Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Distributor Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Distributor License and Recordkeeping Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section...

2

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Golden Eagle Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert Entire Fleet to CNG on AddThis.com...

3

Mr. Timothy Orr Director of Product Development Advanced Distributor Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 4, 2010 November 4, 2010 Mr. Timothy Orr Director of Product Development Advanced Distributor Products RE: Case No. 2010-SE-0304 Dear Mr. On, On May 28, 2010, DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination for two air conditioning heat pumps (basic model N2H348A(G)KB* + H,GE50560 + *8MPV125 and basic model N2H360A(G)KB* + H,GE50560 + MV16J22**B*) manufactured by Advanced Distributor Products (ADP). Pursuant to that Notice, ADP provided information indicating that it had not sold these products in the United States. DOE, as the agency charged with developing and administering a balanced and coordinated national energy policy, has determined, in light of these circumstances, that closing this case without further action properly balances the policies recognized in the Energy Policy and

4

Coal Development (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development (Nebraska) Coal Development (Nebraska) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial Installer...

5

Bio Friendly Fuel Partners LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Bio Friendly Fuel Partners LLC Place Danville, California Zip 94526 Product Biodiesel distributor and plant developer in Califonia. References Bio Friendly Fuel Partners...

6

HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

Shadday, M

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development  

SciTech Connect

This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fuel Cell Development Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and sustainable fuel cell solutions UTC Power About Us PureCell ® Model 400 Solution Process Overview Power Conditioner Converts DC power to high-quality AC power 3 Fuel Cell Stack Generates DC power from hydrogen and air 2 Fuel Processor Converts natural gas fuel to hydrogen

10

Liquid fuel reformer development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Argonne National Laboratory we are developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to a clean hydrogen feed for a fuel cell. The process incorporates a partial oxidation/steam reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. We have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, low-sulfur diesel fuel, and a regular diesel fuel. We achieved complete conversion of the feed to products. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 800 C. For the two diesel fuels, higher temperatures, >850 C, were required to approach similar levels of hydrogen in the product stream. At 800 C, hydrogen yield of the low sulfur diesel was 32%, while that of the regular diesel was 52%. Residual products in both cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, ethylene, and methane.

Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Research and Development Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

15

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

17

Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Zboray, James A. (Irvine, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Standard Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Standard Development The state of Hawaii is responsible for facilitating the development of

19

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Economic Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Economic Development To stimulate local economic development, landowners may apply to amend the

20

Integrated fuel processor development challenges.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the absence of a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, the success of the fuel cell system in the market will depend on fuel processors to enable the use of available fuels, such as gasoline, natural gas, etc. The fuel processor includes several catalytic reactors, scrubbers to remove chemical species that can poison downstream catalysts or the fuel cell electrocatalyst, and heat exchangers. Most fuel cell power applications seek compact, lightweight hardware with rapid-start and load- following capabilities. Although packaging can partially address the size and volume, balancing the performance parameters while maintaining the fuel conversion (to hydrogen) efficiency requires careful integration of the unit operations and processes. Argonne National Laboratory has developed integrated fuel processors that are compact and light, and that operate efficiently. This paper discusses some of the difficulties encountered in the development process, focusing on the factors/components that constrain performance, and areas that need further research and development.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, Lee, S. H. D.; Kaun, T.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel-Efficient Tire Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development The California Energy Commission (CEC) must adopt and implement a

22

HTR Fuel Development in Europe  

SciTech Connect

In the frame of the European Network HTR-TN and in the 5. EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) European programmes have been launched to consolidate advanced modular HTR technology in Europe. This paper gives an overall description and first results of this programme. The major tasks covered concern a complete recovery of the past experience on fuel irradiation behaviour in Europe, qualification of HTR fuel by irradiating of fuel elements in the HFR reactor, understanding of fuel behaviour with the development of a fuel particle code and finally a recover of the fuel fabrication capability. (authors)

Languille, Alain [CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance BP1 (France); Conrad, R. [CEC/JRC/IE Petten (Netherlands); Guillermier, P. [Framatome-ANP/ Lyon (France); Nabielek, H. [FZJ/Juelich (Germany); Bakker, K. [NRG/Petten (Netherlands); Abram, T. [BNFL UK (United Kingdom); Haas, D. [JRC/ITU/Karlsruhe (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

24

WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL REFZR m SYmOL1 LILCB .' .. .",I:, ' ,,:r:~' ., " " In aooordame with our telephone oonvorsation of-this date, there is transmitted herewith for 'your um a few of the prooessora and distributors of' refined source material. i. PRocESSoRS~ DISTRIBUTOBS CJI-'GB&& Chemical Co. Pbilliprrburg, Uew Jersey Haywood Chemloal Uorke "' Maymod, bw Jermy City Chesical Company 132 Ploet Z2nd Street Uw York, Ber York Eiimr &Am& ' 6S6 Oreennioh Street Hen York 10, Hew York 5. W. Sbattuok Chemloal Co. Amend Drug d Chsmioal 1806 South Sameok Street 117 East 24th Street Denver 10, Colorado , Hew York, Hew Pork Lindsay Ught b Chemical Co. bat Chicago, Illinoir A.D.MackayCompany

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Development Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Development Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

26

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research, Development, and Promotion to someone by E-mail Research, Development, and Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

27

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Industry Development...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Industry Development Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Industry Development Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data...

28

Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

Nuvera Fuel Cells

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Advanced Distributor Products: Case Closure (2010-SE-0304)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE closed this case against Advanced Distributor Products without civil penalty after ADP provided information that the non-compliant products were not sold in the United States.

30

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model analysis - Quench testing Technology development -...

31

Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Initial testing successfully completed * 1000 hrs of sub-scale durability completed (Target 8000). Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop; Washington, D.C. March 2011 27 Benefits of...

32

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Program Presentation to Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline Fuel Cycle R&D Mission Changes from the Former Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative The Science-Based Approach Key Collaborators Budget History Program Elements Summary July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 3 Fuel Cycle R&D Mission The mission of Fuel Cycle Research and Development is to develop options to current fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while reducing proliferation risks by conducting

34

Thermochemical Fuel Reformer Development Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical Fuel Reforming (TCFR) is the recovery of internal combustion engine exhaust heat to chemically convert natural gas into a higher calorific flow fuel stream containing a significant concentration of hydrogen. This technique of recycling the engine exhaust heat can reduce fuel use (heat rate). In addition, the hydrogen enhanced combustion also allows stable engine operation at a higher air-fuel ratio (leaner combustion) which results in very low NOx production. This interim report covers two...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fuel Cells: Identifying Promising Development Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low temperature PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells are in the initial stage of commercialization, while high temperature SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) are under development because they hold promise of higher efficiency and lower costs. To assess their future market potential, this study analyzed several innovative market applications and technical improvements: PEM fuel cells for peak shaving, PEM fuel cells for uninterruptible power supply (UPS), tubular and planar SOFC units for residential use...

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

37

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separations and Waste Form. Campaign Objectives. ?Develop the next generation of fuel cycle separation and waste management technologies that enable a.

38

Overview of reduced-enrichment fuels - development  

SciTech Connect

The US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 to provide the technical means to operate research and test reactors with low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuels without significant penalty in experiment performance, operation costs, component modifications, or safety characteristics. A large increase in /sup 238/U is required to reduce the enrichment, and a 10 to 15% increase in /sup 235/U is required to compensate for the extra absorption in /sup 238/U. The additional uranium can be accommodated by redesigning the fuel element to increase the fuel volume fraction in the reactor core and/or by increasing the uranium density in the fuel meat. Since fuel element redesign coupled with the highest density fuel available in 1978 is sufficient for only a few reactors, a fuel development and testing effort was begun to qualify much higher density fuels. The greatest emphasis has been on plate-type fuels, since plate-type reactors are the largest users of highly enriched uranium (HEU). In addition to the RERTR program's work with plate-type dispersion fuels, the CEA developed and tested the caramel fuel, consisting of sintered UO/sub 2/ wafers in Zircaloy-clad plates; GA Technologies developed highly loaded UZrH/sub x/ fuel for TRIGA reactors and tested it in cooperation with the RERTR Program; and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. developed and tested rod-type uranium silicide-Al dispersion fuel. The dispersion fuels were irradiated to high burnups to establish their limits of usability. A whole-core demonstration has been conducted in the ORR using 4.8 Mg U/m/sup 3/ U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersion fuel. Twenty-nine elements have achieved average burnups in excess of 40%.

Snelgrove, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Distributor Products: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0304) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Distributor Products: Noncompliance Determination Advanced Distributor Products: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0304) Advanced Distributor Products: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0304) May 28, 2010 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Advanced Distributor Products finding that basic model N2H348A(G)KB* + H,GE50560 + *8MPV125 and basic model N2H360A(G)KB* + H,GE50560 + MV16J22**B* do not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the products were noncompliant based on ADP's certification. ADP must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom ADP distributed the noncompliant products that the product does not meet Federal standards. In addition, ADP must provide to DOE documents and records showing the number of units ADP distributed and to whom. The manufacturer and/or private labeler of the

40

Fuel consolidation demonstration: Consolidation concept development  

SciTech Connect

EPRI, Northeast utilities Service Company (NUSCO), DOE, Baltimore Gas Electric Company, and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel, in which the consolidated fuel will be licensable by NRC for storage in the spent-fuel storage pool. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent-fuel storage pools. Consolidation equipment design, development, construction, and testing are being performed by C-E in Windsor, Connecticut. Seismic and structural evaluation of the capability of the Millstone Unit 2 spent-fuel pool and building to accommodate the increased fuel capacity is being conducted by NUSCO. NUSCO plans to obtain a license to store consolidated fuel in the Millstone-2 spent-fuel storage pool. NUSCO also plans to perform a hot demonstration of the integrated consolidation system with spent fuel at Millstone-2. This report describes the consolidation system design that forms the basis for the detailed design of the equipment comprising the system, including information on the fabrication and testing of the equipment. Appendix B describes an evaluation of the ability of the system under development to consolidate LWR spent-fuel assemblies other than the 14 {times} 14 fuel of C-E design stored at Millstone-2. A comparison was made of fuel-assembly designs on the basis of information available in open literature. It was concluded that with appropriate dimensional modifications the spent-fuel consolidation system equipment design is applicable to almost all PWR fuel-assembly configurations. 8 refs., 20 figs.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Fuel Cell Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility & High Impact 3 FCEB Development Timeline since 2000 California Air Resources Board Transit Rule Early demonstrations of single prototypes DOE begins funding NREL technology validation for FCEBs First multiple bus fleet demonstrations in California FTA initiates National Fuel Cell Bus Program and

43

Progress in the development OF LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

New nuclear fuels are being developed to enable many of the most important research and test reactors worldwide to convert from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuels to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels without significant loss in performance. The development work is an international effort lead by the US RERTR program under the NNSA's GTRI. Initial testing (circa 2003) demonstrated that the unexpected tendency of U-Mo fuels dispersed in aluminum toward unstable swelling (pillowing) under high-power conditions. Technical investigations were initiated worldwide at this time by the partners (including Argentina, Canada, France, South Korea and Russia) understand this behaviour as well as to develop and test remedies. This paper gives an overview of the current status of U-Mo fuel development, including basic research results, manufacturing aspects, and the results of the latest irradiations and post irradiation examinations. (authors)

Wachs, Daniel; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Burkes, Douglas; Clark, Curtis; Moore, Glen; Jue, Jan-Fong; Ross Finlay, M. [Idaho National Laboratory P.O Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Totev, Totju; Hofman, Gerard; Wiencek, Tom; Kim, Yeon So; Snelgrove, Jim [Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Low-Enrichment Fuel Development Program  

SciTech Connect

The national program of the Department of Energy at Argonne National Laboratory for the development of highly loaded uranium fuels, which provide the means for enrichment reduction, has been briefly described. The objectives of > 60 wt % uranium in plate-type fuels and greater than or equal to 45 wt % uranium in U--ZrH/sub x/ rod-type fuels are expected to be met. The most promising fuels will be further evaluated in full-size element irradiations and whole-core demonstrations on the route toward commercialization.

Stahl, D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Distributor means for charging particulate material into receptacles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are receptacles, such as shaft furnaces illustrated by a blast furnace and an upright oil shale retort, embodying rotatable charge distributor means for distributing particulate charge material in the furnace, which charge distributor means can provide a high uniformity of distribution of various sizes of particles and also can provide and maintain a stock line of desired contour and heighth in the receptacle. The distributor means includes a hopper having rigidly fixed to it a plurality of downwardly extending chutes with lower discharge portions that discharge in concentric circular zones at the stock line. The distributor means includes a segmented portion at the juncture of the hopper and the chutes that divides the charge material discharged into the hopper in proportion to the area of the circular zone at the stock line that is fed by the chute. The distributor means embodies means for providing mass flow of the particulate charge material through the chutes to the stock line and for avoiding segregation between larger and smaller particles of charge material deposited at the stock line.

Greaves, Melvin J. (9995 Cliff Drive, Cleveland, OH 44102)

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

Jukkola, Walfred W. (Westport, CT); Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY); Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C. (Bethel, CT); McCoy, Daniel E. (Williamsport, PA); Fisher, Barry L. (Montgomery, PA); Saiers, Timothy L. (Williamsport, PA); Karstetter, Marlin E. (Loganton, PA)

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Liquid fuel reformer development: Autothermal reforming of Diesel fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to clean hydrogen feeds for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The process incorporates an autothermal reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. The authors have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, certified low-sulfur grade 1 diesel, and a standard grade 2 diesel. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 850 C, while maximum hydrogen product yields for the two diesel fuels were near 50%. Residual products in all cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, and methane. Further studies with grade 1 diesel showed improved conversion as the water:fuel ratio was increased from 1 to 2 at 850 C. Soot formation was reduced when the oxygen:carbon ratio was maintained at 1 at 850 C. There were no significant changes in hydrogen yield as the space velocity and the oxygen:fuel ratio were varied. Tests with a microchannel monolithic catalyst yielded similar or improved hydrogen levels at higher space velocities than with extruded pellets in a packed bed.

Pereira, C.; Bae, J-M.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SiC Research for SiC Research for Accident Tolerant Fuels Shannon Bragg-Sitton Idaho National Laboratory Advanced LWR Fuels Technical Lead Advanced Fuels Campaign Advanced LWR Fuels Pathway Lead Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program August 2013 Outline  Overview of DOE SiC research  Severe accident modeling: MELCOR analysis w/SiC  Recent characterization test results - Oxidation kinetics - Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model analysis - Quench testing  Technology development - ASTM standards development - SiC/SiC joining technology 2 SiC Gap Analysis and Feasibility Study  SiC Gap Analysis / Feasibility - Milestone report issued July 30, 2013 - Incorporates results of work funded

50

Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline...

52

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development...

53

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the...

54

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels &039;Plus&039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada)...

55

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The Minnesota Department of Revenue imposes an excise tax on the first licensed distributor that receives E85 fuel products in the state and on distributors, special fuel dealers, or bulk purchasers of other alternative

56

NP-MHTGR Fuel Development Program Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 1988, the Secretary of Energy announced a strategy to acquire New Production Reactor capacity for producing tritium. The strategy involved construction of a New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) where the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was selected as the Management and Operations contractor for the project. Immediately after the announcement in August 1988, tritium target particle development began with the INEEL selected as the lead laboratory. Fuel particle development was initially not considered to be on a critical path for the project, therefore, the fuel development program was to run concurrently with the design effort of the NP-MHTGR.

Maki, John Thomas; Petti, David Andrew; Hobbins, Richard Redfield; McCardell, Richard K.; Shaber, Eric Lee; Southworth, Finis Hio

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Unconventional Fuels Conference Tribal Energy Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for oil shale development or other unconventional resources on the Reservation be improved by encouraging commercial leasing of oil shale on the considerable public lands where oil shale formations are found out: ­ 1. Learn more about oil shale and other unconventional fuels development, and ­ 2. To understand

Utah, University of

58

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2013 Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Supported by Research Funding...

62

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF)...

63

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of...

64

Berkeley Lab Startup Brings Fuel Cells to the Developing ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Berkeley Lab Startup Brings Fuel Cells to the Developing World Point Source Powers cheap, rugged fuel cells can provide ...

65

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Research and Development

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Research Electricity Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass Research and Biomass Research and Development Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass Research and Development Initiative

70

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Program Type Grant Program Loan Program Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

73

Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

Ray, E.R.; Cracraft, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

Reifsnider, Kenneth

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fuel Cycle Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Research & Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development The mission of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is to conduct research and development to help develop sustainable fuel cycles, as described in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. Sustainable fuel cycle options are those that improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation, minimize waste generation, improve safety, and limit proliferation risk. The FCRD program will develop a suite of options to enable future policymakers to make informed decisions about how best to manage used fuel from nuclear reactors. The overall goal is to demonstrate the technologies necessary to allow commercial deployment of solutions for the sustainable management of used

77

Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development  

SciTech Connect

Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompassesfuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additionssignificant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Present status and development of PWR fuel in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the nuclear power plant fuel design, manufacture and R and D capability in Republic of China; the progress condition of Qinshan fuel assemblies and preparatory work for Guandong and other PWR's fuel assemblies; and the program of research and development of high performance fuel.

Shouhui, D.; Yinian, Z; Dingcang, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Developing alternative feedstocks for fuel alcohol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews recent research to examine the viability of energy sorghum as a feedstock for producing fuel alcohol. Energy sorghum is the name given to any sweet sorghum shown to be feasible for producing fuel alcohol. Energy sorghum can grow on a variety of soils, in 90 day cycles, with up to three crops a year. Crop rotation is rarely needed; most of the nitrogen and potassium returns to the soil. Harmon Engineering and Testing initiated an inhouse program to research sweet sorghum development. Equipment specifications and preliminary results are given. An ''energy farm'' process is explained step by step. Stalk juice, grain, and stalk fiber yields are listed. The use of bagasse and carbon dioxide is also considered.

