Sample records for develop stable fiscal

  1. Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of the several research and development programs having been performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the fiscal year 1995.

  2. Offshore Oilfield Development Planning under Uncertainty and Fiscal Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Offshore Oilfield Development Planning under Uncertainty and Fiscal Considerations Vijay Gupta1 of uncertainty and complex fiscal rules in the development planning of offshore oil and gas fields which involve, Offshore Oil and Gas, Multistage Stochastic, Endogenous, Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs) 1

  3. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  4. Work Scope for Developing Standards for Emergency Preparedness and Response: Fiscal Year 2004 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the fiscal year 2004 work completed on PNNL's Department of Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response Standards Development Project. Also, the report includes key draft standards, in various stages of development and publication, that were associated with various tasks of the fiscal year 2004 scope of the project.

  5. Calcination/dissolution chemistry development Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The task {open_quotes}IPC Liaison and Chemistry of Thermal Reconstitution{close_quotes} is a $300,000 program that was conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Research and Development (EM-53) Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program supported under technical task plan (TTP) RL4-3-20-04. The principal investigator was Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The task encompassed the following two subtasks related to the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste: (1) Technical Liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science (IPC/RAS) and its research into the chemistry of transuranic elements (TRU) and technetium (Tc) in alkaline media. (2) Laboratory investigation of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution (C/D) (or thermal reconstitution) as an alternative to the present reference Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment flowsheet, Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW). This report fulfills the milestone for the C/D subtask to {open_quotes}Provide End-of-Year Report on C/D Laboratory Test Results{close_quotes} due 30 September 1995. A companion report, fulfilling the milestone to provide an end-of-year report on the IPC/RAS liaison, also has been prepared.

  6. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report Fiscal Year 2006 is an annual management report that summarizes research projects funded by the DDRD program. The NREL DDRD program comprises projects that strengthen NREL's four technical competencies: Integrated Systems, Renewable Electricity, Renewable Fuels, and Strategic Analysis.

  7. Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report on BNLs Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Human Capital Development Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper S. E.

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Nonproliferation and National Security Department contributes to the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) through university engagement, safeguards internships, safeguards courses, professional development, recruitment, and other activities aimed at ensuring the next generation of international safeguards professionals is adequately prepared to support the U.S. safeguards mission. This report is a summary of BNL s work under the NGSI program in Fiscal Year 2014.

  8. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  9. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  10. FEMP Fiscal Year 1999 ESPC Business Strategy Development Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcmordie, Katherine; Hunt, W. D.

    2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the objectives, activities, products, and recommendations of the ESPC Business Strategy Development project. The objective of this project was to assist DOE FEMP in defining the potential Federal sector market for FEMP-offered alternative financing services with a focus on Super-Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super-ESPCs).

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  13. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The projects described in this report represent the Laboratory's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides, a) a director's statement, b) an overview of the laboratory's LDRD program, including PNNL's management process and a self-assessment of the program, c) a five-year project funding table, and d) project summaries for each LDRD project.

  15. Leadership Development Scholarship Fiscal Year 2015 Please copy for your files and submit the application, along with a full description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    Team has allocated funds in the FY 2015 budget to support Leadership Development Scholarships or received a scholarship funded through the Leadership Development Scholarship program during FY 2015 (7Leadership Development Scholarship Fiscal Year 2015 Please copy for your files and submit

  16. Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

  17. Unequal development : decentralization and fiscal disparities in the Metropolitan Zone of the Valley of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raich, Uri

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is about the impact of decentralization in metropolitan areas. Studies of fiscal decentralization have largely centered on the formal tiers of government, without looking at the effects of this process on the ...

  18. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

  19. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)] [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  20. Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: Annual report, Fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Z.V.; Grant, T.; Jones, G.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparation, execution, and analysis of a 30-day Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test (ICFT) of the Phase II reservoir were the primary objectives of the Hot Dry Rock Program in fiscal year 1986. The ICFT successfully tested the Phase II heat-extraction loop with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,000 m/sup 3/ of hot water, extracting up to 10 MW/sub t/ when production reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, water loss rate has decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water had been recovered, 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Geochemical, tracer, and seismic analyses suggest reservoir fracture volume was growing throughout the test. A new technique, the ''three-point'' method, was developed to determine locations and orientations of seismically active planes. Fault or joint planes are identified in what superficially appears to be an amorphous microearthquake location set. Five planes were determined when the three-point method was applied to a location data set for the massive hydraulic-fracturing experiment conducted in 1983. 23 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Technical and management support for the development of Small Wind Systems. Fiscal year 1980 annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status and achievements of a program for the development, testing, and commercialization of wind energy systems rated under 100 kilowatts are described. The organization structure and task definition used to promote the production, marketing, and acceptance of small systems are described, and the Work Breakdown Structure under which the program is organized is detailed. Reports are given which describe the status of contracts funded by the Federal Wind Energy Program and managed by the Rocky Flats Wind Systems Program. These project reports, sequenced according to the Department of Energy Work Breakdown Structure, name the principal investigators involved, and discuss achievements and progress made during Fiscal Year 1980. Of fourty-four projects, seven were completed during the Fiscal Year. The Work Breakdown Structure Index details the organization sequence.

  2. Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1992 and 1993 highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W. [eds.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Westinghouse Hanford Company to design and test an earthen cover system that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company provided engineering design support for the program. Work on barrier design has been under way at Hanford for nearly 10 years. The comprehensive development of a long-term barrier, formerly the Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program, was initiated in FY 1986, and a general field-tested design is expected to be completed by FY 1998. Highlights of efforts in FY 1992 and FY 1993 included the resumption of field testing, the completion of the prototype barrier design, and the convening of an external peer review panel, which met twice with the barrier development team. The review panel provided helpful guidance on current and future barrier development activities, while commending the program for its significant technical contributions to innovative barrier technology development.

  3. Fiscal year 1989 annual report for the Sensors Development Program: Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Koski, O.H.; Stice, N.D.; Morgan, L.G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Nikias, C.L. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensors Development Program is conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP). The work is being performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objectives of the Sensors Development Program are to (1) investigate and develop methods of process monitoring/control for operating electrolytic cells and (2) determine safe operating conditions for the inert anodes. The majority of work in FY 1989 involved (1) evaluating Digital Signal Analysis (DSA) methods to monitor inert anode operation and to determine alumina concentration in both PNL bench-scale laboratory cells and the Prototype Inert Anode Test and (2) developing the reference anode against which inert anode voltage signals could be measured by the DSA-based or other methods. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  5. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development (DDRD) program is designed to encourage technical innovation and build new research and development capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Technical innovation is critical to the long-term viability of NREL (also referred to as the Laboratory) and to the success of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The strategic value of DDRD is being continuously enhanced by expanding the opportunities to propose and pursue innovative ideas for building new and enhanced capabilities.

  6. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

  7. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

  8. FEMP fiscal year 1999 ESPC business strategy development summary report[Energy Saving Performance Contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KL McMordie-Stoughton; WDM Hunt

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to reduce the cost of Government by advancing energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of solar and other renewable technologies. This is accomplished by creating partnerships, leveraging resources, transferring technology, and providing training and technical guidance and assistance to agencies. Each of these activities is directly related to achieving requirements set forth in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the goals that have been established in Executive Order 13123 (June 1999), but also those that are inherent in sound management of Federal financial and personnel resources. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the FEMP mission in all activity areas. This responsibility includes working with various Federal energy managers to identify, monitor, and evaluate the performance of new energy efficiency technologies suitable for installation at Federal sites. This report provides the results of a Energy Saving Performance Contracting (ESPC) Business Strategy Development project that PNNL conducted for FEMP. The project provides information regarding the development of Federal market scenarios for FEMP Super-ESPC delivery orders. Two market scenarios were developed. The initial scenario resulted in an estimated delivery order target that was much lower than initially estimated in the spring of 1998. The second scenario yielded a lower estimated number of delivery orders. The main difference between these two scenarios was an estimated increase in utility financed projects in the Federal sector.

  9. 94-1 Research and Development Project lead laboratory support: Fiscal year 1997. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, S.D. [comp.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 26, 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which expressed the board`s concern about nuclear materials left in the manufacturing pipeline after the US halted its nuclear weapons production activities. The DNFSB emphasized the need for remediation of these materials. As part of Recommendation 94-1, the DNFSB defined research objectives as follows: that a research program be established to fill any gaps in the information base needed for choosing among the alternate processes to be used in safe conversion of various types of fissile materials to optimal forms for safe interim storage and the longer-term disposition. To achieve this objective a research and technology development program with two elements is needed: a technology-specific program that is focused on treating and storing materials safety, with concomitant development of storage criteria and surveillance requirements, centered around 3- and 8-year targets; and a core technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim material storage until disposition policies are formulated. The paper reports the progress on the following: materials identification and surveillance; stabilization process development; surveillance and monitoring; core technologies; and project management.

  10. Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremer, G.M. (comp.)

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation and flow testing of the enlarged Phase I heat-extraction system at Fenton Hill continued throughout FY80. Temperature drawdown observed at that time indicated an effective fracture of approximately 40,000 to 60,000 m/sup 2/. In May 1980, hot dry rock (HDR) technology was used to produce electricity in an interface demonstration experiment at Fenton Hill. A 60-kVA binary-cycle electrical generator was installed in the Phase I surface system and heat from about 3 kg/s of geothermal fluid at 132/sup 0/C was used to boil Freon R-114, whose vapor drove a turboalternator. A Phase II system was designed and is now being constructed at Fenton Hill that should approach commercial requirements. Borehole EE-2, the injection well, was completed on May 12, 1980. It was drilled to a vertical depth of about 4500 m, where the rock temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C. The production well, EE-3 had been drilled to a depth of 3044 m and drilling was continuing. Environmental monitoring of Fenton Hill site continued. Development of equipment, instruments, and materials for technical support at Fenton Hill continued during FY80. Several kinds of models were also developed to understand the behavior of the Phase I system and to develop a predictive capability for future systems. Data from extensive resource investigations were collected, analyzed, and assembled into a geothermal gradient map of the US, and studies were completed on five specific areas as possible locations for HDR Experimental Site 2.

  11. Divison of Environmental Education and Development Fiscal Year 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary design criterion for this division`s education activities is directly related to meeting the goal of environmental compliance on an accelerated basis and cleanup of the 1989 inventory of inactive sites and facilities by the year 2019. Therefore, the division`s efforts are directed toward stimulating knowledge and capability to achieve the goals while contributing to DOE`s overall goal of increasing scientific, mathematical, and technical literacy and competency. This annual report is divided into: overview, workforce development, academic partnerships, scholarships/fellowships, environmental restoration and waste management employment program, community colleges, outreach, evaluation, and principal DOE contacts.

  12. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy production. Industrial advisors to the HDR Program have concluded that, while a longer testing period would certainly be desirable, a successful and well-documented flow test of this high-temperature, Phase II reservoir lasting at least one year should convince industry that HDR geothermal energy merits their investment in its commercial development. This test is called the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT), and its completion will be a major milestone in attaining the Level 1 objective. However, before the LTFT could be initiated, well EE-2 had to be repaired, as also briefly described in the ''History of Research''. During this repair operation, superb progress was made toward satisfying the next most critically important Level II objective: Improve the Performance of HDR Drilling and Completion Technology. During the repair of EE-2, Los Alamos sidetracked by drilling out of the damaged well at 2.96 km (9700 ft), and then completed drilling a new-wellbore (EE-2A) to a total depth of 3.78 km (12,360 ft). As a consequence of this drilling experience, Los Alamos believes that if the original wells were redrilled today their combined cost would be only $8 million rather than the $18.8 million actually spent (a 60% cost saving). Further details, particularly of the completion of the well, can be found in the major section, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, but it can be seen that the second, Level II objective is already nearing attainment.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 2009–2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement and leadership on nuclear safety and security issues.

  14. Hot Dry Rock Heat Mining Geothermal Energy Development Program - Annual Report Fiscal Year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchane, David

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was a year of significant accomplishment in the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program. Most importantly, the design, construction, and installation of the surface plant for the Phase II system neared completion by the end of the year. Basic process design work has been completed, and all major components of the system except the gas/particle separator have been procured. For this component, previous design problems have been resolved, and purchase during the first half of FY91 is anticipated. Installation of the surface plant is well underway. The system will be completed and ready for operation by the end of FY91 under the current funding scenario. The operational schedule to be followed will then depend upon the program funding level. Our goal is to start long-term flow testing as soon as possible. Of equal importance, from the standpoint of the long-term viability of HDR technology, during this year, for the first time, it has been demonstrated in field testing that it should be possible to operate HDR reservoirs with water losses of 1-3%, or even less. Our experience in the deep, hot, Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill is in sharp contrast to the significant water losses seen by Japanese and British scientists working in shallower, cooler, HDR reservoirs. Calculations and modeling based on field data have shown that water consumption declines with the log of time in a manner related to water storage in the reservoir. This work may be crucial in proving that HDR can be an economically viable means for producing energy, and that it is useful even in areas where water is in short supply. In addition, an engineering model was developed to predict and explain water consumption in HDR reservoirs under pressure, the collection and processing of seismic information was more highly automated, and the detection limits for reactive tracers were lowered to less than 1 part per billion. All of these developments will add greatly to our ability to conduct, analyze, and understand the long-term test (LTFT). Water-rights acquisition activities, site clean-up, and improvements in the 1 million gallon storage pond at Fenton Hill have assured that we will have adequate water to carry out a vigorous testing program in a safe and environmentally-sound manner. The 1 million gallon pond was recontoured, and lined with a sophisticated multi-layer plastic barrier. A large part of the work on the pond was paid for with funds from the Laboratory's Health, Safety and Environment Division. Almost all the expected achievements set forth in the FY90 Annual Operating Plan were substantially accomplished this past year, in spite of a $300,000 shortfall in funding. This funding shortfall did delay some work and result in some projects not being completed, however. They have had to go more slowly than they would like on some aspects of the installation of the surface plant for the LTFT, purchase of non-critical equipment, such as a back-up electric generator for Fenton Hill, has been delayed, and some work has not been brought to an adequate conclusion. The fracture healing work, for example, was completed but not written up. they simply did not have the funds to pay for the effort needed to fully document this work. As the program enters FY91, the completion of the surface plant at Fenton Hill is within sight. The long-awaited LTFT can then begin, and the large investment in science and technology represents by the HDR Program will begin to bear still greater dividends.

  15. Isotope production and distribution Programs Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Financial Statement Audit (ER-FC-96-01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium and deuterium, and related isotope services. Services provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund, as established by the Fiscal Year 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (Public Law 101-101). The Fiscal Year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-316) modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research may not achieve full-cost recovery. Isotope Program costs are financed by revenues from the sale of isotopes and associated services and through payments from the isotope support decision unit, which was established in the DOE fiscal year 1995 Energy, Supply, Research, and Development appropriation. The isotope decision unit finances the production and processing of unprofitable isotopes that are vital to the national interest.

  16. Title XXXII, National Defense Autorization Act for Fiscal year...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000, Pub. L. 106- 65, as amended by the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 2001, Pub. L. 106-377; the Floyd D. Spence...

  17. Fiscal Policy in India: Lessons and Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar; Srinivasan, T. N.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Policy in India, N. Singh and T.February 2004 Fiscal Policy in India: Lessons andReview, 7-26. Fiscal Policy in India, N. Singh and T. N.

  18. Development of an ultrasonic process for detoxifying groundwater and soil: Laboratory research. Annual report for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting laboratory research to study the effectiveness of a new technique in which ultrasonic energy is used to convert chlorinated organic compounds into nonhazardous end products. Destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were achieved for the organic compounds in aqueous solution. Key process parameters, such as solution pH values, steady-state temperatures under operating conditions, ultrasonic-power intensities, and oxidant concentrations, were investigated. In addition, a detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for the destruction of the organic compounds under an ultrasonic filed was developed and incorporated into a computational model. The agreement between the model and experimental results is generally good.

  19. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  20. Prior Fiscal Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentationsSRS Responds to TrainPrior-Fiscal-Years Sign In

  1. Proposition 13 and The California Fiscal Shell Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCubbins, Colin H; McCubbins, Mathew D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and The California Fiscal Shell Game Notes Others, however,13 and The California Fiscal Shell Game References Abadie,13 and The California Fiscal Shell Game Kogan, Vladimir, and

  2. Hydrogen program summary Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program summary provides stakeholders within the hydrogen community with a snapshop of important advances that have occurred in the National Hydrogen Program over the fiscal year, including industry interactions and cooperation. The document will also be used to encourage additional potential industrial partners to join the Hydrogen Program Team. Fiscal Year 1994 marked a turning point for the Hydrogen Program, with a budget that grew significantly. The focus of the program was broadened to include development of hydrogen production technologies using municipal solid waste and biomass, in addition to an increased emphasis on industrial involvement and near-term demonstration projects. In order to maintain its near- and long-term balance, the Hydrogen Program will continue with basic, fundamental research that provides the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff investment in hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  3. Development of a stable cobalt-ruthenium Fisher-Tropsch catalyst. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reverse micelle catalyst preparation method has been used to prepare catalysts on four supports: magnesium oxide, carbon, alumina- titania and steamed Y zeolite. These catalysts were not as active as a reference catalyst prepared during previous contracts to Union Carbide Corp. This catalyst was supported on steamed Y zerolite support and was impregnated by a pore-filling method using a nonaqueous solvent. Additional catalysts were prepared via pore- filling impregnation of steamed Y zeolites. These catalysts had levels of cobalt two to three and a half times as high as the original Union Carbide catalyst. On a catalyst volume basis they were much more active than the previous catalyst; on an atom by atom basis the cobalt was about of the same activity, i.e., the high cobalt catalysts` cobalt atoms were not extensively covered over and deactivated by other cobalt atoms. The new, high activity, Y zerolite catalysts were not as stable as the earlier Union Carbide catalyst. However, stability enhancement of these catalysts should be possible, for instance, through adjustment of the quantity and/or type of trace metals present. A primary objective of this work was determination whether small amounts of ruthenium could enhance the activity of the cobalt F-T catalyst. The reverse micelle catalysts were not activated by ruthenium, indeed scanning transmission electronic microscopy (STEM) analysis provided some evidence that ruthenium was not present in the cobalt crystallites. Ruthenium did not seem to activate the high cobalt Y zeolite catalyst either, but additional experiments with Y zeolite-supported catalysts are required. Should ruthenium prove not to be an effective promoter under the simple catalyst activation procedure used in this work, more complex activation procedures have been reported which are claimed to enhance the cobalt/ruthenium interaction and result in activity promotion by ruthenium.

  4. Accountability report - fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

  5. Development And Evaluation Of Stable Isotope And Fluorescent Labeling And Detection Methodologies For Tracking Injected Bacteria During In Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark E. Fuller; Tullis C. Onstott

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a research project conducted to develop new methods to label bacterial cells so that they could be tracked and enumerated as they move in the subsurface after they are introduced into the groundwater (i.e., during bioaugmentation). Labeling methods based on stable isotopes of carbon (13C) and vital fluorescent stains were developed. Both approaches proved successful with regards to the ability to effectively label bacterial cells. Several methods for enumeration of fluorescently-labeled cells were developed and validated, including near-real time microplate spectrofluorometry that could be performed in the field. However, the development of a novel enumeration method for the 13C-enriched cells, chemical reaction interface/mass spectrometry (CRIMS), was not successful due to difficulties with the proposed instrumentation. Both labeling methodologies were successfully evaluated and validated during laboratory- and field-scale bacterial transport experiments. The methods developed during this research should be useful for future bacterial transport work as well as other microbial ecology research in a variety of environments. A full bibliography of research articles and meeting presentations related to this project is included (including web links to abstracts and full text reprints).

  6. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

  7. Fiscal Federalism and Decentralization in India?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues in Tax Policy and Reform in India, paper presented atA Sustainable Fiscal Policy for India: An InternationalA Sustainable Fiscal Policy for India: An International

  8. Inert Electrodes Program fiscal year 1988 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, D.M.; Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.; Friley, J.R.; Schilling, C.H.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inert Electrodes Program, being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), involves improving the Hall-Heroult cells used by the Aluminum Industry for the electrochemical production of aluminum. The PNL research centers on developing more energy efficient, longer-lasting anodes and cathodes and ancillary equipment. Major accomplishments for Fiscal Year 1988 are summarized below. 14 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Deep Vadose Zone–Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2012.

  10. Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  11. Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  12. EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report provides details on the research conducted at EMSL--the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2008.

  13. Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report U.S....

  14. Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual...

  15. Consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following overview and accompanying audited financial statements have been prepared for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 to report the financial position and the results of operations of the Department of Energy. These statements include the consolidated Statement of Financial Position and the consolidated Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position. The statements have been prepared in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 94-01, Form and Content for Agency Financial Statements, and were developed in accordance with the hierarchy of accounting standards described therein. The overview provides a narrative on the Department of Energy`s mission, activities, and accomplishments. Utilizing performance measures as the primary vehicle for communicating Departmental accomplishments and results, this overview discusses the most significant measures while others are discussed in the supplemental information to the financial statements.

  16. Development and survival of the stable fly, Stomoxys Calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) in dung from various domestic animal species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boire, Soualika

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The stable fly has been proven to be capable of carrying a number of disease agents to livestock such as those of anthrax caused by Bacillus anthracis, surra by ~fy d p 1 *1? 1* t anemia caused by a virus (Bishopp 1913a) Trypanosomiasis in cattle, horses..., and sheep known as souma (caused by T. vivax, T. condolence and T. brucei) and nagana (caused by T, brucei) is also mechanically transmitted by this fly (Bishopp 1913a). In addition, Bishopp (1913a) noted that, within the portion oi' the United States...

  17. Animal intrusion status report for fiscal year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeen, D.S.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Protective Barrier and Warning Marker System Development Plan identified tasks that need to be completed to design a final protective barrier to implement in-place disposal of radioactive waste. This report summarizes the animal intrusion tasks that were conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in fiscal years 1988 and 1989 with respect to small mammals and water infiltration. 2 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Solar thermal electric: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Electric Program Overview and Accomplishments for Fiscal Years 1993--1994 are documented.

