, Deborah A.

10

Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Service; Justin Klure, Oregon Wave Energy Trust; Greg McMurray, Oregon Department of Land Conservation

11

A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

Suter, G.W. II

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Redefining ecological engineering to promote its integration with sustainable development and tighten its links with the whole of ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Redefining ecological engineering to promote its integration with sustainable development and tighten its links with the whole of ecology Fr√©d√©ric Gosselin Institute for Agricultural and Environmental in "Ecological Engineering", vol. 32, n¬į3, pp.199-205 (doi: 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2007.11.007). Available at http

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability DeBETAbility: Is the Beta House Ecologically Sustainable?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BETAbility: Is the Beta House Ecologically Sustainable? Ada Cheung, Candy Cheung, Sapna Dilgir, Dallas Parsons, Jessica for the implementation of more ecologically sustainable practices at the Beta House, we recommend that the membersUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability De

14

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

Friday, G. P.

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development the capacity to harvest wave energy off its coast as a clean, renewable resource. An important part of moving this agenda forward must include understanding the potential effects of wave energy technology

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

16

2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Bruce Herbert (O) 979-845-2405 herbert@geo.tamu.edu #12;Heather R. Miller 2004-05 TWRI Mills 2 Water2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge Heather R. Miller Department

Herbert, Bruce

17

Excavated soil reuse Development of a French management framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Environment asked BRGM and INERIS to draft a methodological guidance document related to the off-site reuse values. Excavated soil off-site reuse methodology The presentation will focus on the main principlesTex, concerns groundwater risk assessment. It was developed to verify that the off- site reuse of excavated soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Nick Gaguano  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCAUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Nick Gaguano Fred Kaiser .........................................................8 System Boundary

19

Ecological effects of oil shale development: problems, perspectives, and approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although current oil shale developments in the Piceance Basin appear to have had little impact on ecosystems, it is important to recognize that planned expansion of the industry in the Basin will greatly magnify the potential for serious perturbations of the Piceance environs. The relatively small scale of the present oil shale activities in the Basin provides the biologist with a unique opportunity to establish and conduct quantitative studies designed to measure impacts as they occur. This paper is intended to focus attention on some of the problems, perspectives and recommended approaches to conducting ecosystem effects studies that will provide criteria for evaluation and mitigation of impacts should they occur. The purpose of this paper is not to criticize past and current environmental studies on oil shale, but in light of anticipated growth of the industry, to focus attention on the need to carefully define, design and execute ecological effects studies to quantify and provide mitigation criteria for impacts that will undoubtedly result from accelerated industry activities.

Hakonson, T.E.; White. G.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991... Major Subject: Civil Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE SOIL GAS FLUX SAMPLER A Thesis by BRIAN C. McQUOWN Approved as to style and content by: Stuart A. a terman (Co-chair of Committee) Andrew . cFa land (Member) Bill Batchelor (Co...

McQuown, Brian C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scale. The group has developed a tool by which sustainability of the UBC campus may be periodically defined "sustainable development as `development that meets the needs of the present without compromisingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing

23

Crisis, education to sustainable development and eco-citizenship behaviours : example of ecological mobility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crisis, education to sustainable development and eco-citizenship behaviours : example of ecological l'Universitť de Provence, 04000 Digne The contribution deals with topic 1 ę sustainable development of sustainable development in territories: change in problematic or contextual hiccup. Summary: Nowadays

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

24

Developing a Soil Property Database for the Oklahoma Mesonet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to create a comprehensive database of soil hydraulic and physical properties of the Oklahoma Mesonet station soils. Replicate soilÖ (more)

Scott, Bethany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Applied Soil Ecology 23 (2003) 187198 Species diversity and spatial distribution of enchytraeid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

communities in forest soils: effects of habitat characteristics and heavy metal contamination Pawel Kapusta but was not influenced by heavy metal content in soil. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords of anthropogenic impacts (such as pollution) upon the structure and ecosystem function of biotic communi- ties

Weiner, January

26

UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2, one closely tied to conservation. Sustainable development has been famously defined by the Brundtland The Oxford English Dictionary defines `Sustainable' as, "able to be upheld or defended; able to be maintained

27

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainability initiatives, working with UBC Food Services and AMS Food Services to develop and conduct marketUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability Mandy Cheng, Sara Harrison, Andria Lam, Cristina Machial, Lena Syrovy, Diana

28

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report ZHENGXIANG QIU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report ZHENGXIANG QIU Life Cycle ≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA of the inputs, outputs and potential impacts of the building system throughout its life cycle, being regarded

29

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Weicen Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Weicen Wang LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT - Wesbrook Building CIVL 498C November 18UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Weicen Wang LIFE CYCLE

30

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT -CENTER FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findingsUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report JIAN SUN LIFE CYCLE which has one of the largest life cycle inventory database in North America. Assumptions and According

31

Ecology 2004 18, 584591  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional Ecology 2004 18, 584­591 © 2004 British Ecological Society 584 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. WEICHT,* D. L. MOORHEAD* and R. L. SINSABAUGH* *Department of Earth, Ecological and Environmental productivity, soil respiration Functional Ecology (2004) 18, 584­591 Introduction Net ecosystem responses

Neher, Deborah A.

32

Ecology 2005 93, 231243  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 231­243 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS Darkness visible: reflections on underground ecology A. H. FITTER Department of Biology Journal of Ecology (2005) 93, 231­243 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2005.00990.x Soil, science and civilization

Bruns, Tom

33

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Reusable Food Containers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by researching and utilizing various green and sustainable ideas. One of these ideas involves the installationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation..................................................................................................................................... 21 #12;2 Abstract With the future construction of the new Student Union Building (SUB), Alma Mater

34

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Sustainable Water Consumption -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in green building design projects. As part of the new Student Union Building project, the Alma MaterUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Sustainable Water Consumption - Water Bottles versus WaterFillz Units Alireza Tavassoli, Yee Chung Wong, Sina

35

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets Beyond Climate Neutral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets ..................................................................................................................................... 27 Abstract With the increase in global energy use there has been a subsequent increase in greenhouse of qualitative interviews with key stakeholders. Key findings include the low supply of local food, the need

36

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water consumption: drinking from the tap. The reasoning behind this is a lack of awareness and promotionUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Water Consumption This report outlines how Sustainability Marketing practices can be used to reduce

37

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EXPLORING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EXPLORING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN Tabassum Firoz, Emily Kwan, Doris Lo, Cynthia Mak, Karyn Schnick, Sally Shum, Jia THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN AGSC 450 April 3, 2002 Group 12 Tabassum Firoz Emily Kwan Doris Lo Cynthia Mak Karyn

38

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Effect of Selenium-treated Alfalfa on Development, Survival, Feeding,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Effect of Selenium-treated Alfalfa on Development, Survival 92521 Environ. Entomol. 31(6): 953√ź959 (2002) ABSTRACT We examined the effect of irrigating alfalfa. Alfalfa was grown in sand cultures under three levels of sodium selenate irrigation: (1) control

Trumble, John T.

39

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purposes. A life cycle assessment (LCA) was carried out on two of the event arenas built for the 2010UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle AssessmentC: Life Cycle Assessment Report Thunderbird Old Arena Group Members: Dennis Fan, Sean Geyer, Hillary

40

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into the Wheat Straw Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pulping is the black liquor residue. Regarding the black liquor, a by-product of wheat straw pulping, Vibratory Shear Enhanced Process (VSEP) shows that lignin and hemicelluloses can be extracted from the blackUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Science 450 Fence Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Science 450 University of British Columbia AGSC 450 April 10, 2009 Disclaimer: "UBC SEEDS provides students Science 450 Fence Report Group 2 Alexander Changfoot Stephanie Chung Shawn Johnston Stephanie Tai Brian Wu

42

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recycling rate of 59%, with 43% operational waste diversion. Operational waste1 diversion targets are 70 considered: organics, mixed paper, returnable containers, cardboard, e-waste, construction materials (butUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning

43

Development of a Soil Conservation Standard and Guidelines for OHV Recreation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Soil Conservation Standard and Guidelines for OHV Recreation Management, Sacramento, CA 95814 Key Terms: OHV Management, Soil Conservation Guidelines, Erosion Control, Applied Recreation Management also allowed for sustainability of trail systems and recreation opportunities. A key

Ahmad, Sajjad

44

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste, Conserving Natural Resources: Composting Toilets for the New SUB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................................................13 Designing for sustainability: green buildingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Diverting Waste­2008)........................................................................................................35 Appendix C: Maintenance manual for C.K. Choi Building at UBC .....................................41

45

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System: Indicators in the Measurement of Sustainability The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System: Indicators in the Measurement of Sustainability The Sustainability of UBC Food System Collaborative Project System: Indicators in the Measurement of Sustainability The Sustainability of UBC Food System

46

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Demand Side Strategies for Energy Efficiency in University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a project/report". #12;DEMAND&SIDE)STRATEGIES)FOR)ENERGY)EFFICIENCY) INUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Demand Side Strategies for Energy Efficiency in University of British Columbia Residences Jennifer Clark, Nate Croft, Liam Fast

47

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Transportation: UBC Athletic Events as an agent of change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inter-Faculty Cup ­ Athletics and Sustainable Campus Living ExpoUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable from dan-dare.org Sustainable Transportation: UBC Athletic Events as an agent of change Erin Brophy

48

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of UBC Food System Collaborative Project II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of UBC, indicators were developed to assess the sustainability of the food system. Furthermore, we developed of a project/report". #12;The Sustainability of UBC Food System Collaborative Project II Group Three

50

Development Of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes And Results Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meter Soil Temperature Probes And Results Of Temperature Survey Conducted At Desert Peak, Nevada, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

51

Ecological improvement and sustainable development in European skiing resorts by adapting the EU-Eco-Audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The range of environmental problems in European skiing resorts caused by winter sports, agriculture and summer tourism are all well known. The issues and management challenges relate to sensitive ecological conditions, construction activities, deficiencies in visitor management and an land use conflicts during summer. One new approach to manage these problems is the EU-Eco-Audit. In test sites in Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Austria a successful adaptation of the EU-Eco-Audit framework to ski resorts has been developed. The implementation of the Audit framework at these test sites led to positive effects concerning visitor and ecological management. One influencing factor for the future development is the positive public image concerning environmental aspects. Crucial to the implementation of the Eco-Audit-framework is whether it will assist ski resorts in their competition with other destiantions for hosting international events. Finally the acceptance of the certificates or awards by skiers is discussed. It will be argued that due to the increasing relevance of information provision and marketing of wintersport destinations via the internet, the auditing or award concept contributes to a positive image of these enterprises and destinations in the market place. 2

Ulrike PrŲbstl

52

Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils M. Dall limiting performance of alfalfa (Medicago saliva L.) in many parts of the world, but neither an effective different screening methods for selection of acid soil tolerant alfalfa germplasms in the greenhouse during

Parrott, Wayne

53

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ahmed Attieh, Andrew Chutskoff, Brandon Clague, Jonathan Bridle, Tyler Hawkins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an example of UBC's commitment to sustainability, climate change action, and green building innovationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ahmed Attieh, Andrew to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings

54

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability Of The Ubc Food System: Collaborative Project II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability asked to develop a model to assess the sustainability of the UBC Food System. Specifically, we have to of a project/report". #12;1 THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE UBC FOOD SYSTEM: COLLABORATIVE PROJECT II Agricultural

55

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The informationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2 | P a g e Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building CIVL 498E

56

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Roach, Chris Forrest, Jedaiah van Dijk, Jessica Herman, Joseph Kim, Ricky Sangha,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Roach, Chris ( Ricky Sangha ( )Svyatoslav Korshunov ( Joseph Kim ( Andrew Roach ( #12;ii Rainwater Harvesting System

57

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Roach, Chris Forrest, Jedaiah van Dijk, Jess Herman, Ricky Sangha, Svyatoslav Korshunov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Roach, Chris #3 Andrew Roach Chris Forrest ( Jedaiah van Dijk ( Jess Herman ( Ricky Sangha ( Svyatoslav Korshunov

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual soil respiration Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 4 Summary Soil respiration is controlled by soil temperature, soil water, fine roots, microbial activity, and soil physical and Summary: into the model; and...

59

Development of an Fe efficiency screening procedure for sorghum based on realistic soil parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF AN FE EFFICIENCY SCREENING PROCEDURE FOR SORGHUH BASED ON REAl ISTIC SOIL PARAHETERS A Thesis by FRANCISCO HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of HASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Hajor Subject: Agronomy DEVELOPMENT OF AN FE EFFICIENCY SCREENING PROCEDURE FOR SORGHUM BASED ON REALISTIC SOIL PARAMETERS A Thesis by Francisco Hernandez Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Hernandez, Francisco

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into New SUB Rooftop Garden Irrigations Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the new SUB roof. When it comes to sustainability, having the building be as green as possible into sustainability. The amount of water saved within the 100 year life span of the new SUB building is crucialUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into New

62

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Composting in the SUB vs. Composting via UBC Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Composting in the SUB vs. Composting via UBC Waste Management Ian Loo, Kelvin Siu, Kevin Brooks University of British Columbia APSC261 the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;APSC 261 Sustainability Project Composting

63

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability Research Proposal for the UBC Food System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability Research of a project/report". #12;Sustainability Research Proposal for the UBC Food System AGSC 450 Group Members, UBC's Food Sustainability Project 1 of 25 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Abstract

64

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Filtration of Cistern-collected Rainwater for the New SUB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Filtration of Cistern-collected RainwaterUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Filtration of Cistern-collected Rainwater for the New SUB Junggil Park Moowon Choi Sungjin Woo University of British Columbia APSC 262 March

65

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope 4/16/2010 Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn corn as well as corn stover in comparision to petroleum fuels. A Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) using the Ga

66

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

67

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Power to the People: New Student Union Building Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Power to the People: New to power a variety of low input power devices, such as lights or speakers without any additional help from compete against one another to see who could generate the most power. To promote student

68

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EMPOWERING EATERS TO MAKE CLIMATE-FRIENDLY CHOICES: A PUBLIC EDUCATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Website Interactive GameError! Bookmark not defined. #12;3 #12;4 ABSTRACT The UBC Food System Project stakeholders from the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems (CSFS) at UBC Farm and the 100-Mile Diet SocietyUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EMPOWERING EATERS TO MAKE

69

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy Conservation and Behaviour Change Opportunities at UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy Conservation of this were used to recommend how best to motivate staff to decrease their energy conservation consumption and empirical studies of behaviour change and energy conservation was undertaken to better understand

70

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Centre for Sustainable Information Management: A Business Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/documents management. #12;The Centre for Sustainable Information Management (CSIM): A Business Plan iii The design of the CSIM building will be Gold Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified. The facilityUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Centre for Sustainable

71

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Sciences 450 The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Sciences 450, Sandy Lee, Erin McMillan, Andrew Smith, Lysa Wone University of British Columbia AGSC 450 March 31, 2004 of a project/report". #12;Agricultural Sciences 450 The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Collaborative

72

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Alex Imbault, C. Jacob Fountain, Dawn-Marie Barreira, Wendy Tsai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Alex Imbault, C. Jacob with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect

73

Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J. [GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD (United States); Grant, D.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into The Social, Ecological, and Economic Factors To Conisder When  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Into The Social, Ecological, and Economic Factors To Conisder When Planning Sustainble Housing Michael Lanki INTO THE SOCIAL, ECOLOGICAL, AND ECONOMIC FACTORS TO CONISDER WHEN PLANNING SUSTAINBLE HOUSING Prepared, and educating people on sustainability. Key ecological criteria are reduction of green house gases, reduction

75

Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

Beas, Rodrigo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Culturally Appropriate Building Designs for First Nations at UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Ecological) assessment was conducted for the Plank House, Pit-House, and Wigam. Special considerationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation different styles of Aboriginal housing design, with focus placed on designs that could be considered

77

www.frontiersinecology.org The Ecological Society of America In the 1930s, the US Soil Conservation Service grew 85  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Service grew 85 million kudzu (Pueraria lobata) seedlings and encour- aged farmers to plant them to control soil erosion. By 1950, kudzu had escaped cultivation and was creeping across the American 1­3 million ha and has been dubbed "the vine that ate the South". Kudzu can be controlled

Sanders, Nathan J.