Verma, V.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell(tm) Texaco Ovonic Fuel Cell Company, LLC non-precious metal catalysts regenerative braking energy absorption capability wide temperature range instant...

82

Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development A typical spent nuclear fuel cask sitting on a railcar. Since the early 1960s, the United States has safely conducted more than 3,000 shipments of used nuclear fuel without any harmful release of radioactive material. A typical spent nuclear fuel cask sitting on a railcar. Since the early 1960s, the United States has safely conducted more than 3,000 shipments of used nuclear fuel without any harmful release of radioactive material. In order to assure the development of a sustainable nuclear fuel cycle for the nation's energy future, to provide a sound technical basis for implementation of a new national policy for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, and to better understand, assess, and communicate the

83

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

84

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Manufacturing Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Research and Development The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's manufacturing research and development (R&D) activity improves processes and reduces the cost of...

85

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preface Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page i Preface The Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan (MYRD&D...

86

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Research and Vehicle Research and Development Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Research and Development Grants The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IDEC) administers the Indiana

87

Tubular solid oxide fuel cell developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development at Westinghouse is presented in this paper. The basic operating principles of SOFCs, evolution in tubular cell design and performance improvement, selection criteria for cell component materials, and cell processing techniques are discussed. The commercial goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 5 to 10 years. Results of cell test operated for more than 50,000 hours are presented. Since 1986, significant progress has been made in the evolution of cells with higher power, lower cost and improved thermal cyclic capability. Also in this period, successively larger multi-kilowatt electrical generators systems have been built and successfully operated for more than 7000 hours.

Bratton, R.J.; Singh, P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Energy Strategy State Energy Strategy Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Energy Strategy Development The New Hampshire Office of Energy Planning, in consultation with the New

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Support for Advance Support for Advance Biofuel Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Support for Advance Biofuel Development The California Legislature urges the U.S. Congress or the U.S.

90

Electrolysis Technology Development and Fueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production from electrolysis *General electrolysis fueling overview *Near term hydrogen electricity integration *Grid based renewable hydrogen integration Receive feedback from...

91

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of debonds and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Smart Grid Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

93

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives

94

Developments in U.S. Alternative Fuel Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The alternative fueled vehicle (AFV)/alternative fuels industry experienced a number of market-related changes in the second half of the 1990s. This article describes each of the alternative transportation fuels and the AFVs in detail. It provides information on the development to date and looks at trends likely to occur in the future.

Information Center

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts) Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts) Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Office of Business Development The Economic Development Incentive Program (EDIP) is a tax incentive program designed to foster job creation and stimulate business growth throughout the Commonwealth. Participating companies may receive state and

96

Development of internal reforming carbonate fuel cell stack technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities under this contract focused on the development of a coal-fueled carbonate fuel cell system design and the stack technology consistent with the system design. The overall contract effort was divided into three phases. The first phase, completed in January 1988, provided carbonate fuel cell component scale-up from the 1ft{sup 2} size to the commercial 4ft{sup 2} size. The second phase of the program provided the coal-fueled carbonate fuel cell system (CGCFC) conceptual design and carried out initial research and development needs of the CGCFC system. The final phase of the program emphasized stack height scale-up and improvement of stack life. The results of the second and third phases are included in this report. Program activities under Phase 2 and 3 were designed to address several key development areas to prepare the carbonate fuel cell system, particularly the coal-fueled CFC power plant, for commercialization in late 1990's. The issues addressed include: Coal-Gas Related Considerations; Cell and Stack Technology Improvement; Carbonate Fuel Cell Stack Design Development; Stack Tests for Design Verification; Full-Size Stack Design; Test Facility Development; Carbonate Fuel Cell Stack Cost Assessment; and Coal-Fueled Carbonate Fuel Cell System Design. All the major program objectives in each of the topical areas were successfully achieved. This report is organized along the above-mentioned topical areas. Each topical area has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Farooque, M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiatives » Fuel Cycle Technologies » Fuel Cycle Research & Initiatives » Fuel Cycle Technologies » Fuel Cycle Research & Development » Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents November 8, 2011 2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting As the largest domestic source of low-carbon energy, nuclear power is making major contributions toward meeting our nation's current and future energy demands. The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. July 11, 2011 Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report

98

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1 Executive Summary The United States pioneered the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and we continue to lead the way as these technologies emerge from the...

99

Fuel Cells vs. Batteries: Issues and Challenges Facing the Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells vs. Batteries: Issues and Challenges Facing the Development of Electrochemical Power Systems for Transportation Applications Speaker(s): Elton Cairns Frank McLarnon John...

100

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Manufacturing Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Development on AddThis.com... Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Safety, Codes & Standards Education Systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

102

Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications  

SciTech Connect

The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Shoreland Development (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shoreland Development (Minnesota) Shoreland Development (Minnesota) Shoreland Development (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This program aims to (1) provide guidance for the wise development of shorelands of public waters and thus preserve and enhance the quality of

105

Economic Development Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) Economic Development Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation The Economic Development Tax Credit (ETC) program was enacted in 2009 and eliminated five existing tax credit programs (Agricultural Development Zones, Airport Development Zones, Community Development Zones, Enterprise

106

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cells have many potential utility applications including new multi-megawatt central power plants, repowering existing plants, and dispersed generation. A newly designed 25 kW planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system offers simplicity of construction, low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of by product heat, and straight-forward system integration.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300C and 900C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Labyrinth for an ignition distributor cap and rotor assembly with atmospheric purging action  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an ignition distributor to work with spark plug electrodes, a rotor electrode, a coil electrode and a shaft for an internal combustion engine with cylinders, the ignition distributor comprising: a bowl shaped housing; a distributor cap comprising: a generally dome shape with a generally hollow interior and with a circular shaped bottom to mate with the bowl shaped housing; spark towers equal in number to the number of cylinders of the internal combustion engine, projecting up from the top of the dome shape and slotted to accept spark plug electrodes and allow them to protrude into the distributor cap interior for communication with the rotor electrode; a vent tower projecting up from the top of the dome shape and provided with a vent port through to the distributor cap interior to allow for the outward flow of the atmosphere inside the distributor cap and bowl shaped housing; a coil tower projecting up from the top of the dome shape and slotted to accept a coil electrode and allow it to protrude into the distributor cap interior for communication with the rotor electrode; an inner labyrinth of annular shape on the interior surface of the dome shape surround the coil electrode and protruding into the hollow interior of the dome shape; and an outer labyrinth of annular shape on the interior surface of the dome shape surrounding the inner labyrinth thereby forming an annular channel.

Kronberger, L.J.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Linear air-fuel sensor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

Garzon, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miller, C. [General Motors, Flint, MI (United States). GM/Delphi E. Division

1996-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

Overview of reduced enrichment fuels: Development, testing, and specification  

SciTech Connect

The US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 to provide the technical means to operate research and test reactors with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuels without significant penalty in experiment performance, operation costs, component modifications, or safety characteristics. This paper discusses relevant developments in fuel developments. 9 refs., 1 tab.

Snelgrove, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Economic Development Fund (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development Fund (New York) Economic Development Fund (New York) Economic Development Fund (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Loan Program Provider Empire State Development Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing and a range of

113

Update on Fuel Cell Development: Review of Major and Stealth Fuel Cell Players' Activities: Stealth Player Reviews  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting fuel cell technology assessments and sponsoring research and development of fuel cell technologies for distributed power market applications for the past 20 years. Over the past several years, four fuel cell technologies have emerged for stationary power generation applications: Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) Phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) There are dozens of companies...

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

NREL: News - NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

713 713 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released New application for iPhone helps users find stations offering electricity, biodiesel, natural gas, and other alternative fuels. November 7, 2013 iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. The Alternative Fueling Station Locator App, now available through Apple's App Store, allows iPhone users to select an alternative fuel and

116

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of SNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S and other nations, but gaps in knowledge still exist. This document provides an evaluation and prioritization of R&D opportunities

117

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm[sup 2]; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF FUEL PLATES FOR THE RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel is the core component of reactors that is used to produce the neutron flux required for irradiation research purposes as well as commercial power generation. The development of nuclear fuels with low enrichments of uranium is a major endeavor of the RERTR program. In the development of these fuels, the RERTR program uses nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for the purpose of determining the properties of nuclear fuel plate experiments without imparting damage or altering the fuel specimens before they are irradiated in a reactor. The vast range of properties and information about the fuel plates that can be characterized using NDE makes them highly useful for quality assurance and for analyses used in modeling the behavior of the fuel while undergoing irradiation. NDE is also particularly useful for creating a control group for post-irradiation examination comparison. The two major categories of NDE discussed in this paper are X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection/evaluation. The radiographic scans are used for the characterization of fuel meat density and homogeneity as well as the determination of fuel location within the cladding. The UT scans are able to characterize indications such as voids, delaminations, inclusions, and other abnormalities in the fuel plates which are generally referred to as debonds as well as to determine the thickness of the cladding using ultrasonic acoustic microscopy methods. Additionally, the UT techniques are now also being applied to in-canal interim examination of fuel experiments undergoing irradiation and the mapping of the fuel plate surface profile to determine fuel swelling. The methods used to carry out these NDE techniques, as well as how they operate and function, are described along with a description of which properties are characterized.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; S.C. Taylor; G.A. Moore; D.M. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Alternative Renewable Fuels &#039;Plus&#039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial State/Provincial Govt Industrial Local Government Schools Institutional Program Info State Ontario Program Type Grant Program Provider Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs "Exploration of new markets and new uses for bioproducts, alternative renewable fuels and their co-products will contribute to the long term sustainability of Ontario's agri-food, energy and rural sectors. Investment in research will help position Ontario to take advantage of new technologies in these areas. The Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund is a

120

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository. The report describes progress in development of an integrated modeling framework that can be used for systematically analyzing the performance of a natural barrier system and identifying key factors that control the performance. This framework is designed as an integrated tool for prioritization and programmatic decisions. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report More Documents & Publications Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development FY11 Progress Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository. The report describes progress in development of an integrated modeling framework that can be used for systematically analyzing the performance of a natural barrier system and identifying key factors that control the performance. This framework is designed as an integrated tool for prioritization and programmatic decisions. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report More Documents & Publications Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development FY11 Progress Report

122

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels development Unit (AFDU). The program will initially involve a continuation of the work performed under the Liquid Phase Methanol Program but will later draw upon information and technologies generated in current and future DOE-funded contracts, as well as test commercially available catalysts. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of PC 4 dual-fuel engine  

SciTech Connect

Recently, utilization of natural gas, which is considered to be one of most important alternative fuels for petroleum, has been marked. As thermal efficiency of dual-fuel engine is higher than those of other prime movers with gaseous fuel, i.e., spark-ignited gas engine or gas turbine, it is possible to construct fuel-economical gas power plants with dual-fuel engines. However, its horsepower has been limited to the rather lower range. In 1984, NKK succeeded in developing large-sized dual-fuel engines based on the Pielstick PC4 diesel engine. The horsepower is 1200 HP/cyl, i.e. 21,600 HP for 18-cyclinder engine.

Nishikawa, T.; Utsuyama, S.; Maruyama, S.; Ono, T.; Kitahara, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Industrial Development (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Indiana) (Indiana) Industrial Development (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1981 State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Indiana Economic Development Corporation An economically distressed county can apply for designation as a community

125

Site Location of Development Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location of Development Act (Maine) Location of Development Act (Maine) Site Location of Development Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Site Location of Development Act regulates the locations chosen for

126

Small Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) Small Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) Small Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Loan Program Sales Tax Incentive

127

Loess Hills and Southern Iowa Development and Conservation (Iowa) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loess Hills and Southern Iowa Development and Conservation (Iowa) Loess Hills and Southern Iowa Development and Conservation (Iowa) Loess Hills and Southern Iowa Development and Conservation (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Loess Hills Alliance The Loess Hills Development and Conservation Authority, the Loess Hills

128

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

129

Job Development Credit (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Credit (South Carolina) Development Credit (South Carolina) Job Development Credit (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider South Carolina Department of Commerce A Job Development Credit (JDC) is a performance-based incentive that rebates a portion of new employees' withholding taxes that can be used to address the specific needs of individual companies. JDCs are approved on a

130

PROGRESS REPORT ON FUEL ELEMENT DEVELOPMENT AND ASSOCIATED PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

; 9 < 4 6 9 7 ; 6 8 7 6 sting Deactor (MTR) has sought to develop improved, economical, long-life fuel assemblies through a comprehensive study of various fuel compositions, enrichments, claddings, burnable poisons, fuel and poison distributions, and fuelelement geometry optimization. The core materials, including uranium -- aluminum alloys, uranium oxide -aluminum cermets, thorium, thorium oxide, boron, gadolinium, dysprosium, and iridium, are tested in pilot-plant scale by irradiating them as sandwich type sample fuel plates. In the procurement of these sample plates, fabrication techniques were developed and evaluated for incorporation of all the fuels and poisons (except Ir/sub 2/O/sub 3/) into cores of aluminum or aluminum alloys. Methods were developed to minimize "dog-boning" and to produce graded fuels. Some of the sample plate compcsitions have been irradiated to high burn-up, i.e., over 50% of the U/sup 235/ content, and have operated successfully in the MTR for seven or more cycles. The irradiated uranium-- aluminum alloy and uranium oxide-- aluminum cermet fuel plates have shown excellent dimensional stability and good corrosion resistance to long-term irradiation. However, some of the thorium oxide fuel plates failed during one cycle of irradiation because of blistering, rupturing, or forming of pinholes in the cladding. The isostatic bonding procedure used to bond aluminum plates to the ThO/sub 2/ cores is apparently not adequate for reactor use. The sample fuel plate work has demonstrated the suitability of high wt.% uranium oxide--aluminum fuels for testing reactors, indicated the potential of systematically varying the fuel loading within a single plate, and experimentally verified the applicability of burnable poisons for reducing reactivity changes resulting from fuel burnup. The Deactivity Measurement Facility has proved to be an excellent nondestructive analytical tool for determination of fuel and poison burn-up. This program has stimulated several new developments and revealed many interesting facts in the fabrication and testing of reactor fuel materials. For example: (1) ultrasonic inspection has proved to be an excellent nondestructive method for determination of small voids in the core and unbonded cladding not otherwise detected by radiographing, (2) the ultrasonic inspection of irradiated fuel plates in the MTR canal is feasible, and (3) analytical procedures were developed for the determination of the small quantities of gadolinium added to the cores. The prototype studies consisted of theoretical and experimental evaluations of the hydraulic and heat- transfer characteristics, the structural properties, the economics and the reactor operating characteristics of various full-sized fuel assemblies and shim rods. The results of the sample fuel plate studies were incorporated in these prototypes to obtain optimum practical designs for testing reactors. The fuel element geometries investigated include plates, tube bundles, hexagonal honeycomb, and concentric cylinders. A MTR shim rod with renewable fuel and poison sections was designed, tested hydraulically, and is now considered ready for final in-pile testing. This rod outlasts the existing shim rods, is cheaper, and allows more operational flexibility. A theoretical analysis, hydraulic tests, and a mechanical evaluation have shown that an improvement can be made in plate type fuel elements by using an increased number of thinner high-strength fuel plates in the fuel element. An in-pile prototype test of such an element is now planned. An analysis of roughened surfaces indicates that economy or increases in reactor power may be gained through the use of roughened heat- transfer surfaces in nonboiling watercooled reactors. Preliminary hydraulic tests were performed and indicate that practical roughened surfaces may be formed. Out-of-pile heat-transfer tests are now planned. The theoretical analysis of geometries indicates that tube bundles, honeycomb, and concentric cylinder de

Francis, W.C.; Craig, S.E. ed.

1960-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: Connecticut Department of Economic & Community Development Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts, Socio-Economic Website: www.chfcc.org/Publications/reports/Fuel_Cell_Plan%201-31-08_DECD.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/fuel-cell-economic-development-plan-h Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: "Safety Standards,Emissions Standards" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

132

Development of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 250 kW External Fuel Processor was developed and tested that will supply the gases needed by a pipeline natural gas fueled, solid oxide fuel cell during all modes of operation. The fuel processor consists of three major subsystems--a desulfurizer to remove fuel sulfur to an acceptable level, a synthesis gas generator to support plant heat-up and low load fuel cell operations, and a start gas generator to supply a non-flammable, reducing gas to the fuel cell during startup and shutdown operations. The desulfurization subsystem uses a selective catalytic sulfur oxidation process that was developed for operation at elevated pressure and removes the fuel sulfur to a total sulfur content of less than 80 ppbv. The synthesis gas generation subsystem uses a waterless, catalytic partial oxidation reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich mixture from the natural gas and air. An operating window was defined that allows carbon-free operation while maintaining catalyst temperatures that will ensure long-life of the reactor. The start gas subsystem generates an oxygen-free, reducing gas from the pipeline natural gas using a low-temperature combustion technique. These physically and thermally integrated subsystems comprise the 250 kW External Fuel Processor. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was tested at the Rolls-Royce facility in North Canton, Ohio to verify process performance and for comparison with design specifications. A step wise operation of the automatic controls through the startup, normal operation and shutdown sequences allowed the control system to be tuned and verified. A fully automated system was achieved that brings the fuel processor through its startup procedure, and then await commands from the fuel cell generator module for fuel supply and shutdown. The fuel processor performance met all design specifications. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was shipped to an American Electric Power site where it will be tested with a Rolls-Royce solid oxide fuel cell generator module.