  19. Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Lewis

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  20. Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  1. Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit, OAS-FS-13-11

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopmentReport and7Department ofManagement Letter

  2. Field Lysimeter Investigations - test results: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1994-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rodgers, R.D.; Hilton, L.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (1) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (2) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (3) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (4) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the final 2 (10 total) years of data acquisition from operation of the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period. At the end of the tenth year, the experiment was closed down. Examination of soil and waste forms is planned to be conducted next and will be reported later.

  3. Field lysimeter investigations - test results. Low-level waste data base development program: Test results for fiscal years 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Findlay, M.W.; Davis, E.C.; Jastrow, J.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the first 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both Portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  4. Field lysimeter investigations: Low-level waste data base development program for fiscal year 1995. Volume 8, Annual report, October 1994-- September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Larsen, I.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified ion-exchange resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified ion- exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of liners used to dispose the ion-exchange resins. Compressive test results of 12-year-old cement and vinyl ester- styrene solidified waste form samples are presented, which show effects of aging and self-irradiation. Results of the tenth year of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste form samples are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  5. Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.; Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  6. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  7. Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997) A total of 517 students studied abroad; an additional 62) N Am: 36 (10) #12;Oceania: 39 (1) S Am: 100 (2) July, 1997 #12;

  8. Instructionally Related Activities Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Instructionally Related Activities Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the President ......................................................................................................... ix Budget Policy Statements, Procedures, and Guidelines Role of the Chair, IRA Committee

  9. Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the ASI Board of Directors, the ASI% Budgeted # of Paying Students 7,500 37,250 34

  10. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

  11. Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET AND FISCAL YEAR 2006 REVISIONS...................................... 1 B. STABILIZING LONG-TERM FUNDING.................................. 2 BUDGET HISTORY (FIGURE 1)............................................................ 5 BUDGET BY FUNCTION (FIGURE 2) .................................................... 6 BUDGET

  12. Council Document 2012-5 Fiscal Year 2014 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2012 Council Document 2012-5 Fiscal Year 2014 Budget and Fiscal Year 2013 Revisions #12;ii B. Budget History.............................................................................................. 2 Budget History by Function (Figure 1) ............................................... 4 Budget

  13. Council Document 2011-08 Fiscal Year 2013 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2011 Council Document 2011-08 Fiscal Year 2013 Budget and Fiscal Year 2012 Revisions #12;ii B. Budget History.............................................................................................. 2 Budget History by Function (Figure 1) ............................................... 4 Budget

  14. Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2008 BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2008 BUDGET AND FISCAL YEAR 2007 REVISIONS...................................... 1 B. STABILIZING LONG-TERM FUNDING.................................. 2 BUDGET HISTORY (FIGURE 1)............................................................ 5 BUDGET BY FUNCTION (FIGURE 2) .................................................... 6 BUDGET

  15. Out of control? : local democracy failure and fiscal control boards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobes, Deborah Isadora

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nation's current recession has strained the finances of local governments such that many cities with already delicate budgets have plunged into fiscal crisis. This dissertation examines three causes of fiscal crisis - ...

  16. EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan...

  17. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

  18. Testimony Before Senate Energy & Water Development Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reports Testimony Testimony Before Senate Energy & Water Development Committee Testimony Before Senate Energy & Water Development Committee March 21, 2012 Fiscal Year 2013...

  19. Department of Energy's Fiscal Year 2014 Consolidated Financial Statements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopmentReport and7Department of EnergyFiscal

  20. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

  1. Testimony Regarding Fiscal Year 2012 Funding for Federal Science and Technology Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    necessary than ever. Federally-funded scientific research and development (R&D) produces innovationsTestimony Regarding Fiscal Year 2012 Funding for Federal Science and Technology Programs Submitted of delivering energy, food, and water in more sustainable ways. In short, NSF, NASA and NOAA help meet

  2. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.G.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

  3. Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG UNIVERSITYGHG Report - FY10 3 Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people Oil: Amber Sams · Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Davion Reese · First Student: Brian Maxwell · Good Company

  4. Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program #12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many - First Student: Brian Maxwell - Carson Oil: Gena Conner Government Organizations - Baker County: Jason

  5. Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June #12;#12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many, geothermal, tidal or sea currents etc. (7) "OUS Method" refers to the inventory for FY07 that is similar

  6. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non--Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by the authors of the paper [N. K. Yamaleev ...

  7. ICTs and Rural Development in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Sustainable Fiscal Policy for India: An Internationalareas for policy attention. ICTs and India’s Development –policy aspects of providing rural ICTs in India –

  8. Policy Flash 2013-32 Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Contracting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Contracting Goals Policy Flash 2013-32 Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Contracting Goals Attached is Policy Flash 2013-32 Fiscal Year 2013 Small...

  9. Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Proposal Submittal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Proposal Submittal Instructions for Fiscal Year 2015 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program...

  10. Tax and Fiscal Policies for Promotion of Industrial EnergyEfficiency: A Survey of International Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell,Ernst; Graus, Wina

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Foundation's China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) has undertaken a major project investigating fiscal and tax policy options for stimulating energy efficiency and renewable energy development in China. This report, which is part of the sectoral sub-project studies on energy efficiency in industry, surveys international experience with tax and fiscal policies directed toward increasing investments in energy efficiency in the industrial sector. The report begins with an overview of tax and fiscal policies, including descriptions and evaluations of programs that use energy or energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) taxes, pollution levies, public benefit charges, grants or subsidies, subsidized audits, loans, tax relief for specific technologies, and tax relief as part of an energy or greenhouse gas (GHG) emission tax or agreement scheme. Following the discussion of these individual policies, the report reviews experience with integrated programs found in two countries as well as with GHG emissions trading programs. The report concludes with a discussion of the best practices related to international experience with tax and fiscal policies to encourage investment in energy efficiency in industry.

  11. OCRWM annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the progress in the activities of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters include: Yucca Mountain site characterization project; Waste acceptance, storage and transportation project; Program management; Working with external parties; and Financial management. Also included in five appendices are: financial statements; key federal laws and regulations; fiscal year 1997 Congressional testimony and meetings with regulators and oversight bodies; OCREM publications for fiscal year 1997; and selected publications from other organizations during fiscal year 1997.

  12. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy.

  13. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Energy Saving Homes, Buildings, and...

  14. EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    center, and EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management Jack Surash during DOE's Fiscal Year 2011 DOE Secretarial Small Business Awards Program Wednesday....

  15. activities fiscal year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review Board as an independent agency within 106 The Smithsonian Institution Libraries in 1999Fiscal Year October 1, 1998-September 30, 1999 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  16. area fiscal year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review Board as an independent agency within 97 The Smithsonian Institution Libraries in 1999Fiscal Year October 1, 1998-September 30, 1999 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  17. analysis fiscal year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review Board as an independent agency within 98 The Smithsonian Institution Libraries in 1999Fiscal Year October 1, 1998-September 30, 1999 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  18. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sustainable Transportation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Sustainable Transportation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

  19. Procurement Organization, Sandia National Laboratories. Annual report, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimak, D.R.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Procurement Organization for Fiscal Year 1995. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

  20. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the science, awards and honors, and publications that resulted during the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2010 at EMSL.

  1. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  2. Annual report procurement organization Sandia National Laboratories fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.L.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Procurement Organization for Fiscal Year 1996, Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment program fiscal Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The effectiveness of fiscal stimulus cannot be assessed independently of the medium-term fis- cal outlook. Given... Debt consolidation and fiscal stabilization of deep recessions...

  4. Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

  5. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  6. Forecast of Contracting and Subcontracting Opportunities, Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to the US Department of Energy`s Forecast of Contracting and Subcontracting Opportunities. This forecast, which is published pursuant to Public Low 100--656, ``Business Opportunity Development Reform Act of 1988,`` is intended to inform small business concerns, including those owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals, and women-owned small business concerns, of the anticipated fiscal year 1995 contracting and subcontracting opportunities with the Department of Energy and its management and operating contractors and environmental restoration and waste management contractors. This document will provide the small business contractor with advance notice of the Department`s procurement plans as they pertain to small, small disadvantaged and women-owned small business concerns.Opportunities contained in the forecast support the mission of the Department, to serve as advocate for the notion`s energy production, regulation, demonstration, conservation, reserve maintenance, nuclear weapons and defense research, development and testing, when it is a national priority. The Department`s responsibilities include long-term, high-risk research and development of energy technology, the marketing of Federal power, and maintenance of a central energy data collection and analysis program. A key mission for the Department is to identify and reduce risks, as well as manage waste at more than 100 sites in 34 states and territories, where nuclear energy or weapons research and production resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination. Each fiscal year, the Department establishes contracting goals to increase contracts to small business concerns and meet our mission objectives.

  7. LLNL Underground Coal Gasification Project annual report - fiscal year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.; O'Neal, E.M. (eds.)

    1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory has been conducting an interdisciplinary underground coal gasification program since 1974 under the sponsorship of DOE and its predecessors. We completed three UCG tests at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming, during the period 1975 to 1979. Five small field experiments, the large-block tests, were completed from 1981 to 1982 at the exposed coal face in the WIDCO coal mine near Centralia, Washington. A larger test at the same location, the partial-seam CRIP test, was completed during fiscal year 1984. In conjunction with the DOE and an industrial group lead by the Gas Research Institute, we have prepared a preliminary design for a large-scale test at the WIDCO site. The planned test features dual injection and production wells, module interaction, and consumption of 20,000 tons of coal during a hundred-day steam-oxygen gasification. During fiscal year 1984, we documented the large-block excavations. The cavities were elongated, the cavity cross sections were elliptical, and the cavities contained ash and slag at the bottom, char and dried coal above that, and a void at the top. The results from the large-block tests provided enough data to allow us to construct a composite model, CAVSM. Preliminary results from the model agree well with the product-gas chemistry and cavity shape observed in the large-block tests. Other models and techniques developed during the year include a transient, moving-front code, a two-dimensional, reactive-flow code using the method of lines, and a wall-recession-rate model. In addition, we measured the rate of methane decomposition in the hot char bed and developed an engineering rate expression to estimate the magnitude of the methane-decomposition reaction. 16 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Stable isotope enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egle, Brian

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

  9. Stable isotope enrichment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Egle, Brian

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

  10. Council Document 2013-06 Fiscal Year 2015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2013 Council Document 2013-06 DRAFT Fiscal Year 2015 Budget and Fiscal Year 2014 Revisions #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS A. MISSION, VALUES AND STRATEGIC GOALS STATEMENT .......... 1 B. Budget History.............................................................................................. 3 Budget History by Function (Figure 1) ............................................... 5 Budget

  11. Council Document 2013-08 Fiscal Year 2015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2013 Council Document 2013-08 Fiscal Year 2015 Budget and Fiscal Year 2014 Revisions #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS A. MISSION, VALUES AND STRATEGIC GOALS STATEMENT .......... 1 B. Budget History.............................................................................................. 3 Budget History by Function (Figure 1) ............................................... 5 Budget

  12. Accountability report. Fiscal Year 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consolidates several performance-related reports into a single financial management report. Information in this report includes information previously reported in the following documents: (1) US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) annual financial statement, (2) NRC Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, and (3) NRC Chairman`s semiannual report to Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations. This report also contains performance measures. The report is organized into the following subtopics: information about the US NRC, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement for Fiscal Year 1996. 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Request Briefing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department ofDistributionFire Protection ProgramDepartment ofFiscal Year 2010Program

  14. Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLowDiscussion-4,611,201.00fiscal reform (EFR)

  15. Office of Inspector General fiscal year 1996 annual work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This FY 1996 Office of Inspector General (OIG) Annual Work Plan is a summary and distillation of information contained in annual work plans, and includes audits and inspections that are carried over from FY 1995 as well as audits and inspections scheduled to start during FY 1996. Audits and inspections included in this consolidated OIG Annual Work Plan will be performed by OIG staff. Specialized expertise available through a Certified Public Accounting firm will be used to assist in auditing the Department`s financial statements. As part of the OIG Cooperative Audit Strategy, additional audit coverage of the Department`s programs is provided by internal auditors of the Department`s integrated contractors. Through the Cooperative Audit Strategy, the OIG ensures that the internal auditors satisfy audit standards, provides planning guidance to the internal auditors, coordinates work to avoid duplication, and tracks the work of internal auditors to ensure that needed audits are performed. Applicable portions of the four annual work plans issued for Fiscal Year 1996 by the Deputy/Assistant Inspectors General have been combined to form a major part of this overall OIG Annual Work Plan. Also included are portions of the most recent OIG Semiannual Reports to Congress to give an overview of the OIG`s mission/organization, resource status, and the environment in which the OIG currently operates. The OIG Annual Work Plan also lists ongoing and planned audits and inspections, and it presents investigative statistics which have been previously reported in the two OIG Semiannual Reports to Congress which cover Fiscal Year 1995. Furthermore, included in this work plan are descriptions of several innovations developed by the OIG to streamline its operations and to conserve as much efficiency and economy as possible in a time of resource reductions.

  16. FISCAL FORESIGHT: ANALYTICS AND ECONOMETRICS ERIC M. LEEPER, TODD B. WALKER, AND SHU-CHUN SUSAN YANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    FISCAL FORESIGHT: ANALYTICS AND ECONOMETRICS ERIC M. LEEPER, TODD B. WALKER, AND SHU-CHUN SUSAN policy process. This paper develops an analytical framework to study the econometric implications from statistical innovations in conventional ways. Econometric analyses that fail to align agents

  17. Advanced Automotive Technologies annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report serves to inform the United States Congress on the progress for fiscal year 1996 of programs under the Department of Energy`s Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies (OAAT). This document complies with the legislative requirement to report on the implementation of Title III of the Automotive Propulsion Research and Development Act of 1978. Also reported are related activities performed under subsequent relevant legislation without specific reporting requirements. Furthermore, this report serves as a vital means of communication from the Department to all public and private sector participants. Specific requirements that are addressed in this report are: Discussion of how each research and development contract, grant, or project funded under the authority of this Act satisfies the requirements of each subsection; Current comprehensive program definition for implementing Title III; Evaluation of the state of automotive propulsion system research and development in the United States; Number and amount of contracts and grants awarded under Title III; Analysis of the progress made in developing advanced automotive propulsion system technology; and Suggestions for improvements in automotive propulsion system research and development, including recommendations for legislation.

  18. Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  19. awards fiscal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rounds of activist fiscal policy. These began early in the recession with temporary tax cuts enacted in February 2008, followed by a first-time homebuyers tax credit enacted...

  20. HONEYWELL - KANSAS CITY PLANT FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    - KANSAS CITY PLANT FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM RESULTS & FORECAST CATEGORY Total Procurement Total SB Small Disad. Bus Woman-Owned SB Hub-Zone SB...

  1. agency fiscal year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Economic Impact & Outreach 13 12;LETTER FROM THE DIRECTORS Dear 10 For Fiscal Year 1999 CiteSeer Summary: report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of...

  2. Real Property Update Form Fiscal Year: 2007-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Real Property Update Form Fiscal Year: 2007-2008 Action: ___New CIP Record ___ Increase Existing CIP Record ___ Convert CIP to Completed Asset ___ Increase Existing Completed Asset ___ Newly Completed Asset (not formerly CIP) ___ Disposal ___ Other ___________________________ ___ Demolition 1

  3. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes seismic activity at and around the Hanford Site during Fiscal Year 2004. It is also the first description of seismic activity during the fourth quarter of FY04.

  4. Fiscal Year 2006 Washington Closure Hanford Science & Technology Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.J. Kroegler, M. Truex, D.J. McBride

    2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Washington Closure Hanford science and technology (S&T) plan documents the activities associated with providing S&T support to the River Corridor Closure Project for fiscal year 2006.

  5. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report LTS-O&M is at the core of LM efforts to fulfill a strategy that includes objectives published in the 2011-2020...

  6. automatic fiscal stabilisers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This paper examines the long term profile of fiscal deficit and debt relative to GDP in India, with a view to analysing debt-deficit sustainability issues along with the...

  7. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

  8. Fiscal policy coordination in times of economic and financial crises 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rommerskirchen, Charlotte Sophie

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines fiscal policy coordination in the EU during the Great Recession (2008-2010). For the first time since the Maastricht Treaty heralded the coordination of macroeconomic policies among EU Member States, ...

  9. Associated Students, Inc. Fiscal Year 2014-2015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12;Associated Students, Inc. Fiscal Year 2014-2015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the ASI Board of Directors, the ASI President & CEO, and the University ............................................................................................................................... viii Budget Policies and Procedures Finance Committee Process

  10. Fiscal Year 2012 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel spreadsheet shows scope 1, 2, and 3 greenhouse gas inventories reported by federal agencies in fiscal year 2012. It includes emissions from sources not subject to the reduction targets.

  11. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  12. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Nancy S.; Showalter, Mary Ann

    2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities and research performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a Department of Energy national scientific user facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, during Fiscal Year 2006.

  13. Groundwater Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. K. Stoker; A. S. Johnson; B. D. Newman; B. M. Gallaher; C. L. Nylander; D. B. Rogers; D. E. Broxton; D. Katzman; E. H. Keating; G. L. Cole; K. A. Bitner; K. I. Mullen; P. Longmire; S. G. McLin; W. J. Stone

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater protection activities and hydrogeologic characterization studies are conducted at LANL annually. A summary of fiscal year 1998 results and findings shows increased understanding of the hydrogeologic environment beneath the Pajarito Plateau and significant refinement to elements of the LANL Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model pertaining to areas and sources of recharge to the regional aquifer. Modeling, drilling, monitoring, and data collection activities are proposed for fiscal year 1999.

  14. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office. The goals are: (1) Reduce the levelized cost of generating geothermal power to 3-5 cents per kWh by 2007; (2) Double the number of States with geothermal electric power facilities to eight by 2006; and (3) Supply the electrical power or heat energy needs of 7 million homes and businesses in the United States by 2010. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy. balanced strategy for the Geothermal Program.

  15. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The goals are: (1) Double the number of States with geothermal electric power facilities to eight by 2006; (2) Reduce the levelized cost of generating geothermal power to 3-5 cents per kWh by 2007; and (3) Supply the electrical power or heat energy needs of 7 million homes and businesses in the United States by 2010. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2002. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy. balanced strategy for the Geothermal Program.

  16. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, D.F.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1992. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG&G Idaho, Inc. is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations including the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving beryllium, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base, and computer code development for reactor transients. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental studies performed by the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiments and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, the safety analysis for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support for the ARIES commercial reactor design study.

  17. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, D.F.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1992. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG G Idaho, Inc. is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations including the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving beryllium, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base, and computer code development for reactor transients. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental studies performed by the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiments and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, the safety analysis for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support for the ARIES commercial reactor design study.

  18. Buried waste integrated demonstration fiscal year 1992 close-out report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, P.G.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Owens, K.J.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program (BWID) is to support the development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that when integrated with commercially-available baseline technologies form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste disposed of throughout the US Department of Energy complex. To accomplish this mission of identifying technological solutions for remediation deficiencies, the Office of Technology Development initiated the BWID at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-91. This report summarizes the activities of the BWID Program during FY-92.

  19. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Treasury is accepting applications on the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which has opened the fiscal year 2015 funding round for the CDFI Program...

  20. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  1. Abstracts of Phase 1 awards, (fiscal year) 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contained in this booklet are abstracts of the Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year 1987 under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). The program is designed for implementation in a three-phase process, with Phase I determining the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas proposed for investigation. The period of performance in this initial phase is relatively brief, typically about 6 months, and the awards are limited to $50,000. Phase II is the principal research or research and development effort, and the awards are as high as $500,000 for work to be performed in periods of up to 2 years. Phase III is the commercial application. The 111 Phase I projects described were selected in a highly competitive process from a total of 942 proposals received in response to the 1987 Solicitation. They cover the fields of chemistry, materials, control systems, plant natural products, instrumentation, nuclear medicine, health and environmental effects, high energy physics, particle accelerators, nuclear physics, plasma diagnostics and confinement, fusion energy systems, robotics and remote systems, nuclear reactors, space nuclear power, fuel cycle, decontamination/decommissioning, commputers in nuclear plants, coal, enhanced oil recovery/tar sands, fossil energy, photovoltaics, solar thermal, ceramics for heat engines, and industrial separation, conversion and recovery processes. (DLC)

  2. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) during fiscal year 1989. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. A major task in FY 1989 was completion and publication of the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan, which prioritizes tasks to be undertaken to bring the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations into compliance with federal statutes, relations, and guidelines. During FY 1989, six tasks were performed. In order of priority, these were conducting 107 cultural resource reviews, monitoring the condition of 40 known prehistoric archaeological sites, assessing the condition of artifact collections from the Hanford Site, evaluating three sites and nominating two of those to the National Register of Historic Places, developing an education program and presenting 11 lectures to public organizations, and surveying approximately 1 mi{sup 2} of the Hanford Site for cultural resources. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with federal statutes and regulations. This report summarizes activities of the HCRL during fiscal year (FY) 1990. The HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks. The task list guided cultural resources management activities during FY 1990 and is the outline for this report. In order, these tasks were to (1) conduct cultural resource reviews, (2) develop an archaeological resources protection plan, (3) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (4) plan a curation system for artifacts and records, (5) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (6) educate the public about cultural resources, (7) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (8) gather ethnohistorical data from Native American elders.

  4. Fiscal federalism and its potential effects on public transportation in mid-sized cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobi, Amy Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current fiscally conservative climate on Capitol Hill, as the next surface transportation bill is being negotiated, may possibly carry over to a greater dependence on fiscal federalism for funding public transportation. ...

  5. The Office of Environmental Management Technical Reports: A Bibliography. Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's (EM) technical reports bibliography is an annual publication that contains information on scientific and technical reports sponsored by the Office of Environmental Management. This bibliography contains citations for reports published in Fiscal Year 1999 (October 1, 1998 - September 30, 1999). EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors this bibliography that covers EM's activities in environmental restoration, waste management, technology development, and facility transition and management. Subjects include subsurface contaminants; mixed waste characterization, treatment and disposal; radioactive tank waste remediation; plutonium; deactivation and decommissioning; robotics; characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology; and efficient separations.

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory - 1995 Highlights. Fiscal Year 1995, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Highlights Report is to present a brief overview of the Laboratory`s significant research accomplishments during the fiscal year 1995. The activities covered in this report include advances on the large projects, such as the discovery of the Enhanced Reversed Shear mode on the TFTR and the engineering design developments in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, as well as the significant progress made in plasma theory, small-scale experiments, technology transfer, graduate education, and the Laboratory`s outreach program in science education.