78

CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction USDA, Natural Resources of the soil, the vegetation, the water, and the air as well as the ecological processes of the rangeland ecosystem are balanced and sustained. What is soil? Soil is a dynamic resource that supports plants

80

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report APSC 261 Sustainability Project An Investigation Into the Use of Cob and/or Straw Bale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report APSC 261 Sustainability, Rebecca Guo, Zi Zhang Source: Green Building Elements Project An Investigation Into the Use of Cob and/or Straw Bale Construction in Non-residential Buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cyanide leaching from soil developed from coking plant purifier waste as influenced by citrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils in the vicinity of manufactured gas plants and coal coking plants are often highly contaminated with cyanides in the form of the compound Prussian blue. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of citrate on the leaching of iron-cyanide complexes from an extremely acidic soil (pH 2.3) developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking plant. The soil contained 63 g kg{sup -1} CN, 148 g kg{sup -1} Fe, 123 g kg{sup -1} S, and 222 g kg{sup -1} total C. Analysis of the soil by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of Prussian blue, gypsum, elemental sulfur, jarosite, and hematite. For column leaching experiments, air-dried soil was mixed with purified cristabolite sand at a ratio of 1:3 and packed into chromatography columns. The soil was leached with dilute (0.1 or 1 mM) CaCl{sub 2} solutions and the effluent was collected and analyzed for total and dissolved CN, Ca, Fe, SO{sub 4}, pH, and pe. In the absence of citrate, the total dissolved CN concentration in the effluent was always below current drinking water limits (< 1.92 {mu}M), indicating low leaching potential. Adding citrate at a concentration of 1 mM had little effect on the CN concentrations in the column effluent. Addition of 10 or 100 mM citrate to the influent solution resulted in strong increases in dissolved and colloidal CN concentrations in the effluent.

Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Soil Science and Soil Ecology Group, Faculty of Geosciences

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Wheat Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most important reasons why wheat paper is more sustainable than 30% recycled paper. The total carbon to Tons Conversion 11 Equation 3: Price of Paper per Ton 12 #12;5 GLOSSARY by-product - A product made, soils, ocean, or underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams and saline aquifers. minimum

85

Soils in the Riparian Incorporating Soil Dynamics into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposits or upland slope wash · Soil particle size reflect the energy (velocity) of depositionalSoils in the Riparian Complex Incorporating Soil Dynamics into Ecological Site Descriptions Kenneth F. Scheffe, SSS August 16, 2007 #12;Water Changes Everything · Water is the trump card over soils

86

Ecology 2006 94, 342354  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

populations in impacted habitats. In recent decades the grass Phragmites australis has been aggressively, Phragmites australis, recruitment limitation, sedimentation, seedling establishment Journal of Ecology (2006. 2 Our objective was to quantify how P. australis modifies the abiotic (soil and light conditions

Bertness, Mark D.

87

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002) Climate Change Mitigation in Developing Countries:climate change mitigation and adaptation in developing countries (climate change mitigation and adaptation programs in developing countries.

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Development of a Method for Predictively Simulating Penetration of a Low Speed Impactor into a Weak Cohesionless Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geotextile barrier system that utilizes soil as ballast to prevent ballistic or vehicular impacts LSTC Livermore Software Technology Corporation LS-DYNA A complex non-linear explicit FEA software package developed by LSTC to simulate complex high rate non...

Arrington, Dusty Ray

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Brandon Green, Jason Tam, Jeremy Jin, Kai Marder, Kevin Preston, Sam Eichenberger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Brandon Green, Jason Tam of sustainability, a concept embedded in the visions of UBC and UBCBG for greener buildings and infrastructure Research on Sustainability) Building. The system consists of the following: 1200 m2 roof to collect

90

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Ubc Farm: Essential To The Sustainability Of The Food System At The University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Ubc Farm: Essential To The Sustainability Of The Food System At The University Of British Columbia Laureen Cesar, Amy Fung, Craig Hewett TO THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE FOOD SYSTEM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA March 31, 2004 AGSC 450/001 Group 14

91

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8-Perceptions of UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8- Perceptions of UBC Customers regarding the price of food at UBC Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8- Perceptions of UBC Customers regarding the price

92

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AGSC 450: Scenario 8 Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Food System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AGSC 450: Scenario 8 Henley, Day Kwok, Edith Ng, Stacy Robins, Marc Turcotte University of British Columbia AGSC 450 April 2 the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;1 AGSC 450: Scenario 8 ≠ Assessing

93

Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

Payne, Suzette

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Exploring the effects of local development regulations on ecological landscape structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in urban planning and design. The interrelated issues of growth management, smart growth, sustainable development, and new urbanism are topics in the most vibrant discussions at all levels of planning and landscape architecture. Within this context...

Kim, Jin Ki

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Amir Mehdi Dehkhoda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Biodiesel Production by Amir Mehdi Dehkhoda B.Sc., Sharif University of Technology, 2008 A THESIS SUBMITTED Developing Biochar-Based Catalyst for Biodiesel Production CHBE 599 August 01, 2010 126 1061 University

96

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Travis Wade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRYPHON: LCA of electric vs. diesel all-terrain vehicles CEEN 523 December 11, 2013 999 1453 University, Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report PROJECT GRYPHON: LCA of electric vs. diesel all-terrain vehicles ............................................................................................. 7 3 Diesel Vehicle

97

Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organic carbon from peat soils. Nature 412 , 785. Fried,Plant Litter. Standard Soil Methods for Long-Term Ecological2007). Role of proteins in soil carbon and nitrogen storage:

Torn, M.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Raza Jaffery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Sustainability (CIRS) located on 2210 West Mall; is one of the greenest buildings in British Columbia at its time of construction - developed primarily in response to the challenge of creating a more sustainable society. The LCA building and further pave the ways for similar future ventures. Although first of its kind study of a Green

99

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Alex Biczok  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA: This report contains the results of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) performed on the Hennings Building Cycle Assessment (LCA) is to quantify the material and energy inputs into a product or product system

100

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2013 CIVL498 C Ian Eddy LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF THE FOREST SCIENCE CENTER

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrew Russell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;1 Life Cycle Assessment Improvements of Frederic Lasserre Building at University of British Previous cradle to gate life cycle assessment work on the Frederic Lasserre building of UBC

102

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Kendrick Carnes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT Level 3 Building Elements of the Douglas Kenny Building Kendrick Carnes CIVL 498C #12;Page 1 Executive Summary Life Cycle Assessment is the only tool in which decisions regarding

103

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Allard Hall LCA Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA, are detailed in this report. A life cycle assessment was performed previously for this building, also;1 Executive Summary This report is the final project for CIVL 498C, Life Cycle Analysis, which is being taken

104

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Malek Charif  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA.e. to conduct a limited Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), of assigned building. In this case, the object at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;A Life Cycle Assessment of UBC ICICS Building A Report Submitted in Partial

105

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Joshua Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA Summary This study, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the Earth Sciences Building (ESB) serves t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a Life Cycle Assessment: Earth Sciences Building #12;ii Executive

106

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Henrique Falck Grimm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings of the Mathematics Building Henrique Falck Grimm Course: CIVL 498C ≠ Life Cycle Assessment Instructor: Rob Sianchuk of buildings, conducting a LCA study through the whole life cycle, including use and end-of-life stages

107

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Jericho Velarde  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT H.R. MacMillan, University of British Columbia Cycle Analysis (LCA) of the H.R. MacMillan building is done in order to assess the environmental impact

108

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cayley Van Hemmen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;i Life Cycle Assessment of The Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Cycle Assessment of The Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building CIVL 498C November 18, 2013 1065 1531

109

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cassie Tesche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information Building, University of British Columbia Life Cycle Assessment ≠ Final Report CIVL 498C November 18, 2013.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;11/18/2013 Chemistry Building, University of British Columbia Life Cycle Assessment ≠ Final Report

110

Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Examining The Impact of Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) on Student Writing Developed Through Web-Based Ecological Inquiry Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inquiry report components using a grading criteria instrument and (2) explored how the revision process influenced the quality of ecological inquiry report components through text analysis. A web-based science inquiry project was implemented in a large...

Robledo, Denise

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However...

Duncan, Roxanne

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Woodland development and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics and storage in a subtropical savanna ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

succession over the past century to subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by C3 trees/shrubs. To elucidate mechanisms of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total N (STN) storage and dynamics in this ecosystem, I measured the mass and isotopic composition...

Liao, Julia Den-Yue

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

116

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ecology of Ecotourism Spring, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR 4934: Ecology of Ecotourism Spring, 2014 Room 106 Rogers Hall Monday Periods 6-8 (12:50 to 3 with an understanding of the management and planning of ecotourism opportunities. Specific learning outcomes include recreation and tourism development; · understand ecological impacts and ecotourism management approaches

Watson, Craig A.

118

Developing effective removal of caesium, strontium and uranium from contaminated soils and sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their migration from the source. One of the handful of contaminated soil and water remediation technologies being (National Nuclear Laboratory Ltd.) Nuclear materials processing has produced a large and complex legacy of radioactively contaminated ground (1, 2) . An immediate priority is the remediation of high activity fission

Burke, Ian

119

CarbBirch (KolbjŲrk): Carbon sequestration and soil development under mountain birch (Betula pubescens) in rehabilitated areas in southern Iceland.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Understanding soil change when restoring severely degraded land is important to be able to determine when and if the ecosystem services that Ďhealthyí soilÖ (more)

Kolka-Jonsson, Pall Valdimar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology'' By Andruid Kerne dissertation submitted partial addresses browsing creatively, been co­developed with the metadisciplinary framework interface ecology, in addition inside them, open process without definite bounds. a metadiscipline, interface ecology brings

Mohri, Mehryar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid and Maria Fernandez-Gimenez This paper discusses developments in our understanding about rangeland ecology and rangeland dynamics in the last 20 years. Before the late 1980's, the mainstream view in range ecology was that livestock

122

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

Wang, Z. Jane

123

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Balancing the Need to Develop Coastal Areas with the Desire for an Ecologically Functioning Coastal Environment: Is Net Ecosystem Improvement Possible?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global human population is growing exponentially, a majority lives and works near the coast, and coastal commerce and development are critical to the economies of many nations. Hence, coastal areas will continue to be a major focus of development and economic activity. People want and need the economics provided by coastal development but they also want and need the fisheries and social commodities supported by estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Because of these facts, we view the challenge of balancing coastal development with enhancing nearshore marine and estuarine ecosystems (i.e., net ecosystem improvement) as the top priority for coastal researchers in this century. Our restoration research in Pacific Northwest estuaries and participation in the design and mitigation of nearshore structures has largely dealt with these competing goals. To this end, we have applied conceptual models, comprehensive assessment methods, and principles of restoration ecology, conservation biology and adaptive management to incorporate science into decisions about use of estuarine systems. Case studies of Bainbridge Island and the Columbia River demonstrate the use of objective, defensible methods to prioritize estuarine areas for preservation, conservation and restoration. Case studies of Clinton, WA and Port Townsend, WA demonstrate the incorporation of an ecological perspective and technological solutions into design projects that affect the nearshore. Adaptive management has allowed coastal development and restoration uncertainties to be better evaluated, with the information used to improve management decisions. Although unproven on a large scale, we think that these kinds of methods can contribute to the net improvement of already degraded ecosystems. The challenges include applied science to understand the issues, education, incentives, empirical data (not rehashing of reviews), cumulative impact analysis, and an effective adaptive management program. Because the option of net ecosystem improvement is often more costly than other alternatives, commitment by the local or regional community to this approach is essential.

Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Designing for ecology : the ecological park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

Power, Andres M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Radiation site cleanup regulations: Technical support document for the development of radionuclide cleanup levels for soil. Review draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents EPA`s approach to assessing some of the beneficial and adverse radiation health effects associated with various possible values for an annual dose limit. In particular, it discusses the method developed to determine how the choice of cleanup criterion affects (1) the time-integrated numbers of non-fatal and fatal radiogenic cancers averted among future populations, (2) the occurrence of radiogenic cancers among remediation workers and the public caused by the cleanup process itself, and (3) the volume of contaminated soil that may require remediation.

Wolbarst, A.B.; Mauro, J.; Anigstein, R.; Back, D.; Bartlett, J.W.

1994-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) were established in the 1930s to develop comprehensive programs and plans to conserve soil resources, control and prevent soil erosion, prevent floods...

128

Plant Ecology An Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

129

1 INTRODUCTION Researches in unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION Researches in unsaturated soil mechanics considerably developed in the past decades exchanges during shearing were also monitored, and Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics Pierre Delage- mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Stellenbosch University ecological network research (Mondi Ecological Network Programme (MENP) Ecological networks (ENs) reduce the isolation of populations helps to prevent ecological relaxation (the loss of ecological systems and interactions) and so prevents

Geldenhuys, Jaco

131

Soils and agricultural development in the region of Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The process of agricultural development and its related problems is. a serious economic difficulty facing the developing countries throughout the world. In Saudi Arabia suchÖ (more)

Al-Jerash, Mohammed Abdullah

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

An ethnographic investigation of the evolving dynamics of a learning ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecologies, cognitive artifacts, expertise development, environmentally- coupled gestures, situated activity, technology appropriation, adaptive change, perception

Becvar, Laura Amaya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Forest ecology Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

Johnson, Edward A.