Daniel Birmingham; Crispin Debellis; Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks June 30, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN - U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner and Volvo Group CEO Leif Johansson today agreed to expand cooperation to develop more fuel-efficient trucks. Once contractual negotiations are complete later this year, the cooperative program will be extended for three more years. An additional $9 million over three years in DOE funds will be matched by $9 million in Swedish government funds and $18 million from Volvo Group. When added with the existing $12 million commitment from the United States, Sweden and the Volvo Group the overall value of the cooperation will be $48

135

2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and com

136

FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

DOE supported research in alcohol fuel technology development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy sponsored research in alcohol fuel technology development under the direction of Congress and Public Law 96-126. Twenty-seven research grants of about $50,000 each were funded to develop lower cost methods for alcohol fuel production. This paper discusses the objectives of the program and relates the accomplishments achieved by the research. A discussion of the highlights of several selected projects is included.

Dodds, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Montana Legislature, Legislative Services Division

140

Flood Plain or Floodway Development (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or Floodway Development (Iowa) or Floodway Development (Iowa) Flood Plain or Floodway Development (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department Natural Resources This section describes situations when a permit is needed for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio River Greenway Commission

142

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section...

143

Development of a Reliable Fuel Depletion Methodology for the HTR-10 Spent Fuel Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technical working group formed in 2007 between NNSA and CAEA to develop a reliable fuel depletion method for HTR-10 based on MCNPX and to analyze the isotopic inventory and radiation source terms of the HTR-10 spent fuel. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Established a fuel depletion methodology and demonstrated its safeguards application; (2) Proliferation resistant at high discharge burnup ({approx}80 GWD/MtHM) - Unfavorable isotopics, high number of pebbles needed, harder to reprocess pebbles; (3) SF should remain under safeguards comparable to that of LWR; and (4) Diversion scenarios not considered, but can be performed.

Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang-Yoon [unaffiliated

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on ??green fuels? which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Basis for Developing Samarium AMS for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of {sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, and {sup 151}Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

Buchholz, B A; Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Tumey, S J; Weaver, C J

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Program plan for molten carbonate fuel-cell systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe in both programmatic and technical terms the methodology that the US Department of Energy will use to commercialize a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. Responsibility for the planning and management of the program resides in the molten carbonate fuel cell program office at the Argonne National Laboratory which reports to the Assistant Director for Fuel Cells in the Division of Fossil Fuel utilization of DOE/FE. The actual development of technology is carried out by selected contractors. The technology development phase of the program will culminate with the construction and operation of two demonstration power plants. The first power plant will be an industrial cogeneration plant which will be completed in 1987. The other power plant will be a baseload electric power plant to be completed in 1989.

Not Available

1978-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

Recent Developments in Mems-Based Micro Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro fuel cells ($\\mu$-FC) represent promising power sources for portable applications. Today, one of the technological ways to make $\\mu$-FC is to have recourse to standard microfabrication techniques used in the fabrication of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS). This paper shows an overview on the applications of MEMS techniques on miniature FC by presenting several solutions developed throughout the world. It also describes the latest developments of a new porous silicon-based miniature fuel cell. Using a silane grafted on an inorganic porous media as the proton-exchange membrane instead of a common ionomer such as Nafion, the fuel cell achieved a maximum power density of 58 mW cm-2 at room temperature with hydrogen as fuel.

Pichonat, T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels DOE Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels July 7, 2006 - 2:52pm Addthis Research Aimed at Making Cellulosic Ethanol a Practical Alternative to Gasoline WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released an ambitious new research agenda for the development of cellulosic ethanol as an alternative to gasoline. The 200-page scientific "roadmap" cites recent advances in biotechnology that have made cost-effective production of ethanol from cellulose, or inedible plant fiber, an attainable goal. The report outlines a detailed research plan for developing new technologies to transform cellulosic ethanol-a renewable, cleaner-burning, and carbon-neutral alternative to gasoline-into an economically viable

149

Supporting R&D of industrial fuel cell developers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is supporting the industrial developers of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) and tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results suggest that a lithium concentration level of 65-75 mol% in the LiNa electrolyte will improve cell performance. They have made inroads in understanding the interfacial resistance of bipolar plate materials, and they have reduced the air electrode overpotential in OSFCs by adding dopants.

Krumpelt, M.

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of an engine fuel and spark controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an engine control unit (ECU) for a four cylinder engine to be used in a Formula SAE racers. The ECU must provide effective fuel injection and spark ignition control and provide for easy adjustment by the user for engine tuning purposes. The controller was designed to operate using a speed-throttle fuel map, with acceleration enrich, meet and other fuel compensating factors. A paired double-tiring strategy was adapted to avoid the complications associated with sequential fuel injection. The ECU utilized a Motorola 68HC16 development board, as well as special injector and ignition driver circuits. The software was designed to be primarily interrupt driven, with a task manager to arbitrate among other tasks. A user interface program, which runs on a PC, allows the user to instantly alter operating parameters in the ECU during engine tuning and development. The controller was tested on a Yamaha YZF 600 motorcycle engine with a custom intake manifold and fuel injection system. The fuel and spark maps and other parameters were configured for this engine by using the user interface. Dynamometer testing verities that engine performance with this ECU meets design specifications.

Suter, William Gregory

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Developing bioenergy fuels: Biopower fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful development of biomass crops requires unique cooperation between researchers and members of the energy, agriculture, forestry, and environmental communities. DOE's Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program provides a mechanism to integrate the efforts of this diverse group. The federal government must continue to share risks (costs of growing, harvesting, storing, and supplying energy crops) for early adopters of energy crop technology and biomass energy producers.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

154

Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Address One Bear Place #97413 Place Waco, Texas Zip 76798 Region Texas Area Coordinates 31.496762°, -97.305664° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.496762,"lon":-97.305664,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

Ray, E.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of Reliable Methods for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the development of reliable methods for sealing solid oxide fuel cell stacks.

Loehman, R.; Brochu. M.; Gauntt, B.; Shah, R.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

AEC FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Seventh Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is the seventh annual report of the unclassified portion of the Fuels and Materials Development Programs being conducted by the General Electric Company's Nuclear Materials and Propulsion Operation under Contract AT(40-1)-2847, issued by the Fuels and Materials Branch, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, of the Atomic Energy Commission. This report covers the period from January 31, 1967 to January 31, 1968, and thus also serves as the quarterly progress report for the final quarter of the year.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at temperatures up to 160 C.

L.G. Marianowski

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Status of Automotive Fuel Cell Development: Applicability to Stationary Fuel Cell Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology -- targeting the automotive as well as the stationary markets -- are making significant strides in performance improvements and cost reductions. In concept, PEMFC systems could either replace internal combustion engine drivetrains or power auxiliary loads that would otherwise be powered by propulsion power plants. This report describes how automotive PEMFC development and stationary power PEMFC development will complement each other.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of Fuel Shuffling Module for PHISICS  

SciTech Connect

PHISICS (Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for the INL Code System) [4] code toolkit has been in development at the Idaho National Laboratory. This package is intended to provide a modern analysis tool for reactor physics investigation. It is designed with the mindset to maximize accuracy for a given availability of computational resources and to give state of the art tools to the modern nuclear engineer. This is obtained by implementing several different algorithms and meshing approaches among which the user will be able to choose, in order to optimize his computational resources and accuracy needs. The software is completely modular in order to simplify the independent development of modules by different teams and future maintenance. The package is coupled with the thermo-hydraulic code RELAP5-3D [3]. In the following the structure of the different PHISICS modules is briefly recalled, focusing on the new shuffling module (SHUFFLE), object of this paper.

Allan Mabe; Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Aaron Epiney; Michael Lineberry

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Excise Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Excise Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Excise Tax Distributors who sell or use motor fuel, including special fuels, are subject to an excise tax of $0.075 per gallon. Motor fuels that are not

164

Development of fission gas swelling and release models for metallic nuclear fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel swelling and fission gas generation for fast reactor fuels are of high importance since they are among the main limiting factors in the development of metallic fast reactor fuel. Five new fission gas and swelling ...

Andrews, Nathan Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products' laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively benign'' system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE's program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

Brown, D.M.

1992-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Carbonate fuel cell powerplant development and commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CFC powerplants offer the potential for ultrahigh efficiency energy conversion and the enhancement of the quality of our environment. Since combustion is not utilized, CFCs generate very low amounts of NOx. CFC powerplants have been exempt from air permitting requirements in California, Massachusetts. CFC is attractive for both polluted urban areas and remote applications. It is ideal as a distributed generator (sited at or near the electricity user). The US CFC developers enjoy the support of user groups (utility, other end-user members). DOE cooperates with GRI and EPRI in funding the US CFC program.

Williams, M.C. [Fuel Cells Product Manager, USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced ECU Software Development Method for Fuel Cell Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electronic control unit (ECU) in electrical powered hybrid and fuel cell vehicles is exceedingly complex. Rapid prototyping control is used to reduce development time and eliminate errors during software development. This paper describes a high-efficiency development method and a flexible tool chain suitable for various applications in automotive engineering. The control algorithm can be deployed directly from a Matlab/Simulink/Stateflow environment into the ECU hardware together with an OSEK real-time operating system (RTOS). The system has been successfully used to develop a 20-kW fuel cell system ECU based on a Motorola PowerPC 555 (MPC555) microcontroller. The total software development time is greatly reduced and the code quality and reliability are greatly enhanced.

Tian Shuo; Liu Yuan; Xia Wenchuan; Li Jianqiu; Yang Minggao

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 December 12, 2011 Energy Department Awards More Than $7 Million for Innovative Hydrogen Storage Technologies in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles These projects will help lower the costs and increase the performance of hydrogen storage systems by developing innovative materials and advanced tanks for efficient and safe transportation. December 6, 2011 DOE Launches Comprehensive Hydrogen Storage Materials Clearinghouse Free access resource aims to accelerate advanced materials research and development December 2, 2011 Fuel Cell Lift Trucks: A Grocer's Best Friend Working in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, DOE has been analyzing the performance of fuel cell lift trucks at grocery distributors around the country. December 2, 2011 DOE and Partners to Host Webinar December 7: Fuel Cells and

169

Component Development - Advanced Fuel Cells for Transportation Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report summarizes results of second phase of development of Vairex air compressor/expander for automotive fuel cell power systems. Project included optimizing key system performance parameters, as well as reducing number of components and the project cost, size and weight of the air system. Objectives were attained. Advanced prototypes are in commercial test environments.

Butler, William

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

Genetically Modified Bacteria for Fuel Production: Development of Rhodobacteria as a Versatile Platform for Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: Penn State is genetically engineering bacteria called Rhodobacter to use electricity or electrically generated hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuels. Penn State is taking genes from oil-producing algae called Botryococcus braunii and putting them into Rhodobacter to produce hydrocarbon molecules, which closely resemble gasoline. Penn State is developing engineered tanks to support microbial fuel production and determining the most economical way to feed the electricity or hydrogen to the bacteria, including using renewable sources of power like solar energy.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Fuel cells provide these benefits and address critical challenges in all energy...

172

Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for space and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. The carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electrocatalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decrease the cell performance. This irreversible poisoning of the anode can happen even in CO concentrations as low as few ppm, and therefore, require expensive scrubbing of the H{sub 2}-fuel to reduce the contaminant concentration to acceptable level. In order to commercialize this environmentally sound source of energy/power system, development of suitable CO-tolerant catalyst is needed. In this work, we have synthesized several novel electrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell. The concentration of CO in the H{sub 2} fuel varied from 10 ppm to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effect of temperature, catalyst compositions, and electrode film preparation methods on the performance of PEM fuel cell has also been studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalysts (10 wt % Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt % Pt/Mo/C) were more CO-tolerant than 20 wt % Pt catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method is better for the preparation of electrode film than the brushing technique. Some of these results are summarized in this report.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax Rate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Rate A distributor of any alternative fuel used to operate an internal combustion engine must pay a license tax of $0.0025 for each gallon of

175

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Water Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development program is being conducted by International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water-cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Retail Supplier Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind...

177

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels.

Stout, R.B.; Merckx, K.R.; Holm, J.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

Parent, Etienne, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operators garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data analysis, it was determined by a proprietary hydrogen-analysis model that hydrogen produced from the station at a rate of 1500 kg/day and when produced at 1000 stations per year would be able to deliver hydrogen at a price of $3.03/kg (gge) H2. The stations efficiency was measured to be 65.1%, and the PSA was tested and ran at an efficiency of 82.1%, thus meeting the project targets. From the study, it was determined that more research was needed in the area of hydrogen fueling. The overall cost of the hydrogen energy station, when combined with the required plot size for scaled-up hydrogen demands, demonstrated that a station using steam methane reforming technology as a means to produce onsite hydrogen would have limited utility in the marketplace. Alternative hydrogen supplies, such as liquid or pipeline delivery to a refueling station, need to be included in the exploration of alternative energy site layouts. These avenues need to be explored before a definitive refueling station configuration and commercialization pathway can be determined.

David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum gas (LPG, consisting predominantly of propane) or renewable fuels such as biogas from wastewater treatments plants. Fuel cells for auxiliary power units in trucks will...

184

Development of 50 kW Fuel Processor for Stationary Fuel Cell Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop and test a fuel processor capable of producing high hydrogen concentration (>98%) with less than ppm quantities of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at lower capital cost and higher efficiency, compared to conventional natural gas reformers. It was intended that we achieve our objective by developing simple reactor/process design, and high durability CO2 absorbents, to replace pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or membrane separators. Cost analysis indicated that we would not meet DOE cost goals so the project was terminated before construction of the full scale fuel processor. The work on adsorbent development was focused on the development of calcium oxide-based reversible CO2 absorbents with various microstructures and morphologies to determine the optimum microstructure for long-term reversible CO2 absorption. The effect of powder production process variables was systematically studied including: the final target compositions, the reagents from which the final products were derived, the pore forming additives, the processing time and temperature. The sorbent materials were characterized in terms of their performance in the reversible reaction with CO2 and correlation made to their microstructure.

James F. Stevens; Balaji Krishnamurthy; Paolina Atanassova; Kerry Spilker

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

Pitz, W J

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting Disruption Mitigation studies for ITER on NSTX-U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting 2012) 1/3 White Paper for Developing Advanced Fueling System are not to scale. #12;White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System

188

Development of a Natural Gas-to-Hydrogen Fueling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Losses Steam Methane Reformer/Fuel Processor CH4 + 2 H20 4H2 + CO2 #12;8 Some Keys to Success 99 fuel processing using efficient steam methane reforming process Advanced oil-free high- pressure with gasoline on a $/vehicle mile basis > Challenges ­ Flexible fuel reformers & systems ­ Fuel purity ­ Long

189

Development of Standards in Support of Hydrogen-Fueled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Society of Automotive Engineers International (SAE) has proposed a Hydrogen Fuel Quality Specification Guideline. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.'' This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft[sup 2] cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an accident tolerant fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status.  

SciTech Connect

Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R&D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R&D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S. and other nations in understanding disposal concepts in different geologic media, but gaps in knowledge still exist. A principal aspect of concern to the UFDC as it considers the broad issues of siting a repository in different geologic media are the marked differences in the regulatory bases for assessing suitability and safety of a repository between the U.S. and other nations. Because the probability based - risked informed nature of the current U.S. regulations for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is sufficiently different from other regulations, information gained in previous studies, while useful, likely need to be supplemented to enable more convincing communication with the public, better defense of the numerical models, and stronger safety cases. Thus, it was recognized when the UFDC was established that there were readily identified disposal-related R&D opportunities to address knowledge gaps. An effort to document these research opportunities was a key component of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 engineered system, natural system, and system-level modeling activities for a range of disposal environments. A principal contribution to identifying these gaps was a workshop held to gather perspectives from experts both within and external to the UFDC regarding R&D opportunities. In the planning for FY2010 it was expected that these activities would culminate with a UFDC research and development roadmap that would identify the knowledge gaps, discuss the R&D needed to fill these gaps, and prioritize the proposed R&D over both the near- and long-term. A number of knowledge gaps and needed R&D were identified and are discussed in this report. However, these preliminary R&D topics have not been evaluated in detail nor have they been prioritized to support future planning efforts. This will be completed in FY11 and the final UFDC Research and Development Roadmap will be completed. This report discusses proposed R&D topics in three areas related to repository siting, design, and performance: natural systems

Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO{sub 2} and 85% for NO{sub x} were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO[sub 2] and 85% for NO[sub x] were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-detonation technical nuclear forensics techniques for research reactor spent fuel were developed in a collaborative project with Savannah River National Lab ratory. An inverse analysis method was employed to reconstruct reactor parameters from a spent fuel sample using results from a radiochemical analysis. In the inverse analysis, a reactor physics code is used as a forward model. Verification and validation of different reactor physics codes was performed for usage in the inverse analysis. The verification and validation process consisted of two parts. The first is a variance analysis of Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup simulation results. The codes used in this work are MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. Both utilize Monte Carlo transport calculations for reaction rate and flux results. Neither code has a variance analysis that will propagate through depletion steps, so a method to quantify and understand the variance propagation through these depletion calculations was developed. The second verification and validation process consisted of comparing reactor physics code output isotopic compositions to radiochemical analysis results. A sample from an Oak Ridge Research Reactor spent fuel assembly was acquired through a drilling process. This sample was then dissolved in nitric acid and diluted in three different quantities, creating three separate samples. A radiochemical analysis was completed and the results were compared to simulation outputs at different levels ofdetail. After establishing a forward model, an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict burnup, initial 235U, and 236U enrichments. The analytic calculation results may also be used stand alone or in a database search algorithm. In this work, a reactor physics code is used as a for- ward model with the analytic results as initial conditions in a numerical optimization algorithm. In the numerical analysis, the burnup and initial uranium isotopic com- positions are reconstructed until the iterative spent fuel characteristics converge with the measured data. Upon convergence of the samples burnup and initial uranium isotopic composition, the cooling time can be reconstructed. To reconstruct cooling time, the standard decay equation is inverted and solved for time. Two methods were developed. One method uses the converged burnup and initial uranium isotopic compositions along in a reactor depletion simulation. The second method uses an isotopic signature that does not decay out of its mass bin and has a simple production chain. An example would be 137Cs which decays into the stable 137Ba. Similar results are achieved with both methods, but extended shutdown time or time away from power results in over prediction of the cooling time. The over prediction of cooling time and comparison of different burnup reconstruction isotope results are indicator signatures of extended shutdown or time away from power. Due to dynamic operation in time and function, detailed power history reconstruction for research reactors is very challenging. Frequent variations in power, repeated variable shutdown time length, and experimentation history affect the spectrum an individual assembly is burned with such that full reactor parameter reconstruction is difficult. The results from this technical nuclear forensic analysis may be used with law enforcement, intelligence data, macroscopic and microscopic sample characteristics in a process called attribution to suggest or exclude possible sources of origin for a sample.