  7. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  8. Summary of in situ vitrification modeling and analysis accomplishments for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, C.E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The in situ vitrification (ISV) modeling activities encompass a variety of both modeling development efforts and analysis applications in support of the ISV project. The model development effort is directed toward modifying or developing a set of computer codes to simulate the ISV process. These codes are used to perform safety and environmental hazards analyses, assist in experimental test planning and design, assist in equipment design and development of operating procedures, and provide enhanced understanding of the ISV process. This report presents a summary description of the accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1991 for both the model development and analysis areas. Brief descriptions of the models that were developed and the more important conclusions from the analytical studies are presented.

  9. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  10. CAROLINA DEVELOPMENT UPDATE | AUGUST 2012 FISCAL YEAR '13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffay, Kevin

    a 1994 alumni leadership award. He is president and CEO at Valley Health System, a nonprofit health in touch. My training there launched a happy and successful career." Previously, Mark and Teri spearheaded

  11. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program 18th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department remains focused on the technologies that are critical to making electric and hybrid vehicles commercially viable and competitive with current production gasoline-fueled vehicles in performance, reliability, and affordability. During Fiscal Year 1994, significant progress was made toward fulfilling the intent of Congress. The Department and the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (a partnership of the three major domestic automobile manufacturers) continued to work together and to focus the efforts of battery developers on the battery technologies that are most likely to be commercialized in the near term. Progress was made in industry cost-shared contracts toward demonstrating the technical feasibility of fuel cells for passenger bus and light duty vehicle applications. Two industry teams which will develop hybrid vehicle propulsion technologies have been selected through competitive procurement and have initiated work, in Fiscal Year 1994. In addition, technical studies and program planning continue, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to achieve the goals of reducing the transportation sector dependence on imported oil, reducing the level of environmentally harmful emissions, and enhancing industrial productivity and competitiveness.

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  13. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

  14. Budget Windows, Sunsets and Fiscal Control Alan J. Auerbach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Budget Windows, Sunsets and Fiscal Control Alan J. Auerbach University of California, Berkeley have struggled to find the right method of controlling public spending and budget deficits. In recent years, the United States has evaluated policy changes using a ten-year budget window. The use of a multi

  15. Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry Michael T. Hogue, Research Analyst Introduction for oil and gas extraction firms. A recent review by the Government Accountability Office indicates features of Utah's oil and gas industry. The Oil and Gas Industry in Utah Reserves and Production Oil

  16. Peak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    , nation, and states) · Shale oil not included ­ Shale oil reserve estimates 2.0 Trillion bbls in USPeak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications Jim Peach Arrowhead Center Prosper Project is peak oil? · Why peak oil (and gas) matters ­ (In energy and non-energy states) ­ National Real GDP

  17. Accelerator probes for new stable quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin M. Belostky; Maxim Yu. Khlopov; Konstantin I. Shibaev

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonbaryonic dark matter of the Universe can consist of new stable double charged particles $O^{--}$, bound with primordial helium in heavy neutral O-helium (OHe)"atoms" by ordinary Coulomb interaction. O-helium dark atoms can play the role of specific nuclear interacting dark matter and provide solution for the puzzles of dark matter searches. The successful development of composite dark matter scenarios appeals to experimental search for the charged constituents of dark atoms. If $O^{--}$ is a "heavy quark cluster" $\\bar U \\bar U \\bar U$, its production at accelerators is virtually impossible and the strategy of heavy quark search is reduced to search for heavy stable hadrons, containing only single heavy quark (or antiquark). Estimates of production cross section of such particles at LHC are presented and the experimental signatures for new stable quarks are outlined.

  18. Fiscal year 1998 Battelle performance evaluation agreement revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Year 1998 represents the second full year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based contract. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractors performance for the period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998, as required by Articles entitled Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation and Critical Outcomes Review of the Contract DE-AC08-76RLO1830. In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office has defined six critical outcomes that same as the core for the Contractors performance evaluation. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory. As stated above six critical outcomes have been established for FY 1998. These outcomes are based on the following needs identified by DOE-HQ, RL and other customers of the Laboratory. Our Energy Research customer desires relevant, quality and cost effective science. Our Environmental Management customer wants technology developed, demonstrated, and deployed to solve environmental cleanup issues. To ensure the diversification and viability of the Laboratory as a National asset, RL and HQ alike want to increase the Science and Technical contributions of PNNL related to its core capabilities. RL wants improved leadership/management, cost-effective operations, and maintenance of a work environment, which fosters innovative thinking and high morale. RL and HQ alike desire compliance with environment, safety and health (ES and H) standards and disciplined conduct of operations for protection of the worker, environment, and the public, As with all of Hanford, DOE expects contribution of the Laboratory to the economic development of the Tri-Cities community, and the region, to build a new local economy that is less reliant on the Hanford mission, as well as enhancing the status of the Laboratory as a valued corporate citizen of the Northwest Region. The Critical Outcome system focuses all of these customer desires into specific objectives and performance indicators, with supporting measures to track and foster continued improvement in meeting the needs (outcomes) of the Laboratory's customers.

  19. Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

  20. Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries . Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries . Abstract:...

  1. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY S CLEAN ENERGY APPLICATION CENTERS: FISCAL YEAR 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors a set of Clean Energy Application Centers that promote the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. There are eight regional centers that provide assistance for specific areas of the country plus a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association that provides technical assistance on district energy issues and applications to the regional centers. The original focus of the centers was on combined heat and power (CHP) alone but, beginning in fiscal year 2010, their scope expanded to include district energy systems and waste heat recovery. At that time, the official name of the centers changed from CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to Clean Energy Application Centers, and their number was expanded to include the previously-mentioned center focusing on district energy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed two previous studies of RAC activities. The first one examined what the RACs had done each year from the initiation of the program through fiscal year (FY) 2008 and the second one examined RAC activities for the 2009 fiscal year. The most recent study, described in this report, examines what was accomplished in fiscal year 2010, the first year since the RACs expanded their focus and changed their name to Clean Energy Application Centers.

  2. A Stable Massive Charged Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Rajasekaran

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility of the existence of a stable massive charged particle by a minimal extension of the standard model particle content. Absolute stability in the case of singly charged particle is not possible if the usual doublet Higgs exists, unless a discrete symmetry is imposed.But a doubly charged particle is absolutely stable.

  3. Photovoltaic Energy Program overview, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Photovoltaic Energy Program fosters the widespread acceptance of photovoltaic (PV) technology and accelerates commercial use of US PV products. The Program is founded on a collaborative strategy involving industry, the research and development community, potential users, utilities, and state and federal agencies. There are three main Program elements: Systems Engineering and Applications, Technology Development, and Research and Development.

  4. First and Second Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the earthquakes that occurred in the Hanford seismic monitoring network during the first and second quarters of Fiscal Year 2005

  5. River Corridor Cleanup Contract Fiscal Year 2006 Detailed Work Plan: DWP Summary, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project Integration

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This detailed work plan provides the scope, cost, and schedule for the Fiscal Year 2006 activities required to support River Corridor cleanup objectives within the directed guidance.

  6. The Political Economy of India’s Fiscal Federal System and its Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, M. Govinda; Singh, Nirvikar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Finance: Policy Issues for India, New Delhi: OxfordBank conference on India: Fiscal Policies to Acceleratepolicies and own investments have also determined resource flows across India’

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative medicinecam fiscal Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Beyond Alan J. Auerbach and William G. Gale Summary: III discusses the alternative ten- year projections. Section IV considers the longer-term fiscal... The Economic Crisis...

  8. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2010 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, B. J.

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactiviation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2010.

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  10. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laney, P.T.

    2002-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy.

  11. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  13. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  14. Os efeitos da sonegação fiscal na estrutura tributária ótima: experiência brasileira de aplicação das regras de 'lump-sum taxation'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Guardia, Renata

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    da sonegação fiscal. No Brasil, os tributos ‘lump-sum’ sãobusca averiguar se, ao Brasil, aplicam-se as conclusões desonegação fiscal. Claro que o Brasil não passou recentemente

  15. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management fiscal year 1996 annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year 1996 a revised program strategy was developed that reflects Administration policy and responds to sharply reduced funding and congressional guidance while maintaining progress toward long-term objectives. The program is on track, working toward an early, comprehensive assessment of the viability of the Yucca Mountain site; more closely determining what will be required to incorporate defense waste into the waste management system; pursuing a market-driven strategy for waste acceptance, storage, and transportation; and preserving the core capability to respond to an interim storage contingency. Overall, the elements of an integrated system for managing the Nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste are emerging, more soundly conceived, and more modestly designed, as the OCRWM works toward the physical reality of waste shipments to Federal facilities.

  16. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office report for fiscal years 1995--1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, D.D. [comp.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Groundwater Program Office in fiscal years 1995--1997 and document technical results achieved. One of the first contributions of the project was development and publication of a conceptual hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This framework then served to guide research to fill important gaps in knowledge and suggest the most cost-effective approaches to site characterization and remediation. Examples of major goals include: quantitative characterization of the role of matrix diffusion in slowing transport of contaminants and impacting the practicality of pump and treat options for aquifer restoration; the importance of geologic structure and preferred flow pathways in the near surface zone (including the role of stormflow); evaluation of the importance of the deep groundwater system in contaminant migration; and acquisition of three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation capability for fractured porous media.

  17. Space and Movable Equipment Inventory Revision: July 31, 2014 CERTIFICATION OF SPACE AND MOVABLE EQUIPMENT INVENTORY -FISCAL YEAR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Space and Movable Equipment Inventory Revision: July 31, 2014 CERTIFICATION OF SPACE AND MOVABLE EQUIPMENT INVENTORY - FISCAL YEAR 2014 TO BE USED FOR IBB PLANNING FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016 I acknowledge that the space and movable equipment inventory results conducted for this fiscal year will be used for IBB

  18. INITIATIVE #4: Fiscal Responsibility Description and details about the program or initiative that is being proposed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    2014 year-end is to hold the deficit at the FY 2013 level, and the 18-month goal is a FY 2015 budget a budget for the 2015 fiscal year that improves upon our budget position in fiscal year 2014 by ensuring? What will success look like in 12-18 months? The FY 2013 year-end budget deficit was $340

  19. The University of Texas at Austin Budget for Fiscal Year 2013-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Daniel

    The University of Texas at Austin Budget for Fiscal Year 2013-14 and 2014-2015 Legislative Process Officer *** STAFF COUNCIL MEETING May 27, 2014 #12;Agenda I. UT Austin Budget for FY 13-14 II. UT Austin Budget Preparation FY 14-15 III. Legislative Appropriations Request IV. Legislative Hearings V. Fiscal

  20. The Budget Outlook and Options for Fiscal Policy Alan J. Auerbach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    The Budget Outlook and Options for Fiscal Policy Alan J. Auerbach William G. Gale Peter R. Orszag;ABSTRACT This paper examines the federal budget outlook and evaluates alternative fiscal policy choices. Official projections of the federal budget surplus have declined dramatically in the past year. Adjusting

  1. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2014 for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the project for the Bonneville Power Administration. The EOS and ERTG are part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation and habitat restoration efforts, respectively, developed by the Action Agencies (BPA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System and implemented under the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program.

  2. Institutional plan. Fiscal year, 1997--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institutional Plan is the culmination of Argonne`s annual planning cycle. The document outlines what Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) regards as the optimal development of programs and resources in the context of national research and development needs, the missions of the Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory, and pertinent resource constraints. It is the product of ANL`s internal planning process and extensive discussions with DOE managers. Strategic planning is important for all of Argonne`s programs, and coordination of planning for the entire institution is crucial. This Institutional Plan will increasingly reflect the planning initiatives that have recently been implemented.

  3. Investing (in) equity : how can urban development internalize social cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xypolia, Aspasia, 1976-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis recognizes the social costs created by privately driven urban development while also acknowledging cities' fiscal dependence on local property taxes. This study is based on the premise that equitable spatial ...

  4. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  5. Photovoltaics: Program overview fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overview is divided into sections titled: 1993 PV program accomplishments, PV systems for today`s markets generate power and experience, systems development and testing prepares products for market, advances in manufacturing hasten availability of innovations, cooperative research improves PV technology, additional achievements in cooperative R&D, and summary of PV program services. Figs, tabs.

  6. Photovoltaic energy program overview: Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the 1994 overview for the Photovoltaic Energy Program. The topics of this overview include cooperative research projects to improve PV systems and develop pre-commercial prototypes of new PV products, expanding understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the formation and performance of PV materials, and helping US industry enhance its leadership position in the PV market.

  7. FY 1987 current fiscal year work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Current Year Work Plan presents a detailed description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office during FY87. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance, task monitoring, information gathering and task reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of program status reports for DOE. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. This work plan includes: system analyses, requirements analyses, interim and procedure development, legislative and regulatory analyses, dispatch and traffic analyses, and data bases.

  8. EMERGENCY READINESS ASSURANCE PLAN (ERAP) FOR FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shane Bush

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for FY-15. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN-114, “INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  10. Fiscal Year 2013 - Conference Reporting Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 TotalFinalJobs Findof Energyof79012Fiscal Year

  11. FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2002 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 -2 FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year

  12. FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2004 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 -2 FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal

  13. StreamNet Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Bruce; Roger, Phil; Oftedahl, Lenora

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Year 2008 (FY-08) represents a transitional year for the StreamNet project. While the project continued to acquire/update, standardize, georeference and disseminate fish-related data for the state, some tribal and one federal fisheries agencies, it also took on several new initiatives and is anticipating new regional guidance on data needs. Passage of the Columbia Basin Accords caused an administrative change within the project, separating the work done by the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) out to a separate contract with BPA. This will change the structure of the StreamNet contract but not change the relationship with the StreamNet Library or data developed by CRITFC, and will likely increase the availability of tribal data to StreamNet due to increased funding for tribal data efforts. This change will take effect in FY-09. We also expect that data work will be adjusted in the future in response to executive level policy direction in the Columbia Basin based on efforts to establish priorities under a regional data management framework. Data development emphasis was shifted this year to place highest priority on data that support indicators of fish abundance for the focal species covered in the Status of the Resource (SOTR) report, as requested by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) Data Management Framework Subcommittee. We instituted an XML based web service allowing direct access to data from the project database for CBFWA to update the SOTR report. The project also increased efforts to work with tribal fisheries managers to provide data related assistance and to include tribal data in the StreamNet database. A primary theme this year was exploring means to speed the flow of data. We had ongoing success in our strategic emphasis on increasing automation of data conversion through development of comprehensive database systems within our partner agencies, as outlined in our Vision and Strategic Plan. By assisting development of internal database systems, we will be able to automate conversion of agency data to the regionally consistent format as well as help the agency better meet their own data needs. The Idaho StreamNet project contributed to development of IDFG's Idaho Fish and Wildlife Information System (IFWIS), and this year they successfully tested automatic conversion of data to the regional exchange format. We worked with WDFW and developed draft field data input templates for collection of smolt trap and spawning ground survey data. And, we began collaborating in a project with ODFW and EcoTrust to develop an online data dissemination tool. As these and additional data systems are brought online, we expect to be able to shorten the time needed to annually update data, and hope to use the increased efficiency to free existing staff time to develop additional types of data from our partners. Another long-term theme related to expanding data coverage to estimates of productivity and/or data needed to calculate productivity. Initial investigations within our partner agencies indicated that these data are scattered, with some components like age composition of returning fish already being addressed by StreamNet, but others not yet covered. We will continue to determine how available these data are and investigate the feasibility of capturing the estimates and supporting data in the future. Routine ongoing data development of the standard data sets in StreamNet continued this year. An update and new web page for disseminating Protected Areas data was completed. Initial work was done with the CRITFC to get ready to house and disseminate data developed by the Hatchery Scientific Review Group. All database, GIS and web server systems were maintained successfully, with repairs completed as needed. Software applications were developed or maintained, as needed. All required reports, budgets and equipment inventories were submitted. The StreamNet website (www.streamnet.org), the project's primary means of disseminating fish data, was completely redesigned this year to improve

  14. Unexpected, Stable Form of Uranium Detected | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unexpected, Stable Form of Uranium Detected Unexpected, Stable Form of Uranium Detected Insights on underappreciated reaction could shed light on environmental cleanup options...

  15. Institutional plan. Fiscal Year 1997--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is operated for the United States Department of Energy by a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. National security programs and defense-related environmental programs for DOE comprise 65 percent of Sandia`s work. We are the DOE Defense Programs laboratory responsible for engineering development of all US nuclear weapons and for systems integration of the nuclear weapons with their delivery vehicles. Our responsibilities include design, certification, and assessment of the nonnuclear subsystems of nuclear weapons; safety, security, reliability, and use control; issues associated with production and dismantlement of nuclear weapons; surveillance and support of weapons in the stockpile; and work in nuclear intelligence, nonproliferation, and treaty verification technologies. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory. Ten percent of our work supports DOE missions in energy science, research, and development. When appropriate, we also perform work for other government agencies, particularly the Department of Defense, in programs where unique competencies built our mission responsibilities can add value. This report discusses the activities of these responsibilities at the Sandia National Laboratories.

  16. Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

  17. Photovoltaic energy: Contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the National Photovoltaics Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of terrestrial photovoltaic technology as an energy option for the United States. In the past, a summary was prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. Tasks conducted in-house by participating national laboratories or under contract by industrial, academic, and other research institutes were highlighted. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed by Sandia National Laboratory or the Solar Energy Research Institute during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

  18. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  19. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for Fiscal Year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and guidelines. For fiscal year 1991 these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NHPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (6) gather ethnohistorical data from Indian elders. Research conducted as a spinoff from these tasks is also reported. The archaeological site monitoring program is designed to determine whether the RL`s cultural resource management and protection policies are effective; results are used in planning for cultural resource site management and protection. Forty-one sites were monitored during this fiscal year.

  20. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for Fiscal Year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and guidelines. For fiscal year 1991 these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NHPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (6) gather ethnohistorical data from Indian elders. Research conducted as a spinoff from these tasks is also reported. The archaeological site monitoring program is designed to determine whether the RL's cultural resource management and protection policies are effective; results are used in planning for cultural resource site management and protection. Forty-one sites were monitored during this fiscal year.

  1. Stable Mesh Decimation Chandrajit Bajaj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    . The choice of geometric error used to guide the reduction process is chosen independent of the function and Physical Modeling San Francisco, CA what is known as model error. Reducing to a linear sys- tem causesStable Mesh Decimation Chandrajit Bajaj Department of Computer Sciences University of Texas

  2. 13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

  3. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

  4. Inert Anode/Cathode Program: Fiscal Year 1986 annual report. [For Hall-Heroult cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenden, B.B.; Davis, N.C.; Koski, O.H.; Marschman, S.C.; Pool, K.H.; Schilling, C.H.; Windisch, C.F.; Wrona, B.J.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the program is to develop long-lasting, energy-efficient anodes, cathodes, and ancillary equipment for Hall-Heroult cells used by the aluminum industry. The program is divided into four tasks: Inert Anode Development, Cathode Materials Evaluation, Cathode Bonding Development, and Sensor Development. To devise sensors to control the chemistry of Hall-Heroult cells using stable anodes and cathodes. This report highlights the major FY86 technical accomplishments, which are presented in the following sections: Management, Materials Development, Materials Evaluation, Thermodynamic Evaluation, Laboratory Cell Tests, Large-Scale Tests, Cathode Materials Evaluation, Cathode Bonding Development, and Sensor Development.

  5. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  6. Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

  7. Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

  8. Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories annual report, fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.R.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1993. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

  9. Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2013 Activities and Achievements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2013 Activities Institute for Telecommunication Sciences Pursuant to the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act This report summarizes technology transfer activities and achievements of the Department of Commerce's (DOC

  10. Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2012 Activities and Achievements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2012 Activities Institute for Telecommunication Sciences Pursuant to the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act This report summarizes technology transfer activities and achievements of the Department of Commerce's (DOC

  11. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Continuity Readiness Assurance Report — Fiscal Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Stucki; Sherman S. Campbell

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report generated for DOE-ID to summarize accomplishments made by the BEA Continuity of Operations program as a part of BEA Emergency Management at the INL during the past fiscal year.

  12. Research and educational activities at the MIT Research Reactor : Fiscal year 1968

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Nuclear Engineering; 7102 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Research Reactor. Staff; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report of research and educational activities which utilized the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, five-megawatt, heavy water, research reactor during fiscal year 1968 has been prepared for administrative use at MIT ...

  13. Annual report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In fulfillment of statutory requirements, this report provides information on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and also documents activities conducted by Federal agencies in fulfilling those requirements during Fiscal Year 1997.

  14. Annual report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In fulfillment of statutory requirements, this report provides information on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and also documents activities conducted by Federal agencies in fulfilling those requirements during Fiscal Year 1998.

  15. Annual report procurement and logistics management center Sandia National Laboratories fiscal year 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, David L.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Procurement and Logistics Management Center for Fiscal Year 2002. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

  16. Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

  17. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Skwarek

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

  18. Stable carbon isotope ratio of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment: validation of isolation and stable carbon isotope analysis methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Moon Koo

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , purification and compound specific isotope analysis methods were developed to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratio of individual PAHs. Development of the method included improving accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurement by producing...

  19. Skill development among student affairs professionals in the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Region III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Darby Michelle

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    contact; communication; personnel management; fiscal management; professional development; research, evaluation, and assessment; legal issues; technology, and diversity. For each skill category, fifteen learning methods were identified. A usable response...

  20. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.

  1. Stable reduction product of misonidazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The predominant stable product (greater than 80%) of the anaerobic radiation chemical reduction (pH 7, formate, N/sub 2/O) of misonidazole (MISO) has been identified as the cyclic guanidinium ion MISO-DDI, a 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxyimidazolium ion. This cation was prepared as its sulfate salt by the reaction of glyoxal and the appropriate N-substituted guanidinium sulfate. Its formation during MISO reduction was established by NMR spectral comparison and by derivatization as glyoxal bis-oxime, which was formed in 86% yield in fully reduced systems. The toxicity of pure MISO-DDI X sulfate was examined in vivo (C/sub 3/H mice) and in vitro (CHO cells). This product is less toxic than the parent MISO and free glyoxal. A reactive, short-lived, intermediate is suggested as the agent responsible for the toxicity of MISO under hypoxic conditions.