135

Ecology and environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

Sussex, University of

136

DESCRIBING PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATION ISSUES IN HANFORD SOILS: DEVELOPMENT OF A THERMODYNAMIC SURFACE COMPLEXATION MODEL.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The development of remediation strategies for long-term site management requires knowledge of an actinide's geochemical behavior. Understanding this behavior can lead to the formation ofÖ (more)

Herr, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Valuation of ecological resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Complexity, Ecology, Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Surface Soil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

140

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The carbon sequestration potential of three common turfgrasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of weeds and other pests (Quigley 2000). Urban and suburban expansion in North America usually brings of their property and life-style (Robbins and Berkenholtz 2002, Quigley 2000). Despite new developments to rep

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ecology 2007 95, 482492  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIZA S. COMITA*, RICHARD CONDIT§ and STEPHEN P. HUBBELL Department of Plant Biology, University. Comita, Department of Ecology, Evolution & Behaviour, University of Minnesota, 100 Ecology Building, 1987

Bermingham, Eldredge

142

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Running head: Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block CIVL 498 ≠ Life Cycle Assess Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block Minge Weng November 18

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic contaminated soils Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Soil and Water Science Department University of...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali sodic soil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Renewable Energy 29 ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics Summary: of sodic soils in the Caspian region and India (Mishra and...

145

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and management, aesthetic values, biodiversity, recreation, and many others) are sustained through time. Rangeland Ecology graduates are also well prepared to work in ecological restoration of drastically disturbed lands. Rangeland

146

Development of an ultrasonic process for detoxifying groundwater and soil: Laboratory research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is conducting laboratory research to study the effectiveness of a new technique in which ultrasonic energy is used to convert chlorinated organic compounds into nonhazardous end products. Destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were achieved for the organic compounds in aqueous solution. Key process parameters, such as solution pH values, steady-state temperatures under operating conditions, ultrasonic-power intensities, and oxidant concentrations, were investigated. In addition, a detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for the destruction of the organic compounds under an ultrasonic filed was developed and incorporated into a computational model. The agreement between the model and experimental results is generally good.

Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

148

Ecology 2007 21, 455464  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional Ecology 2007 21, 455­464 455 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd The speed of ecological speciation ANDREW P. HENDRY*, PATRIK on ecological time-scales (contemporary evolution) and adaptive divergence can cause reproductive isolation

Rieseberg, Loren

149

Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it...

Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comparative analyses of soil contaminant levels and plant species diversity at developing and disused oil well sites in Qianjiang oilfield, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oilfield development contaminates soils and waters with crude oil, brine and heavy metals. Oil well sites are probably the most contaminated places in oilfields. During drilling and crude oil extraction from underground stores, a significant amount of oil and brine discharges into soils at oil well sites by blowouts, container spillages and pipeline ruptures. In oilfields in China, it was estimated that about 0.77 - 1.85% crude oil discharged into soils at oil well sites during oilfield development. Exposure to oil and salt contaminants could evoke toxicological effects in plants. Responses of plants to the contaminant exposure include inhibition of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, cessation of growth, reduced reproductive success and mortality. These harmful impacts on plants would be expected to result in remarkable loss of biodiversity. Qianjiang oilfield has been developed for about thirty-five years. Oil well sites in it have long been contaminated with oil and brine since, and plants at the well sites are rare. In the last three years however some wells have fallen into disuse. In result, a few plant species have intruded into the disuse well sites and formed new populations, and plant species diversity in these places has increased thereby. For benefit of restoration of the disuse well sites, it is interesting to know the relationships between contaminant levels and plant biodiversity. The present paper focuses the attention on comparative analyses of soil contaminations by crude oil, salt and some heavy metals and plant species diversity at developing and disuse oil well sites. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

Xiong, Z.T.; Hu, H.X.; Wang, Y.X. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China)] [and others] [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China); and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chapter I: Ecological Acoustics 1.1 Ecological Perception  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 Chapter I: Ecological Acoustics 1.1 Ecological Perception The ecological approach to perception of view of low-level sensory stimuli. #12;Ecological Perception 24 The ecological approach, however of its ecological activities, can be obtained by direct sensitivity to invariant structures in the world

Cummins, Fred

153

Ecology or Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: File this under "Statistics to the Rescue". Economy or ecology? Ecology or economy? Tough choice. Especially for China which is barreling recklessly ahead in its quest to become top consumer nation. A recent release from...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division Biotype has changed its name to Ecotype! Following the re-organisation of Forest Research into five science Divisions and three Support Divisions, the former Woodland Ecology Branches to form the new Ecology Division. We decided to give the divisional newsletter a new name (and

155

Ecologically Significant Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys FINAL REPORT Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley Appendix 29b #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys JUNE 1, 1999 DEQ

156

Ecological Applications, 23(1), 2013, pp. 273286 2013 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration; climate change research; data assimilation; Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA; process), and LTER (long-term ecological research sites) along with the extended satellite record, and data collation my data: quantifying the value of ecological data for the development of models of the terrestrial

Keenan, Trevor

157

Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Polluted with Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lead, zinc, and cadmium in smelter-contaminated soils usingof metal availability in smelter soil using earthworms andnear a former Zn and Pb smelter to test the ability of soil

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Soils Soil Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat HomeAssurance: DOESoil0 Soils Soil

159

Microelectrodes in microbial ecology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the microenvironment of bacteria has presented many challenges for the microbial ecologist. Simple intracellular capillary electrodes have been used in neurophysiology since the 1950s to measure action potentials in ion transport over biological membranes, and ion-selective electrodes were developed soon thereafter for the determination of H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}. However, these analytical techniques did not receive much attention until 1978, when Niels Peter Revsbech and Bo Barker Joergensen at the Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark, began using oxygen microelectrodes in their studies of the ecology and biogeochemistry of marine sediments and other microbial environments. Today, Revsbech and Joergensen use five types of microelectrodes, two types of oxygen microelectrodes, a combined microelectrode for nitrous oxide and oxygen, a sulfide microelectrode, and a pH microelectrode. The first three microelectrodes have diameters of about 10 {mu}m and the last two of about 50 {mu}m. Some of the electrodes actually contain two or three cathodes plus a reference electrode, all situated behind a polymer membrane. In situ experiments have been done for several years at a water depth of several meters, where the micromanipulator is operated by a diver. Recently measurements were obtained in the deep sea with the microelectrodes mounted on a free-falling vehicle or operated from a submersible vessel.

Boots, S.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modifying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to Simulate Cropland Carbon Flux: Model Development and Initial Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is one of the most compelling modern issues and has important implications for almost every aspect of natural and human systems. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been applied worldwide to support sustainable land and water management in a changing climate. However, the inadequacies of the existing carbon algorithm in SWAT limit its application in assessing impacts of human activities on CO2 emission, one important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that traps heat in the earth system and results in global warming. In this research, we incorporate a revised version of the CENTURY carbon model into SWAT to describe dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM)- residue and simulate land-atmosphere carbon exchange.

Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, Jeffrey; Williams, Jimmy R.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The development of a crop yield prediction equation for some soils in the Blackland and Grand Prairies of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page III, IV, INTRODUCTION REVIEW OF LITERATURE MATERIALS AND METHODS Anal ye is I Analysis II Analysis III Analysis IV Analysis V RESULTS 14 15 15 16 16 17 Houston Black Clay Austin Clay Crawford Clay Houston Black Clay and Austin... Clay 17 23 28 31 V, VI. VII. VIII . DISCUSSION Houston Black Clay Austin Clay Crawford Clay SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS I. I TERATURE CITED APPENDIX 35 35 38 41 43 46 48 Appendix A - Description of the Soils Studied 49 TABLE...

Buckmaster, Herbert Leo

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ecology and environment What ecology and environment course is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and environment Essentials What ecology and environment course is there? Ecology 01273 876787 Why ecology and environment at Sussex? · You will be taught by lecturers who are leaders in research, with a broad range of experience and expertise including plant, bird and insect ecology, climate

Sussex, University of

164

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

165

Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001 Population ecology is the discipline in ecology that deals with the structure and dynamics (e.g. growth interacting populations. Population ecology is closely related to other ecological disciplines, e

166

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Hidden Valley Ecological Garden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Hidden Valley Ecological Garden Stream and Floodplain Restoration Project Report of 2005 Project Activities to Mecklenburg County Storm Water Services and Water Quality habitat is often inhibited by a lack of organic matter in the soils of restoration project sites, organic

167

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and management, recreation, and many others) are sustained through time. Rangeland Ecology graduates are also well prepared to work in ecological restoration of drastically disturbed lands. Rangeland ecologist often work closely

168

Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they develop over unconsolidated weathering materials ofthin soils derived from unconsolidated material and lacking

Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES* WINTER 2013 ECL 296 (CRN 50337) / PBG 292 (CRN 64677 24 The Modern Ecology of Ice-Covered Lakes in Antarctica: A Journey Back JANUARY 31 Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree: Ecology and Adaptive Radiation

Ishida, Yuko

170

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

171

Research and management of soil, plant, animal, and human resources in the Middle Rio Grande Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research and management of soil, plant, animal, and human resources in the Middle Rio Grande Basin in 1994 called. "Ecology, diversity, and sustainability of soil, plant, animal, and human resources, Diversity, and Sustainability of Soil, Plant, Animal, and Human resources of the Rio Grande Basin" (Finch

172

Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ecology 2006 20, 678688  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Carotenoid accumulation strategies for becoming a colourful HouseFunctional Ecology 2006 20, 678≠688 678 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British. CRINO School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287≠4501, USA Summary 1. Male House

McGraw, Kevin J.

174

Enter Keyword(s) Today's Ecology Top  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enter Keyword(s) Today's Ecology Top News OMG's Business Ecology Initiative BEI Reaches 250 Member Advertisement Ecology Topics Botany Climate Research Ecology Environment Environmental Microbiology Environmental Monitoring Environmental Research Fisheries Research Marine Biology Meteorology Molecular Ecology

175

Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

3, 11851214, 2006 Landscape ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HESSD 3, 1185­1214, 2006 Landscape ecology meets catchment hydrology B. Schr¨oder Title Page, and function in landscape ecology and catchment hydrology ­ how can quantitative landscape ecology support¨oder (boschroe@uni-potsdam.de) 1185 #12;HESSD 3, 1185­1214, 2006 Landscape ecology meets catchment hydrology B

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

179

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing that might guide management decisions. We tested whether ideas from landscape ecology (local vs. landscape-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than

Holl, Karen

180

Journal of Animal Ecology 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Animal Ecology 2002 71, 23¬≠31 ¬© 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science Ltd TONI LAAKSONEN, ERKKI KORPIM√?KI and HARRI HAKKARAINEN Section of Ecology, Department of Biology of Animal Ecology (2002) 71, 23¬≠31 Introduction An understanding of age-dependent reproductive out- put

Laaksonen, Toni

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Journal of Animal Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 342¬≠352 ¬© 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing VALKAMA and VILLE P√?YRI Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, reproductive value, sex allocation, sex-dependent mortality, varia- ble environment. Journal of Animal Ecology

Laaksonen, Toni

182

AgriculturAl And resource economics Anthropology child development communicAtion community development culturAl studies ecology economics geogrAphy history humAn development internAtionAl commerciAl lAw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AgriculturAl And resource economics § Anthropology § child development § communicAtion § community AgriculturAl And resource economics (530) 752-6185 http://www.agecon.ucdavis.edu Ph.D., M.S., Joint M ethnography, politics, cultures of history, identity, sexuality, film, media and visual anthropology

California at Davis, University of

183

AVIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AVIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION IN AN URBANIZING WORLD edited by John M. Marzluff College of Forest...............................................................................49 4. Human perception and appreciation of birds: A motivation for wildlife conservation in urban

Fern√°ndez-Juricic, Esteban

184

Ecology 2007 95, 217225  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matsunosato, Tsukuba 305-8687 Japan, and *Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Dormancyisassociatedwithdecreasedadultsurvivalinthe burnt orchid lower variability in survival and fitness over the long term. We suggest that conservation measures

Shefferson, Richard P.

185

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report A Research Design and Methodology for Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development projects, they have yet to assess the sustainability of the UBC Food System. In this paper we map in the development of a more sustainable food system. These seven indicators are the affordability of food to implement a sustainable development policy. In 1998, UBC established a campus sustainability office

186

Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Managing Soil Salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains soil salinity, factors that contribute to it, and methods of correcting saline soils....

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

188

TR-003 Ecology March 2000 Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-003 Ecology March 2000 Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

189

Pinniped ecology in Santa Monica Bay, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bight. Anderson JW e d . Ecology of the Southern 2005 .347 - 359. 1998 . Behavioral ecology and demography of seals3 % 4 ) : Population Ecology of California Press Stewart B

Bearzi, Maddalena; Saylan, Charles A.; Barroso, Celia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDITORIAL Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and successof areas in theoretical ecology. Among the highlights areyear represent theoretical ecology from around the world: 20

Hastings, Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

Watson, Craig A.

193

APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT TERM 1 - 2014/15 Lead Instructors*: Maja Krzic indicators to assess sustainability of land management practices. Characterize the soil chemical environment 402-Sustainable Soil Management SOIL 502-Advanced Sustainable Soil Management Final exam 35% Final

Farrell, Anthony P.

194

IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS PLACEMENT BPG NOTE 5 Best Practice Guidance for Land of heavy industry. Soil material initially present on a site may have been removed or stored in bunds the original soil that has been stored or importing a soil from elsewhere or using a soil-forming material

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic bulk soil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox potentiala (mV) n120 Soil water contentb (% wet weight) n4 Bulk densityb (g cm... ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Gordon W. Holtgrieve Peter K. Jewett Pamela A. ... Source:...

196

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010. _ 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/ S. Accepted

Boyer, Edmond

197

Soil organisms are the catalysts that link elemen-tal exchange among the lithosphere,biosphere,and at-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil organisms are the catalysts that link elemen- tal exchange among the lithosphere any pool, is becoming increasingly crucial to understanding soil processes and to sus- tainable diffi- cult task in the study of soil ecological processes. The nutri- ent transformations that take

Soatto, Stefano

198

Effect of elevated CO2 and N fertilisation on soil nematode abundance and diversity in a wheat field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Effect of elevated CO2 and N fertilisation on soil nematode abundance). The soil food chain response to elevated CO2 can indicate the changes in soil ecological processes s t r a c t An experimental platform of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) was established in mid June

Neher, Deborah A.