Sternat, Matthew 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles January 31, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled central power generation is being adapted to power UUVs. U.S. Navy photo by Mr. John F. Williams/Released. An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Developing Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com...

202

Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M H x N i H 2 N i C d P b a c i d Energy Storage System Source: Mitlitsky, et al, "Regenerative Fuel Cells", Energy and Fuels, 1998. Packaged specific energy of up to 1,000...

203

Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

Johnson, W.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

Johnson, W.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Task 1. 0, Development of improved molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this task was to develop an improved cell configuration for molten carbonate fuel cells which has improved performance, meets a 40,000 hour projected life, maintains existing cell cost, and is adaptable to a range of power plant applications. A new cell configuration designed to be manufactured using conventional and available equipment and processes was developed and verified in subscale single cells. This cell configuration is adaptable to a broad range of fuels without redesign, operating on very weak low Btu coal gas as well as high Btu gas and natural gas. The success of this program has provided the confidence to proceed with a scale-up to 8-ft{sup 2} cells and a stack verification in a 20-cell, 25 kW stack test. Design requirements and specifications for components in an improved cell design were defined. Electrolyte requirements for the cell components were established, the estimated time-to-short was updated, and a design operating point and gas composition for single cell testing was defined. Four anode, four cathode, five matrix configurations, and three end-cell reservoirs were defined. A total of 54 single cell tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of individual improvements and combinations of improved configurations. Anodes were successfully fabricated by tape casting. A new tape cast cathode for improved electrolyte sharing, new tape cast matrix materials and matrix reinforcement, and an end-cell reservoir configuration using conductive material were developed. Reports on the separate subtasks have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

Johnson, W.H.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of improved cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Missouri-Rolla conducted a 17 month research program focused on the development and evaluation of improved cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The objectives of this program were: (1) the development of cathode materials of improved stability in reducing environments; and (2) the development of cathode materials with improved electrical conductivity. The program was successful in identifying some potential candidate materials: Air sinterable (La,Ca)(Cr,Co)O{sub 3} compositions were developed and found to be more stable than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} towards reduction. Their conductivity at 1000{degrees}C ranged between 30 to 60 S/cm. Compositions within the (Y,Ca)(Cr,Co,Mn)O{sub 3} system were developed and found to have higher electrical conductivity than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} and preliminary results suggest that their stability towards reduction is superior.

Anderson, H.U.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fisher Coachworks Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on AddThis.com...

208

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study The LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program activities must support the timeline dictated by utility life extension decisions to demonstrate a lead test rod in a commercial reactor within 10 years. In order to maintain the demanding development schedule that must accompany this aggressive timeline, the LWRS Program focuses on advanced fuel cladding systems that retain standard UO2 fuel pellets for deployment in currently operating LWR power plants. The LWRS work scope focuses on fuel system components outside of the fuel pellet, allowing for alteration of the existing zirconium-based clad system through coatings, addition of ceramic sleeves, or complete replacement

210

Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview  

SciTech Connect

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Advanced Water-Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is being conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes requested to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a total of up to 74 million to support the research and development of clean, reliable fuel cells for stationary and transportation applications. The solicitations include up to...

216

2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen is a clean fuel. When used in fuel cells, the Hydrogen is a clean fuel. When used in fuel cells, the only byproducts are water and heat. * Clean hydrogen technology has the potential to strengthen national economies and create high-quali- ty jobs in industries such as fuel cell manufacturing. * Hydrogen can be derived from renewable sources and is fully interchangeable with electricity - hydrogen can be used to generate electricity, while electricity can be used to produce hydrogen. * Over 100 years of safe production, transportation and use of hydrogen shows that it carries no more risk than natural gas or gasoline. * Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic sources and processes, freeing it from the political instabilities that affect the world's oil and gas supplies. * Fuel cells have more than double the energy-efficien-

217

New Developments in High Velocity Air-fuel Spraying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is possible because of the low temperature of air-fuel combustion. The heating of the spray ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray.

218

Trends and new developments in automotive fuel economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The significant improvements in passenger car fuel economy that have been achieved up to the present time are identified, and the changes that have produced these improvements are examined in detail. Included are several comparisons of domestic versus foreign vehicles. The potential for further increases in fuel economy is then reviewed by examining the technological, marketing/economic, and other significant factors that will affect future fuel economy levels. Special attention is given to the effect that changing market mix has on corporate average fuel economy and to the future benefits that may be realized through the use of continuously variable transmissions, adiabatic diesel engines, and improved lubricants.

Simpson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation The Jobs Development Act provides an incremental reduction in the corporate income tax rate (9%) to companies creating jobs in Rhode Island. For every ten new jobs created for companies with fewer than 100 employees, companies can reduce the tax by a quarter percentage point. For companies with more

220

DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development December 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced it is accepting applications for a total of up to $74 million to support the research and development of clean, reliable fuel cells for stationary and transportation applications. The solicitations include up to $65 million over three years to fund continued research and development (R&D) on fuel cell components, such as catalysts and membrane electrode assemblies, with the goal of reducing costs, improving durability and increasing the efficiency of fuel cell systems. The funding also includes up to $9 million to conduct independent cost analyses that will assess the progress of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HTGR fuel recycle development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1978  

SciTech Connect

The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel, the design and development of an integrated pilot line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials, and design work in support of Hot Engineering Tests (HET). Work is also described on tradeoff studies concerning the required design of facilities and equipment for the large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels in order to guide the development activities for HTGR fuel recycle.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Loan Program Provider Virginia Department of Business Assistance The Economic Development Loan Fund helps to fill the financing gap between private debt financing and private equity. Up to $1 million is available for each project and can be used for the acquisition of land or facilities, or the purchase of machinery or equipment. Projects must create new jobs or

223

Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Retail Supplier Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Indiana Economic Development Corporation The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit is awarded to businesses with projects that result in net new jobs. The tax credit must be a major factor in the company's decision to move forward with the project in Indiana. The refundable tax credit is calculated as a percentage of the expected increased tax withholdings generated from the new jobs. The

224

Rural Community-Based Energy Development Act (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community-Based Energy Development Act (Nebraska) Community-Based Energy Development Act (Nebraska) Rural Community-Based Energy Development Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Training/Technical Assistance Provider Economic Development This act aims to create new rural economic development opportunities

225

The New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC) Loans for Working  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC) Loans for The New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC) Loans for Working Capital (New York) The New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC) Loans for Working Capital (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Loan Program Provider New York Business Development Corporation The New York Business Development Corporation (NYBDC) Loans for Working

226

TRIGA high wt -% LEU fuel development program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The principal purpose of this work was to investigate the characteristics of TRIGA fuel where the contained U-235 was in a relatively high weight percent (wt %) of LEU (low enriched uranium - enrichment of less than 20%) rather than a relatively low weight percent of HEU (high enriched uranium). Fuel with up to 45 wt % U was fabricated and found to be acceptable after metallurgical examinations, fission product retention tests and physical property examinations. Design and safety analysis studies also indicated acceptable prompt negative temperature coefficient and core lifetime characteristics for these fuels.

West, G.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly-March 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several MPACT BCPs were executed in February, reflecting the shift in MPACT priorities directed late last year. Work continued on the FY2014 IPL, also bringing it in line with the new priorities. Preparations were made for the March MPACT Working Group meeting, in conjunction with Savannah River which is hosting the meeting. Steps were taken to initiate a new project with the World Institute for Nuclear Security, including discussions with WINS staff and preliminary work on the required procurement documentation. Several hardware issues were worked through. The newest detector array is working at LANL. A thorough analysis of previously collected Pu sample data using recently developed analysis code with improved spectral energy calibrations was completed. We now have a significantly better understanding of measurement uncertainties. Post-test analyses of the salt and sensor material for the first sensor test are almost complete. Sensor testing with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first sensor test. Sensor materials for the next couple of tests are being fabricated. Materials with different annealing temperatures are being prepared for analysis. Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials - The imager detectors repairs are complete and work with the imager is under way. The milestone requiring a report on LANSCE experiments was completed and submitted. Analysis of previous experiments and comparisons to simulations is near complete. Results are being compared with previous LANSCE-LSDS and RPI results. Additional data library (TENDL) is also being checked to see whether there are differences in the simulation results. The mid-year MIP Monitor project accomplishments and progress was presented at the MPACT meeting held in March at SRNL. Discussions around the meeting included inquiries into the feasibility of collecting process measurement data at H-Canyon, and it was explored further after the meeting. Kenneth Dayman, the graduate student from University of Texas, completed an initial draft of his master's thesis. His research will contribute to the multivariate classifier currently under development. Sarah Bender, the graduate student from Pennsylvania State University, presented her work on a poster and in a conference paper at the MARC IX meeting. A mass balance flowsheet for the fast reactor fuel was completed and a model simulation is scheduled to begin construction next month. The development of a mass balance flowsheet for light water reactor fuel will predict the behavior of the separation process using mathematical functions. The completed flowsheet will be utilized as the basis for constructing the model simulation for the electrochemical separations. Comments and review of the model from the MPACT Working Group meeting have been used to evaluate updates to the EChem model. A preliminary physical security layout has been developed in ATLAS. Thermal stability tests for high temperature microfluidic interconnections were completed on all compounds tested for bonding strength. An interconnection strategy was determined based on these results that we expect will allow for operation at 400C in the first generation of sampling systems. Design of the sampling system using the chosen interconnections was initiated, with handoff to an external foundry for fabrication based on ANL specified process conditions expected by the middle of the month. Monte Carlo simulations of the sampling system were conducted under conditions of realistic sampling size distributions, electrorefiner inhomogeneity distributions, and detector efficiencies. These simulations were used to establish a baseline limit of detection for system operation, assuming an on-line separation step is conducted before detection. Sensor for measuring density and depth of molten electrolyte - The procurement effort continued. 80% of the components ordered to assemble the double bubbler have arrived at the INL. Pratap Sadasivan, and his team have been working on the new metrics for proliferation a

Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

229

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report, Appendix B-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directed Technologies, Inc. has previously submitted a detailed technical assessment and concept design for a mid-size, five-passenger fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), under contract to the Argonne National Laboratory. As a supplement to that contract, DTI has reviewed the literature and conducted a preliminary evaluation of two energy carriers for the FCEV: hydrogen and methanol. This report compares the estimated fuel efficiency, cost of producing and delivering the fuel, and the resultant life cycle costs of the FCEV when fueled directly by hydrogen and when fueled by methanol with on-board reforming to produce the required hydrogen-rich gas for the fuel cell. This work will be supplemented and expanded under the Ford contract with the Department of Energy to develop the FCEV and its fuel infrastructure.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology echnology Hydro- -Desulfurization T Funded by y Arm y y TARDEC Brass board, transportable system Ran 10 kW PEM fuel cell Demonstrated on JP-8 with...

231

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Page 3.8 - 1 3.8 Education and Outreach Expanding the role of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as an integral part of the Nation's energy portfolio requires sustained...

232

High-density Fuel Development for High Performance Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, High density UMo (7-12wt% Mo) fuel for high performance research ... High Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Deformation Behavior of Alloy HT9.

233

Development of a digital control unit to displace diesel fuel with natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Full Circle Engineering (FCE), supported by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), proposed a Small Business CRADA with Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/Kansas City (FM&T/KC) for the development of a fumigation digital control unit (DCU) that would allow the displacement of diesel fuel with natural gas. Nationwide, diesel trucks and buses consumed over 21 billion gallons of fuel in 1992. The development of systems that allow the use of alternative fuels, natural gas in particular, for transportation would significantly reduce emissions and pollutants. It would also help implement DOE`s mandate for energy security (use of domestic fuels) required by the Energy Policy Act (EPACT).

Talbott, A.D. [AlliedSignal FM& T, Kansas City, MO (United States)]|[Full Circle Engineering, Northglenn, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

235

Oklahoma Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Commerce The Oklahoma Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act provides funding for local units of government to match local tax revenue dedicated to support a project located in an enterprise zone. No more than

236

Development of the Low Swirl Injector for Fuel-Flexible GasTurbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gas turbines are primarily fueled with natural gas. However, changes in fuel cost and availability, and a desire to control carbon dioxide emissions, are creating pressure to utilize other fuels. There is an increased interest in the use of fuels from coal gasification, such as syngas and hydrogen, and renewable fuels, such as biogas and biodiesel. Current turbine fuel injectors have had years of development to optimize their performance with natural gas. The new fuels appearing on the horizon can have combustion properties that differ substantially from natural gas. Factors such as turbulent flame speed, heat content, autoignition characteristics, and range of flammability must be considered when evaluating injector performance. The low swirl injector utilizes a unique flame stabilization mechanism and is under development for gas turbine applications. Its design and mode of operation allow it to operate effectively over a wide range of conditions. Studies conducted at LBNL indicate that the LSI can operate on fuels with a wide range of flame speeds, including hydrogen. It can also utilize low heat content fuels, such as biogas and syngas. We will discuss the low swirl injector operating parameters, and how the LSC performs with various alternative fuels.

Littlejohn, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Nazeer,W.A.; Smith, K.O

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the available chemical free energy directly into electrical energy, without going through heat exchange process. Of all different types of fuel cells, the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hydrogen Fuel Quality Research and Development - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Tommy Rockward (Primary Contact), C. Quesada, K. Rau, E. Brosha, F. Garzon, R. Mukundan, and C. Padró Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-9587 Email: trock@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2015 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel * contaminants in support of the development of science- based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] TC197 WG-12). Validate the ASTM International test method for * determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle (FC) Subcommittee of NEAC met February 7-8, 2012 in Washington (Drs. Hoffmann and Juzaitis were unable to attend). While the meeting was originally scheduled to occur after the submission of the President's FY 2013 budget, the submission was delayed a week; thus, we could have no discussion on balance in the NE program. The Agenda is attached as Appendix A. The main focus of the meeting was on accident tolerant fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the

242

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Research and development of americium-containing mixed oxide fuel for fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

The present status of the R and D program for americium-containing MOX fuel is reported. Successful achievements for development of fabrication technology with remote handling and evaluation of irradiation behavior together with evaluation of thermo-chemical properties based on the out-of-pile experiments are mentioned with emphasis on effects of Am addition on the MOX fuel properties. (authors)

Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Sato, Isamu; Miwa, Shuhei; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Ishi, Yohei; Hirosawa, Takashi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrids for Distributed Power Market Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project was initiated with Rolls-Royce PLC to assess the technical and economic feasibility of their advanced solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology and to better understand the development hurdles to achieving megawatt-scale commercial products. This effort was part of a series of projects in 2001 assessing solid oxide fuel cell technology.

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

245

Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. 10 refs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Job Creation, Retention and Enhancement Fund State Iowa Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Iowa Economic Development Authority The Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) program provides financial assistance to those businesses and industries requiring such assistance in order to create new job opportunities. Assistance is provided to encourage

247

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Methods and apparatuses for the development of microstructured nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microstructured nuclear fuel adapted for nuclear power system use includes fissile material structures of micrometer-scale dimension dispersed in a matrix material. In one method of production, fissile material particles are processed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized-bed reactor including a gas inlet for providing controlled gas flow into a particle coating chamber, a lower bed hot zone region to contain powder, and an upper bed region to enable powder expansion. At least one pneumatic or electric vibrator is operationally coupled to the particle coating chamber for causing vibration of the particle coater to promote uniform powder coating within the particle coater during fuel processing. An exhaust associated with the particle coating chamber and can provide a port for placement and removal of particles and powder. During use of the fuel in a nuclear power reactor, fission products escape from the fissile material structures and come to rest in the matrix material. After a period of use in a nuclear power reactor and subsequent cooling, separation of the fissile material from the matrix containing the embedded fission products will provide an efficient partitioning of the bulk of the fissile material from the fission products. The fissile material can be reused by incorporating it into new microstructured fuel. The fission products and matrix material can be incorporated into a waste form for disposal or processed to separate valuable components from the fission products mixture.

Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Carroll, David W. (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David J. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Biodiesel from Microalgae: Complementarity in a Fuel Development Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel produces fewer pollutants than petroleum diesel, and is virtually free of sulfur. These properties make biodiesel an attractive candidate to facilitate compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). This fuel is ordinarily considered to be derived from oilseeds, but an essentially identical biodiesel can be made from microalgae.