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A. (eds.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser.

  3. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  4. Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes Carey E. Floyd Jr.*ab , Calvin North Carolina Keywords: imaging, neutrons, tomography, spectroscopy ABSTRACT Here we report on the development of a new molecular imaging technique using inelastic scattering of fast neutrons. Earlier studies

  5. Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum- and Bio-based Semi for petroleum and bio-based MWFs that improve fluid lifetime by providing emulsion stability under hard water. The newly developed petroleum and bio-based formulations with improved hard water stability are competitive

  6. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

  7. Fiscal year 1999 Battelle performance evaluation and fee agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Year 1999 represents the third fill year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based evaluation for the Contractor's operations and management of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (here after referred to as the Laboratory). However, this is the first year that the Contractor's fee is totally performance-based utilizing the same Critical Outcomes. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractor's performance for the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999, as required by Clauses entitled ''Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation'' and ''Performance Measures Review'' of the Contract DE-ACO6-76RL01830. Furthermore, it documents the distribution of the total available performance-based fee and the methodology set for determining the amount of fee earned by the Contractor as stipulated within the causes entitled ''Estimated Cost and Annual Fee,'' ''Total Available Fee'' and ''Allowable Costs and Fee.'' In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) and Richland Operations Office (RL) has defined four critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractor's performance-based evaluation and fee determination. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory.

  8. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as “minor” with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

  9. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. They also locate and identify sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consists of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY99 for stations in the HSN was 99.8%. There were 121 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year 1999. Fourteen triggers were local earthquakes; seven (50%) were in the Columbia River Basalt Group, no earthquakes occurred in the pre-basalt sediments, and seven (50%) were in the crystalline basement. One earthquake (7%) occurred near or along the Horn Rapids anticline, seven earthquakes (50%) occurred in a known swarm area, and six earthquakes (43%) were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer during the first quarter of FY99.

  10. Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

  11. Suppression of Stable Flies on Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    populations is sanitation. In confined animal facilities, a top priority should be to eliminate stable fly breeding sites as often as possible. To do this, remove and spread decomposing vegetation or bedding material that has become mixed with urine and feces... but in concert with other meth- ods, such as sanitation. Chemical control: If a stable fly problem persists, an insecticide can be used. Many compounds are available for suppressing adult and larval stable fly populations. Animals can be treated as needed...

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

  13. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

  14. Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terraqua, Inc. (Wauconda, WA)

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

  15. Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel Biennial Report, Fiscal Years 1993--1994. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year 1993, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (``the Panel``) handled 30 proceedings. In Fiscal Year 1994, the Panel handled 36 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report sets out the Panel`s caseload during the year and summarizes, highlight, and analyzes how the wide- ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel`s judges and licensing boards.

  16. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

  17. Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

  18. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earth¬quakes were classified as random events.

  19. Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the Hanford Seismic Network, there were 337 triggers during the third quarter of fiscal year 2005. Of these triggers, 20 were earthquakes within the Hanford Seismic Network. The largest earthquake within the Hanford Seismic Network was a magnitude 1.3 event May 25 near Vantage, Washington. During the third quarter, stratigraphically 17 (85%) events occurred in the Columbia River basalt (approximately 0-5 km), no events in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km), and three (15%) in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km). During the first quarter, geographically five (20%) earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 10 (50%) earthquakes were associated with a major geologic structure, and 5 (25%) were classified as random events.

  20. First quarter Hanford seismic report for fiscal year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EW uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 311 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twelve seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree}N latitude and 119--120{degree}W longitude; 2 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 1 was a quarry blast. Two earthquakes appear to be related to a major geologic structure, no earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 9 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2000.

  1. Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its con-tractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (E WRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 818 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Thirteen seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46-47{degree} N latitude and 119-120{degree} W longitude; 7 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 1 was an earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments, and 5 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Three earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 10 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the third quarter of FY 2000.

  2. Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 506 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twenty-seven seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree} N latitude and 119--120{degree} W longitude; 12 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 5 were quarry blasts. Three earthquakes appear to be related to geologic structures, eleven earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and seven earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the second quarter of FY 2000.

  3. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for Fiscal Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1997 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction continued in the 200-West Area to remove carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-vapor monitoring, and analysis and characterization of sediments sampled below a vadose-zone monitoring well. Source-term analyses for strontium-90 in 100-N Area vadose-zone sediments were performed using recent groundwater-monitoring data and knowledge of strontium`s ion-exchange properties. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1996 and June 1997. Water levels near the Columbia River increased during this period because the river stage was unusually high. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level.

  4. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Valenta, Michelle M.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the HSN, there were 477 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2001 on the data acquisition system. Of these triggers, 176 were earthquakes. Forty-five earthquakes were located in the HSN area; 1 earthquake occurred in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 43 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, and 1 was earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Geographically, 44 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 1 earthquake was on a major structure, and no earthquakes were classified as random occurrences. The Horse Heaven Hills earthquake swarm area recorded all but one event during the first quarter of FY 2001. The peak of the activity occurred over December 12th, 13th, and 14th when 35 events occurred. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2001.

  5. Waste Treatment Plant Support Program: Summaries of Reports Produced During Fiscal Years 1999-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeman, Gordon H.

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) being built on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will be the largest chemical processing plant in the United States. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) is the designer and constructor for the WTP. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has provided significant research and testing support to the WTP. This report provides a summary of reports developed initially under PNNL’s “1831” use agreement and later PNNL’s “1830” prime contract with DOE in support of the WTP. In March 2001, PNNL under its “1831” use agreement entered into a contract with BNI to support their research and testing activities. However, PNNL support to the WTP predates BNI involvement. Prior to March 2001, PNNL supported British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. in its role as overall designer and constructor. In February 2007, execution of PNNL’s support to the WTP was moved under its “1830” prime contract with DOE. Documents numbered “PNWD-XXXX” were issued under PNNL’s “1831” use agreement. Documents numbered “PNNL-XXXX” were issued under PNNL’s “1830” prime contract with DOE. The documents are sorted by fiscal year and categorized as follows: ? Characterization ? HLW (High Level Waste) ? Material Characterization ? Pretreatment ? Simulant Development ? Vitrification ? Waste Form Qualification. This report is intended to provide a compendium of reports issued by PNWD/PNNL in support of the Waste Treatment Plant. Copies of all reports can be obtained by clicking on http://www.pnl.gov/rpp-wtp/ and downloading the .pdf file(s) to your computer.

  6. Restoration Ecology Stable states vs. classic succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    #12;Wetland restoration goals #12;Wetland restoration goals Restoration of stream meanders ­ majorRestoration Ecology #12;Stable states vs. classic succession #12;Stable states vs. classic succession Beisner et al., 2003 #12;Restoration can be difficult if an ecosystem has moved to a new state

  7. Journal de la Socit Franaise de Statistique Spatial extremes: Max-stable processes at work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    and conditional simulation of max-stable processes. The paper ends with the modeling of extreme wind gustsSubmission Journal de la Société Française de Statistique Spatial extremes: Max-stable processes many developments to the functional extreme value theory have been made during the last decades

  8. Steel and Aluminum Energy Conservation and Technology Competitiveness Act of 1988: Annual report of the metals initiative for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report has been prepared for the President and Congress describing the activities carried out under the Steel and Aluminum Energy Conservation and Technology Competitiveness Act of 1988, commonly referred to as the Metals Initiative. The Act has the following purposes: (1) increase energy efficiency and enhance the competitiveness of the American steel, aluminum, and copper industries; and (2) continue research and development efforts begun under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program known as the Steel Initiative. These activities are detailed in a subsequent section. Other sections describe the appropriation history, the distribution of funds through fiscal year 1996, and the estimated funds necessary to continue projects through fiscal year 1997. The Metals Initiative supported four research and development projects with the U.S. Steel industry: (1) steel plant waste oxide recycling and resource recovery by smelting, (2) electrochemical dezincing of steel scrap, (3) rapid analysis of molten metals using laser-produced plasmas, and (4) advanced process control. There are three Metals Initiative projects with the aluminum industry: (1) evaluation of TiB2-G cathode components, (2) energy efficient pressure calciner, and (3) spray forming of aluminum. 1 tab.

  9. CIVIL ENGINEERING ACADEMY FUND FISCAL YEAR 2002 ACCOUNT NUMBER 4360-44-5897

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    CIVIL ENGINEERING ACADEMY FUND FISCAL YEAR 2002 ACCOUNT NUMBER 4360-44-5897 Fund Balance 09/28/03) REVENUES YEAR TO DATE (FY 2003) LESS EXPENDITURES Welch's Jewelry & Awards - Plaques for Academy Inductees United Supermarket - Academy Continental Breakfast 4/5/03 Postal Mailing Services Balance as of 04

  10. Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN 0° 120°E 150° 87°30' 88°00' N M0001Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program · U.S. Implementing Organization­M0004 180° ESO USIO IODP Phase 1 Drill Sites, Expeditions 301­312 #12;Integrated Ocean Drilling

  11. Contract 98, Appendix F self-assessment report for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert (Editor), Rich

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory internal assessment of Laboratory operational and administrative performance in key support functions for Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The report provides documentation of ongoing performance-based management and oversight processes required by the Department of Energy (DOE) to monitor, measure, and evaluate Berkeley Lab work.

  12. Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2008 Activities and Achievements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2008 Activities--Institute for Telecommunication Sciences In response to the: Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106 (FY) 2008. At the Department of Commerce, technology transfer is a significant part of the mission

  13. Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2011 Activities and Achievements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Annual Report on Technology Transfer: Approach and Plans, Fiscal Year 2011 Activities Pursuant to the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106-404) January 2012 #12;ii This page is intentionally left blank FOREWORD This report summarizes technology transfer activities

  14. Asignacin de terrenos fiscales para proyectos de generacin elctrica y su redefinicin como

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    Energía Eólica Superficie: 15.171 hectáreas Inversión aprox.: 7000 Millones US$ Plantas solares: Llano de Bienes Nacionales y Ministerio de Energía para reservar áreas para proyectos eólicos (2010, 2012 y 2013). Bases de procesos de licitación de terrenos fiscales para proyectos ERNC y de generación de energía

  15. Implementation of Section 1072 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice provides guidance for implementing the mandates of Section 1072 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008, commonly referred to as the Bond Amendment. Extended until 9-28-11 by DOE N 251.90 dated 9-28-10. Canceled by DOE O 472.2. Does not cancel other directives.

  16. Economic Contributions of the State University System of Florida in Fiscal Year 2009-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    1 Economic Contributions of the State University System of Florida in Fiscal Year 2009-10 SponsoredD, Thomas J. Stevens, PhD, and Rodney L. Clouser, PhD University of Florida, Food & Resource Economics for Economic Forecasting and Analysis March 8, 2012 #12;2 Table of Contents Executive Summary

  17. Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to fishery stock assessment modeling? What is the suitability of the stock assessment models employed, taking1 Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014 Stock Assessment of this review is to examine and evaluate the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's (SEFSC) fishery stock

  18. Fiscal Sustainability and Retirement Security: A Reform Proposal for the Illinois State Universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    situation: health care and retirement. First, Medicaid expenditures, already a substantial share of state1 Fiscal Sustainability and Retirement Security: A Reform Proposal for the Illinois State errors, are those of the authors alone. I.The Urgent Need for Reform Public pension reform is a national

  19. Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumer, Kagan

    Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant Mitchell Colby University 204 Rogers Hall Corvallis, OR 97331 kagan.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT As power plants become power plant, showing that system parameters may be accurately measured and tracked more effectively than

  20. University Budget System Reports Training Guide Prepared by Budget Management and Fiscal Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 University Budget System Reports Training Guide Prepared by Budget Management and Fiscal Services 345 Strong Hall * 785-864-3136 http://www.budget.ku.edu/ budgetoffice@ku.edu Training Guide Last Updated: November 2010 Contents: I. Description of UBUD II. Budgets, Funds, Appropriations, Cost Centers

  1. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 20042009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2004­2009 (Revised March 2004) Statement of the Board The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the U-level radioactive waste. The Act also established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board as an indepen dent

  2. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Fiscal Year 2002-2007 Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Fiscal Year 2002-2007 Strategic Plan Statement of the Chairman The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board was established of Energy Mission The Board's mission, established in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA

  3. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 20042009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2004­2009 (Revised March 2004) Statement of the Board The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the U-level radioactive waste. The Act also established the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board as an independent

  4. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 20032008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix G Appendix G U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2003­2008 Statement of the Chairman The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the U.S. Department as the location of a permanent repository for dis posing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  5. Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

  6. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communi¬cations procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the site’s seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

  7. Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, fourteen local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the third quarter (May 18, 2008 - magnitude 3.7 Mc) was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, five earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events. The largest event recorded by the network during the third quarter occurred on May 18 (magnitude 3.7 Mc) and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. This earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded in the 46-47 N. latitude / 119-120 W. longitude sector since 1975. The May 18 event, not reported as being felt on the Hanford site or causing any damage, was communicated to the PNNL Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the site’s seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and the 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 12 times larger than the peak acceleration (0.17%) observed at the 300 Area SMA station and no action was required.

  8. Hanford Tanks Initiative fiscal year 1997 retrieval technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tanks Initiative was established in 1996 to address a range of retrieval and closure issues associated with radioactive and hazardous waste stored in Hanford`s single shell tanks (SSTs). One of HTI`s retrieval goals is to ``Successfully demonstrate technology(s) that provide expanded capabilities beyond past practice sluicing and are extensible to retrieve waste from other SSTS.`` Specifically, HTI is to address ``Alternative technologies to past practice sluicing`` ... that can ... ``successfully remove the hard heel from a sluiced tank or to remove waste from a leaking SST`` (HTI Mission Analysis). During fiscal year 1997, the project contracted with seven commercial vendor teams to demonstrate retrieval technologies using waste simulants. These tests were conducted in two series: three integrated tests (IT) were completed in January 1997, and four more comprehensive Alternative Technology Retrieval Demonstrations (ARTD) were completed in July 1997. The goal of this testing was to address issues to minimize the risk, uncertainties, and ultimately the overall cost of removing waste from the SSTS. Retrieval technologies can be separated into three tracks based on how the tools would be deployed in the tank: globally (e.g., sluicing) or using vehicles or robotic manipulators. Accordingly, the HTI tests included an advanced sluicer (Track 1: global systems), two different vehicles (Track 2: vehicle based systems), and three unique manipulators (Track 3: arm-based systems), each deploying a wide range of dislodging tools and conveyance systems. Each industry team produced a system description as envisioned for actual retrieval and a list of issues that could prevent using the described system; defined the tests to resolve the issues; performed the test; and reported the results, lessons learned, and state of issue resolution. These test reports are cited in this document, listed in the reference section, and summarized in the appendices. This report analyzes the retrieval testing issues and describes what has been learned and issues that need further resolution. As such, it can serve as a guide to additional testing that must be performed before the systems are used in-tank. The major issues discussed are tank access, deployment, mining strategy, waste retrieval, liquid scavenging (liquid usage), maneuverability, positioning, static and dynamic performance, remote operations, reliability, availability, maintenance, tank safety, and cost.

  9. Superconductivity program for electric systems, Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, annual progress report for fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, J.O.; Newnam, B.E. [eds.; Peterson, D.E.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has undergone tremendous progress during the past year. Kilometer tape lengths and associated magnets based on BSCCO materials are now commercially available from several industrial partners. Superconducting properties in the exciting YBCO coated conductors continue to be improved over longer lengths. The Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI) projects to develop HTS fault current limiters and transmission cables have demonstrated that HTS prototype applications can be produced successfully with properties appropriate for commercial applications. Research and development activities at LANL related to the HTS program for Fiscal Year 1997 are collected in this report. LANL continues to support further development of Bi2223 and Bi2212 tapes in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Oxford Superconductivity Technology, Inc. (OSTI), respectively. The tape processing studies involving novel thermal treatments and microstructural characterization have assisted these companies in commercializing these materials. The research on second-generation YBCO-coated conductors produced by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) over buffer template layers produced by ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) continues to lead the world. The applied physics studies of magnetic flux pinning by proton and heavy ion bombardment of BSCCO and YBCO tapes have provided many insights into improving the behavior of these materials in magnetic fields. Sections 4 to 7 of this report contain a list of 29 referred publications and 15 conference abstracts, a list of patent and license activities, and a comprehensive list of collaborative agreements in progress and completed.

  10. Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Shao, Yuyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rechargeable Mg batteries are attractive energy storage systems and could bring cost-effective energy solutions. Currently, however, no practical cathode current collectors that can withstand high voltages in Mg2+ electrolytes has been identified and therefore cathode research is greatly hindered. Here we identified that two metals, Mo and W, are electrochemically stable through formation of surface passive layers. The presented results could have significant impacts on the developments of high voltage Mg batteries.

  11. Theoretical construction of stable traversable wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown in this paper that it is possible, at least in principle, to construct a traversable wormhole that is stable to linearized radial perturbations by specifying relatively simple conditions on the shape and redshift functions.

  12. Modeling and Computational Strategies for Optimal Development Planning of Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Modeling and Computational Strategies for Optimal Development Planning of Offshore Oilfields for offshore oil and gas fields as a basis to include the generic fiscal rules with ringfencing provisions-integer programming. 1 Introduction Offshore oil and gas field development planning has received significant attention

  13. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  14. An Autoethnography of a First-Time School District Superintendent: Complicated by Issues of Race, Gender and Persistent Fiscal Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dailey, Ardella Jones

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    schools that met schoolwide 2005-06 API growth targets butthan 3% reserve for the 2005-06 fiscal year. The HighlightsIn both 2004-05 and 2005-06, three elementary schools have

  15. Effectiveness and Impacts of Ecological Fiscal Transfers and Payments for Environmental Services: A Case Study of Shengnongjia National Nature Reserve 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingmei

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    .e. Ecological Fiscal Transfers (EFT) and Payments for Environmental Services (PES), in achieving conservation effectiveness and their economic and social impacts, through a case study on the Shengnongjia National Nature Reserve in China. It is found...

  16. Paths toward the modern fiscal state : England (1642-1752), Japan (1868-1895), and China (1850-1911)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wenkai

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the rise of the modem fiscal state, which enabled the state to use centrally collected revenues from indirect taxes to mobilize financial resources either through long-term borrowing or issuing ...

  17. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J. [and others

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  20. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 81 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2010. Sixty-five of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter is a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, and 2009d). Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with only 1 event in the 2.0-3.0 range; the maximum magnitude event (2.5 Mc) occurred on December 22 at depth 2.1 km. The average depth of the Wooded Island events during the quarter was 1.4 km with a maximum depth estimated at 3.1 km. This placed the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. The Hanford SMA network was triggered several times by these events and the SMA recordings are discussed in section 6.0. During the last year some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the swarm area and individuals living directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. Strong motion accelerometer (SMA) units installed directly above the swarm area at ground surface measured peak ground accelerations approaching 15% g, the largest values recorded at Hanford. This corresponds to strong shaking of the ground, consistent with what people in the local area have reported. However, the duration and magnitude of these swarm events should not result in any structural damage to facilities. The USGS performed a geophysical survey using satellite interferometry that detected approximately 1 inch uplift in surface deformation along an east-west transect within the swarm area. The uplift is thought to be caused by the release of pressure that has built up in sedimentary layers, cracking the brittle basalt layers with the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG) and causing the earthquakes. Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988 but not with SMA readings or satellite imagery. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. The Wooded Island swarm, due its location and the limited magnitude of the events, does not appear to pose any significant risk to Hanford waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will persist or increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity. Outside of the Wooded Island swarm, sixteen earthquakes were recorded, all minor events. Seven earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments and nine earthquakes at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, seven earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and nine earthquakes were classified as random events.

  1. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  2. Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping a

  3. Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping amagnetic

  4. Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005...

  5. Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

  6. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices Fact 766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices All energy prices...

  7. Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaeh, R.A.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

  8. Transversely stable soliton trains in photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Jianke [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the existence of transversely stable soliton trains in optics. These stable soliton trains are found in two-dimensional square photonic lattices when they bifurcate from X-symmetry points with saddle-shaped diffraction inside the first Bloch band and their amplitudes are above a certain threshold. We also show that soliton trains with low amplitudes or bifurcated from edges of the first Bloch band ({Gamma} and M points) still suffer transverse instability. These results are obtained in the continuous lattice model and are further corroborated by the discrete model.

  9. THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B202 THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2002. The dual objective of the fusion theory program at General Atomics (GA) is to significantly advance the scientific understanding of the physics of fusion plasmas and to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments. The program plan is aimed at contributing significantly to the Fusion Energy Science and the Tokamak Concept Improvement goals of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

  10. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  11. Hanford Seismic Annual Report and Fourth Quarter Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AC Rohay; DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network. (EWRN) consist of 40 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. A major reconfiguration of the HSN was initiated at the end of this quarter and the results will be reported in the first quarter report for next fiscal year (FY2000). For the HSN, there were 390 triggers during the fourth quarter of fiscal year(FY) 1999 on the primary recording system. With the implementation of dual backup systems during the second quarter of the fiscal year and an overall increase observed in sensitivity, a total of 1632 triggers were examined, identified, and processed during this fiscal year. During the fourth quarter, 24 seismic events were located by the HSN within the reporting region of 46 degrees to 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees to 120 degrees west longitude 9 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 10 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement; and 2 were quarry blasts. One earthquake appears to be related to a major geologic structure, 14 earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 7 earthquakes were random occurrences.

  12. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw's Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements.

  13. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements. 32 figs.

  14. Stable ideals and Arf rings.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a regular element of AI (Proposition 1.1) it follows that aAI=IAI. Conversely if wAI =IA.' and I" is stable, i. e. InAr =1", then r1" = rI"AI= I"(IAI) = 1"“, proving (i) (of.

  15. National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Development Report on Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement DOE Office of Environmental Management Project and Contract Management Improvement Timeline...

  16. Stable levitation and dynamics of ice particles at low pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Kowalski; Bernard Xie; Colin V. Parker; Cheng Chin

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate stable levitation and trapping of ice particles of 30~200 micon at low background gas pressures in the presence of a temperature gradient. The thermophoretic force levitates the particles, which have long lifetimes of over an hour. The equilibrium position depends on the background pressure and temperature gradient, which is consistent with theoretical expectations. Furthermore, we investigate interesting launching and merging dynamics of the levitated particles, as well as the development of instability at high background pressures. Our system provides a robust platform to investigate the aggregation of floating ice particles in air, and potentially chemical and biological processes in a microgravity environment.