199

FrontiersinEcology and the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;© The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Human population growth and industrial develop- ment have led to increased and unsustainable con- sumption of natural resources. The resulting interrelated for the pollination of fruit, vegetable, oil, seed, and nut crops (Free 1993). The global economic value of wild

Paxton, Robert

200

Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 Fall 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 ­ Fall 2013 Course Syllabus NRE 687: Landscape Planning (preferable immediately before or after class times) Course Overview The Landscape Planning + Analysis Studio is a core studio in the landscape architecture curriculum. This course provides an opportunity to develop

Awtar, Shorya

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Applied Ecology 0888 British  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of earthworms decreased with proximity to the smelter[ No worms were collected from the two sites closest the smelter are absent from the most contaminated soils[ 4[ Reduced species richness resulted in lower Shannon from changes in community structure[ The most sim! #12;063 Earthworms in smelter! contaminated soils √?

Hopkin, Steve

202

Ecology 2004 18, 530538  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transport soil water, and in doing so alter ecosystem water, energy and nutrient balance. One potentially of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South water balance where plant root systems span large gradients in soil water potential. To assess seasonal

Williams, David G.

203

Soils and Environment Soil fertility and soil processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be removed without blasting. Definition of soil #12; Land use planning, urbanization, timber management, landslides, and earthquakes Soils often carry a climatic signal Soil properties related to environmental soil. The fertile soils formed on glacial deposits in the mid-western United States are transported

Pan, Feifei

204

Big data and the future of ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecological research. Ecology 91: 2536Ė39. Ernest SKM,opportunities of open data in ecology. Science 331: 703Ė05.Stokstad E. 2011. Open-source ecology takes root across the

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of an ultrasonic process for detoxifying groundwater and soil: Laboratory research. Annual report for fiscal year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is conducting laboratory research to study the effectiveness of a new technique in which ultrasonic energy is used to convert chlorinated organic compounds into nonhazardous end products. Destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were achieved for the organic compounds in aqueous solution. Key process parameters, such as solution pH values, steady-state temperatures under operating conditions, ultrasonic-power intensities, and oxidant concentrations, were investigated. In addition, a detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for the destruction of the organic compounds under an ultrasonic filed was developed and incorporated into a computational model. The agreement between the model and experimental results is generally good.

Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An investigation of soil-tool interaction theories as they apply to a Lunar soil simulant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed for finding the force required to fail soil with a blade, given the appropriate parameters of the blade, the soil, and their interaction. The properties of interest in the Lunar soil are presented in this thesis. Then the parameters of a... terrestrial analog of the true Lunar soil is determined. Given these, the predictive models are implemented to predict the required force to fail the Lunar soil simulant with a flat blade. An apparatus is developed to fail the prepared Lunar soil simulant...

Willman, Brian Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

1808 METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 7 Ecology, 85(7), 2004, pp. 18081810  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forum 1808 METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 7 Ecology, 85(7), 2004, pp. 1808­1810 2004 by the Ecological Society of America CAN FUNCTION AT THE ORGANISMAL LEVEL EXPLAIN ECOLOGICAL of chemistry, physics, and biology'' can be used to link the function of individual organisms to ecological pro

Koehl, Mimi

208

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Derek Guo, Drew Willms, Kliment Kuzmanovski, Ralph Mercado, Stuart Armstrong, Thomas Denton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Kliment Kuzmanovski, Ralph Mercado, Stuart Armstrong, Thomas Denton UBC Botanical Garden Development Plan Plan CIVL 445 Engineering Design and Analysis I Group 19 Stuart Armstrong Thomas Denton Derek Guo

209

The behavior of soil-applied cyclotri- and cyclotetraphosphate in Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyclotriphosphate (C3P) is of interest to soil scientists because it demonstrates little or no retention by soil constituents. Non-sorption is desirable in the development of mobile P fertilizers. Work was expanded to include cyclotetraphosphate...

Trostle, Calvin Lewie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Landscape pattern Landscape ecology, if not ecology in general, is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VAL006- Landscape pattern metrics Landscape ecology, if not ecology in general, is largely founded on the notion that environmental patterns strongly influence ecological processes [32]. The habitats in which with organism perception and behav- ior to drive the higher-level processes of population dynamics and community

McGarigal, Kevin

211

44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 4453.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 44­53. Accepted 13 May 2009 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 agricultural landscape on local bird communities. ­ Web Ecol. 9: 44­53. This study assesses whether Alcalá de Henares, Spain. #12;45WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 multifunctional systems are common in southern Europe

Rey Benayas, José María

212

120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120131.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120­131. Accepted 27 December 2007 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quer- cus coccifera. ­ Web, Spain. #12;121WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 have important economic consequences because large amounts of public

Rey Benayas, José María

213

Effects of cropping-system, irrigation method, and soil properties on soil nitrogen and organic matter dynamics in the Big Horn Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerns interact to create a need for better understanding of production efficiency and ecological impacts and maintenance of the resource base; and 2) evaluating long-term impacts of farming systems on the resource baseEffects of cropping-system, irrigation method, and soil properties on soil nitrogen and organic

Norton, Jay B.

214

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

215

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Graduate Handbook 2011-2012 University of California OVERVIEW The Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) Graduate Program at UCSC reflects the remarkable local related fields as they acquire mastery in their areas of specialization. The graduate program in Ecology

California at Santa Cruz, University of

216

Journal of Animal Ecology 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Animal Ecology 2007 76, 1045­1052 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Climatechangecanaltercompetitiverelationshipsbetween resident and migratory birds MARKUS P. AHOLA, TONI LAAKSONEN, TAPIO EEVA and ESA LEHIKOINEN Section of Ecology

Laaksonen, Toni

217

The evolutionary ecology of metacommunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolutionary ecology of metacommunities Mark C. Urban1* , Mathew A. Leibold2* , Priyanga Vellend12 and Michael J. Wade13 1 National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara, CA Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California­Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Hochberg, Michael

218

APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

880 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 3 Ecology, 83(3), 2002, pp. 880881  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

880 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 3 Ecology, 83(3), 2002, pp. 880¬≠881 2002 by the Ecological Society of America COMMUNITY ECOLOGY--IN SPANISH Jaksic A., Fabia¬īn. 2000. Ecologi¬īa de comunidades. Edi ecology. Few branches of ecology have gone through such a shocking process of redefinition of paradigms

Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

220

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality-- Physical and Biological Soil Crusts USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 7 What are soil crusts? A physical crust is a thin layer with reduced porosity and increased density at the surface of the soil. A biological crust

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ecology 2007 21, 154161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of contexts, both reproductive and routine. For example, large antlers of moose are effective weapons in male Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Costs of bearing a sexually selected ornamental weapon be costly to produce and maintain. 2. Male fiddler crabs use a single greatly enlarged claw as both a weapon

Levinton, Jeffrey

222

Ecology 2006 94, 10111026  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specific variation in resistance to wind mortality interacted strongly with: (i) shade tolerance characteristics, (ii Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Species resistance and community response to wind disturbance, Millbrook, NY 12545, USA Summary 1 Severe winds are the predominant cause of natural disturbance

223

Ecology 2007 95, 12611273  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Wind-throw mortality in the southern boreal forest: effects of tree mortality as influenced by species, diameter and stand age were assessed across a gradient in wind in tree size and wind intensity index, and for three stand ages. 3. Probability of mortality was higher

Minnesota, University of

224

Environmental Sciences and Ecology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abella, Scott R. - School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada at Las Vegas Abouheif, Ehab - Department...

225

RUTGERS ECOLOGICAL PRESERVE POSTALPLAZA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RUTGERS ECOLOGICAL PRESERVE Solar Farm METLARSLN ETHELRDW REDBUDRD GO R DO N RD RD 3 RD 2 SUTTONS Material Services Central Receiving/Rutgers Computer Store Security Technologies Shop/University Facilities Operations & Services Asian American Cultural Center/Day Care Center Bainton Field NN N N S LLSSNNNNS OOOON

Hanson, Stephen José

226

ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.arlettaz@iee.unibe.ch www.conservation.unibe.ch Grassland management: designing tomorrow's farmland for biodiversity 1ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Prof. Dr Rapha√ęl Arlettaz Head of the division of Conservation Biology Office: Erlachstrasse 9a Mail: Baltzerstrasse 6 CH¬≠3012 Bern +41 31 631 31 61 +41 79 637

Richner, Heinz

227

Ecology 2006 94, 905914  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and water table affect wetland plant in experimental wetland plant communities, where the dominant plant species are non-mycorrhizal and subordinate table (un-saturated) treatment, above-ground plant biomass increased in the presence of AMF relative

Pringle, Anne

228

Ecology 2007 95, 139150  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon sequestration may offset losses of carbon from the soil. Studies have already indicated of carbon presently stored in terrestrial ecosystems are released in to the atmosphere (Oechel et al. 1993

229

Populations Population Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- species interactions Abiotic factors: l Climate l Temperature l Moisture l Wind l Soil l Fire Biotic- √? mortality increases as population size increases or birth rate decreases" l Negative feedback

Dever, Jennifer A.

230

TITLE SOIL SUITABILITY EVALUATION FOR TOBACCO BASED ON GREY CLUSTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE SOIL SUITABILITY EVALUATION FOR TOBACCO BASED ON GREY CLUSTER ANALYSIS GAO Rui QIAO Hong Abstract: Suitability evaluation of soil for tobacco is the base of spatial analysis and optimization disposition. It provides scientific basis for reasonable development of soil for tobacco. Taking soil in San

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

231

Science and technology for industrial ecology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tropical Ecosystem and Soil Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2) Atmosphere (N2 is 80%) Ultimate source Ocean Parent rock material (via evaporation & recon ∑ ENERGY Organisms need: Atmosphere (CO2) Atmosphere (N2 is 80%) Ultimate source Ocean Parent rock material, ...) ∑ Water ∑ ENERGY Organisms need: Atmosphere (CO2) Atmosphere (N2 is 80%) Ultimate source Ocean Parent rock

Saleska, Scott

233

Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes...

Joshi, Champa

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradientsĖi.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin; et al, et al

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

The ecology of mutualism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 62, 87, 146, 147, 257). Plants benefit most when soil nutrient concentrations are low. In some circumstances, normally mutualistic fungi can be parasitic, and in rare instances of high phosphate levels the increased uptake caused by mycor- rhizae can... it is valuable [e.g. protection in areas of high predation pressure (15), nodulation under competition for soil nitrogen (40)] and when it is cheap and efficient [e.g. extrafloral nectaries when ants and sunlight are abundant (170)]. What is still lacking is a...

Boucher, D. H.; James, Samuel W.; Keeler, K. H.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology? Asking the question, What is tropical ecology? may seem akin to asking questions such as, Who is buried in Grant's tomb? Tropical ecology is the study of the ecology of tropical regions. But so what? Consider these questions: First, what is ecology? What are its

Landweber, Laura

237

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

238

Soil Remediation Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

240

TR-017 Ecology March 2002 Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-017 Ecology March 2002 Technical Report Forest Research Vancouver Forest Region 2100 Labieux Region Coarse Woody Debris Working Group Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology? Allan Konopka Biological Sciences Division for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include by a `microbial community' and identification of important characteristics specific to community ecology. What

242

The ecology of coral-microbe interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algal symbioses. Molecular Ecology 18:1823-1833. Webster, N.F. Rohwer. 2008. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls inin Caribbean coral reefs. Ecology Letters 9:818-826. Porter,

Marhaver, Kristen Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

commentary: A Darwinian approach to community ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant ecol- ogy. Journal of Ecology, 55, 247-270. Kress, W.The merging of community ecology and phylogenetic biology.Ecology Let- ters, 12, 693-715. Freckleton, R. P. & Harvey,

Freckleton, Robert P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A mathematical model for variation in water-retention curves among sandy soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activity in soil varies with water content, soil texture and structure, temperature, energy and nutrientA mathematical model for variation in water-retention curves among sandy soils H.W. HUNT1 *, A@nrel.colostate.edu Abstract: Equations were developed to predict soil matric potential as a function of soil water content

Wall, Diana

246

Ecological Modeling with Soils Data: Semiparametric Stochastic Mixed Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

smoothing parameter selection ­ results and extensions #12;Greenhouse Effect · Solar energy transmitted residues on surface ­ No-Till (NT): doesn't use tillage; all crop residues left on surface #12;Advantages

247

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

Halverson, N.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

SRS ecology: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Ecological Impact of Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

Kammen, Daniel M.

250

Kiyoko Yokota 100 Ecology Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Kiyoko Yokota 100 Ecology Building Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior University: Michael Mullan, Fiona Crawford, and Daniel Paris, 1999-2001 #12;2 Oral presentations Yokota, K. and R. W and Oceanography Aquatic Sciences Meeting. Santa Fe, New Mexico. Yokota, K. and R. W. Sterner. 2006. Long

Sterner, Robert W.

251

Journal of Applied Ecology 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377≠384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

Thomas, Len

252

Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22: Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22nd , 2010, Economic Sustainability: Room to Move? Workshop Hosted by Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Walden

253

Journal of Applied Ecology 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beneficial stream and river restoration. We propose five criteria that must be met for a river restoration ArticleEcological success in river restorationM. A. Palmer et al. FORUM Standards for ecologically successful river restoration M.A. PALMER,* E.S. BERNHARDT,* J. D. ALLAN, P.S. LAKE, G. ALEXANDER, S. BROOKS

Palmer, Margaret A.

254

Modeling, estimation, and control of robot-soil interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the development of hardware, theory, and experimental methods to enable a robotic manipulator arm to interact with soils and estimate soil properties from interaction forces. Unlike the majority of ...