Brown, L. M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WASTE-AS-FUEL PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stream char acterization for co-firing RDF and coal as perti nent to the progress of the study to date TECHNOLOGIES There are three primary thermal waste-as-fuel technologies described below: (1) co-firing of an RDF suit able for co-firing. In most instances there is little or no preprocessing associated

Columbia University

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

253

Subtask 3.4 - Fischer - Tropsch Fuels Development  

SciTech Connect

Under Subtask 3.4, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) examined the opportunities and challenges facing Fischer??Tropsch (FT) technology in the United States today. Work was completed in two distinct budget periods (BPs). In BP1, the EERC examined the technical feasibility of using modern warm-gas cleanup techniques for FT synthesis. FT synthesis is typically done using more expensive and complex cold-gas sweetening. Warm-gas cleanup could greatly reduce capital and operating costs, making FT synthesis more attractive for domestic fuel production. Syngas was generated from a variety of coal and biomass types; cleaned of sulfur, moisture, and condensables; and then passed over a pilot-scale FT catalyst bed. Laboratory and modeling work done in support of the pilot-scale effort suggested that the catalyst was performing suboptimally with warm-gas cleanup. Long-term trends showed that the catalyst was also quickly deactivating. In BP3, the EERC compared FT catalyst results using warm-gas cleanup to results using cold-gas sweetening. A gas-sweetening absorption system (GSAS) was designed, modeled, and constructed to sweeten syngas between the gasifier and the pilot-scale FT reactor. Results verified that the catalyst performed much better with gas sweetening than it had with warm-gas cleanup. The catalyst also showed no signs of rapid deactivation when the GSAS was running. Laboratory tests in support of this effort verified that the catalyst had deactivated quickly in BP1 because of exposure to syngas, not because of any design flaw with the pilot-scale FT reactor itself. Based on these results, the EERC concludes that the two biggest issues with using syngas treated with warm-gas cleanup for FT synthesis are high concentrations of CO{sub 2} and volatile organic matter. Other catalysts tested by the EERC may be more tolerant of CO{sub 2}, but volatile matter removal is critical to ensuring long-term FT catalyst operation. This subtask was funded through the EERC??U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding for BP1 was provided by the North Dakota Industrial Commission??s (NDIC) Renewable Energy Council.

Joshua Strege; Anthony Snyder; Jason Laumb; Joshua Stanislowski; Michael Swanson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly - June 2012  

SciTech Connect

Topics are: (1) MPACT Campaign - (a) Management and Integration - Coordination meetings between NE and NA-22, NA-24, and NA-82 were conducted the week of June 11th. Preparations are being made for the next MPACT working group meeting, scheduled for Aug 28-30 at Idaho Falls. In addition to covering accomplishments and discussing future plans, a site tour of INL facilities (MFC, EBR, ATR, INTEC) is being organized. (2) Accounting and Control Technologies - (a) Microcalorimetry - Now operating 256-pixel array at LANL. We are in the process of tuning detector parameters to improve and optimize performance. Preliminary measurements show approximate number of live pixels is similar to that observed previously at NIST. Continuing to study contribution to systematic error from uncertainties in tabulated gamma-ray energies. (b) Electrochemical Sensor - Testing of sensors fashioned from different precursor materials continued. SEM analysis of all used sensors has been or will be performed. (c) Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer - Ongoing perturbation calculations are providing information on the fundamental systematic error limits of LSDS. In order to achieve separating the contribution of Pu and 235U to the signal, there will need to be tight controls on systematic errors. Continuing to look into a He4 detector. Research into local construction of a He4 detector continued. We have started to apply the algorithm to test the LSDS using experimental data from previous RPI measurements. PNNL also developed a plan to address the lack of statistics in the MCNP modeling of the NGSI 64 assemblies. The ISU graduate student built and tested a fission chamber to gain experience with them. (d) Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials - The imaging detector design was modified for each pixel to have an 8 x 8 pixel array. Quotations and purchasing process for components, including the new PSD scintillator are in progress. (e) Fast Neutron Multiplicity Analysis - The team submitted two papers to the upcoming INMM meeting that are related to the fast neutron multiplicity R&D effort. Progress was made on the project's main goal of designing a concept for a prototype fast-neutron multiplicity counter. We started laying out the outline for the final report. We have been working with our ORNL collaborators to develop a new digitizer system to support our experimental campaign planned for next year. (3) MPACT Analysis Tools - (a) Multi-isotope Process Monitor - Fuel characterization framework development continued during June. A report describing the methodologies is being completed. Kenneth Dayman, from University of Texas, spent a week at PNNL wrapping up his master's research and working on a journal submission covering that work. The target journal is the IEEE transactions on Nuclear Science; submission is planned for the end of July. A proposal to instrument H-Canyon is being prepared in conjunction with SRNL and the NNSA's NGSI program. The impact of gamma-ray spectrum counting statistics on the precision of relative radioisotope component intensities as reconstructed via Principal Component Regression (PCR) continued in June with Monte Carlo simulations of a two-component (i.e., two radioisotope) system. This work generalizes earlier studies in FY12 in which Poisson counting variations of only a single spectrum component were simulated. (b) Modeling and Simulation for Analysis of Safeguards Performance (Electrochemical) - Preliminary insights into safeguards challenges and the initial design for an electrochemical plant have been written up into an INMM paper and will be presented at the INMM Summer Meeting. Work is currently adding a new visualization capability for integrating materials accountancy with physical protection. (c) Material Control including Process Monitoring (Pattern Recognition, Sensors) - Fabrication of quartz chips continued at an external foundry. Awaiting delivery of the heat exchange manifold and chip holder. (d) MPACT System Integration and Technical Support - The initial report on cost-basis metrics for nucle

Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fuels Performance Technologies: Milestone FY06 9.1 -- Using IQT measurements, develop simplified kinetic expressions for ignition of fuels that could be used in HCCI engine models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the development of a new fuel characterization, based on simplified kinetic expression, to quantify ignition quality for low-temperature combustion vehicle applications.

Taylor, J. D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

PEM fuel cellstack development based on membrane-electrode assemblies of ultra-low platinum loadings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attempt is made to scale-up single cell technology, based on ultra-low platinum loadings, to develop a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack for stationary power generation.

Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights October 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DB Program monthly highlights report for September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/252, was distributed to program participants by email on October 26. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis; (2) Spent Fuel Management; (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development of a Liquid to Compressed Natural Gas (LCNG) Fueling Station. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective was the development of equipment and processes to produce compressed natural gas (CNG) from liquified natural gas (LNG) for heavy duty vehicular applications. The interest for this technology is a result of the increased use of alternative fuels for the reduction of emissions and dependency of foreign energy. Technology of the type developed under this program is critical for establishing natural gas as an economical alternative fuel.

Moore, J. A.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors. The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business and Market Development Program (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Newfoundland and Labrador Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

262

Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.  

SciTech Connect

Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

264

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

266

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Focus Area: Hydrogen Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.iea.org/Textbase/npsum/hydrogenSUM.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/hydrogen-fuel-cells-review-national-r Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships Regulations: Safety Standards This book maps the various governmental research activities and policies

267

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with government agencies and industries, is actively engaged in the development, testing, and characterization of high efficiency, low cost modular solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems for stationary, automotive and military applications. Advanced SOFC systems are being developed which will offer ease of operation on a variety of gaseous liquid hydrocarbon and coal-derived fuels as well as "zero emissions" capability. SOFC R&D activities at PNNL continue in the areas of cell component materials, electrochemistry, cell design and modeling, high temperature corrosion, and fuel processing. Specific activities include development of optimized materials and cost effective fabrication techniques for high power density anode-supported cells operating at temperatures below 800 degrees C, characterization of processes responsible for high electrical performance and long term performance degradation, optimization and cell and stack designs using computational engineering models, and hydrocarbon fuel processing using micro technology.

Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Baskaran, Suresh; Chick, Lawrence A.; Chou, Y. S.; Deibler, John E.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Marina, Olga A.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Simner, Steve P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Weil, K. Scott; Yang, Z Gary; Singh, Prabhakar; McVay, Gary L.

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

268

SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE U.S. FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Treatment or processing of used nuclear fuel to recycle uranium and plutonium has historically been accomplished using the well known PUREX process. The PUREX process has been used on an industrial scale for over 60 years in the nuclear industry. Research is underway to develop advanced separation methods for the recovery of other used fuel components, such as the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) for possible transmutation in fast spectrum reactors, or other constituents (e.g. Cs, Sr, transition metals, lanthanides) to help facilitate effective waste management options. This paper will provide an overview of new solvent extraction processes developed for advanced nuclear fuel cycles, and summarize recent experimental results. This will include the utilization of new extractants for selective separation of target metals and new processes developed to selectively recover one or more elements from used fuel.

Terry A. Todd

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coal-fueled diesel technology development Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEESI Emissions Control program activity ranged from control concept testing of 10 CFM slipstream from a CWS fuel single cylinder research diesel engine to the design, installation, and operation of a full-size Emissions Control system for a full-size CWS fuel diesel engine designed for locomotive operation.Early 10 CFM slipstream testing program activity was performed to determine Emissions Characteristics and to evaluate Emissions Control concepts such a Barrier filtration, Granular bed filtration, and Cyclone particulate collection for reduction of particulate and gaseous emissions. Use of sorbent injection into the engine exhaust gas upstream of the barrier filter or use of sorbent media in the granular bed filter were found to provide reduction of exhaust gas SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in addition to collection of ash particulate. Emergence of the use of barrier filtration as a most practical Emissions Control concept disclosed a need to improve cleanability of the filter media in order to avoid reduction of turbocharger performance by excessive barrier filter pressure drop. The next progression of program activity, after the slipstream feasibility state, was 500 CFM cold flow testing of control system concepts. The successful completion of 500 CFM cold flow testing of the Envelope Filter led to a subsequent progression to a similar configuration Envelope Filter designed to operate at 500 CFM hot gas flow from the CWS fuel research diesel engine in the GETS engine test laboratory. This Envelope Filter included the design aspect proven by cold flow testing as well as optimization of the selection of the installed filter media.

Van Kleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in target channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium driver fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EXTRUDED CERAMIC NUCLEAR FUEL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Urania rods 6-in. long and 0.475-in. in diameter were extruded and sintered to densities exceeding 94% of the theoratical urania density. The rods dropped freely through a straight metal tube 8-in. long with an internal diameter 0.004-in. greater than the diameter of the rods. All properties of the extruded and sintered rods relevant to their use as a nuclear fuel material were at least equal to the corresponding properties of pressed and sintered urania pellets. Extruded and sintered urania rods can be produced with standard ceramic-industry machinery. From preliminary estimates it appears that extrusions may be produced more cheaply than pellets. (auth)

1961-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet fuel Specimens for Thermionic Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration initiated a project at Battelle Memorial Institute for the purpose of fabricating clad fuel pellet containment vessel assemblies. These assemblies house clad fuel pellets containing enriched fuel. Irradiation studies of these assemblies in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor will provide data required for the desigi of thermionic converter reactors being considered by NASA. Three major objectives were defined at the initiation of this project at Battelle. These were (1) to provide containment vessel assemblies for irradiation studies, (2) to identify the best fuel dispersion/cladding combination for the fueled pellets, and (3) to identify and optimize the most promising fabrication technique to the extent necessary to provide reproducible specimens. In addition to these major objectives, other goals were defined in relation to supporting studies required for the successful conclusion of this program. The approach for accomplishing these objectives involved the cooperation of various research and research support groups at Battelle. These groups contributed to the overall program by involvement in the following areas: (1) Preparation or procurement of various types of UO{sub 2} fuel particles; (2) Application of tungsten coating to the fuel particles; (3) Development of various powder-consolidation techniques for the fuel form including use of explosive methods and hot isostatic pressing; (4) Selection and evaluation of high-temperature claddings for the fuel form; (5) Development of techniques for cladding application to the fuel form; (6) Evaluation of candidate systems by thermal cycling; (7) Fabrication of irradiation containment vessels and the associated components; and (8) Conduction of appropriate supporting studies associated with welding and brazing of the containment vessel components. The objectives of this program were accomplished to the extent that two clad fuel pellet containment vessel assemblies were completed and forwarded to NASA for irradiation testing. In conjunction with this effort, a compatible fuel-cladding system was developed for the clad fuel pellet as well as a fabrication process. In addition'to the accomplishment of these major goals, other valuable information relating to the fabrication and assembly of the containment vessel components was developed.

Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

1968-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Development of Kilowatt-Scale Coal Fuel Cell Technology - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Steven S.C. Chuang (Primary Contact), Tritti Siengchum, Jelvehnaz Mirzababaei, Azadeh Rismanchian, and Seyed Ali Modjtahedi The University of Akron 302 Buchtel Common Akron, OH 44310-3906 Phone: (330) 972-6993 Email: schuang@uakron.edu DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-08GO0881114 Project Start Date: June 1, 2008 Project End Date: May 31, 2012 *Congressionally directed project Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To develop a kilowatt-scale coal-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology. The outcome of this research effort

275

GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

Wang, M. Q.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Final Report: Development of a Thermal and Water Management System for PEM Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final program report is prepared to provide the status of program activities performed over the period of 9 years to develop a thermal and water management (TWM) system for an 80-kW PEM fuel cell power system. The technical information and data collected during this period are presented in chronological order by each calendar year. Balance of plant (BOP) components of a PEM fuel cell automotive system represents a significant portion of total cost based on the 2008 study by TIAX LLC, Cambridge, MA. The objectives of this TWM program were two-fold. The first objective was to develop an advanced cooling system (efficient radiator) to meet the fuel cell cooling requirements. The heat generated by the fuel cell stack is a low-quality heat (small difference between fuel cell stack operating temperature and ambient air temperature) that needs to be dissipated to the ambient air. To minimize size, weight, and cost of the radiator, advanced fin configurations were evaluated. The second objective was to evaluate air humidification systems which can meet the fuel cell stack inlet air humidity requirements. The moisture from the fuel cell outlet air is transferred to inlet air, thus eliminating the need for an outside water source. Two types of humidification devices were down-selected: one based on membrane and the other based on rotating enthalpy wheel. The sub-scale units for both of these devices have been successfully tested by the suppliers. This project addresses System Thermal and Water Management.

Zia Mirza, Program Manager

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

278

Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative and Durable High Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Development of Alternative and Durable High Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells PNNL: Yong Wang Conrad Zhang Vilayanur Viswanath Yuehe Lin Jun Liu Project kick Project kick - - off meeting off meeting Feb 13 Feb 13 - - 14, 2007 14, 2007 Ballard Power Systems: Stephen Campbell University of Delaware: Jingguang Chen ORNL: Sheng Dai 2 Technical Issues and Objective Technical Issues and Objective Current technical issues z Carbon support „ Susceptible to oxidation under fuel cell operating conditions. „ Oxidation further catalyzed by Pt „ Corrosion leads to Pt migration and agglomeration

279

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Agency/Company /Organization Resources for the Future Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Topics Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.rff.org/RFF/Documen Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica[1] Abstract "Although fuel taxes are a practical means of curbing vehicular air pollution, congestion, and accidents in developing countries-all of which are typically major problems-they are often opposed on distributional

282

Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Development Test. Second annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second annual report covering progress made under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC21-92MC29237, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test. The project is for the design, construction, and testing of a 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant in the City of Santa Clara, California. The report is divided into sections which describe the progress in various program activities, and provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.

Not Available

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmentally clean power generation has never been so important. The increasing cost of fossil fuels and more stringent regulations on emissions (particularly CO2 and NOx), together with increasing demand for electricity, make the provision of cost... Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins Magdalene College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy June 2008...

Collins, William Tristan

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

EPRI PWR Fuel Cladding Corrosion (PFCC) Model: Volume 2: Corrosion Theory and Rate Equation Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI PWR Fuel Cladding Corrosion (PFCC) model has been developed to help utilities manage high burnup fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding issues. The model predicts the peak oxide thickness with 92 percent confidence of being within plus or minus 10 micrometers of the measured value, with a conservative bias of 7 micrometers when the metallurgical variables are well characterized. This volume documents the evolution of the rate equation for predicting Zircaloy cladding corrosion and the database us...

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

New In-pile Instrumentation to Support Fuel Cycle Research and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New and enhanced nuclear fuels are a key enabler for new and improved reactor technologies. For example, the goals of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will not be met without irradiations successfully demonstrating the safety and reliability of new fuels. Likewise, fuel reliability has become paramount in ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear power plants. Recently, the Office of Nuclear Energy in the Department of Energy (DOE-NE) launched a new direction in fuel research and development that emphasizes an approach relying on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time, data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. A three-year strategic research program is proposed for developing the required test vehicles with sensors of unprecedented accuracy and resolution for obtaining the data needed to characterize three-dimensional changes in fuel microstructure during irradiation testing. When implemented, this strategy will yield test capsule designs that are instrumented with new sensor technologies for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and other irradiation locations for the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FC R&D) program. Prior laboratory testing, and as needed, irradiation testing, of these sensors will have been completed to give sufficient confidence that the irradiation tests will yield the required data. Obtaining these sensors must draw upon the expertise of a wide-range of organizations not currently supporting nuclear fuels research. This document defines this strategic program and provides the necessary background information related to fuel irradiation testing, desired parameters for detection, and an overview of currently available in-pile instrumentation. In addition, candidate sensor technologies are identified in this document, and a list of proposed criteria for ranking these technologies. A preliminary ranking of candidate technologies is performed to illustrate the path forward for developing real-time instrumentation that could provide the required data for the FC R&D program. This draft document is a starting point for discussion with instrumentation experts and organizations. It is anticipated that the document will be used to stimulate discussions on a wide-range of sensor technologies and to gain consensus with respect to the path forward for accomplishing the goals of this research program.

J. Rempe; H. MacLean; R. Schley; D. Hurley; J. Daw; S. Taylor; J. Smith; J. Svoboda; D. Kotter; D. Knudson; M. Guers; S. C. Wilkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Page B - 1 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page B - 2 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page B - 3 Multi-Year Research,...

289

Development of a liquid-fueled micro-combustor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) have made possible the development of shirtbutton-sized gas turbine engines for use as portable power sources. As part of an effort to develop a microscale gas turbine ...