  17. Approach to inherently stable interfaces for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Kupp, E.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shanmugham, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually all ceramic matrix composites require and interface coating between the fibers and matrix to achieve the desired mechanical performance. To date, the most effective interface materials for non- oxide matrix composites have been carbon and boron nitride. They are, however, susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperatures, and thus under many envisioned operating environments they will fail, possibly allowing oxidation of the fibers as well, adversely affecting mechanical behavior. Current efforts are directed toward developing stable interface coating, which include oxides and silicon carbide with appropriate thermomechanical properties.

  18. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents presents a programmatic overview and program element plan summaries for conceptual design and assessment; physics; computation and modeling; system engineering science and technology; electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components; chemistry and materials; special nuclear materials, tritium, and explosives.

  19. University of California Directed Research and Development (UCDRD) Activities for Fiscal Year 1997`

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, J.

    1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong magnetic fields are a powerful tool for studying physical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures. The pulsed magnet facilities at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have provided an unique opportunity to explore new correlated electronic phases of quantum Hall devices in ultra-high magnetic fields. We have performed both magneto-transport and photoluminescence experiments in the pulsed magnet for fields up to 50 T and temperatures down to 500 mK to study several types of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. The findings of our exploratory experiments are summarized.

  20. Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Proposal Submittal Instructions for Fiscal Year 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor Technology Subcommittee of NEAC MujidDepartmentof Nuclear

  1. A review of stable water isotopeA review of stable water isotope modellingmodelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Christophe "Kristof"

    fractionation · Kinetic fractionation 2. Modelling the stable water isotope cycle · Rayleigh distillation model Institution of Oceanography) Harald SODEMANN (Norwegian Institute for Air Research) Kristof 18Ovapour=-40 18Oocean=0 18Osnow=-3018Orain=-2 Equilibrium fractionationEquilibrium fractionation

  2. Stable, free-standing Ge nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Liao, C.Y.; Yi, D.O.; Beeman, J.W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Yu, K.M.; Zakharov, D.N.; Ager III, J.W.; Chrzan,D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-standing Ge nanocrystals that are stable under ambient conditions have been synthesized in a two-step process. First, nanocrystals with a mean diameter of 5 nm are grown in amorphous SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. The oxide matrix is then removed by selective etching in diluted HF to obtain free-standing nanocrystals on a Si wafer. After etching, nanocrystals are retained on the surface and the size distribution is not significantly altered. Free-standing nanocrystals are stable under ambient atmospheric conditions, suggesting formation of a self-limiting native oxide layer. For free-standing as opposed to embedded Ge nanocrystals, an additional amorphous-like contribution to the Raman spectrum is observed and is assigned to surface reconstruction-induced disordering of near-surface atoms.

  3. Fiscal year 1997 final report for task plan SR-16WT-31 task B, vitrification of ion exchange material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrara, D.; Andrews, M.K.; Harbour, J.R.; Fellinger, T.L.; Herman, D.T.; Marshall, K.M.; Workman, P.J.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year 1997, the Department of Energy Tanks Focus Area (TFA) funded the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to develop and demonstrate the vitrification of a CST ion exchange material loaded with radioactive cesium from one of the Melton Valley Storage Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRTC developed a patent-pending glass formulation that can be used to vitrify CST sorbent producing a quality borosilicate glass waste form. SRTC demonstrated this formulation by vitrifying the radioactive CST in the SRTC shielded cells melter.In addition to the formulation developed for vitrification of the `CST-only` glass waste form, SRTC also developed formulations for vitrification of CST coupled with High-Level Waste (HLW) sludges. A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) coupled feed formulation has been developed with up to 10 weight percent CST and 28 weight percent DWPF sludge oxides. A coupled Hanford formulation has also been developed for producing quality glass waste forms with up to 10 weight percent CST and 45 weight percent Hanford sludge oxides. The significant accomplishments of this project were then development of CST-only glass formulations incorporating up to 65 weight-percent CST, development of techniques for delivering a slurry or dry feed to a joule-heated melter, demonstration of a CST-only glass formulation in a continuous melter operation, demonstration of compliance with the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), development of CST-sludge glass formulations incorporating up to 10 weight percent CST and 28 weight percent DWPF sludges oxides, demonstration of CST-sludge glass formulations using radioactive sludge and radioactive CST, development of CST-sludge glass formulations incorporating up to 10 weight percent CST and 45 weight percent. All commitments made to the TFA have been met as indicated by the associated milestones. Milestones and the month in which they were completed: Initiate Immobilization of CST in Glass (completed 8/97); Demonstrate that Sludge-CST Glass Satisfied PC Specs in WAPS (completed 9/97); Determine Process Parameters of Sludge-CST Glass (completed 8/97); Demonstrate that CST-Only Glass Satisfied PC Specs in WAPS (completed 9/97); Determine Process Parameters of CST-Only Glass (completed 9/97). The results for Task B of Task Plan SR-16WT-31 have been documented in reports that have been included as attachments. The following is a summary of the attachments from the CST vitrification project.

  4. Effect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    temperature and the abundance of heavy isotopes of water found in water vapor and precipitation as functionsEffect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice fractionation model is developed to investigate postdepositional modification of stable isotopes of water

  5. Charge Radii of beta-Stable Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Nie

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work it was shown that the radius of nucleus R is determined by the alpha-cluster structure and can be estimated on the number of alpha-clusters disregarding to the number of excess neutrons. A hypothesis also was made that the radius R_m of a beta-stable isotope, which is actually measured at electron scattering experiments, is determined by the volume occupied by the matter of the core plus the volume occupied by the peripheral alpha-clusters. In this paper it is shown that the condition R_m = R restricts the number of excess neutrons filling the core to provide the beta-stability. The number of peripheral clusters can vary from 1 to 5 and the value of R for heavy nuclei almost do not change, whereas the number of excess neutrons should change with the number of peripheral clusters to get the value of R_m close to R. It can explain the path of the beta-stability and its width. The radii R_m of the stable isotopes with 12 =< Z =< 83 and the alpha-decay isotopes with 84 =< Z =< 116 that are stable to beta-decay have been calculated.

  6. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  7. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, J.L.

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: (1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and (2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

  8. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  9. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Clark D.; Bennett, Sheila Q.

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998 and seven in fiscal year 1999.(a) All of the fiscal year 1996 awards have been completed and the Principal Investigators are writing final reports, so their summaries will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  10. Center for Wood Utilization Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , Asia, and Latin America. A business plan was developed to capture 1% of the $2.5 billion h manufacturing; and (c) lead to more efficient use of renewable wood-based materials for the benefit of Americans. Renewable wood is essential to human existence. Wood utilization research is critical to national needs

  11. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Laney

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or economical.

  12. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or economical.

  13. Summary of student scenarios: 2020 Vision project, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, K.W.; Munoz, A.; Scott, K.P.; Rinne, R.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Issues Thinking: 2020 Vision project introduces students and teaches to national security issues through the techniques of scenario building, and engages them in an interactive process of creating scenarios relevant to the Department of Energy, Defense Programs (DOE/DP). Starting with the world as it is today, teams of students develop a series of scenarios on international developments over the next 25 years under various circumstances. This report identifies recurrent themes in the student`s scenarios, lists creative ways the students presented their scenarios, compares and contrasts the program`s FY97 results with FY96 results, identifies the benefits of the program, and offers a glimpse of Sandia`s future plans for the 2020 Vision project.

  14. Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

  15. SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

    1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action fiscal year 1992 roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is funded and managed as two separate projects: Surface remediation (UMTRA-S) and Groundwater compliance (UMTRA-G). Surface remediation is a Major System Acquisition and has been completed at 10 sites, 7 sites are under construction, and 7 sites are in the planning stage. The planning stages of the UMTRA-G Project, a major project, began in April 1991. A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) has been started. Site characterization work and baseline risk assessment will begin FY 1993. Thus, the UMTRA-S Project is a mature and ongoing program with the roles of various organizations well defined, while the UMTRA-G Project is still being formulated and the interfaces between the DOE, states and tribes, and the EPA are being established. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) directed that all projects under its authority develop roadmaps for their activities. The UMTRA Project Roadmap was developed by the UMTRA Project Office with input from the TAC, RAC, the GJPO, and assistance from SAIC. A single roadmap has been prepared for both the UMTRA-S and UMTRA-G Projects. This was deemed appropriate due to the close relationship between the projects and to the fact that the same Government and contractor personnel are preparing the roadmaps. Roadmap development is a planning process that focuses on issue identification, root-cause analysis, and issues resolution. The methodology is divided into three phases: assessment, analysis, and issues resolution.

  17. Solar thermal program summary: Volume 1, Overview, fiscal year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the solar thermal program is to improve overall solar thermal systems performance and provide cost-effective energy options that are strategically secure and environmentally benign. Major research activities include energy collection technology,energy conversion technology, and systems and applications technology for both CR and DR systems. This research is being conducted through research laboratories in close coordination with the solar thermal industry, utilities companies, and universities. The Solar Thermal Technology Program is pursuing the development of critical components and subsystems for improved energy collection and conversion devices. This development follows two basic paths: for CR systems, critical components include stretched membrane heliostats, direct absorption receivers (DARs), and transport subsystems for molten salt heat transfer fluids. These components offer the potential for a significant reduction in system costs; and for DR systems, critical components include stretched membrane dishes, reflux receivers, and Stirling engines. These components will significantly increase system reliability and efficiency, which will reduce costs. The major thrust of the program is to provide electric power. However, there is an increasing interest in the use of concentrated solar energy for applications such as detoxifying hazardous wastes and developing high-value transportable fuels. These potential uses of highly concentrated solar energy still require additional experiments to prove concept feasibility. The program goal of economically competitive energy reduction from solar thermal systems is being cooperatively addressed by industry and government.

  18. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Annual Report for Fiscal Year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. Table 1 lists significant events in the history of use of geothermal energy in the U.S., starting in1884. That is useful for tracking which Federal departments and agencies managed aspects of this work over time. Table 2 gives a complete accounting for all Federal outlays for geothermal energy development for FY 1979 - 1989, including non-DOE outlays. Table 3 shows the status of the U.S. Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program at end of FY 1989: of the $500 million authorized, $285 million was committed to eight projects, and about $40 million had been paid out on project defaults. An additional $101 million had been repaid by the borrowers. (DJE 2005)

  19. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, manages archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological, and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. The SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research, and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1994.

  20. Fiscal Year 2014 GreenBuy Award Winners Announced | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 TotalFinalJobs Findof Energyof79012Fiscal

  1. Fiscal Year 2013 Phase II (Release 2) Awardee List | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department ofDistributionFire Protection ProgramDepartment ofFiscal Year

  2. Fiscal Year's (FY) 2011 and 2012 Balanced Scorecard Guidance for Federal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport Maine WindFLASH2011-6-OPAMFY2012Final FY 2009First U.S.Fiscal Year 2013Sites

  3. Solid Waste Program Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS 1.2.1, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan for the Solid Waste Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Solid Waste Program treats, stores, and disposes of a wide variety of solid wastes consisting of radioactive, nonradioactive and hazardous material types. Solid waste types are typically classified as transuranic waste, low-level radioactive waste, low-level mixed waste, and non-radioactive hazardous waste. This report describes the mission, goals and program strategies for the Solid Waste Program for fiscal year 1996 and beyond.

  4. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

    1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico, second only to the activities of the U.S. Department of Defense. The agency's far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both the Department and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 50 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE's impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as Federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. The information on which the models are based is updated periodically to ensure the most accurate depiction possible of the economy for the period of reference. For this report, the reference periods are Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997), and FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998). Total impact represents both direct and indirect impacts (resending by business), including induced (resending by households) effects. The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models uniquely developed for New Mexico. This report includes seven main sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Profile of DOE Activities in New Mexico; (3) DOE Expenditure Patterns; (4) Measuring DOE/New Mexico's Economic Impact: (5) Technology Transfer within the Federal Labs funded by DOE/New Mexico; (6) Glossary of Terms; and (7) Technical Appendix containing a description of the model.

  5. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Temple, J. [Temple (John), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico. The agency`s far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both DOE and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 50 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE`s impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. The information on which the models are based is updated periodically to ensure the most accurate depiction possible of the economy for the period of reference. For this report, the reference periods are Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 and FY 1997. Total impacts represents both direct and indirect impacts (respending by business), including induced (respending by households) effects. The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models uniquely developed for New Mexico. This report includes seven main sections: (1) introduction; (2) profile of DOE activities in New Mexico; (3) DOE expenditure patterns; (4) measuring DOE/New Mexico`s economic impact; (5) technology transfer within the federal labs funded by DOE/New Mexico; (6) glossary of terms; and (7) technical appendix containing a description of the model. 9 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. The AMTEX Partnership. Second quarter report, Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemon, D.K.; Quisenberry, R.K. [AMTEX Partnership (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMTEX Partnership{trademark} is a collaborative research and development program among the US Integrated Textile Industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), the national laboratories, other federal agencies and laboratories, and universities. The goal of AMTEX is to strengthen the competitiveness of this vital industry, thereby reserving and creating US jobs. The operations and program management of the AMTEX Partnership is provided by the Program Office. This report is produced by the Program Office on a quarterly basis and provides information on the progress, operations, and project management of the partnership.

  7. Solar thermal energy contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the national Solar Thermal Technology Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of solar thermal technology as an energy option for the United States. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name. Amount of funding milestones are listed.

  8. Thermionic Technology Program, fiscal year 1986: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, V.P.; Dunlay, J.B.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1986, the Thermionic Technology Program at Thermo Electron Corporation concentrated on advancing the development of cermet sheath insulators and additive converters. Both development efforts were based on the thermionic technology established by thermionic reactor programs during the 1960's and early 1970's. Improved sheath insulators and additive converters were fabricated during FY 1986 and delivered to Rasor Associates Incorporated, for extensive testing and evaluation. The most promising cermet fabrication process changed from dry ceramic powder coating of niobium spherical particles to the use of water-based slurries of ceramic powder and fine, irregularly shaped, niobium powder. Slurry processing is much more controlled and reproducible. The fabrication of crack-free, fully dense yttria alumina garnet (YAG) sheath insulator trilayers remains to be accomplished. Measurements of the thermal expansion of YAG indicate that the expansion mismatch with niobium (particularly from 1300 to 1500 C) may cause cracking. Limited evidence also suggests that high-temperature (1500 C and higher) reactions between YAG and niobium may also contribute to cracking. Alternative fabrication schedules need to be explored to minimize these adverse high-temperature effects. Preliminary tests indicate that alternative ceramics, such as oxide composites and aluminum oxynitride (ALON), show promise as improved sheath insulators. 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Energy Division progress report, fiscal years 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, C.I. [ed.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At ORNL, the Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this progress report for FY 1994 and FY 1995. The Division`s expenditures in FY 1995 totaled 44.9 million. Sixty percent of the divisions work was supported by the US DOE. Other significant sponsors include the US DOT, the US DOD, other federal agencies, and some private organizations. The Division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation systems, and (3) energy use and delivery technologies. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and transportation analysis. Transportation systems research seeks to improve the quality of both civilian and military transportation efforts. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on building equipment, building envelopes, (walls, roofs, attics, and materials), improvement of energy efficiency in buildings, and electric power systems.

  10. Development Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

  11. Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Report, Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernowski, John

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program ensures that Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is implemented institutionally and by all divisions. The Self-Assessment Program, managed by the Office of Contract Assurance (OCA), provides for an internal evaluation of all ES&H programs and systems at LBNL. The functions of the program are to ensure that work is conducted safely, and with minimal negative impact to workers, the public, and the environment. The Self-Assessment Program is also the mechanism used to institute continuous improvements to the Laboratory's ES&H programs. The program is described in LBNL/PUB 5344, Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Program and is composed of four distinct assessments: the Division Self-Assessment, the Management of Environment, Safety, and Health (MESH) review, ES&H Technical Assurance, and the Appendix B Self-Assessment. The Division Self-Assessment uses the five core functions and seven guiding principles of ISM as the basis of evaluation. Metrics are created to measure performance in fulfilling ISM core functions and guiding principles, as well as promoting compliance with applicable regulations. The five core functions of ISM are as follows: (1) Define the Scope of Work; (2) Identify and Analyze Hazards; (3) Control the Hazards; (4) Perform the Work; and (5) Feedback and Improvement. The seven guiding principles of ISM are as follows: (1) Line Management Responsibility for ES&H; (2) Clear Roles and Responsibilities; (3) Competence Commensurate with Responsibilities; (4) Balanced Priorities; (5) Identification of ES&H Standards and Requirements; (6) Hazard Controls Tailored to the Work Performed; and (7) Operations Authorization. Performance indicators are developed by consensus with OCA, representatives from each division, and Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Division program managers. Line management of each division performs the Division Self-Assessment annually. The primary focus of the review is workplace safety. The MESH review is an evaluation of division management of ES&H in its research and operations, focusing on implementation and effectiveness of the division's ISM plan. It is a peer review performed by members of the LBNL Safety Review Committee (SRC), with staff support from OCA. Each division receives a MESH review every two to four years, depending on the results of the previous review. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs and processes. The intent of ES&H Technical Assurance assessments is to provide assurance that ES&H programs and processes comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented by LBNL divisions. The Appendix B Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) requires that LBNL sustain and enhance the effectiveness of integrated safety, health, and environmental protection through a strong and well-deployed system. Information required for Appendix B is provided by EH&S Division functional managers. The annual Appendix B report is submitted at the close of the fiscal year. This assessment is the Department of Energy's (DOE) primary mechanism for evaluating LBNL's contract performance in ISM.

  12. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  13. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  14. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph (Burnt Hills, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Deshpande, Anirudha Rajendra (Twinsburg, OH); Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev (Sofia, BG)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphors includes providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof. A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor composition radiationally coupled to the light source, and which includes a color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor.

  15. Selection and Traceability of Parameters To Support Hanford-Specific RESRAD Analyses -- Fiscal Year 2008 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal years 2007 and 2008, the Hanford Site Groundwater Remediation Project, formerly managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., requested the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the development and initial implementation of a strategy to establish and maintain, under configuration control, a set of Hanford-specific flow and transport parameter estimates that can be used to support Hanford Site assessments. This document provides a summary of those efforts, culminating in a set of best-estimate Hanford-specific parameters for use in place of the default parameters used in the RESRAD code. The RESRAD code is a computer model designed to estimate radiation doses and risks from RESidual RADioactive materials. The long-term goals of the PNNL work are to improve the consistency, defensibility, and traceability of parameters and their ranges of variability, and to ensure a sound basis for assigning parameters for flow and transport models in the code. The strategy was to start by identifying the existing parameter data sets most recently used in site assessments, documenting these parameter data sets and the raw data sets on which they were based, and using the existing parameter sets to define best-estimate parameters for use in the RESRAD code. The Hanford-specific assessment parameters compiled for use in RESRAD are traceable back to the professional judgment of the authors of published documents. Within the references, parameters are often not directly traceable back to the raw data and analytical approaches used to derive the assessment parameters. Future activities will work to continuously improve the defensibility and traceability of the parameter data sets and to address limitations and technical issues associated with the existing assessment parameter data sets.

  16. National Center for Atmospheric Research annual report, fiscal year 1991. Report for 1 October 1990-30 September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, L.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) annual report for fiscal year 1991 is presented. NCAR's projects for the period included investigations of air pollution from the oil well fires in Kuwait, a solar eclipse, thunderstorms in central Florida, the El Nino current, greenhouse processes, and upper atmosphere phenomena.

  17. FISCAL YEAR 2015 B U D G E T E S T I M A T E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    to improve the quality of life on our home planet 2 #12;2015 Budget Highlights Provides the necessary planet and the Sun. By the end of FY 2015, NASA will have launched an unprecedented five Earth scienceFISCAL YEAR 2015 B U D G E T E S T I M A T E S 1 #12;Strategic Plan Expand the frontiers

  18. Option Pricing with Levy-Stable Processes Generated by Levy-Stable Integrated Variance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Cartea1 and Sam Howison2 1 Birkbeck, University of London 2 Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford hypothesis, stochastic volatil- ity, -stable processes, option pricing, time-changed Brownian motion. We of the underlying stochastic processes used in the financial literature were based on Brownian motion, modelling

  19. FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

  20. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

  1. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  2. Preparation of stable crude oil transport emulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoli, A.A.; Hamshar, J.A.; Olah, A.M.; Riley, C.J.; Rimmer, D.P.

    1988-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing an oil-in-water emulsion for pipeline transmission is described comprising: (a) shearing and mixing statically, without any dynamic shearing and mixing preceding or following the shearing and mixing statically, a hydrocarbon with an emulsifying composition comprising water and a minor amount of an emulsifying agent at a temperature of from about 100/sup 0/F. to about 200/sup 0/F. to form an oil-in-water emulsion having a viscosity sufficiently low for pipeline transmission, wherein the amount of water in the oil-in-water emulsion is from about 15% to about 60% by weight, and wherein the emulsifying agent is used in an amount sufficient to assist in the formation of the oil-in-water emulsion that is sufficiently stable for pipeline transmission; and wherein the emulsifying agent comprises about 50 percent by weight of an ethoxylated nonyl phenol compound.

  3. Stable quarks of the 4th family?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belotsky; M. Khlopov; K. Shibaev

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Existence of metastable quarks of new generation can be embedded into phenomenology of heterotic string together with new long range interaction, which only this new generation possesses. We discuss primordial quark production in the early Universe, their successive cosmological evolution and astrophysical effects, as well as possible production in present or future accelerators. In case of a charge symmetry of 4th generation quarks in Universe, they can be stored in neutral mesons, doubly positively charged baryons, while all the doubly negatively charged "baryons" are combined with He-4 into neutral nucleus-size atom-like states. The existence of all these anomalous stable particles may escape present experimental limits, being close to present and future experimental test. Due to the nuclear binding with He-4 primordial lightest baryons of the 4th generation with charge +1 can also escape the experimental upper limits on anomalous isotopes of hydrogen, being compatible with upper limits on anomalous lithium. While 4th quark hadrons are rare, their presence may be nearly detectable in cosmic rays, muon and neutrino fluxes and cosmic electromagnetic spectra. In case of charge asymmetry, a nontrivial solution for the problem of dark matter (DM) can be provided by excessive (meta)stable anti-up quarks of 4th generation, bound with He-4 in specific nuclear-interacting form of dark matter. Such candidate to DM is surprisingly close to Warm Dark Matter by its role in large scale structure formation. It catalyzes primordial heavy element production in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and new types of nuclear transformations around us.