Hong, Won, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

AgriculturAl And resource economics Anthropology child development communicAtion community development culturAl studies ecology economics environmentAl policy And mAnAgement* geogrAphy globAl heAlth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AgriculturAl And resource economics § Anthropology § child development § communicAtion § communityAnsportAtion technology And policy SOCIAL SCIENCES GRADUATE PROGRAMS AgriculturAl And resource economics (530) 752, politics, cultures of history, identity, sexuality, film, media and visual anthropology, globalization

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

256

The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

Soil Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat HomeAssurance: DOE NSoftwareSoil0

260

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Baseline ecological risk assessment Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salmon Site (SS), formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site, located in Mississippi was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion tests conducted between 1964 and 1970. A consequence of these testing activities is that radionuclides were released into the salt dome, where they are presently contained. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. As part of the remedial investigation effort, a Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted at the SS. The purpose is to gauge ecological and other environmental impacts attributable to past activities at the former test facility. The results of this facility-specific baseline risk assessment are presented in this document.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Compost Science and Utilization, 9(4):274-283 (2001) BIOREMEDIATION OF A PCB-CONTAMINATED SOIL VIA COMPOSTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compost Science and Utilization, 9(4):274-283 (2001) BIOREMEDIATION OF A PCB-CONTAMINATED SOIL VIA COMPOSTING Frederick C. Michel Jr.1 , John Quensen, C.A.Reddy NSF Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan and composted in field scale piles to determine the effect of soil to amendment ratio on PCB degradation

Michel Jr., Frederick C.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

Arnold, Jonathan

264

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

Arnold, Jonathan

265

ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology Samuel M. Scheiner & Michael R. Willig Received: 9 of ecology have existed for the past half century; ecologists simply have failed to explicitly recognize them. We present a general theory of ecology and show how it relates to ecology's numerous constituent

Willig, Michael

266

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

Maxwell, Bruce D.

267

Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Ecology Volume 2012, Article ID 939862, 17 pages doi:10.1155/2012/939862 Review Article Parallel Ecological Speciation in Plants? Katherine L speciation, known as parallel ecological speciation, is one of several forms of evidence for ecology's role

Rieseberg, Loren

268

ECOLOGY LIFE 320 Spring Semester 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGY LIFE 320 Spring Semester 2011 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Liba Pejchar Office: 234 Wagar E-mail: liba to the fundamental principles of ecology. You will learn about the mechanisms that generate ecological patterns the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature. We will spend most of the semester studying ecology

269

New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

270

0038-075X/06/17102-152-166 Soil Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. AN APPLICATION OF THE RUNGE "ENERGY MODEL" OF SOIL DEVELOPMENT IN MICHIGAN'S UPPER PENINSULA Randall J. Schaetzl1 of nearby soils, whose chemistry and morphology are very different. The energy model presupposes that soils amount of distinction is the "energy model", developed by Ed Runge, a soil scientist

Schaetzl, Randall

271

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed ConiferAssumptions Mixed conifer forests are a collection of different species, each with different ecologic requirements

272

Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 769779 2006 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

769 Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 769­779 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ECOLOGICAL and phenotypic plasticity in promoting ecological character displacement (i.e., trait evolution stemming from resource competition between species). Because ecological character displacement generates new populations

Behe, Michael J.

273

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

274

Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arq172  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arq172 Forum: Invited Review The fusion of behavioral ecology and ecology Deborah M. Gordon Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA Behavioral ecology and ecology have projects in common. Community ecology can provide behavioral ecology

Gordon, Deborah

275

Book Reviews Ecology, 92(8), 2011, p. 1705  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Book Reviews Ecology, 92(8), 2011, p. 1705 √? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Advances in community ecology Gido, Keith B., and Donald A. Jackson, editors. 2010. Community ecology of stream fishes: community ecology; fish ecology; long-term studies; stream ecology. It is rare that a book has a 25-year

Mangel, Marc

276

Soil Testing and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright © 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

277

Indiana Soil and Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indiana Soil and Landscape Evaluation Manual Version 1.0 D.P. Franzmeier G.C. Steinhardt D soil scientists to be the state soil. The scale on the gray panel is in decimeters and feet. The upper 18 inches (46 cm) of the soil formed in Wisconsinan age loess, and the lower part formed

Holland, Jeffrey

278

Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams J. B. Johnson (jerry.johnson@byu.edu), S. M. Peat and B. J. Adams, Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Dept

Pfrender, Michael

279

vendredi 7 dcembre 2012 Benchmarking of Excavated Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vendredi 7 dťcembre 2012 Benchmarking of Excavated Soil Reuse Management in Europe & Development ∑ Implementation at a National Level: different options, different tools > Challenge with Excavated Soil Reuse from some experienced countries. vendredi 7 dťcembre 2012 D3E / DG > 2 Benchmarking of Excavated Soil

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

280

Feeding on Phytoestrogens: Implications of Estrogenic Plants for Primate Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change. Journal of Tropical Ecology 21: 31-45. Chapman, C. ,success in a mammal. Ecology 90: Dixon, R. 2004.physiology, and feeding ecology. Evolutionary Anthropology

Wasserman, Michael David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Empirical and theoretical challenges in abovegroundĖbelowground ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in abovegroundĖbelowground ecology Wim H. van der Putten ∑Interactions, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology, NetherlandsInstitute of Ecology NIOO-KNAW, Boterhoeksestraat 48, 6666

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Dolphins and African apes: comparisons of sympatric socio-ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of sympatric ecology among dolphins and African apesA. 1998. Gorilla ecology and behaviour. EvolutionaryVolume 2: be- haviour, Ecology, and Conservation.Tokyo:

Bearzi, Maddalena; Stanford, Craig B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Behavior, Ecology and Genetics of Geoffroy's Tamarin (Saguinus geoffroyi)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of landscapes for conservation. Ecology Letters 11: 78-91. LSystematics, behaviour and ecology. Oxford University Press,The evolutionary ecology of the major histocompatibility

Diaz-Munoz, Samuel Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ecology 2007 2006 The Authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and realized niche, internal transcribed spacer, metacommunity, soil characteristics, competition, T-RFLP, Zea dimensions (Hutchinson 1957). Neutral theory, in contrast to niche theory, initially assumes that trophically

Rohr, Jason

286

Final report, Ames Mobile Laboratory Project: The development and operation of instrumentation in a mobile laboratory for in situ, real-time screening and characterization of soils using the laser ablation sampling technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main focus of the Ames Laboratory`s Technology Integration Program, TIP, from May 1991 through December 1994 was the development, fabrication, and demonstration of a mobile instrumentation laboratory incorporating rapid in situ sampling systems for safe, rapid, and cost effective soil screening/characterization. The Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies, MDLEST, containing the analysis instrumentation, along with surface and subsurface sampling probe prototypes employing the laser ablation sampling technique were chosen to satisfy the particular surface and subsurface soil characterization needs of the various Department of Energy facilities for determining the extent of heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The MDLEST, a 44 foot long 5th wheel trailer, is easily configured for the analysis instrumentation and sampling system required for the particular site work. This mobile laboratory contains all of the utilities needed to satisfy the operating requirements of the various instrumentation installed. These utilities include, an electric generator, a chilled water system, process gases, a heating/air conditioning system, and computer monitoring and automatic operating systems. Once the MDLEST arrives at the job site, the instrumentation is aligned and calibration is completed, sampling and analysis operations begin. The sample is acquired, analyzed and the results reported in as little as 10 minutes. The surface sampling probe is used in two modes to acquire samples for analysis. It is either set directly on the ground over the site to be sampled, in situ sampling, or in a special fixture used for calibrating the sampling analysis system with standard soil samples, having the samples brought to the MDLEST. The surface sampling probe was used to in situ sample a flat concrete surface (nondestructively) with the ablated sample being analyzed by the instrumentation in the MDLEST.

Anderson, M.S.; Braymen, S.D.

1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694707 Plain strain soilstructure interaction model for a building supported by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694≠707 Plain strain soil≠structure interaction, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 3 January 2006 Abstract A simple theoretical model for soil≠structure interaction in water saturated poroelastic soils is presented, developed to explore if the apparent building≠foundation≠soil

Southern California, University of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ecology and Conservation Biology This option is appropriate for students interested in the scientific study of ecology and conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeography 3 EEOB 570 Landscape Ecology 3 Y EEOB 596 Ecology and Society 3 AEcl 418 Stream Ecology 3 Y Ent

Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

289

Adsorption and transport of pyrithiobac in soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adsorbents (Gonzales bentonite, Georgia kaolinite, goethite, and Michigan peat) and four soils (Houston Black c, Hidalgo sl, Orelia scl, and Ships sic) having a wide range of physical and chemical properties. Adsorption isotherms were developed...

Matocha, Christopher John

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Departments of the Environment and Natural Resources are authorized to develop regulations to combat soil erosion and control the addition of sediment to waters of the state. As part of the...

291

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

Entekhabi, Dara

292

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory....

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

SpecialFeature Ecology, 85(5), 2004, pp. 11791192  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7072, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden 3Southampton Oceanography Centre for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Netherlands Abstract, the concept of ``energy flow'' in food webs has been and remains a cornerstone in ecological theory in which

Hessen, Dag Olav

295

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY BIOL 4115 FALL 2014 RESEARCH PAPER GUIDLINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY ≠ BIOL 4115 ≠ FALL 2014 RESEARCH PAPER GUIDLINES Purpose: To develop and evaluate of oil Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed are all good options for searching scientific articles examples: General topic Specific topic Anaerobic ammonia oxidation Anaerobic removal of nitrogen

Christner, Brent C.

296

Ecological Modelling 192 (2006) 143159 Nitrogen transformation and transport modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model; Transformation; Transport; Nitrification; Denitrification; RT3D 1. Introduction Nitrogen of this paper are to develop a nitro- gen transport and transformation model for saturated groundwater systemsEcological Modelling 192 (2006) 143­159 Nitrogen transformation and transport modeling

Clement, Prabhakar

297

A potential technique to determine the unsaturated soil shear strength parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to understand the various aspects associated with development of shear strength of unsaturated soils. The research is conducted to obtain the most economical and reliable design solutions. The magnitude of positive pore water pressure developed in saturated soil...

Kulkarni, Renu Uday

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair Evan Siemann Professors of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyoffersabroadrangeofcoursesinthebiosciences:animalbehavior,animal biology, bioinformatics, conservation biology, diseases, ecology, evolutionary biology, field ecology, genetics, genomics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

299

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils Larry G. Bundy & Laura W. Good Department of Soil Science University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;Introduction ∑ Soil test P is often measured ∑ Little information is available on total P content of soils ∑ Why do we care about total P now? ≠ Soil total P

Balser, Teri C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ecologic and geographic distribution of filovirus disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We used ecologic niche modeling of outbreaks and sporadic cases of filovirus-associated hemorrhagic fever (HF) to provide a large-scale perspective on the geographic and ecologic distributions of Ebola and Marburg viruses. We predicted...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Bauer, John T.; Mills, James N.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping a

303

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping amagnetic

304

Ecology, 92(12), 2011, pp. 21592166 2011 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reports Ecology, 92(12), 2011, pp. 2159¬≠2166 √? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America plant parasites is widespread. Yet, understanding the ecological determinants of evolutionary divergence such a trade-off has been reported, this study provides further ecological bases for the coexistence of closely

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The primary mission of the Graduate Program in Ecology & Environmental Science is to offer a graduate program

Thomas, Andrew

306

Ecology, 91(10), 2010, pp. 29412951 2010 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology, 91(10), 2010, pp. 2941¬≠2951 √? 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Origin Integrative Ecology Group, Estacio¬īn Biolo¬īgica de Do~nana, CSIC, 41092 Sevilla, Spain 6 Northwestern interactions--and on the food web's degree of compartmentalization. Despite its ecological importance

Newman, Mark

307

Ecology, 91(6), 2010, pp. 17631773 2010 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology, 91(6), 2010, pp. 1763¬≠1773 √? 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Recruitment and negative species interactions acts to drive community dynamics is a fundamental question in ecology. Here to drive community dynamics has become increasingly apparent in both theoretical and applied ecological

308

Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 1 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102 DOE is to provide a summary of the literature on the physiology and molecular ecology of bacteria and in particular to be a comprehensive review. Excellent current detailed reviews are available on the physiology and molecular ecology

309

Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems Why is Integration Needed in Ecology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems #12;Why is Integration Needed in Ecology? Great advances have been made by dividing ecology into subdisciplines. But too much focus on subdisciplines has also hindered ecology · too little study of the interface between disciplines · tended to narrow focus

Hansen, Andrew J.

310

Touchpoint: A Foundation for Sustainable Product Development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Much has been written on the subject of sustainable development and the urgent need for society to understand and address human impacts on socio-ecological systems.Ö (more)

Durgin, Ron

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Big data and the future of ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Archives, iPlant, NatureServe, Dryad, the National Oceanographic Data Center). Some of these repositories house

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 7483.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Villar-Salvador and Pedro J√°uregui Rey Benayas, J. M., Cuesta, B., Villar-Salvador, P. and Ja√ļregui, P.rey@uah.es), B. Cuesta and P. Villar-Salvador, Univ. de Alcal√°, Dept de Ecolog√≠a, ES¬≠28871 Alcal√° de Henares

Villar-Salvador, Pedro

315

Nitrification in Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a high nitrificati is the balmcing of these extremes which redlices the average le between acid ancl non-acid soils. C03TPOSITION OF SOILS TVITFI LOW AND HIGH NITRIFIC-4TION. Table 11 contains the chemical composition of soils having low nitl... are subsoils. Subsoils thus possess nnu~nally high and unusually low nitrification. Table 11.-Chemical composition of soils with nitrification below 10 . I Average .............................. Nitri- fication 7164 7090 4596' 5710 4645 3976 3657 3...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

Kaufman, Glennis A.

317

The Ecology of Malware Jedidiah R. Crandall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ecology of Malware Jedidiah R. Crandall University of New Mexico Dept. of Computer Science Mail of ecological systems have begun to emerge. This may include competition between malware, fa- cilitation, parasitism, predation, and density-dependent population regulation. Ecological principles will likely

Forrest, Stephanie

318

Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896 Popul Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10144-012-0352-3 Impacts of enemy of Population Ecology and Springer Japan. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall not be self of Population Ecology and Springer Japan 2012 Abstract In this study, we used data from both experi- ments

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

319

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Undergraduate Programmes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Undergraduate Programmes BSc ConsEcol Would you like, with an emphasis on socio-ecological systems, equips you to work at solving conservation challenges. The areas and freshwater), restoration ecology, game farm management, ecotourism, community-based natural resource

Geldenhuys, Jaco

320

Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world://bee.oregonstate.edu/ecoe Ecological Engineering is: · Ecosystem restoration and habitat design at multiple scales · Watershed · Phytoremediation and bioremediation · Industrial ecology · Constructed wetlands and tidal marshlands · Mitigation

Tullos, Desiree

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid1 and Maria Fernandez Ecology Lab 2Associate Professor Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Global Issues and Questions in Rangeland Ecology · Despite the focus here on global issues, we need to recognize that Mongolia

322

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Dr James Pryke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Dr James Pryke My academic career began with an MSc on landscape ecology issues. After receiving my PhD, I undertook a two month fellowship at the Universiti. This position primarily involved conducting research into improving the design and management of ecological

Geldenhuys, Jaco

323

UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION DURING PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION QUALITY ASSURANCE Mn !! Performance Based Construction QA !! Unsaturated Soil Mechanics !! What We've Learned !! Next Steps #12.6-6.0 5 - 7 19 0.8 5 7 - 9 24 1.1 4 9 - 11 28 1.2 4 #12;Unsaturated Soil Mechanics #12;Fundamentals

Minnesota, University of

324

Ecology, 85(8), 2004, pp. 22152229 2004 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in their litter quantity and quality, live biomass, and effects on soil labile C, soil temperature, and soil with one another, such as litter biomass and species effects on soil temperature during the winter. However with similar litter chemistry had the largest differences in plant biomass, soil moisture, and soil labile C

Eviner, Valerie

325

A soil moisture availability model for crop stress prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is composed of three major components, which are, a) calcul ation of evapotranspiration, b) infiltration of moisture into the soil, c) redistribution of the soil moisture. Other edaphic models have been developed by Hill [1974], Bai er and Robertson... inputs could result in the development of moist layers in the lower soil layer that would not be accounted for if the moisture were uniformly redistributed. As the cycle progesses, redistribution and moisture depletion do occur, until there 1s less...