Peck, Jhongwoo, 1976-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Agency of Natural Resources The Act 250 program provides a public, quasi-judicial process for reviewing

291

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials  

SciTech Connect

The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

Smith, B.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Final Technical Report for the Martin County Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In September 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy and Martin County Economic Development Corporation entered into an agreement to further the advancement of a microtubular PEM fuel cell developed by Microcell Corporation. The overall focus of this project was on research and development related to high volume manufacturing of fuel cells and cost reduction in the fuel cell manufacturing process. The extrusion process used for the microfiber fuel cells in this project is inherently a low cost, high volume, high speed manufacturing process. In order to take advantage of the capabilities that the extrusion process provides, all subsequent manufacturing processes must be enhanced to meet the extrusion lines speed and output. Significant research and development was completed on these subsequent processes to ensure that power output and performance were not negatively impacted by the higher speeds, design changes and process improvements developed in this project. All tasks were successfully completed resulting in cost reductions, performance improvements and process enhancements in the areas of speed and quality. These results support the Department of Energys goal of fuel cell commercialization.

Eshraghi, Ray

2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

S.E. Veyo

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix D - Project Evaluation Form Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page D- 1 DOE Hydrogen Program 2011 Annual Merit Review Project Evaluation Form...

296

Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX reg sign ) molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor...

298

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment (Saskatchewan, Canada) Saskatchewan Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local...

299

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumer Industrial Residential Louisiana Department of Natural Resources Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Louisiana Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor...

300

Relocated Business Tax Credit or Deduction (Wisconsin) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Relocated Business Tax Credit or Deduction (Wisconsin) Relocated Business Tax Credit or Deduction (Wisconsin) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Entrepreneur and Small Business Loan Guarantee Fund (Georgia) Georgia Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor...

302

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stormwater Management (Maryland) Maryland Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial InstallerContractor...

303

Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Rhode Island) Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public...

304

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

305

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) Alabama Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial...

306

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland) Maryland Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial Installer...

307

Workforce Training Grant (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workforce Training Grant (Wisconsin) Workforce Training Grant (Wisconsin) Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer...

308

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer...

309

Technical Assistance to Developers - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program T. Rockward and R.L. Borup (Primary Contacts), F. Garzon, R. Mukundan, and D. Spernjak Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-9587 and (505) 667-2823 Emails: trock@lanl.gov, borup@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2003 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Objectives Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell * component and system developers Assess fuel cell materials and components and give * feedback to developers Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the * development of various new material durability testing

310

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

Joseph Pierre

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed during the period February 21, 2006 through August 21, 2006 is summarized herein. During this period, efforts were focused on 5 kWe bundle testing, development of on-cell reformation, the conceptual design of an advanced module, and the development of a manufacturing roadmap for cells and bundles. A 5 kWe SOFC system was built and delivered to the Pennsylvania State University; fabrication of a second 5 kWe SOFC for delivery to Montana State University was initiated. Cell testing and microstructural analysis in support of these efforts was also conducted.

Joseph F. Pierre

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

314

Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi,Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

316

Development of Supported Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Partnerships Program to further the development of their wind turbine. #12;Success Stories of Past drug, PTH-CBD, is being prepared for licensing to a pharmaceutical company after the Phase I trials the provisional patent for the technology, process and delivery of LOCUS. This is a single- chambered microbial

317

Development of an impedance-based sensor for the detection of catalyst coking in fuel-reforming systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel sensor for detecting the early stages of catalyst coking in fuel reforming systems has been developed. The sensor was manufactured by inkjet printing (more)

Wheeler, Jeffrey L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of research and development (R and D) activities are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY98 in support of the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). During the past few years, the ability to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel using surplus-weapons plutonium has been researched, and various experiments have been performed. This research effort will be continued in FY98 to support further development of the technology required for MOX fuel fabrication for reactor-based plutonium disposition. R and D activities for FY98 have been divided into four major areas: (1) feed qualification/supply, (2) fuel fabrication development, (3) analytical methods development, and (4) gallium removal. Feed qualification and supply activities encompass those associated with the production of both PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} feed materials. Fuel fabrication development efforts include studies with a new UO{sub 2} feed material, alternate sources of PuO{sub 2}, and determining the effects of gallium on the sintering process. The intent of analytical methods development is to upgrade and improve several analytical measurement techniques in support of other R and D and test fuel fabrication tasks. Finally, the purpose of the gallium removal system activity is to develop and integrate a gallium removal system into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) design and the Phase 2 Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) demonstration line. These four activities will be coordinated and integrated appropriately so that they benefit the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. This plan describes the activities that will occur in FY98 and presents the schedule and milestones for these activities.

Alberstein, D.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J. [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated nuclear fuel has been reprocessed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) since 1953 to recover uranium-235 and krypton-85 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The resulting acidic high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLLW) has been solidified to a high-level waste (HLW) calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless-steel bins enclosed in concrete vaults. Residual HLW and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless-steel underground tanks contained in concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also stored at INEL. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium. As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the INEL. The plan was developed jointly by DOE and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc., (WINCO) and with the concurrence of the State of Idaho.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. GTI has been developing high-efficiency steam methane reformers and fuel processing technology looks to introduce innovative, compact natural gas steam reforming system and appliance quality hydrogen system integration for efficient operation of the unit. High- Efficiency Natural Gas Steam Reformer

323

Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-92MC28065, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test (PDT) during the period of October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. Information is presented on stack design, manufacturing, stack assembly, procurement, site preparation, and test plan.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Developments of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pyroprocessing Technology at Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes research in used fuel pyroprocessing that has been published by Idaho National Laboratory over the last decade. It includes work done both on treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and development of advanced technology for potential scale-up and commercialization. Collaborations with universities and other laboratories is included in the cited work.

Michael F. Simpson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION USE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vendor includes a service station dealer, a broker or distributor as defined under the Motor Vehicle Fuel License Tax Law, and a user who sells fuel to others. Vendor also includes any person who sells fuel delivered into the fuel tank of a motor vehicle through a pump equipped with a key-lock meter which he supplies when he retains ownership of the fuel until it is withdrawn and placed in the fuel tank, notwithstanding that the fuel is placed in the fuel tank by the user. Vendor does not include a commission agent who makes no sales of fuel to users on his own account, who sells fuel title to which remains in the agents principal until the fuel is delivered to the user, and who bills the user in the name, and on the invoice, of the principal for whom the agent sells the fuel. In such instances the agents

unknown authors

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Type Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development Program The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation provides funding for alternative fueling infrastructure...

327

High-uranium-loaded U/sub 3/O/sub 8/--Al fuel element development program  

SciTech Connect

The High-Uranium-Loaded U/sub 3/O/sub 8/--Al Fuel Development Program supports Argonne National Laboratory efforts to develop high-uranium-density research and test reactor fuel to accommodate use of low-uranium enrichment. The goal is to fuel most research and test reactors with uranium of less than 20% enrichment for the purpose of lowering the potential for diversion of highly-enriched material for nonpeaceful usages.

Martin, M.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Appendix E: Acronyms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E - Acronyms E - Acronyms Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page E - 1 Appendix E - Acronyms AEI Advanced Energy Initiative AEO Annual Energy Outlook AFC Alkaline Fuel Cell AHJ Authorities Having Jurisdiction AMFC Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells AMR Annual Merit Review ANL (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory APU Auxiliary Power Unit ARRA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ASES American Solar Energy Society ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers AST Accelerated Stress Test ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATP Adenosine-5'-Triphosphate Bchl Bacteriochlorophyll BES (DOE Office of) Basic Energy Sciences BEV Battery Electric Vehicle BNL (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory BOP Balance of Plant

329

Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The U.S. molten carbonate fuel-cell development and commercialization effort  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the status of molten carbonate fuel-cell (MCFC) development in the U.S., including the role of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in commercializing MCFC power-plant products for use by gas utility and electric power industries. They describe major fundamental stack research issues, as well as MCF power-plant network and system issues, that need to be resolved before MCFC technology can be commercialized. A significant initiative in MCFC research is the spatial configuration of MCFC stacks into networks in a fuel-cell power plant.

Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.; Mayfield, M.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The U.S. molten carbonate fuel-cell development and commercialization effort  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the status of molten carbonate fuel-cell (MCFC) development in the US, including the role of the US Department of Energy (DOE) in commercializing MCFC power-plant products for use by gas utility and electric power industries. The authors describe major fundamental stack research issues, as well as MCFC power-plant network and system issues, that need to be resolved before MCFC technology can be commercialized. A significant initiative in MCFC research is the spatial configuration of MCFC stacks into networks in a fuel-cell power plant.

Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.; Mayfield, M.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NREL Develops Technique to Measure Membrane Thickness and Defects in Polymer Electrode Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 * November 2010 4 * November 2010 2-D image of a PEM fuel cell membrane sample measured with the NREL device (corresponding optical image in inset). The image shows bubble defects and a color shift in the sample. An area of approximately three inches by three inches is shown. NREL Develops Technique to Measure Membrane Thickness and Defects in Polymer Electrode Membrane Fuel Cells Project: Fuel Cell MEA Manufacturing R&D NREL Team: Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center and National Center for Photovoltaics Accomplishment: NREL developed a technique to measure the two-dimensional thickness of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell membranes for in-line quality control during manufacturing (first reported in May 2009). The technique is based on an NREL-developed instrument currently used in continuous manufacturing of photovoltaic cells. This

333

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Task 1, Proof of principle testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Pearson Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pearson Fuels Pearson Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Pearson Fuels Address 4067 El Cajon Blvd Place San Diego, California Zip 92105 Sector Biofuels Product Alternative fuel distributor provides ethanol-based fuels Website http://www.pearsonfuels.com/ Coordinates 32.754335°, -117.107501° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.754335,"lon":-117.107501,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blending Ethanol Blending Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blending Regulation Gasoline suppliers who provide fuel to distributors in the state must offer gasoline that is suitable for blending with fuel alcohol. Suppliers may not

336

Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing SAE Safety Standards for Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Polymer and Composite Materials R&D Gaps for Hydrogen Systems Michael Veenstra Ford Motor Company October 17, 2012 1 SAE Fuel Cell Vehicle Committee � Developing vehicle and systems-level, performance- based standards based on best available knowledge. � Cooperating with other organizations to verify current standards and develop new capabilities, when appropriate. � DOE-funded verification testing of methodologies � Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) � CSA America � Overall objective � Use FCVs as current ICEs are used (without restrictions) � Facilitate rapid advances by the industry � Provide a technical basis for national and global requirements 2 SAE FCV ENABLING Standards

337

Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

Bryant, J.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

Edward F. Kiczek

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of high energy density fuels from mild gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the program is the determination of the minimal processing requirements to produce High Energy Density Fuels (HEDF), meeting a minimal energy density of 130,000 Btu/gal (conventional jet fuels have energy densities in the vicinity of 115,000--120,000 Btu/gal) and having acceptable advanced fuel specifications in accordance with the three defined categories of HEDF. The program encompasses assessing current technology capability; selecting acceptable processing and refining schemes; and generating samples of advanced test fuels. A task breakdown structure was developed containing eight key tasks. This report summarizes the work that Amoco Oil Company (AOC), as key subcontractor, performed in the execution of Task 4, Proposed Upgrading Schemes for Advanced Fuel. The intent of the Task 4 study was to represent all the candidate processing options, that were either studied in the experimental efforts of Task 3 or were available from the prior art in the open literature, in a linear program (LP) model. The LP model would allow scaling of the bench-scale Task 3 results to commercial scale and would perform economic evaluations on any combination of the processes which might be used to make HEDF. Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the process and economic bases used. Sections 3.0 and 4.0 details the economics and processing sensitivities for HEDF production. 1 ref., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Development of molten-carbonate fuel cells for power generation. Quarterly progress report, 15 November 1978-15 February 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cell research and development at General Electric Company during the three month period beginning 15 November 1978 and ending 15 February 1979 is described. The objectives of this Phase I effort include the development of promising concepts to circumvent a number of outstanding technical challenges in molten carbonate fuel cell technology and the better definition of the operating limits of molten carbonate fuel cells and power plant based thereupon. During this quarter of the program, principal activities have been the operation of experimental molten carbonate fuel cells using pure and H/sub 2/S- and HCl-contaminated fuels which simulate coal-derived fuels, the development of synthesis and fabrication techniques to prepare electrolyte tiles, the diagnostic analysis of new and used electrolyte tiles, the quantification of anode sintering, the fabrication of a 10 in. x 10 in. scaled-up single cell, and design activities leading to a stackable 10 in. x 10 in. cell.

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Grant Program Industry Recruitment/Support Loan Program Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and technologies. The Office of Energy is currently working on developing the supply chains for the wind,

344

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly - May 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management and Integration LANL - Initial coordination meetings with NE and NA-20 were held the first week of May. Additional meetings, to include NA-82 and the new Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment task are scheduled for June. Work package planning as part of the NTD transition is ongoing. Microcalorimetry LANL - Some parts to attempt repair of a malfunctioning water chiller that has been holding up work on the current detector array have arrived. We will attempt to begin running the compressor/cryostat next week to resume work on commissioning the detector array. We have also been working on a backup plan to temporarily move our system to a different lab space. Completed data analysis and prepared a paper summarizing Pu measurements for peer-review journal. Two members of our team presented work at the SORMA West 2012 conference. Completed data analysis and prepared a milestone report summarizing the development of Monte Carlo tools to study systematic errors. Electrochemical Sensor INL - The second sensor test was stopped short due to the work stand-down. Some activities related to this work have resumed, but not all. The sensor used during the second test was removed from the furnace and it showed cracks and later crumbled when being rinsed for sample preparation. The sensor material will be submitted to SEM analysis once work is resumed in the facilities where analysis is performed. A third sensor test has started. Tests with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first three sensor tests. Materials with different annealing temperatures will also be prepared for analysis. Lead slowing down spectrometer LANL - Continued work on perturbation method for LSDS analysis. We are running simulations to delineate issues and are checking additional data libraries to see whether there are differences in simulation results. Electrochemical sensor INL - The second sensor test was stopped short due to the work stand-down. Some activities related to this work have resumed, but not all. The sensor used during the second test was removed from the furnace and it showed cracks and later crumbled when being rinsed for sample preparation. The sensor material will be submitted to SEM analysis once work is resumed in the facilities where analysis is performed. A third sensor test has started. Tests with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first three sensor tests. Materials with different annealing temperatures will also be prepared for analysis. Fast Neutron Multiplicity analysis INL - The University of Michigan team continues its work on the post-experiment analysis of the validation data from JRC ISPRA, as well as scoping studies using the simulation tool MCNPX-PoliMi. At INL, our new staff member working on this project is now working to model performance capabilities for the fast-neutrons scintillator design concepts. At INL our primary analysis approach is focused on the Feynman mean-to-variance approach. At the University of Michigan, the primary analysis approach is multiplicity coincidence analysis. Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials ORNL - Completed additional measurements of the two 'trainer' configurations as well as calibration measurements with sources on an x-y stage. The imager was shipped to Pantex for an NA-22 obligation at the end of May. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer LANL - Continued to look into He4 detector. A Swiss company was located that makes He4 detectors and associated electronics. Had a teleconference with them to assess the possible help we can get from them. We are also looking in to constructing one locally. Ongoing perturbation calculations are providing information on the fundamental systematic error limits of LSDS. In order to achieve separating the contribution of Pu and 235U to the signal, there will need to be tight controls on systematic errors. Multi-isotope Process Monitor PNNL - Attended a training call in advanced multivariate classification and analysis method

Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development

346

DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

2004-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010  

SciTech Connect

The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

High-temperature fuel cell research and development. Final technical status report, June 1977-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An initial survey of the literature produced a list of ceramic materials with properties which made them potential candidates for use in molten-carbonate fuel cell tiles or electrodes. Seven of the materials in the original list were dropped from consideration because of unfavorable thermodynamic properties; four materials were set aside because of high cost, lack of availability, or fabrication difficulties. Thirteen compositions were tested statically at 1000 K in a Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ bath under a dry CO/sub 2/ atmosphere. Only four of the materials tested showed severe degradation reactions in the molten carbonate. A low-temperature process for forming small diameter, high-aspect ratio ceramic fibers for fuel cell use has been developed. A short-term program to initiate a computer study on the thermodynamic analysis of fuel cell materials was initiated at Montana State University. The report on this program is included as Appendix B. The MHD and high-temperature fuel cell literature was surveyed, and material properties were evaluated to identify MHD materials with potential use for fuel cell applications. A technology transfer report of these findings was prepared. This report is included as Appendix A. Laboratory facilities were established to conduct research on interfacial diffusion processes which could be detrimental to successful long-term operation of the solid-electrolyte fuel cell. A variety of physical and chemical techniques were examined for the preparation of high-density substituted LaCrO/sub 3/ which was to be one component of a diffusion couple with Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. Hydrolysis of a mixed metal-nitrate solution with urea produced the most reactive powder. A final theoretical density of almost 98% was attained in cold-pressed sintered discs of this material. (Extensive list of references)

Not Available

1978-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Maine's Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development statue provides an expedited permitting pathway for proposed wind developments in

350

Ohio Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) Ohio Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Retail Supplier Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Ohio Air Quality Development Authority The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority provides financing for new air quality facilities for all types of Ohio businesses, ranging from small, family-owned shops to multi-million-dollar manufacturing plants. Many large Ohio companies, in fact, are required to purchase new equipment or make operational changes to comply with EPA air quality regulations. Smaller companies of 100 or fewer employees may also need to make similar changes.

351

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program]. Quarterly technical progress narrative No. 21, December 1, 1987--February 29, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm{sup 2}; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of a pressurized fluidized-bed biomass gasifier to produce substitute fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting a program to convert forest and crop residues to substitute fuel in a pressurized fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The process is designed for operation at pressures up to 2.17 MPa (315 psia) and temperatures up to 1255 K (1800/sup 0/F). Various goals for synthesis or fuel gas processes are being pursued to develop an efficient process. Some of these goals are to maximize the throughput, the amount, and the quality of the gas, while minimizing both the amount of the feedstock preparation needed and the formation of condensible compounds that require by-product disposal and process wastewater treatment. The process development results obtained from fluidization, biomass devolatilization, and char gasification studies were used to design a 30.5-cm (12-inch) ID adiabatic fluidized-bed gasification process development unit (PDU), capable of handling up to 455 kg (1000 lb) of biomass per hour. The fluidized-bed gasifier performance is to be determined as a function of the standard operating parameters to develop a basis for recommending processes to produce either an industrial fuel gas for energy generation or a synthesis gas for methanol and ammonia production.