  4. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project.

  6. Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project.

  7. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  8. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy continued to operate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California and Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 in Wyoming through its contractors. In addition, natural gas operations were conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3. All productive acreage owned by the Government at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 in California was produced under lease to private companies. The locations of all six Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves are shown in a figure. Under the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976, production was originally authorized for six years, and based on findings of national interest, the President was authorized to extend production in three-year increments. President Reagan exercised this authority three times (in 1981, 1984, and 1987) and President Bush authorized extended production once (in 1990). President Clinton exercised this authority in 1993 and again in October 1996; production is presently authorized through April 5, 2000. 4 figs. 30 tabs.

  9. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides `execution year` work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy fiscal year 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Government Management Reform Act and the Government Performance and Results Act both have the objective of ensuring that Federal government agencies are accountable to American taxpayers. This report provides a clear accounting of the return on the investment entrusted to the Department of Energy. Unlike previous annual reports prepared by the Department, this report is fashioned along the lines of a corporate report to the shareholders. Not only does this report contain audited financial statements for the fiscal year but it also describes what the shareholders, American taxpayers, received in the way of services and contributions to the important National goals this Administration and the Department have promised to provide. This report provides a progress report on how the Department is serving the country and how they are doing it for much lower cost.

  11. carolina development update | march 2011 New commitments to date: $198,667,196

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffay, Kevin

    complete: 67% FiScal Year '11 development neWS national college advising corps receives social innovation fund grant The National College Advising Corps has received a $1.5 million Social Innovation Fund grant-private partnership that leverages each dollar contributed through the Social Innovation Fund at the Corporation

  12. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  13. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Deshpande, Anirundha Rajendra; Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor material radiationally coupled to the light source. The phosphor material includes a color-stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor prepared by a process including providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof.

  14. Energy stable schemes and numerical simulations of two phase ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Energy stable schemes and numerical simulations of two phase complex fluids by the phase-field method Abstact: We present an energetic variational ...

  15. Efficient energy stable schemes with spectral discretization in space ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct energy stable schemes for the time discretization of the highly nonlinear ... shape) in order to achieve a well-defined energy for the system.

  16. The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy federally funded national security laboratory that uses engineering and science to ensure the security of the Nation. SNL provides scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs in nuclear weapons and related defense systems, energy security, and environmental integrity. SNL works in partnerships with universities and industry to enhance their mission and transfer technology that will address emerging national challenges for both government and industry. For several years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output (I/O) model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico. Caution should be exercised when comparing economic impacts between fiscal years prior to this report. The I/O model was rebased for FY 1998. The fringe benefits coefficients have been updated for the FY 1996 and FY 1997 economic impacts analysis. Prior to FY 1993 two different I/O base models were used to estimate the impacts. New technical information was released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Department of Commerce in 1991 and in 1994 and was incorporated in FY 1991, FY 1993, and FY 1994 I/O models. Also in 1993, the state and local tax coefficients and expenditure patterns were updated from a 1986 study for the FY 1992 report. Further details about the input-output model can be found in ''The Economic Impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico--FY 1998'' report by Lansford, et al. (1999). For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998) and includes two major impact analyses: The impact of SNL activities on Central New Mexico and the economic impacts of SNL on the state of New Mexico. For purposes of this report, the Central New Mexico Region includes: Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia, and Torrance Counties (Figure 1). Total impact represents both direct and indirect resending by business, including induced effects (resending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the four-county region and the state of New Mexico.

  17. Economic transition FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) WBS 7.4.9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenk, R.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the WHC Economic Transition Center is to support Hanford`s cleanup mission and to leverage the assets of that mission to promote diversification and long-term sustainability of the regional economy and workforce. Conducting an economic transition program is imperative at sites such as Hanford, which are faced with transition from a defense production mission to a massive cleanup mission, followed by rampdown and site closure. At issue are the human and physical resources of the Site and the final disposition of those resources. Without an effective economic transition program, the federal government will have invested billions of dollars to achieve environmental regulatory compliance without generating any greater return on investment. With an effective economic transition program, the potential exists to redeploy the highly skilled, well-trained, and educated workforce developed and utilized during the Site`s cleanup mission and find productive uses for land, facilities, and equipment. The Economic Transition Center has been divided into the following business areas: outsourcing; spinoffs; technology acquisition; technology transfer; conversion; and cross-cutting partnerships. A work package has been developed for each of these business areas in this Fiscal Year Work Plan.

  18. High-power TSP bits. [Thermally Stable Polycrystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.H.; Maurer, W.C. (Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Westcott, P.A. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a three-year R D project to develop advanced thermally stable polycrystalline diamond (TSP) bits that can operate at power levels 5 to 10 times greater than those typically delivered by rotary rigs. These bits are designed to operate on advanced drilling motors that drill 3 to 6 times faster than rotary rigs. TSP bit design parameters that were varied during these tests include cutter size, shape, density, and orientation. Drilling tests conducted in limestone, sandstone, marble, and granite blocks showed that these optimized bits drilled many of these rocks at 500 to 1,000 ft/hr (150 to 300 m/h), compared to 50 to 100 ft/hr (15 to 30 m/h) for roller bits. These tests demonstrated that TSP bits are capable of operating at the high speeds and high torques delivered by advanced drilling motors now being developed. These advanced bits and motors are designed for use in slim-hole and horizontal drilling applications.

  19. B U D G E T E S T I M A T E S FISCAL YEAR 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and stewardship of Earth Strategic Plan #12;3 2015 Budget Highlights Provides the necessary resources to advance and the dynamics between our planet and the Sun. By the end of FY 2015, NASA will have launched an unprecedented1 B U D G E T E S T I M A T E S FISCAL YEAR 2015 #12;2 Serve the American public and accomplish our

  20. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    characteristics of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure sufficient...

  1. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

  2. A LOW-VOLTAGE TEMPERATURE-STABLE MICROMECHANICAL PIEZOELECTRIC OSCILLATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    A LOW-VOLTAGE TEMPERATURE-STABLE MICROMECHANICAL PIEZOELECTRIC OSCILLATOR Reza Abdolvand, Hossein polarization voltages (5-20V) for operation, which complicates the design of the oscillator circuit in today reference oscillator that utilizes a temperature-stable thin- film piezoelectric-on-silicon resonator

  3. Differentially Flat Trajectory Generation for a Dynamically Stable Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the ballbot, a dynamically stable mobile robot which balances on a single spherical wheel. To this end, assumptions are made to form the system as differentially flat, and a method of deriving feasible trajectories, dynamically stable mobile robot. It is a human-sized robot that balances on a single spherical wheel

  4. Human-Robot Physical Interaction with Dynamically Stable Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the ballbot as an example. The ballbot is a dynamically stable mobile robot moving on a single spherical wheel single spherical wheeled mobile robot capable of omnidirec- tional motion. Unlike statically stable The ballbot uses a four-motor inverse mouse-ball drive unit for actuating the ball. The ballbot has

  5. ENRICHED STABLE ISOTOPE TARGET PREPARATION AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaron, W Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Zevenbergen, Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1960s the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Program, through the Isotope Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been developing and supplying, among other things, enriched stable isotope targets for nuclear research around the world. This group also maintains and distributes the DOE inventory of enriched stable isotopes. Chemical and pyrochemical techniques are used to prepare enriched stable isotopes from this inventory in the desired chemical form. Metallurgical, ceramic, or vacuum processing methods are then used to prepare the isotopes in a wide range of physical forms from thin films, foils, and coatings to large fabricated shapes to meet the needs of experimenters. Significant characterization capabilities are also available to assist in the preparation and evaluation of these custom materials. This work is part of the DOE Isotope Program, which recently transferred to the Office of Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of Science, resulting in a stronger emphasis on enabling R&D. This presentation will focus on the custom preparation of enriched stable isotope targets and other research materials.

  6. A Stable Magnetic Background in SU(2) QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. M. Cho; D. G. Pak

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the instability of the Savvidy-Nielsen-Olesen (SNO) vacuum we make a systematic search for a stable magnetic background in pure SU(2) QCD. It is shown that Wu-Yang monopole-antimonopole pair is unstable under vacuum fluctuations. However, it is shown that a pair of axially symmetric monopole-antimonopole string configuration is stable, provided the distance between the two strings is small enough (less than a critical value). The existence of a stable monopole-antimonopole string background strongly supports that a magnetic condensation of monopole-antimonopole pairs can indeed generate a dynamical symmetry breaking, and thus a desired magnetic confinement of color, in QCD.

  7. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission accountability report, fiscal year 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is one of six Federal agencies participating in a pilot project to streamline financial management reporting. The goal of this pilot is to consolidate performance-related reporting into a single accountability report. The project, which is being carried out under the guidance of the Chief Financial Officers Council, was undertaken in accordance with the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA) of 1994. The GMRA permits the streamlining of financial management reports in consultation with the appropriate Congressional Committees through a liaison in the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The results of the pilot project will determine the method to be used for reporting financial management information for fiscal year (FY) 1996. This report consolidates the information previously reported in the following documents: (1) the NRC`s annual financial statement required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990; (2) the Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, required by the Federal Managers` Financial Integrity Act of 1982; (3) the Chairman`s semiannual report to the Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations, required by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. This report also includes performance measures, as required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990.

  8. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Office. Annual report for fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO) for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater programs at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants (PGDP and PORTS, respectively.) This report describes the administrative framework of the GWPO including staffing, organization, and funding sources. In addition, summaries are provided of activities involving the Technical Support staff at the five facilities. Finally, the results of basic investigations designed to improve our understanding of the major processes governing groundwater flow and contaminant migration on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are reported. These investigations are conducted as part of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Studies (ORRHAGS) program. The relevance of these studies to the overall remediation responsibilities of Energy Systems is discussed.

  9. Documentation for fiscal year 1995 annual BUSS cask SARP testing and inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saueressig, P.T.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile the data generated during the Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 annual tests and inspections performed on the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask. The BUSS Cask Model R-1 is a type B shipping container used for shipment of radioactive cesium-137 and strontium-90 capsules to Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The primary purpose of the BUSS Cask is to provide shielding and confinement as well as impact, puncture, and thermal protection for the capsules under both normal and accident conditions. Section 8.2 ``Maintenance and Periodic Inspection Program`` of the BUSS Cask SARP requires that the following tests and inspections be performed on an annual basis: hydrostatic pressure test; helium leak test; dye penetrant test on the trunnions and life lugs; torque test on all permanent bolts; and impact limiter inspection and weight test. In addition to compiling the generated data, this report will verify that the testing criteria identified in section 8.2 of the BUSS Cask Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) was met.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  11. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: Fiscal year 1996. Volume 19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 (PL 93-438) identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety. The Federal Reports Elimination and Sunset Act of 1995 (PL 104-66) requires that AOs be reported to Congress on an annual basis. This report includes those events that NRC determined to be AOs during fiscal year 1996. This report addresses eighteen AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. Two involved events at nuclear power plants, eleven involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and five involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Eight AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved stolen radiography cameras, one involved a ruptured source, one involved release of radioactive material while being transported, one involved a lost source, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and two involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Four updates of previously reported AOs are included in this report. Three ``Other Events of Interest`` events are being reported, and one previously reported ``Other Events of Interest`` event is being updated.

  12. Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Fellows, Robert J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Progress Report describes the work performed and summarizes some of the key observations to date on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report describes activities undertaken to collect samples of soils from three regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and perform analyses to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Section 3 summarizes information gathered regarding agricultural practices and common and unusual crops grown in each of these three areas. Section 4 describes progress in studying radionuclide uptake in several representative crops from the three soil types in controlled laboratory conditions. Section 5 describes a range of international coordination activities undertaken by Project staff in order to support the underlying data needs of the Project. Section 6 provides a very brief summary of the status of the GENII Version 2 computer program, which is a “client” of the types of data being generated by the Project, and for which the Project will be providing training to the US NRC staff in the coming Fiscal Year. Several appendices provide additional supporting information.

  13. STABLE FILTERING SCHEMES WITH RATIONAL DILATIONS BRODY DYLAN JOHNSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Brody Dylan

    STABLE FILTERING SCHEMES WITH RATIONAL DILATIONS BRODY DYLAN JOHNSON Abstract. The relationship Services Administration at St. Louis University. 1 #12;2 BRODY DYLAN JOHNSON If is a scaling function

  14. Stable nonlinear identification from noisy repeated experiments via convex optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobenkin, Mark M.

    This paper introduces new techniques for using convex optimization to fit input-output data to a class of stable nonlinear dynamical models. We present an algorithm that guarantees consistent estimates of models in this ...

  15. Intraseasonal variability in South America recorded in stable water isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Christophe "Kristof"

    Intraseasonal variability in South America recorded in stable water isotopes Christophe Sturm,1 cores (South America) has illustrated the key role such archives can play in past climate South America, highlighting the internal atmospheric variability, as opposed to external forcing

  16. GENERAL THEORY OF COUPLED THERMALLY STABLE ANISOTROPIC LAMINATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of rotor blades of helicopters or of wind-mills. Usually, structural composite laminates are obtained material. The problem of obtaining coupled thermally stable laminates has a certain importance in practical

  17. Separations and Waste Forms Research and Development FY 2013 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Separations and Waste Form Campaign (SWFC) under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year (FY) 2013 accomplishments report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within SWFC in FY 2013. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but the intent of the report is to highlight the many technical accomplishments made during FY 2013.

  18. Environmental support FY 1995 multi-year program plan/fiscal year work plan WBS 1.5.2/7.4.11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) is the programmatic planning baseline document for technical, schedule, and cost data. The MYPP contains data by which all work is managed, performed and controlled. The integrated planning process, defined by RL, is redicted on establishment of detailed data in the MYPP. The MYPP includes detailed information for the data elements including Level II critical path schedules, cost estimate detail, and updated technical data to be done annually. There will be baseline execution year and out year approval with work authorization for execution. The MYPP will concentrate on definition of the scope, schedule, cost and program element level critical path schedules that show the relationship of planned activities. The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) is prepared for each program to provide the basis for authorizing fiscal year work. The MYPP/FYWP will be structured into three main areas: (1) Program Overview; (2) Program Baselines; (3) Fiscal Year Work Plan.

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

  20. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  1. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  2. Compendium of Data for the Hanford Site (Fiscal Years 2004 to 2008) Applicable to Estimation of Recharge Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, William E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compendium of recharge data collected in Fiscal Years 2004 through 2008 at various soil and surface covers found and planned in the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The addition of these new data to previously published recharge data will support improved estimates of recharge with respect to location and soil cover helpful to evaluations and risk assessments of radioactive and chemical wastes at this site. Also presented are evaluations of the associated uncertainties, limitations, and data gaps in the existing knowledge base for recharge at the Hanford Site.

  3. Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Program 1994 fiscal year work plan. Work breakdown structure 2.0: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Site Management System (SMS) guidance requires a Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) to be prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Mission Area and all related programs. This revision is a complete update to cover the FY 1994 time period. This document describes the overall ER Missions Area and provides FYWP appendices for each of the following five program areas: Remedial Action (RA); Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D); Project Management and Support (PM&S); Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); and Disposal Facilities (DF).

  4. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  5. Annual summary report on the surveillance and maintenance activities for the Oak Rige National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program for fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Summary Report on the Surveillance and Maintenance Activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 1995 was prepared to communicate the accomplishments of the Program during fiscal year 1995. This work was performed under work breakdown structure element 1.4.12.6.1.14.20 (activity data sheet 3314, ``Remedial Action Surveillance and Maintenance``). Publication of this document meets the Life Cycle Baseline milestone date of November 30, 1995. This document provides the accomplishments for both the Remedial Action and Decontamination and Decommissioning Surveillance and Maintenance programs.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan, fiscal year 1994. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A was promulgated in final form on September 26, 1988. The order requires heads of field organizations to prepare and to submit updates on the waste management plans for all operations under their purview according to the format in Chap. 6, {open_quotes}Waste Management Plan Outline.{close_quotes} These plans are to be submitted by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) in December of each year and distributed to the DP-12, ES&H-1, and other appropriate DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) organizations for review and comment. This document was prepared in response to this requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) waste management mission is reduction, collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of DOE wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of this document is compilation and consolidation of information on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what activities are planned for FY 1994, and how all of the activities are documented.

  7. Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the HSN, there were 270 triggers during the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 229 triggers during the third quarter on the primary recording system. During the second quarter, 22 seismic events were located; 11 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 6 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 5 were quarry blasts. Two earthquakes appear to be related to major geologic structures, eight earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and seven earthquakes were random occurrences. During the third quarter, 23 seismic events were located; 11 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 4 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 4 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 4 were quarry blasts. Five earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, six earthquakes formed a new swarm near the Horse Heavens Hills and Presser, Washington, and eight earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the second or third quarters of FY 1999.

  8. A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion in the development of combustion science. Several aspects of these two-dimensional flame cells are identified for premixed combustion when the other types of idealized flames are inapplicable. 1 #12;Nomenclature fuel

  9. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarb...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate...

  10. Decoupled energy stable schemes for phase-field models of two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Shen

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 7, 2015 ... Efficient energy stable numerical schemes for a phase field ... conditions and a linear decoupled energy stable scheme for systems with static ...

  11. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  12. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

  13. DV/Payment Requests, PCARD, IOs and Purchase Orders. The following is required by Fiscal Office in order to process your request and to avoid delay in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DV/Payment Requests, PCARD, IOs and Purchase Orders. The following is required by Fiscal Office that is of an "Official Function" nature, or mainly when food items are purchased. This includes business meals, training and recruiting costs. As well, these must be signed and originals sent. 5. There are two types of Purchase orders

  14. Economic Impact of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the State of Washington in Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a large economic entity, with $1.06 billion in annual funding, $936 million in total spending, and 4,344 employees in fiscal year (FY) 2013. Four thousand, one hundred and one (4,101) employees live in Washington State. The Laboratory directly and indirectly supports almost $1.31 billion in economic output, 6,802 jobs, and $514 million in Washington State wage income from current operations. The state also gains more than $1.21 billion in output, more than 6,400 jobs, and $459 million in income through closely related economic activities, such as visitors, health care spending, spending by resident retirees, and spinoff companies. PNNL affects Washington’s economy through commonly recognized economic channels, including spending on payrolls and other goods and services that support Laboratory operations. Less-commonly recognized channels also have their own impacts and include company-supported spending on health care for its staff members and retirees, spending of its resident retirees, Laboratory visitor spending, and the economic activities in a growing constellation of “spinoff” companies founded on PNNL research, technology, and managerial expertise. PNNL also has a significant impact on science and technology education and community nonprofit organizations. PNNL is an active participant in the future scientific enterprise in Washington with the state’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The Laboratory sends staff members to the classroom and brings hundreds of students to the PNNL campus to help train the next generation of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and technicians. This investment in human capital, though difficult to measure in terms of current dollars of economic output, is among the important lasting legacies of the Laboratory. Finally, PNNL contributes to the local community with millions of dollars’ worth of cash and in-kind corporate and staff contributions, all of which strengthen the economy. This report quantifies these effects, providing detailed information on PNNL’s revenues and expenditures, as well as the impacts of its activities on the rest of the Washington State economy. This report also describes the impacts of the four closely related activities: health care spending, spinoff companies with roots in PNNL, visitors to the Laboratory, and PNNL retirees.

  15. Ultra Stable Capacitor charging Power Supply of Klystron-Modulator for PAL XFEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Y. G.; Kwon, S. J.; Jang, S. D.; Suh, J. H.; Oh, J. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, San-31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, S. (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory) 2.5-GeV linac is planed to be converted to a SASE-XFEL facility (PAL XFEL) that supplies coherent X-rays down to 0.3-nm wavelength. The electron beams has to have an emittance of 1.0 mm-mrad, a peak current of 3 kA, and a low energy spread of 1.0 MeV. In order to provide reasonably stable SASE output, the RF stability of 0.02% rms is required for both RF phase and amplitude. This stability is mainly determined by a low level RF drive system and klystron-modulators. The stability level of the modulator has to be improved 10 times better to meet the pulse stability of 0.02%. This is a technologically challenging issue for PAL XFEL. An inverter technology is to be applied to charge the PFN of a new modulator. Therefore, a new inverter system should provide very stable charging performances. This paper presents the development of an ultra stable klystron-modulator with an inverter power.

  16. Nonasymptotically stable attractors in O(2) mode interactions \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    z August 3, 1993 Abstract Heteroclinic cycles are a natural source of nonasymptotically sta­ ble for a large class of heteroclinic cycles. In particular, we establish the existence of several nonasymp heteroclinic cycles can coexist as nonasymptotically stable attractors. 1 Introduction It is now well

  17. COMMUNICATION Formation of a Stable Oligomer of -2 Microglobulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranker, Andrew

    amyloidosis. © 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd. *Corresponding author Keywords: -2 microglobulin; amyloidCOMMUNICATION Formation of a Stable Oligomer of -2 Microglobulin Requires only Transient Encounter and Biochemistry, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520-8114, USA -2 Microglobulin (2m

  18. STABLE POLYNOMIALS FROM TRUNCATIONS AND ARCHITECTURE-DRIVEN FILTER TRANSFORMATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boston, Nigel

    or sums of a few such powers. We also ask that the roots of D(z) all lie inside the unit circleSTABLE POLYNOMIALS FROM TRUNCATIONS AND ARCHITECTURE-DRIVEN FILTER TRANSFORMATIONS Nigel Boston Abstract. An extension of a polynomial consists of the polynomial plus higher power terms. Given

  19. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  20. Stable plateau formation and Brillouin suppression in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulser, P. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Weng, S. M. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80333 Munich (Germany)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the variety of ponderomotively induced density structures in laser produced plasmas in one dimension, it is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that the stable plateau formation at critical, subcritical, and above critical density is possible. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering is suppressed with increasing laser intensity.