Gay, Roger Franklin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

ACCESSCCESS MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPENPEN ACCESSCCESS MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 458: 39≠52, 2012 doi: 10 and the instability or unpre- dictability of disturbance. Global warming is expec- ted to increase the vulnerability. 2010, Gruber 2011). Much of the available information about the impact on benthic systems comes

Zuschin, Martin

327

Collection Policy: ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their physical, chemical, and biotic environment, on the interactions among organisms (of the same and different decisions in environmental, agricultural, and medical science. Understanding ecological principles infectious diseases. 1.2 Faculty research 24 Tenure-track Faculty, 3 joint appointees, and 10-15 Research

Angenent, Lars T.

328

SYSTEMKOLOGIE ETHZ SYSTEMS ECOLOGY ETHZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but most efficient method is the common application of the dependence function to mean values. Condensing are linear in the observed temperature range, or low precision but very high efficiency is required. Given of ecological models. For the sake of simplicity and efficiency, the temperature dependencies in many models

Fischlin, Andreas

329

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

RESEARCH PROJECTS & IDEAS FOR FALL 2013 Soil and Water Lab, Ecohydrology Group (compiled by Todd Walter)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEW (ish) Aquatic Ecology and Hydraulic Fracturing (WRI/DEC, other) Maya Field work done; counting1 RESEARCH PROJECTS & IDEAS FOR FALL 2013 Soil and Water Lab, Ecohydrology Group (compiled by Todd and N- treatments Cayuga Lake watershed modeling (Cornell) Erin with Becky, Dan, and Brian Need to start

Walter, M.Todd

331

Role of Nematodes in Soil Health and Their Use as Indicators1 Deborah A. Neher2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The composition of nematode communities (plant-parasitic and free-living) may be used as bioindicators of soil laboratory from remote locations, and frequent sampling not be required during the year (Neher et al., 1995 as the ``microbial commu- nity''). Although microbial communities are known to play critical roles in ecological

Neher, Deborah A.

332

Nematode faunal analysis in an aquic brown soil fertilised with slow-release urea, Northeast China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nematode faunal analysis in an aquic brown soil fertilised with slow-release urea, Northeast China, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, PR China b Department of Earth of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, PR China Received 14 May 2004; received in revised form 15

Neher, Deborah A.

333

The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the load- settlement behavior of single piles in cohesionless soils is addressed. The available data on instrumerted piles load-tested vertically in sands is collected and analyzed to determine the load transfer characteristics of the soil. A... the distribution of residual stresses in the piles, and methods of obtaining residual stresses from load test results are discussed. Correlations with the results of the Standard Penetration Test are presented and are used to develop a new design procedure which...

Tucker, Larry Milton

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Soil Fumigation for Plant Disease Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satisfactory results were secured wikh xylene, ethylene dichloride, sodium cyanide and formaldehyde. Paper impregnated wit11 hoof-and-horn glue, casein glue, or vegetttble paste, and adequately sealed at the edges, was most satisfactory for con- fining... of a system of electrically heated units in the plant bed or soil box has been developed. Liquid soil drenches with disinfecting chemicals such as mercuric chlo- ride, formaldehyde, various organic mercury compounds, cyanide compounds, sulphuric...

Young, P. A. (Paul Allen); Godfrey, G. H. (George Harold)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink The impact and benefits of soil science have only partly been documented. Here I highlight four noteworthy soil science achievements from the state of Wisconsin that took place between 1870 and the early 1980s: (i) the first soil

Mladenoff, David

336

Application of diversity to regional ecological assessment: a review with recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Species diversity is frequently considered a primary indicator of ecosystem health, stability, and resilience. As such, species diversity is commonly the major criterion upon which environmental impact statements and ecological assessments are based. This report describes the theoretical development and refinement of the concept of ecological diversity and the various mathematical expressions of diversity. Advantages and disadvantages of each diversity expression are discussed. The application and interpretation of diversity indices for different spatial scales (e.g., specific sites and regional assessments) and variables (e.g., species diversity, habitat diversity, landscape diversity) are contrasted. Recommendations indicate the appropriate diversity indices for regional ecological assessments.

Levenson, J.B.; Stearns, F.W.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Radio-Ecological Situation in the Area of the Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association - 13522  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association' (hereinafter referred to as PPMCA) is a diversified mining company which, in addition to underground mining of uranium ore, carries out refining of such ores in hydrometallurgical process to produce natural uranium oxide. The PPMCA facilities are sources of radiation and chemical contamination of the environment in the areas of their location. In order to establish the strategy and develop criteria for the site remediation, independent radiation hygienic monitoring is being carried out over some years. In particular, this monitoring includes determination of concentration of the main dose-forming nuclides in the environmental media. The subjects of research include: soil, grass and local foodstuff (milk and potato), as well as media of open ponds (water, bottom sediments, water vegetation). We also measured the radon activity concentration inside surface workshops and auxiliaries. We determined the specific activity of the following natural radionuclides: U-238, Th-232, K-40, Ra-226. The researches performed showed that in soil, vegetation, groundwater and local foods sampled in the vicinity of the uranium mines, there is a significant excess of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th content compared to areas outside the zone of influence of uranium mining. The ecological and hygienic situation is as follows: - at health protection zone (HPZ) gamma dose rate outdoors varies within 0.11 to 5.4 ?Sv/h (The mean value in the reference (background) settlement (Soktui-Molozan village) is 0.14 ?Sv/h); - gamma dose rate in workshops within HPZ varies over the range 0.14 - 4.3 ?Sv/h. - the specific activity of natural radionuclides in soil at HPZ reaches 12800 Bq/kg and 510 Bq/kg for Ra-226 and Th-232, respectively. - beyond HPZ the elevated values for {sup 226}Ra have been registered near Lantsovo Lake - 430 Bq/kg; - the radon activity concentration in workshops within HPZ varies over the range 22 - 10800 Bq/m{sup 3}. The seasonal dependence of radon activity concentration is observed in the air of workshops (radon levels are lower in winter in comparison with spring-summer period). - in drinking water, intervention levels by gross alpha activity and by some radionuclides, in particular by Rn-222, are in excess. Annual effective dose of internal exposure due to ingestion of such water will be 0.14-0.28 mSv. (authors)

Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Kiselev, S.M.; Titov, A.V. [FSBI SRC A.I. Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [FSBI SRC A.I. Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)] [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation); Marenny, A.M. [Ltd 'Radiation and Environmental Researches' (Russian Federation)] [Ltd 'Radiation and Environmental Researches' (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

Flury, Markus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

McNeal, Karen Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Measurement of dielectric and magnetic properties of soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of subsurface imaging using SAR technology has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. One requirement for the successful development of a subsurface imagin system is an understanding of how the soil affects the signal. In response to a need for an electromagnetic characterization of the soil properties, the Radar/Antenna department has developed a measurement system which determines the soils complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability at UHF frequencies. The one way loss in dB is also calculated using the measured values. There are many reports of measurements of the electric properties of soil in the literature. However, most of these are primarily concerned with measuring only a real dielectric constant. Because some soils have ferromagnetic constituents it is desirable to measure both the electric and magnetic properties of the soil.

Patitz, W.E.; Brock, B.C.; Powell, E.G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydrological, geochemical, and ecological characterization of Kesterson Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Kesterson Reservoir related research activities carried out under a cooperative program between Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of California during FY89. The primary objectives of these investigations are: Predict the extent, probability of the occurrence, and selenium concentrations in surface water of temporary wetland habitat at Kesterson; assess rates and direction of migration of the drainage water plume that seeped into the aquifer under Kesterson; monitor and predict changes in quantity and speciation of selenium in surface soils and vadose zone pore-waters; and develop a comprehensive strategy through soil, water, and vegetation management to safely dissipate the high concentrations of selenium accumulated in Kesterson soils. This report provides an up-date on progress made in each of these areas. Chapter 2 describes results of recent investigations of water table fluctuations and plume migration. Chapter 3 describes results of ongoing monitoring of soil water selenium concentrations and evaporative accumulation of selenium at the soil surface. Chapter 4 describes early results from the soil, water, and vegetation management field trials as well as supporting laboratory and theoretical studies. In Chapter 5, new analytical methods for selenium speciation are described and quality assurance/quality control statistics for selenium and boron are provided. 110 refs., 138 figs., 62 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

Huston, M.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

Noble, James S.

347

Soil and Water Conservation (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and...

348

Ecology, 77(5),1996, pp. 1367-1378 O 1996 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology, 77(5),1996, pp. 1367-1378 O 1996 by the Ecological Society of America PALEOBIOLOGY, COMMUNITY ECOLOGY, AND SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL PATTERN1 DAVIDJABLONSKIAND J. JOHNSEPKOSKI,JR. Department that some biotic interactions influence large-scale ecological and evolutionary patterns, albeit in more

Boyce, C. Kevin

349

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION FOREST ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION FOREST ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION For students entering after 8 in Conservation; courses in Sociology, Anthropology, Public Policy, GIS, Remote Sensing; at the direction

Schweik, Charles M.

350

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

351

Technical background document for draft soil screening level guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides technical details of the derivation of the September 30, 1993, draft Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) Guidance for Superfund (PB93-963508). The document is presented in two sections. Section I defines SSL and provides background information on the development of SSLs and their application and implementation at Superfund sites, including sampling schemes for measuring SSL attainment. It also provides draft SSLs developed for 30 chemicals. Section II provides the technical basis for the development of SSLs addressing direct ingestion of soil, inhalation of volatiles and fugitive dust, and the soil-to-ground-water exposure pathway, including the assumptions and theories used the their development.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ecology, 87(9), 2006, pp. 22152220 2006 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extinction times based on extinction data for any species. The finding that the distribution of populationREPORTS Ecology, 87(9), 2006, pp. 2215≠2220 ” 2006 by the Ecological Society of America EXTINCTION extinctions is a key element of quantitative conservation biology and population ecology. Although stochastic

353

Ecological ranking of Phanerozoic biodiversity crises: ecological and taxonomic severities are decoupled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological ranking of Phanerozoic biodiversity crises: ecological and taxonomic severities extensive analyses of the taxonomic severity of major biodiversity crises in geologic time. In contrast, we propose here an alternative analysis of the ecological severity of biodiversity crises. It is clear

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

354

Ecology, 92(4), 2011, pp. 924937 2011 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology, 92(4), 2011, pp. 924¬≠937 √? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Disentangling 3 School of Renewable Resources, Louisiana State University, 227 RNR Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-6202 USA 4 Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation and Center for Latin American

Bruna, Emilio M.

355

Development Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

356

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

357

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

358

Soil Conservation Districts Law (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes a soil and water conservation division within the Iowa Department of Agriculture, as well as local soil and water conservation districts. The regulations accompanying...

359

Why study Ecology at Auckland? Long-standingstrengthsinmarineecology,evolution,behaviour,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why study Ecology at Auckland? ·Long? Formoreinformationabouttheprogrammeandtherequirements ofthefourspecialisations,visitwww.ecology.auckland.ac.nz. Adviceisavailablefromthe: +6493737599ext88199 Fax:+6493737431 Email: scifac@auckland.ac.nz Web: www.ecology.auckland.ac.nz BSc

Sun, Jing

360

TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise for the inventory of dead wood in Coastal-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology and Environmental Sciences This cross of ecology and environmental sciences, within the unparalleled natural laboratory that is the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Particular program strengths include terrestrial and aquatic ecology, environmental

Lawrence, Rick L.

362

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Spring Semester 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Spring Semester 2013 All Hilu February 28 Robert Cox University of Virginia The ecology and physiology Christine May James Madison Unv. Disturbance ecology: linking stream communities

Virginia Tech

363

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 June 14, 2005 Issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation...

364

Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing Karen S. Baker@scu.edu Abstract. An information ecology provides a conceptual framework to consider data, the creation Ecological Research (LTER) community, presents some manifestations of traditionally unreported `invisible

Bowker, Geoffrey C.

365

John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

366

DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED AGENTS Master's Thesis Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGNING AN ECOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED AGENTS Master's Thesis Proposal November 5, 1997 Revised Lab #12; #12; Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Ecologies of Programs of Computational Ecologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.5 Summary of Expected Contributions

367

The effect carbohydrate consumption on Argentine ants' nutritional ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 18, 111-an invasive mealybug. Ecology, 83, 2425-2438. Helms, K.R. &invasions. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, Kaplan,

Chou, Cheng T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Insidious Island Invasion: An exploration of Falcataria moluccana stand ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1997) 21:1-16. APPENDIX A:plantation forestry. Ē Forest Ecology and Management (2006)Seychelles. Ē Functional Ecology (2008) 22:359- Little, E.L.

Minnich, Amanda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

update: Emerging research opportunities in global urban ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

populations. † Global† Ecology† and† Bio? geography,†20,†Global† change† and† the† ecology† of† cities. † Science,†rates†in†urban†areas. †Ecology†Letters,†12,†1165Ė La†Sorte,†

La Sorte, Frank A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Food Web Ecology of a Leafminer-Parasitoid Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the timing of species interactions. Ecology Letters 13:1-10.The Netherlands. Landscape Ecology 23:595-602. Biesmeijer,there general patterns? Ecology Letters 11:499-515. Sala, O.