Babu, S P; Onischak, M; Kosowski, G

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tax Refund Tax Refund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Tax Refund on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Tax Refund A licensed distributor who pays the special fuel tax on biodiesel may claim a refund equal to $0.02 per gallon of biodiesel sold during the previous quarter if the biodiesel is made entirely from components produced in

354

Development and demonstration of a solid fuel-fired gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) and Power Generating Incorporated (PGI) are developing a solid fuel-fired gas turbine system for specialized cogeneration applications. The system is based on a patented pressurized combustor designed and tested by PGI in conjunction with McConnell Industries. The other components of the system are (a) fuel receiving, preparation, storage and feeding system, (b) gas clean-up equipment, and (c) a gas turbine generator. An approximately 400 kW prototype system is under construction at the WRI facilities in Laramie, Wyoming. As a part of this demonstration the integrated system, following a short shakedown period, will be operated on white wood. White wood was selected as the fuel for early tests because of its low ash (0.5 - 1.0 %), silica, and sulfur contents. The system will then be operated on coal. It is expected that the design of the coal-based system will evolve as the wood testing proceeds. In previous similar wood-fired system development attempts, albeit at lower turbine inlet temperatures, a major technical hindrance to long-term operation of a gas turbine power system has been the degradation of the hot section of the gas turbine. Deposition, erosion, and corrosion are main issues that need to be addressed. In the wood-fired PGI system, erosion is not likely to be of concern because of the low silica and low overall ash content of the fuel and the fact that the wood ash particle size is expected to be in the range where little or no erosion would be expected. However, because of the high alkali content of the fuel, deposition and corrosion can become major issues. This paper will deal with the issues pertaining to the design of the prototype being constructed at the WRI premises. Preliminary thoughts on the design aspects of the plant modifications required for coal testing will also be presented.

Speight, J.G.; Sethi, V.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2009 October 2009 BUILDING A CLEAN ENERGY GROWTH COMPANY B A L L A R D P O W E R S Y S T E M S Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kick-off Meeting COPYRIGHT © 2009 BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Project Objectives ƒ Understand and quantify the fundamental degradation mechanisms Establish relationships between morphology, operational conditions, and the rate of catalyst/catalyst layer degradation ƒ Understand the impact of degradation on the mechanical/chemical stability of the component interfaces, including the stability of the 3-phase interface ƒ Develop mechanistic, forward predictive kinetic and materials aging models for catalyst layer degradation

356

Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy C th d C t l t f PEM F l C ll Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Project Kick-Off P I : Branko N Popov P. I.: Branko N. Popov Center for Electrochemical Engineering University of South Carolina Columbia SC 29208. September 28, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Center for Electrochemical Engineering, University of South Carolina 1 Overview Timeline * S Start d date: J June 01 2010 01 2010 * End date: Nov 30 2012 (Phase I) : May 31 2014 (Phase II) Budget * Total project funding ¾ DOE share: $ 4 400 000 ¾ DOE share: $ 4,400,000 ¾ Contractor share: $1,100,000 * Incremental funding received in FY10: $750,000

357

On the Development of a Distillation Process for the Electrometallurgical Treatment of Irradiated Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the spent fuel treatment program at the Idaho National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of actinide products following an electrorefining process. Separation of the actinide products from a molten salt electrolyte and cadmium is achieved by a batch operation called cathode processing. A cathode processor has been designed and developed to efficiently remove the process chemicals and consolidate the actinide products for further processing. This paper describes the fundamentals of cathode processing, the evolution of the equipment design, the operation and efficiency of the equipment, and recent developments at the cathode processor. In addition, challenges encountered during the processing of irradiated spent nuclear fuel in the cathode processor will be discussed.

B.R. Westphal; K.C. Marsden; J.C. Price; D.V. Laug

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Small Graphite Moderated Reactor and Associated Fuel Cycle Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactors have been around since the beginning of the atomic age. Though their existence in the past has been associated with nuclear weapons programs, they are capable of being used in civilian power programs. The simpler design constraints associated with this type of reactor would make them ideal for developing nations to bolster their electricity generation and help promote a greater standard of living in those nations. However, the same benefits that make this type of reactor desirable also make it suspicious to the international community as a possible means to shorten that state?s nuclear latency. If a safeguards approach could be developed for a fuel cycle featuring one of these reactors, it would ease the tension surrounding their existence and possibly lead to an increased latency through engineered barriers. The development of this safeguards approach follows a six step procedure. First, the fuel cycle was analyzed for the types of facilities found in it and how nuclear material flows between facilities. The goals of the safeguards system were established next, using the normal IAEA standards for the non-detection and false alarm probabilities. The 5 MWe Reactor was modeled for both plutonium production and maximum power capacity. Each facility was analyzed for material throughput and the processes that occur in each facility were researched. Through those processes, diversion pathways were developed to test the proposed safeguards system. Finally, each facility was divided into material balance areas and a traditional nuclear material accountancy system was set up to meet the established safeguards goals for the facility. The DPRK weapons program is a great example of the type of fuel cycle that is the problem. The three major facilities in the fuel cycle, the Fuel Fabrication Facility, the 5 MWe Reactor, and the Radiochemical Laboratory, can achieve the two goals of safeguards using traditional methods. Each facility can be adequately safeguarded using methods and practices that are relatively inexpensive and can obtain material balance periods close to the timeliness limits set forth by the IAEA. The Fuel Fabrication Facility can be safeguarded at both its current needed capacity and its full design capacity using inexpensive measurements. The material balance period needed for both capacities are reasonable. For the 5 MWe reactor, plutonium production is simulated to be 6.7 kg per year and is on the high side of estimates. The Radiochemical Laboratory can also be safeguarded at its current capacity. In fact, the timeliness goal for the facility dictates what the material balance period must be for the chosen set of detectors which make it very reasonable.

Rauch, Eric B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Development and Testing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Cogeneration Applications: FY 2000 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim technical progress report describes efforts to develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems that provide both electric power generation and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). Since SOFC systems operate at high temperature (650 to 1000 degrees Celsius), cogeneration seems to be a natural fit. In SOFC-HVAC systems, the exhaust heat from the SOFC is used to drive heat-actuated HVAC subsystems such as absorption chillers or boilers. SOFC-HVAC...

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT OF A PROCESS FOR SEPARATING BARIUM-140 FROM MTR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

S>The results of all laboratory research and development on the process for separation of barium-140 from MTR fuel elements are presented. The steps include caustic dissolution separation of barium and strontium with fuming nitric acid and removal of strontium by the chromate-acetate method. The results of laboratory and pilot plant corrosion investigations and high radiation level flowsheet tests in the Multicurie Cell are also included. ( auth)

Anderson, E.L.; MacCormack, R.S.; Slansky, C.M.

1959-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tennessee Incentives and Laws Tennessee Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Biodiesel Production Incentive Expired: 06/30/2013 The Tennessee Department of Revenue administers the biodiesel manufacturers' incentive fund, which provides Tennessee biodiesel producers with payments for biodiesel fuel produced and sold to Tennessee distributors. Each manufacturer may receive incentives for up to 10 million gallons of biodiesel produced annually. This incentive is available through June 30, 2013, and funding must be appropriated each year. (Reference Tennessee Code 67-3-103 and 67-3-423) Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - ECOtality

363

U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant effort is being placed on silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiC CMC) nuclear fuel cladding by Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. The intent of this work is to invest in a high-risk, high-reward technology that can be introduced in a relatively short time. The LWRS goal is to demonstrate successful advanced fuels technology that suitable for commercial development to support nuclear relicensing. Ceramic matrix composites are an established non-nuclear technology that utilizes ceramic fibers embedded in a ceramic matrix. A thin interfacial layer between the fibers and the matrix allows for ductile behavior. The SiC CMC has relatively high strength at high reactor accident temperatures when compared to metallic cladding. SiC also has a very low chemical reactivity and doesn't react exothermically with the reactor cooling water. The radiation behavior of SiC has also been studied extensively as structural fusion system components. The SiC CMC technology is in the early stages of development and will need to mature before confidence in the developed designs can created. The advanced SiC CMC materials do offer the potential for greatly improved safety because of their high temperature strength, chemical stability and reduced hydrogen generation.

George W. Griffith

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

MINING PROCESS AND PRODUCT INFORMATION FROM PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN A FUEL PARTICLE COATER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Fuel Development and Qualification Program included the design, installation, and testing of a 6-inch diameter nuclear fuel particle coater to demonstrate quality TRISO fuel production on a small industrial scale. Scale-up from the laboratory-scale coater faced challenges associated with an increase in the kernel charge mass, kernel diameter, and a redesign of the gas distributor to achieve adequate fluidization throughout the deposition of the four TRISO coating layers. TRISO coatings are applied at very high temperatures in atmospheres of dense particulate clouds, corrosive gases, and hydrogen concentrations over 45% by volume. The severe environment, stringent product and process requirements, and the fragility of partially-formed coatings limit the insertion of probes or instruments into the coater vessel during operation. Pressure instrumentation were installed on the gas inlet line and exhaust line of the 6-inch coater to monitor the bed differential pressure and internal pressure fluctuations emanating from the fuel bed as a result of bed and gas bubble movement. These instruments are external to the particle bed and provide a glimpse into the dynamics of fuel particle bed during the coating process and data that could be used to help ascertain the adequacy of fluidization and, potentially, the dominant fluidization regimes. Pressure fluctuation and differential pressure data are not presently useful as process control instruments, but data suggest a link between the pressure signal structure and some measurable product attributes that could be exploited to get an early estimate of the attribute values.

Douglas W. Marshall; Charles M. Barnes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

Daniel T. Hennessy

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Annual report, October 1992--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cell active components have been developed and scaled up from laboratory scale to commercial scale. Full width components of both the stabilized nickel cathodes and the low chrome anodes have been successfully cast on M-C Power`s production tape caster. An improved design for a fuel cell separator plate has been developed. The improved design meets the goals of lower cost and manufacturing simplicity, and addresses performance issues of the current commercial area plate. The engineering that the Bechtel Corporation has completed for the MCFC power plant includes a site design, a preliminary site layout, a Process Flow Diagram, and specification for the procurement of some of the major equipment items. Raw materials for anode and cathode components were ordered and received during the first half of 1993. Tape casting of anodes was started in late summer and continued through August. In addition to the technical progress mentioned above, an environment assessment was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). As a result, the PDT has received a categorical exclusion from the Air Pollution Control District permit requirements. The PDT is configured to demonstrate the viability of natural gas-fueled MCFC for the production of electricity and thermal energy in an environmentally benign manner for use in commercial and industrial applications.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

List of Fuel Cells Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 1021 Fuel Cells Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-1000) CSV (rows 1001-1021) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) Federal Grant Program United States Commercial Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Fuel Cells No Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations Connecticut Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com...

369

DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

DEVELOPMENT OF CLAD CERAMIC FUEL PLATES BY SPRAY-COATING TECHNIQUES. Final Report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a program to develop techniques of plasma spraying clad plate-type UO/sub 2/ fuel elements are reported. The investigation was also directed toward determining the limitations of the process as applied to fuel element fabrication. UO/sub 2/ powder coatings having densities of 90% theoretical were produced. At conditions required for spraying plates, densities of 86% appear to be practical. The rate and efficiency of UO/sub 2/ coating deposition were also determined for various spraying conditions. Gritblasting was found to provide the best surface for coating adherence. The O/U ratio of the UO/sub 2/ was maintained by spraying in an Ar atmosphere. Zircaloy-2 was found to be the most desirable cladding material. Cladding thicknesses of 0.035 in. are required in distortion-free 2-in.-wide plates. (J.R.D.)

Weare, N.E.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 2. Brown, S. ,Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Clark, N. N. andModal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 4.6. E XHAUST A

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage and reprocessing since 1953. Reprocessing of SNF has resulted in an existing inventory of 1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid waste and 3800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine, in addition to the 768 metric tons (MT) of SNF and various other fuel materials in inventory. To date, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, recent changes in world events have diminished the demand to recover and recycle this material. As a result, DOE has discontinued reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery, making the need to properly manage and dispose of these and future materials a high priority. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a geological repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will properly stored and prepared for final disposal. Program elements in support of acceptable interim storage and waste minimization include: developing and implementing improved radioactive waste treatment technologies; identifying and implementing enhanced decontamination and decommissioning techniques; developing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) recycle capabilities; and developing and implementing improved technologies for the interim storage of SNF.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-Fueled Transportation System  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lessons Learned from the Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen- Fueled Transportation System M. Melendez, K. Theis, and C. Johnson Technical Report NREL/TP-560-40753 August 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-40753 August 2007 Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-

374

DEVELOPMENT OF OTM SYNGAS PROCESS AND TESTING OF SYNGAS-DERIVED ULTRA-CLEAN FUELS IN DIESEL ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1 through September 15, 2001 in the following task areas: Task 1--materials development; Task 2--composite element development; Task 3--tube fabrication; Task 4--reactor design and process optimization; Task 5--catalyst development; Task 6--P-1 operation; Task 8--fuels and engine testing; and Task 10--project management. OTM benchmark material, LCM1, exceeds the commercial oxygen flux target and was determined to be sufficiently robust to carry on process development activities. Work will continue on second-generation OTM materials that will satisfy commercial life targets. Three fabrication techniques for composite elements were determined to be technically feasible. These techniques will be studied and a lead manufacturing process for both small and large-scale elements will be selected in the next Budget Period. Experiments in six P-0 reactors, the long tube tester (LTT) and the P-1 pilot plant were conducted. Significant progress in process optimization was made through both the experimental program and modeling studies of alternate reactor designs and process configurations. Three tailored catalyst candidates for use in OTM process reactors were identified. Fuels for the International diesel engine and Nuvera fuel cell tests were ordered and delivered. Fuels testing and engine development work is now underway.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Ravi Prasad

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

DOE's Hydrogen Fuel Cell Activities: Developing Technology and Validating it through Real-World Evaluation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation prepared for the May 12, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Conference that describes DOE's current hydrogen fuel cell technology validation projects.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Mandate Ethanol Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Mandate All gasoline offered for sale at retail stations within the state must contain 10% ethanol (E10). This requirement is waived only if a distributor is unable to purchase ethanol or ethanol-blended gasoline at the same or

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Fuel Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Electricity Fuel Basics Photo of a plug-in hybrid vehicle fueling. Electricity is considered an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act

379

NREL Develops Technique to Measure Membrane Thickness and Defects in Polymer Electrode Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in fuel cell membrane electrode assembly research and development. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center and the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the potential advantage for more efficient destruction of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) relative to MOX fuel. Greater efficiency in plutonium reduction results in greater flexibility in managing plutonium inventories and in developing strategies for disposition of MA, as well as a potential for fuel cycle cost savings. Because fabrication of plutonium-bearing (and MA-bearing) fuel is expensive relative to UO{sub 2} in terms of both capital and production, cost benefit can be realized through a reduction in the number of plutonium-bearing elements required for a given burn rate. In addition, the choice of matrix material may be manipulated either to facilitate fuel recycling or to make plutonium recovery extremely difficult. In addition to plutonium/actinide management, an inert matrix fuel having high thermal conductivity may have operational and safety benefits; lower fuel temperatures could be used to increase operating and safety margins, uprate reactor power, or a combination of both. The CANDU reactor offers flexibility in plutonium management and MA burning by virtue of online refueling, a simple bundle design, and good neutron economy. A full core of inert matrix fuel containing either plutonium or a plutonium-actinide mix can be utilized, with plutonium destruction efficiencies greater than 90%, and high (>60%) actinide destruction efficiencies. The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) could allow additional possibilities in the design of an IMF bundle, since the tighter lattice pitch and light-water coolant reduce or eliminate the need to suppress coolant void reactivity, allowing the center region of the bundle to include additional fissile material and to improve actinide burning. The ACR would provide flexibility for management of plutonium and MA from the existing LWR fleet, and would be complementary to the AFCI program in the U.S. Many of the fundamental principles concerning the use of IMF are nearly identical in LWRs and the ACR, including fuel/coolant compatibility, fuel fabrication, and fuel irradiation behavior. In addition, the U.S. and Canada both

William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

U.S. solid oxide fuel cell powerplant development and commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC powerplants have many potential attributes which make them suitable for distributed generation applications. Power densities for SOFCs are very promising. Power densities possibilities of 20 watts per square centimeter have been reported to be possible. Westinghouse Electric is the leader in tubular SOFC technology. Several completely packaged and self-contained generators, up to nominal 25-kW size, have been manufactured and tested by Westinghouse Electric. A manufacturing facility currently produces these generators. In the US, several planar designs are also under development. Organizations developing planar designs include IGT, Celamalec, Ztek, TMI, and Allied Signal Aerospace. One of the most promising developments in SOFC powerplants is the conceptual development of very high efficiency fuel cell gas turbine powerplants. Combination of SOFC and turbine has the potential for enormous synergies.