  1. A Stable Primal-Dual Approach for Linear Programming under ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    computations in this section were done on a Sun-Fire-480R running SunOS 5.8. ... negative effect that the loss of sparsity has on the stable direct solver, since ..... centiat thesis, Department of Mathematics, Linköping University, Sweden, 1991.

  2. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

  3. Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2317&D2). Remedial actions performed in the Balance of Site (BOS) Laboratory Area of EU Z2-33 and two small areas in EU Z2-42 are described in Sects. 5 through 10 of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-33; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe RAs performed in the EU Z2-33 BOS Laboratory Area and two small areas in EU Z2-42. Approximately 18 acres in EU Z2-33 are addressed in this PCCR. Based on the results of the DVS evaluation and RAs performed, all 18 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. Three Federal Facility Agreement sites are addressed and recommended for no further action within this acreage, including: (1) K-1004-L Recirculating Cooling Water Lines Leak Sites; (2) K-1044 Heavy Equipment Repair Shop; and (3) K-1015-A Laundry Pit. Remedial actions for EU Z2-33 were developed in response to DVS characterization results described in the EU Z2-33 Technical Memorandum (Appendix A) and to support reindustrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park as a commercial industrial park. Remediation criteria were designed for the protection of a future industrial worker who normally would not have the potential for exposure to soil below 10ft bgs. Accordingly, the Zone 2 ROD required land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likel

  4. Research, development and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed from October 1, 1978 to September 30, 1979. The approach for development of both the Improved State-of-the-Art (ISOA) and Advanced lead-acid batteries is three pronged. This approach concentrates on simultaneous optimization of battery design, materials, and manufacturing processing. The 1979 fiscal year saw the achievement of significant progress in the program. Some of the major accomplishments of the year are outlined. 33 figures, 13 tables. (RWR)

  5. Construction of energy-stable Galerkin reduced order models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report aims to unify several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs). Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The model reduction procedure consists of two steps: the computation of a reduced basis, and the projection of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) onto this reduced basis. Two kinds of reduced bases are considered: the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) basis and the balanced truncation basis. The projection step of the model reduction can be done in two ways: via continuous projection or via discrete projection. First, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of PDEs using continuous projection is proposed. The idea is to apply to the set of PDEs a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The resulting ROM will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special weighted L2 inner product, termed the %E2%80%9Csymmetry inner product%E2%80%9D. Attention is then turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, a weighted L2 inner product termed the %E2%80%9CLyapunov inner product%E2%80%9D, is derived. The weighting matrix that defines the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system arising from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. It is shown that a ROM constructed via discrete projection using the Lyapunov inner product will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. Comparisons are also made between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. The performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.

  6. Double Macdonald polynomials as the stable limit of Macdonald superpolynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blondeau-Fournier, O; Mathieu, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macdonald superpolynomials provide a remarkably rich generalization of the usual Macdonald polynomials. The starting point of this work is the observation of a previously unnoticed stability property of the Macdonald superpolynomials when the fermionic sector m is sufficiently large: their decomposition in the monomial basis is then independent of m. These stable superpolynomials are readily mapped into bisymmetric polynomials, an operation that spoils the ring structure but drastically simplifies the associated vector space. Our main result is a factorization of the (stable) bisymmetric Macdonald polynomials, called double Macdonald polynomials and indexed by pairs of partitions, into a product of Macdonald polynomials (albeit subject to non-trivial plethystic transformations). As an off-shoot, we note that, after multiplication by a t-Vandermonde determinant, this provides explicit formulas for a large class of Macdonald polynomials with prescribed symmetry. The factorization of the double Macdonald polynom...

  7. Searching Stable CuxS Structures for Photovoltaic Application (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, O.; Huang, B.; Yan, Y.; Noufi, R,; Wei, S-H

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal and electronic band structures of CuxS (1.25 < x ? 2) are systematically studied using the density-functional theory method. For Cu2S, all the three chalcocite phases, i.e., the low-chalcocite, the high-chalcocite, and the cubic-chalcocite phases have direct band gaps around 1.3-1.5 eV, with the low-chalcocite being the most stable one. However, Cu vacancies can form spontaneously in these compounds, causing instability of Cu2S. We find that under Cu-rich condition, the anilite Cu1.75S is the most stable structure. It has a predicted band gap of 1.4 eV and is a promising solar cell absorber.

  8. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United Staes). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple “weather regimes.” To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, “bred vectors” and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemble forecasts issued from “clouds” (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.

  9. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for research, development, demonstration, technology transfer, and policy development activities for the electric transmission and...

  10. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  11. Annual report on surveillance and maintenance activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year (FY) 1995, the sites and facilities from both the Remedial Action (RA) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) programs were combined to form the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) Program. Surveillance and Maintenance activities were conducted throughout FY 1996 at the RA facilities. Overall, the RA S and M Program consists of approximately 650 acres that include 14 waste area groupings with approximately 200 sites. These sites include 46 major facilities, several leak and contaminated soil sites, 38 inactive tanks, approximately 50 environmental study areas and approximately 2,973 wells and boreholes. Site inspections were conducted at established frequencies on appropriate sites in the RA S and M Program in accordance with the established S and M FY 1996 Incentive Task Order (ITO).

  12. The potential role of a carbon tax in U.S. fiscal reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKibbin, Warwick [Australian National Univ. (Australia); The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Morris, Adele [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Wilcoxen, Peter [Syracuse University, NY (United States); The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Cai, Yiyong [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australian National Univ. (Australia)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines fiscal reform options in the United States with an intertemporal computable general equilibrium model of the world economy called G-Cubed. Six policy scenarios explore two overarching issues: (1) the effects of a carbon tax under alternative assumptions about the use of the resulting revenue, and (2) the effects of alternative measures that could be used to reduce the budget deficit. We examine a simple excise tax on the carbon content of fossil fuels in the U.S. energy sector starting immediately at $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) and rising at 4 percent above inflation each year through 2050. We investigate policies that allow the revenue from the illustrative carbon tax to reduce the long run federal budget deficit or the marginal tax rates on labor and capital income. We also compare the carbon tax to other means of reducing the deficit by the same amount. We find that the carbon tax will raise considerable revenue: $80 billion at the outset, rising to $170 billion in 2030 and $310 billion by 2050. It also significantly reduces U.S. CO2 emissions by an amount that is largely independent of the use of the revenue. By 2050, annual CO2 emissions fall by 2.5 billion metric tons (BMT), or 34 percent, relative to baseline, and cumulative emissions fall by 40 BMT through 2050. The use of the revenue affects both broad economic impacts and the composition of GDP across consumption, investment and net exports. In most scenarios, the carbon tax lowers GDP slightly, reduces investment and exports, and increases imports. The effect on consumption varies across policies and can be positive if households receive the revenue as a lump sum transfer. Using the revenue for a capital tax cut, however, is significantly different than the other policies. In that case, investment booms, employment rises, consumption declines slightly, imports increase, and overall GDP rises significantly relative to baseline through about 2040. Thus, a tax reform that uses a carbon tax to reduce capital taxes would achieve two goals: reducing CO2 emissions significantly and expanding short-run employment and the economy. We examine three ways to reduce the deficit by an equal amount. We find that raising marginal tax rates on labor income has advantages over raising tax rates on capital income or establishing a carbon tax. A labor tax increase leaves GDP close to its baseline, reduces consumption very slightly and expands net exports slightly. Investment remains essentially unchanged. In contrast, a capital tax increase causes a significant and persistent drop in investment and much larger reductions in GDP. A carbon tax falls between the two: it lowers GDP more than a labor tax increase because it reduces investment. However, its effects on investment and GDP are more moderate than the capital tax increase, and it also significantly reduces CO2 emissions. A carbon tax thus offers a way to help reduce the deficit and improve the environment, and do so with minimal disturbance to overall economic activity.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

  14. FORMATION OF STABLE MAGNETARS FROM BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    By performing fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of binary neutron star mergers, we investigate the possibility that the end result of the merger is a stable magnetar. In particular, we show that, for a binary composed of two equal-mass neutron stars (NSs) of gravitational mass M {approx} 1.2 M{sub Sun} and equation of state similar to Shen et al. at high densities, the merger product is a stable NS. Such NS is found to be differentially rotating and ultraspinning with spin parameter J/M{sup 2} {approx} 0.86, where J is its total angular momentum, and it is surrounded by a disk of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 M{sub Sun }. While in our global simulations the magnetic field is amplified by about two orders of magnitude, local simulations have shown that hydrodynamic instabilities and the onset of the magnetorotational instability could further increase the magnetic field strength up to magnetar levels. This leads to the interesting possibility that, for some NS mergers, a stable and magnetized NS surrounded by an accretion disk could be formed. We discuss the impact of these new results for the emission of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave signals and for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Federalism and Economic Development in India: An Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar; SRINIVASAN, T N

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues in Tax Policy and Reform in India, paper presented atA Sustainable Fiscal Policy for India: An InternationalA Sustainable Fiscal Policy for India: An International

  16. Development of Enabling Technologies for High Efficiency, Low...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Comments Barriers Approach Performance Measures and Accomplishments Technology Transfer Collaborations PublicationsPatents Plans for Next Fiscal Year ...

  17. Problems and prospects in future applications of stable isotopes in the life sciences and medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the use of stable isotopes of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in the life sciences and medicine fueled by the increased availability of the isotopes and isotopically labeled compounds and of instruments for their detection. Accelerated development of /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, and /sup 17/ /sup 18/O can be expected in the future for studies of drug bioavailability, nutrition and body protein economy, viability of organs for transplant, and for non-invasive tests of metabolic diseases and dysfunctions. These accelerated developments depend on continued improvements in nmr and ms instrumentation and in methods for the synthesis of isotopically labeled compounds. The main part of this paper explores the possibilities of biosynthesis for the selective enrichment of natural products, especially amino acids, with /sup 13/C.

  18. Double Macdonald polynomials as the stable limit of Macdonald superpolynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Blondeau-Fournier; L. Lapointe; P. Mathieu

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Macdonald superpolynomials provide a remarkably rich generalization of the usual Macdonald polynomials. The starting point of this work is the observation of a previously unnoticed stability property of the Macdonald superpolynomials when the fermionic sector m is sufficiently large: their decomposition in the monomial basis is then independent of m. These stable superpolynomials are readily mapped into bisymmetric polynomials, an operation that spoils the ring structure but drastically simplifies the associated vector space. Our main result is a factorization of the (stable) bisymmetric Macdonald polynomials, called double Macdonald polynomials and indexed by pairs of partitions, into a product of Macdonald polynomials (albeit subject to non-trivial plethystic transformations). As an off-shoot, we note that, after multiplication by a t-Vandermonde determinant, this provides explicit formulas for a large class of Macdonald polynomials with prescribed symmetry. The factorization of the double Macdonald polynomials leads immediately to the generalization of basically every elementary properties of the Macdonald polynomials to the double case (norm, kernel, duality, positivity, etc). When lifted back to superspace, this validates various previously formulated conjectures in the stable regime. The q,t-Kostka coefficients associated to the double Macdonald polynomials are shown to be q,t-analogs of the dimensions of the irreducible representations of the hyperoctahedral group B_n. Moreover, a Nabla operator on the double Macdonald polynomials is defined and its action on a certain bisymmetric Schur function can be interpreted as the Frobenius series of a bigraded module of dimension (2n+1)^n, a formula again characteristic of the Coxeter group of type B_n. Finally, as a side result, we obtain a simple identity involving products of four Littlewood-Richardson coefficients.

  19. Engineering fast and stable splitting of matter waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Torrontegui; S. Martínez-Garaot; M. Modugno; Xi Chen; J. G. Muga

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When attempting to split coherent cold atom clouds or a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) by bifurcation of the trap into a double well, slow adiabatic following is unstable with respect to any slight asymmetry, and the wave "collapses" to the lower well, whereas a generic fast chopping splits the wave but it also excites it. Shortcuts to adiabaticity engineered to speed up the adiabatic process through non-adiabatic transients, provide instead quiet and robust fast splitting. The non-linearity of the BEC makes the proposed shortcut even more stable.

  20. Stable atomic structure of NiTi austenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitinol (NiTi), the most widely used shape-memory alloy, exhibits an austenite phase that has yet to be identified. The usually assumed austenitic structure is cubic B2, which has imaginary phonon modes, hence it is unstable. We suggest a stable austenitic structure that “on average” has B2 symmetry (observed by x-ray and neutron diffraction), but it exhibits finite atomic displacements from the ideal B2 sites. The proposed structure has a phonon spectrum that agrees with that from neutron scattering, has diffraction spectra in agreement with x-ray diffraction, and has an energy relative to the ground state that agrees with calorimetry data.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  2. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada For Fiscal Year 2012 (October 2011–September 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): · CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment · CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well · CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility · CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater · CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits · CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches This report covers fiscal year 2012 (October 2011–September 2012).

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDRD-FY-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dena Tomchak

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of the research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. This report demonstrates the types of cutting edge research the INL is performing to help ensure the nation's energy security. The research conducted under this program is aligned with our strategic direction, benefits the Department of Energy (DOE) and is in compliance with DOE order 413.2B. This report summarizes the diverse research and development portfolio with emphasis on the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) mission, encompassing both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies.

  4. 1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comp.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

  5. 1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

  6. Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korman, Tyler P; Sahachartsiri, Bobby; Charbonneau, David M; Huang, Grace L; Beauregard, Marc; Bowie, James U

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in terms of kg of bio- diesel produced per kg of catalyst [efficient synthesis of bio- diesel even in the presence of a

  7. Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korman, Tyler P; Sahachartsiri, Bobby; Charbonneau, David M; Huang, Grace L; Beauregard, Marc; Bowie, James U

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J, Campelo JM, Romero AA: Biodiesel as feasible petrol fueltowards ever greener biodiesel production. Biotechnol Adv 3.T, Bielecki S: Enzymatic biodiesel synthesis - key factors

  8. Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korman, Tyler P; Sahachartsiri, Bobby; Charbonneau, David M; Huang, Grace L; Beauregard, Marc; Bowie, James U

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metha- nol and 1.5 ml of canola oil. This mixture provides aconverting ~76% of the canola oil to biodiesel within 20with less than 15% of the canola oil being converted to

  9. High-Efficiency and Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency and Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using a Single Emitter High-Efficiency and Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using a Single Emitter Presenter: Jian...

  10. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy Storage. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy...

  11. A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction. A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for...

  12. Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson to render the electromechanical valve actuator (EVA) globally asymptotically stable (GAS). Elec model. Here, we demonstrate and prove that our controller renders the system GAS without any assumption

  13. Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction April 2014 Keywords: Megasonic cleaning Stable cavitation Microstreaming Hydrogen bubbles Water on wafers without affect- ing the transient cavitation responsible for feature damage. Ã? 2014 Elsevier B

  14. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  15. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this OSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  16. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Oregon State University project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  17. STABLE MAPS: EXAMPLES WITHOUT SADDLES. J. IGLESIAS, A. PORTELA, AND A. ROVELLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    points that are Cr structurally stable (r > 1) and have nontrivial nonwandering sets, see [IPR1] and [IPR

  18. Phase Stable RF-over-fiber Transmission using Heterodyne Interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, R.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Huang, G.; Staples, J. W.

    2010-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    New scientific applications require phase-stabilized RF distribution to multiple remote locations. These include phased-array radio telescopes and short pulse free electron lasers. RF modulated onto a CW optical carrier and transmitted via fiber is capable of low noise, but commercially available systems aren't long term stable enough for these applications. Typical requirements are for less than 50fs long term temporal stability between receivers, which is 0.05 degrees at 3GHz. Good results have been demonstrated for RF distribution schemes based on transmission of short pulses, but these require specialized free-space optics and high stability mechanical infrastructure. We report a method which uses only standard telecom optical and RF components, and achieves less than 20fs RMS error over 300m of standard single-mode fiber. We demonstrate stable transmission of 3GHz over 300m of fiber with less than 0.017 degree (17fs) RMS phase error. An interferometer measures optical phase delay, providing information to a feed-forward correction of RF phase.

  19. 94-1 Research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rink, N.A. [comp.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This status report is published for Los Alamos National Laboratory 94-1 Research and Development Project Support. The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management funds these projects in order to support the storage or disposal of legacy plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials that resulted from weapons production throughout the DOE complex. This report summarizes status and technical progress for Los Alamos 94-1 projects during the second quarter of fiscal year 1997.

  20. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chunlong; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic interactions (EI) and hydrophobic interactions (HI), with HI playing the dominant role. While either strong EI or HI inhibit growth and suppress (104) face expression, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate EI allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate HI cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of (104) faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  1. hal-00187600,version1-14Nov2007 Models for dependent extremes using stable mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    hal-00187600,version1-14Nov2007 Models for dependent extremes using stable mixtures Running/short title: Models for dependent extremes Anne-Laure Foug`eres ´Equipe Modal'X, Universit´e Paris X-stable, multivariate extreme value distribu- tion, pitting corrosion, random effect, positive stable variables

  2. The Thirteenth Annual Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Report for Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. (DJE 2005)

  3. Annual report to the Office of Industrial Relations, fiscal year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assessment and Field Support Program (AFSP) of the Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division, ORAU, provides lead technical assistance to the Office of Industrial Relations (OIR), DOE. OIR has headquarters responsibility for monitoring and supporting DOE national laboratories and other government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) facilities in developing and maintaining an efficient and effective workforce. In addition to providing support to GOCOs, this mission includes coordination and assistance to DOE program offices in carrying out their mission includes coordination and assistance to DOE program offices in carrying out their human resource development activities. The Division of Contractor Personnel Management, Human Resource Development Branch, is responsible for carrying out four major functions: (1) policy development and communication, (2) manpower planning and analysis, (3) training program development, administration, and evaluation, and (4) sharing training resources and expertise. AFSP's support to OIR is organized around these four major functions.

  4. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities In Support Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment: Task 2.1.7 Permitting and Planning Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.; Judd, Chaeli R.; Blake, Kara M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2012 year-end report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the MHK industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, NGOs, and industry. Objectives for 2.1.7 are the following: • To work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process. • To work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development. • To communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders. • To engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which are described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning As the MHK industry works with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit and license MHK technologies they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under 2.1.7 is to understand these varied interests, explore mechanisms to reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately identify pathways to reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  5. Stable heteronuclear few-atom bound states in mixed dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin Tao; Zhang Peng; Zhang Wei [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study few-body problems in mixed dimensions where two or three heavy atoms are trapped individually in parallel one-dimensional tubes or two-dimensional disks and a single light atom travels freely in three dimensions. Using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, we find three- and four-body bound states for a broad parameter region. Specifically, the existence of trimer and tetramer states persists to the negative scattering length regime, where no two-body bound state is present. As pointed out by Y. Nishida in an earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 82, 011605(R) (2010)], these few-body bound states are stable against three-body recombination due to geometric separation. In addition, we find that the binding energy of the ground trimer and tetramer state reaches its maximum value when the scattering lengths are comparable to the separation between the low-dimensional traps.

  6. Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Munger, Alan C. (Miamisburg, OH)

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

  7. Stable laser–plasma accelerators at low densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Ge, Xulei; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report stable laser wakefield acceleration using 17–50 TW laser pulses interacting with 4?mm-long helium gas jet. The initial laser spot size was relatively large (28??m) and the plasma densities were 0.48–2.0?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. High-quality 100–MeV electron beams were generated at the plasma density of 7.5?×?10{sup 18?}cm{sup ?3}, at which the beam parameters (pointing angle, energy spectrum, charge, and divergence angle) were measured and stabilized. At higher densities, filamentation instability of the laser-plasma interaction was observed and it has led to multiple wakefield accelerated electron beams. The experimental results are supported by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The achievement presented here is an important step toward the use of laser-driven accelerators in real applications.

  8. Seismic pulse propagation with constant Q and stable probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Massimo Tomirotti

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional propagation of seismic waves with constant Q is shown to be governed by an evolution equation of fractional order in time, which interpolates the heat equation and the wave equation. The fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are expressed in terms of entire functions (of Wright type) in the similarity variable and their behaviours turn out to be intermediate between those for the limiting cases of a perfectly viscous fluid and a perfectly elastic solid. In view of the small dissipation exhibited by the seismic pulses, the nearly elastic limit is considered. Furthermore, the fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are shown to be related to stable probability distributions with index of stability determined by the order of the fractional time derivative in the evolution equation.

  9. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Seventeenth annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program, in cooperation with industry, is conducting research, development, testing, and evaluation activities to develop the technologies that would lead to production and introduction of low-and zero-emission electric and hybrid vehicles into the Nation`s transportation fleet. This annual report describes program activities in the areas of advanced battery, fuel cell, and propulsion systems development. Testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and laboratories are also provided. Also presented is status on incentives (CAFE, 1992 Energy Policy Act) and use of foreign components, and a listing of publications by DOE, national laboratories, and contractors.

  10. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Forsythe

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

  11. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  12. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

  13. Evaluation of Low-Level Waste Disposal Receipt Data for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Robert [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational or institutional waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research. Environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on-site and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The accuracy of the performance assessment and composite analysis depends upon the validity of the data used and assumptions made in conducting the analyses. If changes in these data and assumptions are significant, they may invalidate or call into question certain aspects of the analyses. For example, if the volumes and activities of waste disposed of during the remainder of the disposal facility's lifetime differ significantly from those projected, the doses projected by the analyses may no longer apply. DOE field sites are required to implement a performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. The purpose of this program is to ensure the continued applicability of the analyses through incremental improvement of the level of understanding of the disposal site and facility. Site personnel are required to conduct field and experimental work to reduce the uncertainty in the data and models used in the assessments. Furthermore, they are required to conduct periodic reviews of waste receipts, comparing them to projected waste disposal rates. The radiological inventory for Area G was updated in conjunction with Revision 4 of the performance assessment and composite analysis (Shuman, 2008). That effort used disposal records and other sources of information to estimate the quantities of radioactive waste that have been disposed of at Area G from 1959, the year the facility started receiving waste on a routine basis, through 2007. It also estimated the quantities of LLW that will require disposal from 2008 through 2044, the year in which it is assumed that disposal operations at Area G will cease. This report documents the fourth review of Area G disposal receipts since the inventory was updated and examines information for waste placed in the ground during fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2011. The primary objective of the disposal receipt review is to ensure that the future waste inventory projections developed for the performance assessment and composite analysis are consistent with the actual types and quantities of waste being disposed of at Area G. Toward this end, the disposal data that are the subject of this review are used to update the future waste inventory projections for the disposal facility. These projections are compared to the future inventory projections that were develope

  14. Buried waste integrated demonstration Fiscal Year 1993 close-out report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, K.J.; Hyde, R.A.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management needs and objectives. BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process. To accomplish this mission of identifying technological solutions for remediation deficiencies, the Office of Technology Development initiated BWID at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report summarizes the activities of the BWID program during FY-93.