Blitzer, Eleanor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Ecology and Evolution of Soritid Foraminifera with Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimates. Molecular Ecology 16:5326-5340. Zohary, T. , Z.in a host individual. Marine Ecology Progress Series 195:93-from Taiwan. Marine Ecology-Progress Series 295:113-121.

Fay, Scott Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThisEcoGrid EU (Smart GridNantes Jump to:Ecologic

373

New Ecology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithunCenter Jump to:2 JumpCanaan,Ecology Jump to:

374

Ecologic Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESEInformation SmartEcologic Institute

375

On-Farm Soil Monitoring for Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Soil quality and soil management resources the air which helps build soil organic matter and tilth, and sustains the soil resource for future generations and other species. Improving and protecting soil quality can help support sustainable crop

Holland, Jeffrey

376

Spatial Ecology of the Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens): A Test of Species Distribution Models as Ecological Revealers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:141-148. Kremen,simple habitat models. Ecology Letters 8:993-1009. Krebs, C.2008. Ecology: the experimental analysis of distribution and

Bean, William Timothy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods.

Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roots, rills, gullies, wind scours, and soil deposition reflect such processes as runoff and erosion. Waterflow patterns X X 3. Pedestals and/or terracettes X X 4. Bare ground X X 5. Gullies X X 6. Wind. Compaction layer X X X 12. Functional/structural groups X 13. Plant mortality/ decadence X 14. Litter amount

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Prediction methods for capacity of drag anchors in clayey soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A drag anchor is a marine foundation element, which is penetrated into the seabed by dragging in order to generate a required capacity. The holding capacity of a drag anchor in a particular soil condition is developed by soil resistance acting...

Yoon, Yeo Hoon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

383

Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

Pringle, Anne

384

AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 39­48, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION) as are microbes from discussions on biogeography (e.g. Pielou 1979, Lomolino & Heaney 2004) or ecological geography (Longhurst 1998). To some extent this is probably because of a perception

Dolan, John

385

Why study Ecological and Environmental Sciences at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ecological management or environmental science; or alternatively maintain a broad mix of subject choices, land use and water resources and environmental modelling. Recent graduates have followed careers Sciences with Management This degree programme provides the opportunity for Ecological and Environmental

Schnaufer, Achim

386

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION FOREST ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION FOREST ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION For students entering after 8 for the Forest Ecology & Conservation curriculum total 93 credits. This curriculum meets the Society of American & Conservation concentration. Two of these three courses must have the additional Diversity (U and G) designation

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

387

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Fisheries Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Fisheries Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester the Landscape 3 NRC 397AE Aquatic Ecology (odd yrs) 4d NRC 390E Evolution & Conserv. 3e Physical Science Year NRC 597F Conserv. Genetics (even yrs) 4g NRC 597AE Cons. Aq. Sys. (odd yrs) 4g Communication

Schweik, Charles M.

388

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation For students entering fall 2010 graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. 1 - Earth Science elective ­ GEO-SCI 100 (f more of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Schweik, Charles M.

389

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester interested in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

390

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective options - BIOL of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

391

UNITY IN DIVERSITY: ECOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS AS A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecology Miguel A. Fortuna* and Jordi Bascompte Integrative Ecology Group Estaci√≥n Biol√≥gica de Do√Īana, CSIC Apdo. 1056, E-41080 Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence should be addressed to M.A.F. e-mail: fortuna

Fortuna, Miguel A.

392

USING ECOLOGICALLY SCALED LANDSCAPE INDICES TO ASSESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

81 6 USING ECOLOGICALLY SCALED LANDSCAPE INDICES TO ASSESS BIODIVERSITY CONSEQUENCES OF LAND-USE DECISIONS Robert K. Swihart and Jana Verboom CHAPTER OVERVIEW If maintenance of biological diversity the utility of ecologically scaled landscape indices (ESLIs) as measures of relative suitability of proposed

Swihart, Robert K. "Rob"

393

FrontiersinEcology and the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FrontiersinEcology and the Environment Stream restoration strategies for reducing river nitrogen). Natural resource managers are now asking how restoration of stream ecosystems might reduce the downstream turned to ecological restoration as a tool for reducing N loading. While more than 30% of the stream

Bledsoe, Brian

394

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-3897) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

395

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

396

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-2635) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

397

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class

Gray, Matthew

398

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

399

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

400

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion USDA, Natural Resources of the earth's surface by wind. Wind erosion removes and redistributes soil. Small blowout areas may, fence rows, and roadbanks. In many cases the fine soil particles and organic matter are blown offsite

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion USDA, Natural Resources and removal of soil material by water. The process may be natural or accelerated by human activity. The rate of erosion may be very slow to very rapid, depending on the soil, the local landscape, and weather conditions

402

Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis -Chemistry Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis - Chemistry Case Study "Sustainability Street are represented by the Podzolic Order, and more specifically form part of the Bose Soil Management Group) with a limited decomposer community dominated by fungi. Any remnants of native soil at the Sustainability Street

403

Human behaviour and ecosystem services in sustainable farming landscapes : an agent-based model of socio-ecological systems†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on agentsí interactions at smaller scale. This approach is better suited to understanding and modelling complex socio-ecological systems, which emerge from individual actions, and therefore for developing tools which improve policy effectiveness. In recent...

Guillem, Elťonore E.

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

December 2006 Spatial Autocorrelation and Pseudoreplication 107 Practices and Applications in Fire Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology SPATIAL AUTOCORRELATION AND PSEUDOREPLICATION IN FIRE ECOLOGY Amanda L. Bataineh1 , Brian P the traditional statistical assumption of observational independence. What, if anything, can the fire ecology fire ecology researchers. Key Words: nearness, experimental design, ecology, landscape

Hung, I-Kuai

405

Ecological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North - Consequences of Nuclear

406

area development plans: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology Websites Summary: -CDQ directed pollock fishery in the AI subarea to the Aleut Corporation for the purpose of economic development in the Aleutian Islands subarea (AI)....

407

area development plan: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology Websites Summary: -CDQ directed pollock fishery in the AI subarea to the Aleut Corporation for the purpose of economic development in the Aleutian Islands subarea (AI)....

408

Technical background document for soil screening guidance. Review draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides the technical background behind the development of the November 1994 Soil Screening Guidance for Superfund. These documents define the Soil Screening framework, a suite of methodologies for developing Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) for 107 chemicals commonly found at Superfund sites. The document is an updated version of the background document developed in support of the September 30, 1993, draft SSL guidance (PB93-963508). The document and the Guidance is available for public comment and is currently undergoing extensive peer review. Because the guidance is still under review, it and this document should not be used until they are finalized following this rigorous technical review and public comment.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002 Efficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line intersec  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002 Efficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

410

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist Committee Membership Dr. John Beasley - committee chair Dr. Jared Whitaker Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (912) 681-0376 Dr. Robert Carrow Dr. Mark Risse Department of Crop & Soil Sciences

Arnold, Jonathan

411

Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

Grunwald, Sabine

412

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

Arnold, Jonathan

413

Measuring soil moisture with imaging radars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An empirical algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture content and surface Root Mean Square (RMS) height from remotely sensed radar data was developed using scatterometer data. The algorithm is optimized for bare surfaces and requires two copolarized channels at a frequency between 1.5 and 11 GHz. It gives best results for kh {le} 2.5, {mu}{sub {upsilon}}{le}35%, and {theta}{ge}30{degree}. Omitting the usually weaker hv-polarized returns makes the algorithm less sensitive to system cross-talk and system noise, simplify the calibration process and adds robustness to the algorithm in the presence of vegetation. However, inversion results indicate that significant amounts of vegetation (NDVI>0.4) cause the algorithm to underestimate soil moisture and overestimate RMS height. A simple criteria based on the {sigma}{sub hv}{sup 0}/{sigma}{sub vv}{sup 0} ratio is developed to select the areas where the inversion is not impaired by the vegetation. The inversion accuracy is assessed on the original scatterometer data sets but also on several SAR data sets by comparing the derived soil moisture values with in-situ measurements collected over a variety of scenes between 1991 and 1994. Both spaceborne (SIR-C) and airborne (AIRSAR) data are used in the test. Over this large sample of conditions, the RMS error in the soil moisture estimate is found to be less than 4.2% soil moisture.

Dubois, P.C.; Zyl, J. van [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.] [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Engman, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Soil quality standards and guidelines for forest sustainability in northwestern North America$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil quality standards and guidelines for forest sustainability in northwestern North America of the ¬ģrst in the world to be developed to evaluate changes in forest soil productivity and sustainability and include diagnostic criteria for evaluating management-caused changes to soil productivity. Research

415

Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia Page 1 ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia: historical review, current classification in Croatia Page 2 Summary An historical overview of soil survey and soil classification activities

Rossiter, D G "David"

416

Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

417

Soil Erosion (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Board of Water and Soil Resources has adopted a model ordinance to serve as the minimum standard for local governments, which are asked to implement standards and administrative procedures...

418

Automated soil gas monitoring chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

Saving our soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when we consider how important the worldís soils are to human civilization. Within the next several decades, about 9Ė10 billion people will increasingly require food, timber, fiber, and bioenergy, as well as related ecosystem ser- vices... producers, motivated by short-term finances, increase inputs of fertilizers and pesticides to maximize yields, frequently with adverse environmental impacts. Subsistence farmers coax decreasing crop yields from soils that can no longer be managed sustainably...

Grandy, A. Stuart; Billings, Sharon A.; Richter Dan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292≠2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R ezaī c ovaī a,b,√, Hana Hrs elovaī a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

Miksik, Ivan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 93(7), 2012, pp. 1527¬≠1539 √? 2012 by the Ecological Society of America Uses and misuses of bioclimatic envelope, they can be applied to a variety of questions in ecology, evolution, and conservation. However, some have

Hammerton, James

423

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 87(6), 2006, pp. 1345¬≠1358 √? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ANALYTIC WEBS SUPPORT THE SYNTHESIS OF ECOLOGICAL DATA SETS AARON M. ELLISON,1,3 LEON J. OSTERWEIL,2 LORI CLARKE,2 JULIAN L. HADLEY,1 ALEXANDER WISE

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

424

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

425

What can I do with a degree in Ecology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What can I do with a degree in Ecology? Science Planning your career Choosing a career involves.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Ecology? Ecology is the scientific study of the interactions between organisms and the environment. In reality, modern ecology is much broader than this, encompassing studies on individuals

Hickman, Mark

426

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

427

SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 11241134  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1124 SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 1124­1134 2005 by the Ecological Society of America STATISTICS OF EXTREMES: MODELING ECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES RICHARD W. KATZ,1,3 GRACE S. BRUSH,2 AND MARC B ecological disturbances is the central theme of this paper. The statistics of extremes have played only

Gilleland, Eric

428

Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 15 Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back Roie Levy and Elhanan Borenstein the environments in which they evolved and are adapted to. Re- verse Ecology--an emerging new frontier's ecology. The Reverse Ecology framework facilitates the translation of high-throughput genomic data

Borenstein, Elhanan

429

SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574577  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

574 SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574­577 2003 by the Ecological Society of America WHAT that genetics should be incorporated into ecological explanations (Collins 1986). C. C. Adams (1915) sug- gested. Evolutionary ecology emerged in the 1960s, driven by empirical results in three areas (Collins 1986

Antonovics, Janis

430

Hygrothermal Simulation of Foundations: Part 1 - Soil Material Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is a complicated process. A computational approach for heat transfer through the ground has been well defined (EN ISO 13370:2007, 2007), and simplified methods have been developed (Staszczuk, Radon, and Holm 2010). However, these approaches generally ignore the transfer of soil moisture, which is not negligible (Janssen, Carmeliet, and Hens 2004). This study is divided into several parts. The intention of the first part is to gather, comprehend and adapt soil properties from Soil Science. The obtained information must be applicable to related tasks in Building Science and validated with hygrothermal calculation tools. Future parts of this study will focus on the validation aspect of the soil properties to be implemented. Basic changes in the software code may be requested at this time. Different types of basement construction will be created with a hygrothermal calculation tool, WUFI. Simulations from WUFI will be compared with existing or ongoing measurements. The intentions of the first part of this study have been fulfilled. The soil properties of interest in Building Science have been defined for 12 different soil textures. These properties will serve as input parameters when performing hygrothermal calculations of building constructions coupled to soil materials. The reliability of the soil parameters will be further evaluated with measurements in Part 2.

Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Unusual persistence of DDT in some western USA soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural use of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane) was canceled in 1972. By the late 1970's and early 1980's, the National Soils Monitoring Program of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was consistently finding higher soil residues of the degradate DDE (1,1-dichloro 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene) than of parent DDT. Similarly, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) had been finding during the late 1970's that DDT and related compounds had been decreasing in birds throughout the US. During 1984 and 1985, the EPA and the agriculture departments of Texas and New Mexico, in response to the FWS, conducted soil sampling in 13 areas where contaminated birds had been collected. It was agreed that soil samples containing higher levels of DDT than DDE would serve as a possible indicator of illegal DDT use. This was an intensive soil sampling program; over 236 fields were sampled. A controversy developed as to whether high ratios of DDT and DDE might corroborate the accusations of recent illegal use of DDT products. Dell City area soils containing higher levels of DDT than of DDE became classified as suspicious soils. Soils bearing the expected higher level of DDE were dubbed as normal. To resolve the controversy, the authors, in 1989, conducted a DDT soil metabolism study with representative samples of the suspicious and normal soils. It was felt that a soil metabolism study could, once and for all, determine if there was, indeed, something unusual about the rate at which the suspicious soils degrade DDT.

Hitch, R.K.; Day, H.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Crop and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________ ID Intensive (SOIL 325) (3) _______ HHS 231 ≠ Lifetime Fitness for Health (2. Global Issues (3) (*soil science electives meeting requirement) _______ Science

GrŁnwald, Niklaus J.

433

Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Abigail Golden, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Mentor: Dr. Joshua Drew, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abigail Golden, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Mentor: Dr. Joshua Drew, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Advisor: Dr. Elisa Bone, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution their fishing practices, which species they targeted most heavily, and aspects of their traditional ecological

435

Journal of Mediterranean Ecology vol.3, No 2-3 2002 Ecology is increasingly being asked to address  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35 Journal of Mediterranean Ecology vol.3, No 2-3 2002 Preface Ecology is increasingly being asked advising on these issues, ecologists rely on two central concepts in ecology, the concept of ecosy- stem concepts are translated into two separate approaches for land planning and management is new. Most ecologi

436

HO #19 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Barbour et al. (1999) Terrestrial Plant Ecology, 3rd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HO #19 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Barbour et al. (1999) Terrestrial Plant Ecology, 3rd Edition. #12;HO #20 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 From Larcher (1995) #12;HO #21 NRES 725: Plant Physiol. Ecology Spring 2013 Osmond et al. (1982) IN Encyclopedia of Plant

Nowak, Robert S.

437

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

Smith, M.H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Technical report for the alkali lake ecological assessment, phase 1 reconnaissance (FY 91 and FY 92)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes the results of three field survey trips (June and September 1991, May 1992) taken to investigate the ecological effects associated with the release of over a million gallons of hazardous waste from herbicide production on the Alkali Lake playa. Sampling of soil, sediment, groundwater, soil-dwelling invertebrates and vegetation confirmed that hazardous materials from the waste disposal area are migrating westerly within the shallow aquifer to West Alkali Lake. Two areas of dead vegetation were identified and permanently marked to determine if these areas are changing in size and location. Preliminary calculations using a linear food-chain model suggested that small mammalian herbivores would probably not display adverse effects due to dietary exposures to the contaminants. However, nestling shorebirds may be exposed to concentrations potentially associated with adverse biological effects.

Linder, G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators July 21-25, 2014 CI 5540-003 (86282) 3 Credits Science and Earth Science curricula in Minnesota public schools. It is designed primarily for middle

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ungulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007). Forest biodiversity, energy flow, nutrient cycling, and regeneration are significantly affectedUngulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create Biogeochemical Hotspots in Forest. Vucetich, Rolf O. Peterson, Joshua M. Shields, and Matthew D. Powers School of Forest Resources

442

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY BACKGROUND MATERIAL HSU WILDLIFE 531 Dr. Matt Johnson;39 #12;HSU Matt Johnson CHI-SQUARE GOODNESS-OF-FIT TESTS OF WILDLIFE HABITAT SELECTION In a nutshell

Johnson, Matthew

443

The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-44 1973 The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas By: William J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 44 Texas A&M University System...

Clark, W. J.

444

Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, ...

Rusconi, Roberto

445

A Rapid Assessment Method Examining the Ecological Health of Tidal Marine Wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galveston Bay, and then grouped those measurements into four functional groups: landscape/site characteristics, hydrology, wildlife habitat, and soil characteristics. I then developed a scoring system (minimum 0, maximum 100) to summarize the overall health...

Staszak, Lindsey Ann

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Environmental Planning and Ecology Program Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and GeomorphologyMinerals, and Geomorphology · Soil is unconsolidated material). ·· SoilSoil is unconsolidated material at the surface of the Earth thatis unconsolidated material

449

Theoretical ecology: a successful first year and a bright future for a new journal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 EDITORIAL Theoretical ecology: a successful first year andvolume 2 of Theoretical Ecology. Looking back, this has beenfocusing on theoretical ecology can play an expanding role

Hastings, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ecology and environments of an extreme faunal turnover in topical American scallops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paleobiology, community ecology, and scales of ecologicalpattern. Ecology 77: 1367-1378. Jablonski, D. , K.W. Flessa,naturalist 108: óó. 1988. Does ecology matter? Paleobiology

Smith, James Travis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Organizational ecology and population dynamics in politics : an agent-based model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.3 Organizational Ecology and PopulationOrganizational Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2Chapter 3 An Agent Based Model of Organizational Ecology 3.1

Jung, Danielle Fitzpatrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ecology and Management of Canyon Flies (Fannia benjamini complex) in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. W. 1976. Mosquito Ecology: Field sampling methods. Newin southern Israel. J. Vector Ecology. 36(1): S212-S218.control from chemical ecology. Agriculture, Ecosystems &

Ekanayake, Panchali Kumari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - adopting ecological principles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lornd University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 Introduction to Landscape Ecology By Kevin McGarigal Summary: . In addition, landscape ecology involves the...

454

soils.ifas.ufl.edu Soil & Water Science Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interested in courses that emphasize sustainability, resource management, valuation of ecosystem servicessoils.ifas.ufl.edu UF/IFAS Soil & Water Science Department DISTANCE EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS #12;SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT The Soil and Water Science Department at the University of Florida

Watson, Craig A.

455

Soil cracking modelling using the mesh-free SPH method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of desiccation cracks in soils can significantly alter their mechanical and hydrological properties. In many circumstances, desiccation cracking in soils can cause significant damage to earthen or soil supported structures. For example, desiccation cracks can act as the preference path way for water flow, which can facilitate seepage flow causing internal erosion inside earth structures. Desiccation cracks can also trigger slope failures and landslides. Therefore, developing a computational procedure to predict desiccation cracking behaviour in soils is vital for dealing with key issues relevant to a range of applications in geotechnical and geo-environment engineering. In this paper, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method will be extended for the first time to simulate shrinkage-induced soil cracking. The main objective of this work is to examine the performance of the proposed numerical approach in simulating the strong discontinuity in material behaviour and to learn about the crack ...

Bui, H H; Kodikara, J; Sanchez, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Floridaís 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in 1937 under Chapter 582 Florida Statutes. The law was based on federal model legislation to establish Soil and Water...

457

Residential construction on expansive soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residences founded on expansive soils experience billions of dollars each year in damage caused by the heaving and shrinking of the foundation soils. It is thought that stiffening the foundation, while increasing the cost of the home, will save...

Phipps, James Frederick

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

459

Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

460

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

Sandercock, Brett K.

462

Ecology, 93(1), 2012, pp. 38 2012 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reports Ecology, 93(1), 2012, pp. 3≠8 ” 2012 by the Ecological Society of America Fungal endophytes conditions. Here we tested the effects of two phylotypes of Alternaria endophytes on the growth, competitive in the absence of endophytes. However, one endophyte both increased the biomass of C. stoebe and reduced

Aschehoug, Erik

463

Ecological Applications, 18(2), 2008, pp. 321334 2008 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects, and herbicide-induced habitat changes could not explain the P. maniculatus response. Treatment a management tool for mitigating exotic impacts on a native species. We evaluate the effectiveness of the toolEcological Applications, 18(2), 2008, pp. 321¬≠334 √? 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

464

Ecological Applications, 17(8), 2007, pp. 23652376 2007 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Applications, 17(8), 2007, pp. 2365¬≠2376 √? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America of nitrate to nitrogen gas. An important factor in this process is the interaction of river water to this study, the site had been leveed, drained, and farmed for more than 50 years. In late fall 2002

Stanley, Emily

465

Ecology, 85(12), 2004, pp. 32673276 2004 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There was no evidence for self-incompatibility, and fitness was dramatically lower in selfed compared to outcrossed3267 Ecology, 85(12), 2004, pp. 3267­3276 2004 by the Ecological Society of America EFFECTS OF SELF of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 USA Abstract. The costs of self-fertilization were evaluated

Washburn, Libe

466

Ecological Applications, 20(6), 2010, pp. 15691582 2010 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Applications, 20(6), 2010, pp. 1569≠1582 ” 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 137 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 USA 2 Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside

467

Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 675685 2006 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enemies. While much is known about how environmental variation influences the amount of damage a plant environmental variation impacts the magnitude and negative fitness effects of pathogen damage is important675 Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 675≠685 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ENVIRONMENTAL

Rausher, Mark D.

468

Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils, Comprehensive Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system.

Altman, D.J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

GUIDE TO GRADUATE SOIL SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GUIDE TO GRADUATE PROGRAMS in AGRONOMY and SOIL SCIENCE Updated July 2011 THE DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND SOIL SCIENCES THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY PARK, PA #12;iiii Guide to Graduate Programs in Agronomy and Soil Science Table of Contents Introduction

Guiltinan, Mark

471

5, 95145, 2008 Soil parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools to sim- ulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for nu, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulicHESSD 5, 95­145, 2008 Soil parameter inversion ­ potential and limits A. Loew and W. Mauser Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

472

LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35į K

Rathbun, Julie A.

473

Soil Segregation Methods for Reducing Transportation and Disposal Costs - 13544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where the selected alternative for contaminated soil is excavation and off-site disposal, the most significant budget items of the remedial action are the costs for transportation and disposal of soil at an off-site facility. At these sites, the objective is to excavate and dispose of only those soils that exceed derived concentration guideline levels. In situ soil segregation using gross gamma detectors to guide the excavation is often challenging at sites where the soil contamination is overlain by clean soil or where the contaminated soil is located in isolated, subsurface pockets. In addition, data gaps are often identified during the alternative evaluation and selection process, resulting in increased uncertainty in the extent of subsurface contamination. In response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District is implementing ex situ soil segregation methods. At the remediated Painesville Site, soils were excavated and fed through a conveyor-belt system, which automatically segregated them into above- and below-cleanup criteria discharge piles utilizing gamma spectroscopy. At the Linde Site and the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site, which are both in the remediation phase, soils are initially segregated during the excavation process using gross gamma detectors and then transported to a pad for confirmatory manual surveying and sampling. At the Linde Site, the ex situ soils are analyzed on the basis of a site-specific method, to establish compliance with beneficial reuse criteria that were developed for the Linde remediation. At the SLDA Site, the ex situ soils are surveyed and sampled based on Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) final status survey guidance to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels. At all three sites, the ex situ soils that meet the site- specific DCGLs are retained on-site and used as backfill material. This paper describes the ex situ soil segregation methods, the considerations of each method, and the estimated cost savings from minimizing the volume of soil requiring transportation and off-site disposal. (authors)

Frothingham, David; Andrews, Shawn; Barker, Michelle; Boyle, James; Buechi, Stephen; Graham, Marc; Houston, Linda; Polek, Michael; Simmington, Robert; Spector, Harold [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Elliott, Robert 'Dan' [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States)] [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

264 September 2013 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 31.3 Ecological Restoration Vol. 31, No. 3, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, did not decrease either buckthorn reinvasion or soil N availability. The mechanical disturbance. RESEARCH ARTICLE Amending Soil with Mulched European Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) Does Not Reduce a three-year field experiment to determine if amending soils with mulched European buckthorn (Rhamnus

Illinois at Chicago, University of

475

The Primate Life History Database: a unique shared ecological data resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Primate Life History Database: a unique shared ecological data resource Karen B. Strier1 of the collaborative life history database developed by our Working Group at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center scientists that collaborative databases can facilitate these activities. 2. We provide a detailed description

Bronikowski, Anne

476

Ecological Modelling 187 (2005) 179200 Eutrophication model for Lake Washington (USA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Modelling 187 (2005) 179­200 Eutrophication model for Lake Washington (USA) Part II Abstract We developed a complex eutrophication model to simulate the current chemical and biological of the present eutrophication model with a hydrodynamic model with enhanced vertical resolution will allow more

Arhonditsis, George B.

477

Ecological Modelling 187 (2005) 140178 Eutrophication model for Lake Washington (USA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Modelling 187 (2005) 140­178 Eutrophication model for Lake Washington (USA) Part I eutrophication model that has been developed to simulate plankton dynamics in Lake Washington, USA. Because loading scenarios. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Eutrophication; Lake Washington

Arhonditsis, George B.

478

Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 105131 Tropical deforestation in Madagascar: analysis using hierarchical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 105­131 Tropical deforestation in Madagascar: analysis using­effect relationships for deforestation at various scales has proven difficult even when rates of deforestation appear approach to develop a novel deforestation model for the eastern wet forested zone of Madagascar, a global

Silander Jr., John A.

479

AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

Gray, Matthew

480

Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

Edwards, N.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developing ecological soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

State trends in ecological risk assessment and standard setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this paper are (1) to identify key states' activities and plans related to setting cleanup standards using the ecological risk assessment process, and (2) to discuss the impacts these actions may have on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) environmental restoration program. This report is prepared as part of a larger task, the purpose of which is to identify and assess state regulatory trends and legal developments that may impact DOE's environmental restoration program. Results of this task are intended to provide DOE with advance notice of potentially significant regulatory developments so as to enhance DOE's ability to influence these developments and to incorporate possible regulatory and policy changes into its planning process.

Siegel, M R; Fowler, K M; Bilyard, G R

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Aspects of the ecology and systematics of the lizards Coleonyx brevis and Coleonyx reticulatus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edward Dial, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James R. Dixon N 1 hi y d' f ~C1 1* ' ' 1 d ly- sis of the reproductive and thermal ecology, diet composition, and behavior of the species. Data on the thermal ecology, diet... and mensural data from each species were recorded and geographic variation in C. brevis was analyzed. The reproductive cycle of C. brevis involves cyclic gonadal development in males and females. Males emerge from hibernation with enlarged testes...

Dial, Benjamin Edward

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

The development of high definition television : an ecology of games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is an analysis of the forces that shaped the overall character of a new US television system, high definition or HDTV, between the early 1980s and 2010, with a primary focus on the period leading up the Federal ...

Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoff MeetingKuda TrainingCeramic.# .

485

Microsatellite DNA Development Service | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject Quarterly ReportsMicrofluidicThis page has moved

486

Soil-penetrating synthetic aperture radar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results for the first year of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort. This effort included a system study, preliminary data acquisition, and preliminary algorithm development. The system study determined the optimum frequency and bandwidth, surveyed soil parameters and targets, and defined radar cross section in lossy media. The data acquisition imaged buried objects with a rail-SAR. Algorithm development included a radar echo model, three-dimensional processing, sidelobe optimization, phase history data interpolation, and clutter estimation/cancellation.

Boverie, B.; Brock, B.C.; Doerry, A.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

488

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

489

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

490

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

491

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

492

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

493

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

494

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

495

Ecoinformatics: supporting ecology as a data-intensive science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requiring data management Author's personal copy Reviewpersonal copy Review Critically, metadata enable a scientist to understand and use the data;personal copy Review Special Issue: Ecological and evolutionary informatics Ecoinformatics: supporting ecology as a data-

Michener, William H.; Jones, Matthew B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium ,,Theoretical of natural communities #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Abstracts Carlos data sets and theory in a flexible framework. #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems

Wehrli, Bernhard

497

INVITED TECHNICAL REVIEW Sunflower genetic, genomic and ecological resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and religion, sunflow- ers represent solar deities, power, nuclear nonproliferation, longevity and mortality tool kit, important economic impacts and fascinating ecology, it is an ideal taxon for many ecological

Burke, John M.

498

FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

Watson, Craig A.

499

Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

500

Applicability of 10 CFR 851 to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Letter from Bruce Diamond, Assistant General Counsel for Environment, DOE, dated November 24, 2007 to Mr. Bertsch, Director and Professor, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, regarding Savannah Riber Ecology Laboratory's Request for Interpretive Ruling under 10 CFR 851.