Williams, M.C. [Fuel Cells Product Manager, USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DEVELOPMENT OF NIOBIUM DIFFUSION BARRIERS FOR ALUMINUM-CLAD URANIUM ALLOY FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

S>Nickel was used as a diffusion barrier for Al-clad uranium alloy fuel elements, operating at 650 nif- F in organiccooled reactors. Advanced organic-moderated reactor (AOMR) concepts include operating temperatures up to 850 nif- F. Since the interdiffusion of Al --Ni is 150 times faster at 850 nif- F than at 650 nif- F, an alternate diffusion barrier is required. Subsequent studies resuited in the selection of niobium. Several techniques for bonding niobium to the U--10 Mo fuel were investigated. After considerable development effort, electron beam vacuum deposition yielded adherent, nonporous, ductile coatings. Isostatic bonding, at 1050 nif- C and 12,000 psi for 1 hr, also resulted in metallurgically bonded niobium on the major surfaces of U-10 Mo fuel plates. Roll-bonding achieved metallurgically bonded plates on small test specimens, but was never reproduced on full-size plates. Vapor phase deposition, by H/sub 2/ reduction of NbCl/sub 5/, was also partially successful, but not reproducible. Ultrasonic bonding has shown promise in spot welding tests. Plasma-spray coating and electroplating in a fused salt bath were also considered, but not actively evaluated. (auth)

Briggs, B.N.; Friske, W.H.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System  

SciTech Connect

Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the companys global facility environmental footprint.

Mighton, Steven, J.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Final Scientific Report : Development of Transition Metal/ Chalcogen Based Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of this project was to investigate the potential for using base metal sulfides and selenides as low cost replacements for precious metal catalysts, such as platinum, currently being used in PEM fuel cells. The approach was to deposit thin films of the materials to be evaluated onto inert electrodes and evaluate their activity for the cathode reaction (oxygen reduction) as well as ex-situ structural and compositional characterization. The most active materials identified are CoS2 and the 50:50 solid solution (Co,Ni)S2. However, the OCP of these materials is still considered too low, at 0.83V and 0.89V vs. RHE respectively, for testing in fuel cells. The methods employed here were necessary to compare with the activity of platinum as, when nano-dispersed on carbon supports, the active surface area of these materials is difficult to measure, making comparisons inaccurate. This research adds to the knowledge of potential candidates for platinum replacement in order to reduce the cost of PEM fuel cell technology and promote commercialization. Although the fabrication methods employed here are strictly experimental, methods were also developed to produce nano-dispersed catalysts with similar compositions, structure and activity. Cycling of these catalysts to highly oxidizing potentials resulted in an increase of the open circuit voltage to approach that of platinum, however, it proved difficult to determine why using these dispersed materials. The potential for non-precious, non-metallic, low cost, compound catalysts for PEM fuel cells has been investigated and demonstrated.

Campbell, Stephen, A.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coal fueled diesel system for stationary power applications-technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of coal as a fuel for diesel engines dates back to the early days of the development of the engine. Dr. Diesel envisioned his concept as a multi-fuel engine, with coal a prime candidate due to the fact that it was Germany`s primary domestic energy resource. It is interesting that the focus on coal burning diesel engines appears to peak about every twenty years as shortages of other energy resources increase the economic attractiveness of using coal. This periodic interest in coal started in Germany with the work of Diesel in the timeframe 1898-1906. Pawlikowski carried on the work from 1916 to 1928. Two German companies commercialized the technology prior to and during World War II. The next flurry of activity occurred in the United States in the period from 1957-69, with work done at Southwest Research Institute, Virginia Polytechnical University, and Howard University. The current period of activity started in 1978 with work sponsored by the Conservation and Renewable Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy. This work was done at Southwest Research Institute and by ThermoElectron at Sulzer Engine in Switzerland. In 1982, the Fossil Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy, through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) initiated a concentrated effort to develop coal burning diesel and gas turbine engines. The diesel engine work in the METC sponsored program was performed at Arthur D. Little (Cooper-Bessemer as subcontractor), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (now NIPER), Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corporation, General Motor Corporation (Electromotive Division), General Electric, Southwest Research Institute, and various universities and other research and development organizations. This DOE-METC coal engine RD & D initiative which spanned the 1982-1993 timeframe is the topic of this review document. The combustion of a coal-water fuel slurry in a diesel engine is described. The engine modifications necessary are discussed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Development of molten-carbonate fuel-cell technology. Final report, February-December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to focus on the basic technology for producing molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) components. This included the development and fabrication of stable anode structures, preparation of lithiated nickel oxide cathodes, synthesis and characterization of a high surface area (gamma-lithium-aluminate) electrolyte support, pressurized cell testing and modeling of the overall electrolyte distribution within a cell to aid performance optimization of the different cell components. The electrode development program is highlighted by two successful 5000 hour bench-scale tests using stabilized anode structures. One of these provided better performance than in any previous state-of-the-art, bench-scale cell (865 mV at 115 mA/cm/sup 2/ under standard conditions). Pressurized testing at 10 atmosphere of a similar stabilized, high surface area, Ni/Co anode structure in a 300 cm/sup 2/ cell showed that the 160 mA/cm/sup 2/ performance goal of 850 mV on low Btu fuel (80% conversion) can be readily met. A study of the H/sub 2/S-effects on molten carbonate fuel cells showed that ERC's Ni/Co anode provided better tolerance than a Ni/Cr anode. Prelithiated nickel oxide plaques were prepared from materials made by a low temperature and a high temperature powder-production process. The methods for fabricating handleable cathodes of various thicknesses were also investigated. In electrolyte matrix development, accelerated out-of-cell and in-cell tests have confirmed the superior stability of ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rural Jobs Tax Credit (New Mexico) New Mexico Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen &...

389

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Loans (New Mexico) New Mexico Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor Retail Supplier Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen &...

390

Certification challenges in the development of an innovative high payload capacity spent fuel transportation cask  

SciTech Connect

The design approach and certification strategy used in the development of an innovative transportation cask for legal weight truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel is presented. The proposed approach represents a significant departure from conventional cask designs in that it uses titanium alloy, a material with a high strength-to-weight ratio which has no precedent in transportation cask certification. The significant increase in payload obtainable with the proposed approach, and the associated benefits such as reduced life cycle costs, lower personnel exposure, and lower transportation accident risks are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Mair, B.R.; Severson, M.J.; Ciez, A.P. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of Novel PEM Membrane and Multiphase CD Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance. To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance.

K. J. Berry; Susanta Das

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

RD&D Cooperation for the Development of Fuel Cell, Hybrid and Electric Vehicles within the International Energy Agency: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Annex XIII on 'Fuel Cell Vehicles' of the Implementing Agreement Hybrid and Electric Vehicles of the International Energy Agency has been operating since 2006, complementing the ongoing activities on battery and hybrid electric vehicles within this group. This paper provides an overview of the Annex XIII final report for 2010, compiling an up-to-date, neutral, and comprehensive assessment of current trends in fuel cell vehicle technology and related policy. The technological description includes trends in system configuration as well as a review of the most relevant components including the fuel cell stack, batteries, and hydrogen storage. Results from fuel cell vehicle demonstration projects around the world and an overview of the successful implementation of fuel cells in specific transport niche markets will also be discussed. The final section of this report provides a detailed description of national research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts worldwide.

Telias, G.; Day, K.; Dietrich, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Organic fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fuels fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Organic fuels Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Product Biodiesel producer and distributor Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT ON FUEL ELEMENT DEVELOPMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress in fuels and materials development is summarized. Major areas of investigation include a materials study by means of sample fuel plates containing uranium alloys or cermets, burnable poisons, non-uniform fuel and poison distributions and clad with various aluminum alloys; and an engineering study of fuel element geometries optimized in heat transfer, hydraulics, and materials strength. Up to 45 wt% U-Al alloys, 6 to 65 wt% UO/-Al and U3O6-Al dispersions, including enrichments ranging from 20% to 93%, were tested to 70% burnup in de-ionized water at 200 deg F in the MTR. Their performance at higher temperature is still being investigated. Test results for the MTR conditions indicate that all of the compositions investigated to date will successfully withstand even the longest irradiation at these conditions if properly fabricated. Some high strength aluminum alloy claddings, not yet fully tested, show some peculiar surface effects which may be related to corrosion. Metallographic studies of irradiated cermets reveal a reaction'' (diffusion) zone produced around UO/sub 2/ particles in contact with aluminum. These zones are being studied by means of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis. From engineering studies has come promise of improved heat removal and lower pumping requlrements for reactors through artificial roughening of fuel plates. Computer optimizatlon studies and hydraulic tests indicated 80% improvement in heat transfer or 60% less flow for the same heat load are obtainable for MTR conditions. Heat transfer test results from 0.110 x 2.624 ' electrically-heated channels using heat fluxes up to 2.88 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr-ft/ sup 2/, sgree better with correlations based on bulk temperatures than with the more widely used modified Colburn equation. In this range, a modifled Colburn equation with a 20% safety factor, as is presently used, seems adequate. However, an equation based on the bulk coolant temperature could be used employing a smaller safety factor because of its greater accuracy. ( auth)

Gibson, G.W.; Shupe, O.K.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development of Low-Cost Manufacturing Processes for Planar, Multilayer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase II of this program, 'Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'. The objective of the program is to develop advanced ceramic manufacturing technologies for making planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. Phase II development work focused on three distinct manufacturing approaches (or tracks) for planar solid oxide fuel cell elements. Two development tracks, led by NexTech Materials and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, involved co-sintering of planar SOFC elements of cathode-supported and anode-supported variations. A third development track, led by the University of Missouri-Rolla, focused on a revolutionary approach for reducing operating temperature of SOFCs by using spin-coating to deposit ultra-thin, nano-crystalline YSZ electrolyte films. The work in Phase II was supported by characterization work at Ohio State University. The primary technical accomplishments within each of the three development tracks are summarized. Track 1--NexTech's targeted manufacturing process for planar SOFC elements involves tape casting of porous electrode substrates, colloidal-spray deposition of YSZ electrolyte films, co-sintering of bi-layer elements, and screen printing of opposite electrode coatings. The bulk of NexTech's work focused on making cathode-supported elements, although the processes developed at NexTech also were applied to the fabrication of anode-supported cells. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Scale up of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode powder production process; (2) Development and scale-up of tape casting methods for cathode and anode substrates; (3) Development of automated ultrasonic-spray process for depositing YSZ films; (4) Successful co-sintering of flat bi-layer elements (both cathode and anode supported); (5) Development of anode and cathode screen-printing processes; and (6) Demonstration of novel processes for composite cathode and cermet anode materials. Track 2--ORNL's development work focused solely on making anode-supported planar cells by tape casting of a porous anode substrate, screen printing of a YSZ electrolyte film, co-sintering of the bi-layer element, and screen-printing of an opposite cathode coating. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Development and scale-up of anode tape casting and lamination processes; (2) Development of proprietary ink vehicle for screen-printing processes; (3) Development of screen-printing process for depositing YSZ films; (4) Successful co-sintering of flat bi-layer anode-supported elements; and (5) Development of cathode screen-printing process. Track 3--UMR's process development work involved fabrication of a micro-porous cathode substrate, deposition of a nano-porous interlayer film, deposition of nano-crystalline YSZ electrolyte films from polymeric precursor solutions, and deposition of an anode coating. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Development and scale up of tape casting and sintering methods for cathode substrates; (2) Deposition of nano-porous ceria interlayer films on cathode substrates; (3) Successful deposition of dense YSZ films on porous cathode substrates; and (4) Identification of several anode material options.

Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Tim Armstrong; Harlan Anderson; John Lannutti

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development and Evaluation of a Safeguards System Concept for a Pebble-Fueled High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pebble-fueled high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology was first developed by the Federal Republic of Germany in the 1950s. More recently, the design has been embraced by the People's Republic of China and the Republic of South Africa. Unlike light water reactors that generate heat from fuel assemblies comprised of fuel rods, pebble-fueled HTGRs utilize thousands of 60-mm diameter fuel spheres (pebbles) comprised of thousands of TRISO particles. As this reactor type is deployed across the world, adequate methods for safeguarding the reactor must be developed. Current safeguards methods for the pebble-fueled HTGR focus on extensive, redundant containment and surveillance (C/S) measures or a combination of item-type and bulk-type material safeguards measures to deter and detect the diversion of fuel pebbles. The disadvantages to these approaches are the loss of continuity of knowledge (CoK) when C/S systems fail, or are compromised, and the introduction of material unaccounted for (MUF). Either vulnerability can be exploited by an adversary to divert fuel pebbles from the reactor system. It was determined that a solution to maintaining CoK is to develop a system to identify each fuel pebble that is inserted and removed from the reactor. Work was performed to develop and evaluate the use of inert microspheres placed in each fuel pebble, whose random placement could be used as a fingerprint to identify the fuel pebble. Ultrasound imaging of 1 mm zirconium oxide microspheres was identified as a possible imaging system and microsphere material for the new safeguards system concept. The system concept was evaluated, and it was found that a minimum of three microspheres are necessary to create enough random fingerprints for 10,000,000 pebbles. It was also found that, over the lifetime of the reactor, less than 0.01% of fuel pebbles can be expected to have randomly the same microsphere fingerprint. From an MCNP 5.1 model, it was determined that less than fifty microspheres in each pebble will have no impact on the reactivity or temperature coefficient of reactivity of the reactor system. Finally, using an ultrasound system it was found that ultrasound waves can penetrate thin layers of graphite to image the microsphere fingerprint.

Gitau, Ernest Travis Ngure

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Development and Demonstration of a New Generation High Efficiency 10kW Stationary Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

The overall project objective is to develop and demonstrate a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell combined heat and power (PEMFC CHP) system that provides the foundation for commercial, mass produced units which achieve over 40% electrical efficiency (fuel to electric conversion) from 50-100% load, greater than 70% overall efficiency (fuel to electric energy + usable waste heat energy conversion), have the potential to achieve 40,000 hours durability on all major process components, and can be produced in high volumes at under $400/kW (revised to $750/kW per 2011 DOE estimates) capital cost.

Howell, Thomas Russell

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM, A BOILING WATER REACTOR RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. First Summary Report for March 1959-July 1960  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Cycle Development Program is a basic development program for boiling and other water technology. It covers the areas of oxide fuel fabrication. irradiation. and examination; the physics of water-moderated reactore; and boiling-water heat transfer and stability. Schedules for the fuel- cycle program were examined. and it was concluded that portions of the Task A program should be conducted during the period May to Dec. 1959 in order to keep costs of the work as low as possible and to allow initiation of the fuel-cycle program at the earliest possible date after the Vallecitos BWR was returned to service. The basis for the scheduling of the work is discussed. and a chronological summary describing the content of the work is given. Technical progress is outlined and details are summarized. Subsequent reports issued monthly and quarterly will summarize the progress of the prognam. (W.D.M.)

Cook, W.H.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "developer fuel distributor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

McTaggart, Paul

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

IN-PILE INSTRUMENTATION TO SUPPORT FUEL CYCLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT - FY12 STATUS REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the FCRD program objective to emphasize science-based, goal-oriented research, a strategic research program is underway to develop new sensors that can be used to obtain the high fidelity, real-time, data required for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. The overarching goal of this initiative is to develop new test vehicles with new sensors of unprecedented accuracy and resolution that can obtain the required data. Prior laboratory testing and, as needed, irradiation testing of sensors in these capsules will be completed as part of this initiative to give sufficient confidence that the irradiation tests will yield the required data. This report documents FY12 progress in this initiative.

J. . Rempe; J. Daw; D. Knudson; R. Schley

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Major Government-Supported Fuel Cell Vehicle Projects Government support for fuel cell projects is critical to the development of fuel cell technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide most of its power. In the future, there are plans to use fuel cells, a solar-thermal system. The Centre also will house a "National Research Flagship," entitled "Energy Transformed," that will focus sustainable energy technologies, including solar, gas micro-turbines, and wind generators that will initially

404

Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Key Technologies for the Development of Fossil Fuels in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

As the world faces growing economic and environmental challenges, the energy mix that fuels the global economy is undergoing rapid change. Yet how this change will evolve in the future is uncertain. What will be the sources of primary energy in twenty years? In fifty years? In different regions of the globe? How will this energy be utilized? Fossil energy currently supplies about ninety percent of the world's primary energy. In Japan this number is closer to eighty percent. It is clear that fossil energy will be a major supplier of global energy for some time to come, but what is not clear is the types of fossil energy and how it will be utilized. The degree to which the abundant supplies of fossil energy, especially coal, will continue to play a major role will depend on whether technology will provide safe, clean and affordable fuel for electricity and transportation. Technology will not only assist in finding more fossil energy in varying regions of the globe but, most importantly, will play a strong role in efficient utilization and in determining the cost of delivering that energy. Several important questions will have to be answered: (1) Will cost effective technologies be found to burn coal more cleanly? Can this be done with drastically reduced or no emitted carbon? (2) Can enough oil be found outside the Middle East to ensure more adequate and secure supplies to fuel the transportation and industrial needs? (3) Will the transportation sector, so heavily dependent on oil, be fueled on another source? (4) Can enough natural gas be assured from enough secure places to ensure investment in the utilization of this lowest-carbon fossil fuel? (5) What will these options cost in research and in the price of energy? The answers to these and other questions challenge leaders and researchers in the fossil energy industry. A World Energy Council (WEC) study of those technologies that might be key sheds some light on what might happen in terms of a wide range of possible scenarios. Also on what might be necessary in expenditure, time, and policies to help bring these technologies to market. This study should be helpful to energy executives in planning for future technologies, either as new ventures or as competition for existing technologies. The emphasis in this ongoing study is on what is possible from today's vantage, not what will happen--actual developments are unpredictable and it is, of course, impossible to foresee the course of actual technology development or economic growth. Nevertheless, it is possible to look at what could happen in a number of scenarios using (1) knowledge about current technologies and (2) their projected development, investment costs, and likely time to commercialization based on historical energy technology development. A comprehensive set of possible technologies was available from the WEC in conjunction with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and studies as part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Schock, R

2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Stations to someone by E-mail Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fueling Stations Photo of a liquefied petroleum ga