  15. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  16. 94-1 R&D program annual operating plan: Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Richard E.; Dominguez, Pamela D.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 94-1 R&D Program focuses on developing the technical basis for stabilizing and safely storing plutonium-bearing materials. To address these issues, we have in place a material identification and stabilization project, a surveillance and monitoring project, and a management team.

  17. Fiscal Year 1985 Congressional budget request. Volume 1. Atomic energy defense activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents include: summaries of estimates by appropriation, savings from management initiatives, staffing by subcommittee, staffing appropriation; appropriation language; amounts available for obligation; estimates by major category; program overview; weapons activities; verification and control technology; materials production; defense waste and by-products management; nuclear safeguards and security; security investigations; and naval reactors development.

  18. On self-sustaining processes in Rayleigh-stable rotating plane Couette flows and subcritical transition to turbulence in accretion disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; G. I. Ogilvie; C. Cossu

    2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcritical transition to turbulence in Keplerian accretion disks is still a controversial issue and some theoretical progress is required in order to determine whether or not this scenario provides a plausible explanation for the origin of angular momentum transport in non-magnetized accretion disks. Motivated by the recent discoveries of exact nonlinear steady self-sustaining solutions in linearly stable non-rotating shear flows, we attempt to compute similar solutions in Rayleigh-stable rotating plane Couette flows and to identify transition mechanisms in such flows by combining nonlinear continuation methods and asymptotic theory. We obtain exact nonlinear solutions for Rayleigh-stable cyclonic regimes but show that it is not possible to compute solutions for Rayleigh-stable anticyclonic regimes, including Keplerian flow, using similar techniques. We also present asymptotic descriptions of these various problems at large Reynolds numbers that provide some insight into the differences between the non-rotating and Rayleigh-stable anticyclonic regimes and derive some necessary conditions for mechanisms analogous to the non-rotating self-sustaining process to be present in flows on the Rayleigh line. Our results demonstrate that subcritical transition mechanisms cannot be identified in wall-bounded Rayleigh-stable anticyclonic shear flows by transposing directly the phenomenology of subcritical transition in cyclonic and non-rotating wall-bounded shear flows. Asymptotic developments, however, leave open the possibility that nonlinear self-sustaining solutions may exist in unbounded or periodic flows on the Rayleigh line. These could serve as a starting point to discover solutions in Rayleigh-stable flows, but the nonlinear stability of Keplerian accretion disks remains to be determined.

  19. Hydroconversion reactions catalyzed by highly stable pillared clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, S.A.; Mosqueira, L.; Espinosa, J.; Fuentes, G.A. [Universidad A. Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-pillared clays (Al-PILC) and Al-X-PILC (X = Ga, Ni), structurally stable at high temperature - in the case of Ga above 800{degrees}C-have been synthesized by controlling intercalation steps and stabilization procedures. New bidimensional materials with an interlaminar distance about 10-12{angstrom} and with different chemical reactivities in the pillars have thus been produced. The analytical techniques employed to characterize the materials and the processes involved during stabilization include N{sub 2} adsorption, AA, XRD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, TGA-DTA, HR- and MAS-NMR (Al, Si, and Ga) and in-situ IR and DRIFTS. Chemical characterization using high pressure reactions with probe molecules such as diphenylmethane and tert-butylbenzene shows selectivity patterns than can be clearly associated with the microstructure of the PILC used, as well as an effect due to the composition of the pillars. Similar studies with zeolites give patterns that differ from those of PILC, probably because of the change in dimensionality of the internal structure. Poisoning studies with metal porphyrins prove that PLIC have improved resistance compared to standard catalysts. Hydrotreatment of Maya crude results a significant reduction in total sulfur under conditions suitable for commercial operation.

  20. Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.R.; Perry, G.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.

  1. Evolutionary stable strategies in networked games: the influence of topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasthurirathna, Dharshana; Uddin, Shahadat

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolutionary game theory is used to model the evolution of competing strategies in a population of players. Evolutionary stability of a strategy is a dynamic equilibrium, in which any competing mutated strategy would be wiped out from a population. If a strategy is weak evolutionarily stable, the competing strategy may manage to survive within the network. Understanding the network-related factors that affect the evolutionary stability of a strategy would be critical in making accurate predictions about the behaviour of a strategy in a real-world strategic decision making environment. In this work, we evaluate the effect of network topology on the evolutionary stability of a strategy. We focus on two well-known strategies known as the Zero-determinant strategy and the Pavlov strategy. Zero-determinant strategies have been shown to be evolutionarily unstable in a well-mixed population of players. We identify that the Zero-determinant strategy may survive, and may even dominate in a population of players connec...

  2. Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, K.M.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

  3. Department of Energy's Nuclear Waste Fund's Fiscal Year 2012 Financial Statement Audit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopmentReport and7Department

  4. Fiscal year 1986 program plan for the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy is national planning, integration, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY 86 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Research Development (R D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of all R D activities meet requirements tated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. The Program Plan is revised as needed. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY 86; outyear budget projections are presented for future years.

  5. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Annual Report for Fiscal Year 1989 Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. Table 1 lists significant events in the history of use of geothermal energy in the U.S., starting in1884. That is useful for tracking which Federal departments and agencies managed aspects of this work over time. Table 2 gives a complete accounting for all Federal outlays for geothermal energy development for FY 1979 -1989, including non-DOE outlays. Table 3 shows the status of the U.S. Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program at end of FY 1989: of the $500 million authorized, $285 million was committed to eight projects, and about $40 million had been paid out on project defaults. An additional $101 million had been repaid by the borrowers. (DJE - 2005)

  6. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  8. Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint US/Russian Progress Report for Fiscal 1997. Volume 3 - Calculations Performed in the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the progress report provides documentation of reactor physics and criticality safety studies conducted in the Russian Federation during fiscal year 1997 and sponsored by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program of the US Department of Energy. Descriptions of computational and experimental benchmarks for the verification and validation of computer programs for neutron physics analyses are included. All benchmarks include either plutonium, uranium, or mixed uranium and plutonium fuels. Calculated physics parameters are reported for all of the contaminated benchmarks that the United States and Russia mutually agreed in November 1996 were applicable to mixed-oxide fuel cycles for light-water reactors.

  9. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

  10. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  11. Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relations (865) 574-7308 Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries ORNL researchers used scanning transmission electron microscopy to take an...

  12. An Efficient, Energy Stable Scheme for the Cahn-Hilliard-Brinkman ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an unconditionally energy stable and uniquely solvable finite difference ... The scheme is based on a convex splitting of the discrete CH energy and.

  13. Energy Stable Schemes for Cahn-Hilliard phase-field model of two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 25, 2010 ... Several efficient and energy stable time discretization schemes for the coupled nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard phase-field system for both the matched ...

  14. Decoupled energy stable schemes for phase-field models of two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    decoupled, unconditionally energy stable schemes for Cahn-Hilliard phase-field models of two-phase incompressible flows. At each time step, these schemes ...

  15. The Maximum Stable Broadcast Throughput for Wireless Line Networks with Network Coding and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA Intelligent Automation Inc cluster size. We show that network coding improves the stable rate over plain retransmissions

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer stable isotopes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: aquifer stable isotopes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas via ocean outfalls. In...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - age mammal stable Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: age mammal stable Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biogerontology 4: 119120, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic...

  18. STDAC: Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center annual report fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia is a resource provided by the DOE Solar Thermal Program. The STDAC`s major objective is to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems by providing direct technical assistance to users in industry, government, and foreign countries; cooperating with industry to test, evaluate, and develop renewable energy systems and components; and educating public and private professionals, administrators, and decision makers. This FY94 report highlights the activities and accomplishments of the STDAC. In 1994, the STDAC continued to provide significant direct technical assistance to domestic and international organizations in industry, government, and education, Applying solar thermal technology to solve energy problems is a vital element of direct technical assistance. The STDAC provides information on the status of new, existing, and developing solar technologies; helps users screen applications; predicts the performance of components and systems; and incorporates the experience of Sandia`s solar energy personnel and facilities to provide expert guidance. The STDAC directly enhances the US solar industry`s ability to successfully bring improved systems to the marketplace. By collaborating with Sandia`s Photovoltaic Design Assistance Center and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory the STDAC is able to offer each customer complete service in applying solar thermal technology. At the National Solar Thermal Test Facility the STDAC tests and evaluates new and innovative solar thermal technologies. Evaluations are conducted in dose cooperation with manufacturers, and the results are used to improve the product and/or quantify its performance characteristics. Manufacturers, in turn, benefit from the improved design, economic performance, and operation of their solar thermal technology. The STDAC provides cost sharing and in-kind service to manufacturers in the development and improvement of solar technology.

  19. The AMTEX Partnership{trademark}. First quarter report, Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMTEX Partnership is a collaborative research and development program among the US Integrated Textile Industry, DOE, the National Laboratories, other federal agencies and laboratories, and universities. The goal of AMTEX is to strengthen the competitiveness of this vital industry, thereby preserving and creating US jobs. Topics in this quarters report include: computer-aided fabric evaluation, cotton biotechnology, demand activated manufacturing architecture, electronic embedded fingerprints, on-line process control in flexible fiber manufacturing, rapid cutting, sensors for agile manufacturing, and textile resource conservation.

  20. Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the DOE Geothermal Program activities were split between Core Research and Industrial Development. The technical areas covered are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology (including Hot Dry Rock Research and The Geyser Cooperation), and Conversion Technology (power plants, materials, and direct use/direct heat). Work to design the Lake County effluent pipeline to help recharge The Geysers shows up here for the first time. This Progress Report is another of the documents that are reasonable starting points in understanding many of the details of the DOE Geothermal Program. (DJE 2005)

  1. Department of Energy's Nuclear Waste Fund's Fiscal Year 2014 Financial Statement Audit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopmentReport and7DepartmentNuclear Waste Fund's

  2. Fitting random stable solar systems to Titius-Bode laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Hayes; Scott Tremaine

    1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ``solar systems'' are generated with planetary orbital radii r distributed uniformly random in log(r) between 0.2 and 50 AU. A conservative stability criterion is imposed by requiring that adjacent planets are separated by a minimum distance of k Hill radii, for values of k ranging from 1 to 8. Least-squares fits of these systems to generalized Bode laws are performed, and compared to the fit of our own Solar System. We find that this stability criterion, and other ``radius-exclusion'' laws, generally produce approximately geometrically spaced planets that fit a Titius-Bode law about as well as our own Solar System. We then allow the random systems the same exceptions that have historically been applied to our own Solar System. Namely, one gap may be inserted, similar to the gap between Mars and Jupiter, and up to 3 planets may be ``ignored'', similar to how some forms of Bode's law ignore Mercury, Neptune, and Pluto. With these particular exceptions, we find that our Solar System fits significantly better than the random ones. However, we believe that this choice of exceptions, designed specifically to give our own Solar System a better fit, gives it an unfair advantage that would be lost if other exception rules were used. We conclude that the significance of Bode's law is simply that stable planetary systems tend to be regularly spaced; this conclusion could be strengthened by the use of more stringent methods of rejecting unstable solar systems, such as long-term orbit integrations.

  3. Inflation with stable anisotropic hair: is it cosmologically viable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigbjørn Hervik; David F. Mota; Mikjel Thorsrud

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently an inflationary model with a vector field coupled to the inflaton was proposed and the phenomenology studied for the Bianchi type I spacetime. It was found that the model demonstrates a counter-example to the cosmic no-hair theorem since there exists a stable anisotropically inflationary fix-point. One of the great triumphs of inflation, however, is that it explains the observed flatness and isotropy of the universe today without requiring special initial conditions. Any acceptable model for inflation should thus explain these observations in a satisfactory way. To check whether the model meets this requirement, we introduce curvature to the background geometry and consider axisymmetric spacetimes of Bianchi type II,III and the Kantowski-Sachs metric. We show that the anisotropic Bianchi type I fix-point is an attractor for the entire family of such spacetimes. The model is predictive in the sense that the universe gets close to this fix-point after a few e-folds for a wide range of initial conditions. If inflation lasts for N e-folds, the curvature at the end of inflation is typically of order exp(-2N). The anisotropy in the expansion rate at the end of inflation, on the other hand, while being small on the one-percent level, is highly significant. We show that after the end of inflation there will be a period of isotropization lasting for about 2N/3 e-folds. After that the shear scales as the curvature and becomes dominant around N e-folds after the end of inflation. For plausible bounds on the reheat temperature the minimum number of e-folds during inflation, required for consistency with the isotropy of the supernova Ia data, lays in the interval (21,48). Thus the results obtained for our restricted class of spacetimes indicates that inflation with anisotropic hair is cosmologically viable.

  4. SmartShelf{trademark}: Report of activities for fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Z.W.; Lawson, R.L.

    1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers activities relating to the SmartShelf{trademark} project during the period October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997. During this year, project team members have advanced the state of both the hardware and software through a six-month-long test that exercised all hardware and nearly all software components. Second-generation node hardware was constructed and tested with the system and it was found that components supplied by Dallas Semiconductor did not meet the manufacturer`s specifications and were unstable. However, it was possible to work around this problem by rapidly redesigning the second-generation printed circuit board to use proven first-generation electronics and still fit inside the custom designed second-generation enclosure. Thus, the benefits realized by adopting the custom enclosure was not compromised. The software was improved by moving the user interface from modules developed with LabView to forms, queries, and reports developed with Microsoft Access and the structures of the software was modified to take better advantage of the dynamic data exchange (DDE) client-server architecture built into the Windows95 operating system and Access.

  5. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of the Strategic Initiatives listed at the LDRD web site. These included support for NSLS-II, RHIC evolving to a quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) lab, nanoscience, translational and biomedical neuroimaging, energy and, computational sciences. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL.

  7. Army Net Zero: Energy Roadmap and Program Summary, Fiscal Year 2013 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army (Army) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through improved energy efficiency and optimized renewable energy strategies at nine installations across the Army's portfolio. Referred to as Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEIs), these projects demonstrate and validate energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies with approaches that can be replicated across DOD and other Federal agencies, setting the stage for broad market adoption. This report summarizes the results of the energy project roadmaps developed by NREL, shows the progress each installation could make in achieving Net Zero Energy by 2020, and presents lessons learned and unique challenges from each installation.

  8. Budget-in-brief, fiscal year 1998: Energy for today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a brief overview of how the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy programs plan to improve: environmental quality, energy security, public health, and economic productivity. Substantial opportunities remain to improve the nation`s energy future without incurring high costs or imposing overly restrictive regulations. Current restructuring of electricity markets and international agreements on global climate change are focusing attention on some of these opportunities. With energy demand in countries such as China and India projected to grow exponentially in coming decades, US exports of clean energy technologies will be important for mitigating world environmental degradation and climate change--and for fostering strong US industries in sustainable energy products and services. Enabling developing countries to grow without the negative consequences of pollution is one of the most valuable forms of leadership the US can exercise in world affairs in the years ahead.

  9. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  10. The AMTEX Partnership{trademark} mid year report, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMTEX Partnership{trademark} is a collaborative research and development program among the US Integrated Textile Complex (ITC), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the DOE national laboratories, other federal agencies and laboratories, and universities. The goal of AMTEX is to strengthen the competitiveness of this vital industry, thereby preserving and creating US jobs. Three AMTEX projects funded in FY 1997 are Diamond Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA), Computer-Aided Fabric Evaluation (CAFE), and Textile Resource Conservation (TReC). The five sites involved in AMTEX work are Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (the latter is funded through Y-12).

  11. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) multiprogram laboratory whose primary mission has been to research nuclear technologies. Working with these technologies and conducting other types of research generates waste, including radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. While most of the waste treatment, storage, and disposal practices have been effective, some practices have led to the release of contaminants to the environment. As a result, DOE has developed (1) an Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to identify and, where necessary, cleanup releases from inactive waste sites and (2) a Waste Management (WM) Program to safely treat, store, and dispose of DOE wastes generated from current and future activities in an environmentally sound manner. This document describes the plans for FY 1993 for the INEL`s ER and WM programs as managed by DOE`s Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID).

  12. Vehicle technologies program Government Performance and Results Act (GPA) report for fiscal year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.; Stephens, T. S.; Birky, A. K. (Energy Systems); (DOE-EERE); (TA Engineering)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has defined milestones for its Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). This report provides estimates of the benefits that would accrue from achieving these milestones relative to a base case that represents a future in which there is no VTP-supported vehicle technology development. Improvements in the fuel economy and reductions in the cost of light- and heavy-duty vehicles were estimated by using Argonne National Laboratory's Autonomie powertrain simulation software and doing some additional analysis. Argonne also estimated the fraction of the fuel economy improvements that were attributable to VTP-supported development in four 'subsystem' technology areas: batteries and electric drives, advanced combustion engines, fuels and lubricants, and materials (i.e., reducing vehicle mass, called 'lightweighting'). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MA{sup 3}T (Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies) tool was used to project the market penetration of light-duty vehicles, and TA Engineering's TRUCK tool was used to project the penetrations of medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Argonne's VISION transportation energy accounting model was used to estimate total fuel savings, reductions in primary energy consumption, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that would result from achieving VTP milestones. These projections indicate that by 2030, the on-road fuel economy of both light- and heavy-duty vehicles would improve by more than 20%, and that this positive impact would be accompanied by a reduction in oil consumption of nearly 2 million barrels per day and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of more than 300 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. These benefits would have a significant economic value in the U.S. transportation sector and reduce its dependency on oil and its vulnerability to oil price shocks.

  13. Information management fiscal year 1996 site support program plan, WBS 6.4. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the recent past, information resource management (IRM) was a neatly separable component of the overall DOE mission, concerned primarily with procuring and implementing automatic data processing (ADP) systems. As the DOE missions have shifted from producing product to managing processes, those clear lines have blurred. Today, IRM is firmly embedded in all aspects of the DOE mission. BCS Richland, Inc., (BCSR) provides IRM for the Hanford Site. The main focus in executing this mission is to meet customer goals by providing high-quality, timely, and cost-effective electronic communication, computing, and information services. Information resources provide the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Hanford Site contractors the ability to generate, store, access, and communicate information quickly, reliably, and cost effectively. BCSR plans, implements, and operates electronic communication, computing and information management systems that enable effective operation of the Hanford Site. Five strategic initiatives to encompass the vision provide guidance and focus to the information technology (IT) direction for developing the BCSR program plan. These strategic initiatives are the program vision and are as follows: primary focus; fast response; accessible information; world class information management infrastructure; powerful desktop. The business directions that guide the development of the BCSR Program Plan are: (1) emphasize providing cost-effective and value-added communication, computing, and information systems products and services to the Site missions; (2) strengthen the alignment of products and services with Site projects and programs and eliminate duplications Sitewide; (3) focus on the effective resolution of critical Site information management (IM) issues.

  14. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible CO, HC, or NOx and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at lower temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued, not the least of which is reduced cost. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (>0.05 S cm{sup -1} at 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of bismuth oxide on the air side and ceria on the fuel side. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based electrolytes are the only known solid oxide electrolytes to have an ionic conductivity that meets the program conductivity goal. We have previously demonstrated that this concept works, that a bismuth oxide/ceria bilayer electrolyte provides near theoretical open circuit potential (OCP) and is stable for 1400 h of fuel cell operation under both open circuit and maximum power conditions. More recently, we developed a computer model to determine the defect transport in this bilayer and have found that a bilayer comprised primarily of the more conductive component (bismuth oxide) is stable for 500 C operation. In this first year of the project we are obtaining necessary thermochemical data to complete the computer model as well as initial SOFC results based on thick 1-2 mm single and bilayer ceria/bismuth oxide electrolytes. We will use the computer model to obtain the optimum relative layer thickness as a function of temperature and air/fuel conditions. SOFCs will be fabricated with 1-2 mm single and bilayer electrolytes based on the modeling results, tested for OCP, conductivity, and stability and compared against the predictions. The computer modeling is a continuation of previous work under support from GRI and the student was available at the inception of the contract. However, the experimental effort was delayed until the beginning of the Spring Semester because the contract was started in October, 2 months after the start of our Fall Semester, and after all of the graduate students were committed to other projects. The results from both of these efforts are described in the following two sections: (1) Experimental; and (2) Computer Modeling.

  15. Office of Inspector General audit report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department prepared the Fiscal Year 1998 Accountability Report to combine critical financial and program performance information in a single report. The Department`s consolidated financial statements and the related audit reports are included as major components of the Accountability Report. The Office of Inspector General audited the Department`s consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended September 30, 1998 and 1997. In the opinion of the Office of Inspector General, except for the environmental liabilities lines items in Fiscal year 1998, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Department as of September 30, 1998 and 1997, and its consolidated net cost, changes in net position, budgetary resources, financing activities, and custodial activities for the years then ended in conformity with Federal accounting standards. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, the Office of Inspector General issued a separate report on the Department internal controls. This report discusses needed improvements to the environmental liabilities estimating process and the reporting of performance measure information.

  16. Abstract.-Stable nitrogen (/ll5Nl and carbon (/ll3CI isotope measure-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    540 Abstract.-Stable nitrogen (/ll5Nl and carbon (/ll3CI isotope measure- ments were used and the Gulfof Mexico Loop Current. Use of stable isotopes to assess groups of king mackerel, Scomberomorus caval), the carbon isotopic composition of a food source is not substantially altered during assimilation. De

  17. Stable High Beta Plasmas Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field D. T. Garnier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Stable High Beta Plasmas Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field D. T. Garnier, A. Hansen, M. E. Mauel Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (Dated: October 21, 2005) Abstract Stable high-beta plasma is created we report the first production of high beta plasma confined by a laboratory dipole using neutral gas

  18. Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope predators; island ecosystem conservation; stable isotope analysis; Norway rats; diet. Correspondence Heather of introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus has raised concerns for the fate of the large least auklet Aethia

  19. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Connor, P.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit. 11 figs.

  20. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY)

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit.