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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Analytical Thresholds: Determination of Minimum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Different color channels behave differently – if possible, determine ATs for each color • ATs derived from methods based ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each exposed to local cooling airflow, where temperatures were 22, 25 and 28°C. Thirty randomly-selected male subjects, dressed in shorts, were exposed to each condition for 30 minutes. Data were collected on their local thermal sensations of each body part, overall thermal sensation, and overall thermal acceptability on voting scales at regular intervals during the exposure. Results show that the non-uniformity of thermal sensation is a key factor affecting thermal acceptability except for overall thermal sensation. A new assessment model for local cooling was proposed. The model shows that face cooling can improve thermal acceptability more than chest or back cooling, and the upper boundary of the acceptable range of room temperature can be shifted from 26°C to 30.5°C when face cooling is provided.

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Surface structure determination by a one-stop search method for the deepest minimum  

SciTech Connect

We report results of a one-stop automated search method for the deepest minimum in surface structure determination. Starting from known chemical bond lengths, the deepest minimization frozen low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) method locates the deepest minimum in a single run without any human intervention. This is achieved by using an approximation method, the frozen LEED, which has a radius of convergence of over 0.8 A, together with a simulated annealing algorithm that hops out of local minima until a deepest minimum is found. Demonstrations are presented using simulated and experimental results.

Yu, Z.X. [Department of Physics, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Tong, S.Y. [Department of Physics and Materials, City University of Hong Kong (China)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the applicability of forecasting production from low permeability and layered tight gas wells using the Arps hyperbolic equation at earlier times and then switching to the exponential form of the equation at a predetermined minimum decline rate. This methodology is called the minimum terminal decline rate method. Two separate completion types have been analyzed. The first is horizontal completions with multi-stage hydraulic fractures while the second is vertical fractured wells in layered formations, completed with hydraulic fractures. For both completion types both simulated data and real world well performance histories have been evaluated using differing minimum terminal decline rates and the benefit of increasing portions of production history to make predictions. The application of the minimum terminal decline rate method to the simulated data in this study (3 percent minimum decline applied to multiple fractured horizontal wells MFHW- and 7 percent applied to vertical fractured layered wells) gave high errors for some simulations within the first two years. Once additional production data is considered in making predictions, the errors in estimated ultimate recovery and in remaining reserves is significantly reduced. This result provides a note of caution, when using the minimum decline rate method for forecasting using small quantities of production history. The evaluation of real world data using the minimum terminal decline rate method introduces other inaccuracies such as poor data quality, low data frequency, operational changes which affect the production profile and workovers / re-stimulations which require a restart of production forecasting process. Real well data for MFHW comes from the Barnett Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination of the minimum terminal decline rate it would be impossible to correctly apply this methodology. Real well data for vertical fractured layered wells from the Carthage Cotton Valley field indicate that for wells similar to Conoco operated Panola County wells a feasible decline rate is between 5 percent and 10 percent. Further if a consistent production trend and with more than 2 years of production history are used to forecast, the EUR can be predicted to within plus/minus 10 percent and remaining reserves to within plus/minus 15 percent.

McMillan, Marcia Donna

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

Purchase, Iain F.H. [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ifhp@chadzombe.u-net.com

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Determinations of TSD facility acceptability under the CERCLA Off-Site Rule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 22, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the ``Off-Site Rule`` to implement section 121(d)(3) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA {section}121(d)(3) requires that wastes generated as a result of remediation activities taken under CERCLA authority and transferred off-site be managed only at facilities that comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In 1994, the DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (OEPA), RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413) published a CERCLA Information Brief titled ``The Off-Site Rule`` which describes the content of the Off-Site Rule and clarifies some of its implications for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. Additionally, EH-413 published the Guide on Selecting Compliant Off-Site Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities which provides a regulatory roadmap for accomplishing off-site transfers of environmental restoration and process hazardous waste at DOE facilities in a manner compliant with the Off-Site Rule and other relevant Federal regulations. Those guidance documents concentrate primarily on DOE`s perspective as a hazardous waste generator. The purpose of this Information Brief is to address the implications of the Off-Site Rule for DOE-owned hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities that accept CERCLA remediation wastes from off-site locations.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Accepted by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in building and computational technologies, coupled with a reorganized and integrated system of residential design, may make custom homes a possibility for a larger segment of the population in the years to come. While tools and materials that embody building and design expertise are necessary for making such a system workable, how the homeowner is supported and represented will determine whether the resulting houses are not just custom, but personally meaningful. The particular focus of this work is on how to externalize the layperson's task of establishing needs and setting goals as an essential stage within a sophisticated design process. The work is informed by interviews with homeowners and a participant study of constructive and interpretative exercises. One such exercise asked participants to serve as investigators into their own practices through use of simple sensors placed in the home environment. The work concludes with a proposal for tools and approaches to collect rich requirement data and prime users for design decisions by helping them to identify their

Jennifer Suzanne Beaudin; Ba Psychology; Kent Larson; William J. Mitchell; Jennifer Suzanne Beaudin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

9

Acceptance Test Refactoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In Executable Acceptance Test Driven Development, acceptance tests represent the requirements of a software system. As requirements change over time, the acceptance tests have to be updated and maintained. This process can be time-consuming and risky as acceptance tests lack the regression safety net that production code has. Refactoring of acceptance tests is used to keep the fixtures and the acceptance test definitions consistent.

Heiko Ordelt; Frank Maurer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Minimum Magnetic Energy Theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Thomson's Theorem states that static charge distributions in conductors show up at the conducting surfaces in an equipotential configuration, so that the electrostatic energy is a minimum. In this work we study an analogue statement for magnetic systems: in a given set of conductors, the stored magnetic field energy reaches the minimum value for superficial current distributions so that the magnetic vector potential is tangent to the conductors surfaces. This is the counterpart of Thomson's theorem for the magnetic field.

Fiolhais, M C N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Microsoft Word - acceptance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptance Checklist Acceptance Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and planning information system acceptance activities. The checklist reflects recognized acceptance management activities to be performed throughout the information systems project lifecycle. Information systems acceptance is generally characterized as a process to officially accept new or modified software components, which, when integrated, form an information system. Within this context, the objectives of software acceptance are summarized as the following: C Verify that the software product meets users= requirements and is fully operational.

12

The Minimum Price Contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimum price contract is one of many tools a marketer may use to better manage price and production risk while trying to achieve financial goals and objectives. This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages involved in this marketing program and the situations when it can be used.

Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

Weidert, R.S.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Minimum Description Length Model Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum Description Length Model Selection Problems and Extensions Steven de Rooij #12;#12;Minimum Description Length Model Selection Problems and Extensions #12;ILLC Dissertation Series DS-2008-07 For further-mail: illc@science.uva.nl homepage: http://www.illc.uva.nl/ #12;Minimum Description Length Model Selection

16

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

17

3G Mobile TV Acceptance in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies on intention to use, adopting the technology acceptance model (TAM), have been reported but their extended models do not provide a good explanation of the determinants of intention to use 3G mobile TV. The present study develops and examines ... Keywords: mobile communication system, 3G mobile TV, behavioral intention to use, Technology Acceptance Model

Andri Qiantori; Agung Budi Sutiono; Hirohiko Suwa; Toshizumi Ohta

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Minimum-mirror-area single-stage solar concentrators  

SciTech Connect

A means of generating a comcentrating mirror of minimum size for a given average flux-concentration output is outlined. The method is useful for acceptance angles typical of those required for tilting and tracking solar concentrators and can result in substantial cost savings when expensive mirrors (i.e.,glass) are used. Comparisons are made with compound parabolic concentrators.

Mills, D.; Harting, E.; Giutronich, J.E.; Cellich, W.; Morton, A.; Walker, I.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Quantum games and minimum entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyze Nash's equilibrium (maximum utility MU) and its relations with the order state(minimum entropy ME). I introduce the concept of minimum entropy as a paradigm of both Nash-Hayek's equilibrium. The ME concept is related to Quantum Games. ...

Edward Jiménez

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

User acceptance OTM machine: in the Arab culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

User acceptance and support is one of the most important factors in determining the success or failure of information technology systems. Behavioural biometrics mostly have the characteristics needed for effortless acceptance, such as easiness and usefulness ...

Abdullah A. Rashed; Henrique M. Dinis Santos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901...

23

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies SylviaWe assess alternative research designs for minimum wageAllegretto: Institute for Research on Labor and Employment,

Allegretto, Sylvia; Dube, Arindrajit; Reich, Michael; Zipperer, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors Section 313 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 raised Federal minimum efficiency standards for...

26

Order acceptance using genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses a genetic algorithm to solve the order-acceptance problem with tardiness penalties. We compare the performance of a myopic heuristic and a genetic algorithm, both of which do job acceptance and sequencing, using an upper bound based on ... Keywords: Genetic algorithms, Order acceptance, Scheduling

Walter O. Rom; Susan A. Slotnick

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Consumers (Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure) Consumer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSUMERS (CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE AND CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE) EV Everywhere Workshop July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Session 1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance...

29

Acceptance Test Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptance Test Plan Acceptance Test Plan This template is used to document the plan for performing the systems acceptance test, the roles and responsibilities of individuals...

30

Selection of minimum earthquake intensity in calculating pipe failure probabilities  

SciTech Connect

In a piping reliability analysis, it is sometimes necessary to specify a minimum ground motion intensity, usually the peak acceleration, below which the ground motions are not considered as earthquakes and, hence, are neglected. The calculated probability of failure of a piping system is dependent on this selected minimum earthquake intensity chosen for the analysis. A study was conducted to determine the effects of the minimum earthquake intensity on the probability of pipe failure. The results indicated that the probability of failure of the piping system is not very sensitive to the variations of the selected minimum peak ground acceleration. However, it does have significant effects on various scenarios that make up the system failure.

Lo, T.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays.

Blackaby, W.B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Minimum wear tube support hole design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet: D2L105 Magnet: D2L105 Date of this summary: 20 August 2003 This document has a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets with the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance Status: The BNL committee has approved the magnet for shipment to CERN. However, several items need further work: * CERN acceptance of the waiver on pipe positions in the interconnect region * Determine LHC part number, sign "BNL acceptance" certificate, make official name plate * BNL/CERN resolve dry N2 fill of cold mass before shipment * Decision about tracking: use FQ data available now or wait for all D2 FQ data. * Software to rotate the survey and field angle data into the magnet frame

34

Zero forcing parameters and minimum rank problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zero forcing number Z(G), which is the minimum number of vertices in a zero forcing set of a graph G, is used to study the maximum nullity / minimum rank of the family of symmetric matrices described by G. It is shown that for a connected graph of order at least two, no vertex is in every zero forcing set. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number Z_+(G) is introduced, and shown to be equal to |G|-OS(G), where OS(G) is the recently defined ordered set number that is a lower bound for minimum positive semidefinite rank. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number is applied to the computation of positive semidefinite minimum rank of certain graphs. An example of a graph for which the real positive symmetric semidefinite minimum rank is greater than the complex Hermitian positive semidefinite minimum rank is presented.

Barioli, Francesco; Fallat, Shaun M; Hall, H Tracy; Hogben, Leslie; Shader, Bryan; Driessche, P van den; van der Holst, Hein

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Process of Fixing the British National Minimum Wage, 1997-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to negotiate, with embedded mediation, a level of minimum wage that has been not only 19 acceptable to government but also, at time of writing, overwhelmingly benign in its economic and social impact. The author is grateful for the comments of David...

Brown, William

36

Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid Electricity Advisory Committee June 6, 2013 Thanks To * Sonny Popowsky * Sue Kelly * Phyllis Reha * Bob Curry * Paul Centolella * Chris Peters * David Till * Paul Hudson * Tom Sloan * Wanda Reder Paper Objective * End-Use Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid Critical To Infrastructure Investments Being Fully Realized * While Utilities & Regulators Have Prime Role In Shaping SG, There Is Role For DOE As Facilitator & Educator * Focus Of This Paper Is On Systems Installed Inside Homes & Businesses Issues Experienced In Early Smart Grid Roll-Outs * Initial Resistance By Some End-Use Consumer Groups To Smart Grid Installation * Early Technology Roll-Outs Were Not Prepared For This Pushback * Since These Initial Efforts, Lessons-Learned

37

Cape Charles - STIP Minimum Sustainability Requirements (Virginia...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cape Charles - STIP Minimum Sustainability Requirements (Virginia) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as...

38

Parabolic equations without a minimum principle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, we consider several parabolic equations for which the minimum principle fails. We first consider a two-point boundary value problem for a one… (more)

Pang, Huadong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Toward an acceptable nuclear future  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear option is in danger of being foreclosed. The trend toward antinuclearism may be reversed if concerns about low-level radiation insult can be shown ultimately to be without foundation; evidence for this speculation is presented. Nevertheless it is suggested that the nuclear enterprise itself must propose new initiatives to increase the acceptability of nuclear energy. A key element of an acceptable nuclear future is cluster siting of reactors. This siting plan might be achieved by confining new reactors essentially to existing sites.

Weinberg, A.M.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Acceptable Materials for Recycling at Colorado State University Mixed Paper -Acceptable Items  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acceptable Materials for Recycling at Colorado State University Mixed Paper - Acceptable Items - Acceptable Items Refrigerators Microwave ovens Electrical Equipment: computers, monitors, TV's, etc. Remember

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY...

42

W-025, acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This acceptance test report (ATR) has been prepared to establish the results of the field testing conducted on W-025 to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation systems functioned as intended by design. This is part of the RMW Land Disposal Facility.

Roscha, V.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

L-286 Acceptance Test Record  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

HARMON, B.C.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Stochastic Variational Approach to Minimum Uncertainty States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schr\\"{o}dinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials.

F. Illuminati; L. Viola

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

A New Minimum Temperature Record for Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A minimum temperature of ?31°F (?35°C) was recorded at Nowata, Oklahoma, on 10 February 2011. This exceeded the previous record minimum temperature for Oklahoma of ?27°F (?32.8°C). The Nowata station is in the Oklahoma Mesonet network. High pressure was ...

Gary McManus; Thomas W. Schmidlin; Christopher A. Fiebrich

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

Ulloa, Osvaldo

49

Parabolic equations without a minimum principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we consider several parabolic equations for which the minimum principle fails. We first consider a two-point boundary value problem for a one dimensional diffusion equation. We show the uniqueness and ...

Pang, Huadong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A branch-and-cut algorithm for the minimum labeling Hamiltonian cycle problem and two variants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a mathematical model, valid inequalities and polyhedral results for the minimum labeling Hamiltonian cycle problem. This problem is defined on an unweighted graph in which each edge has a label. The aim is to determine a Hamiltonian ... Keywords: Branch-and-cut, Minimum labeling problem, Traveling salesman problem

Nicolas Jozefowiez; Gilbert Laporte; Frédéric Semet

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Towards a Conceptual Model of User Acceptance of Location-Based Emergency Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the introduction of location-based services by government as part of an all-hazards approach to modern emergency management solutions. Its main contribution is in exploring the determinants of an individual's acceptance or rejection ... Keywords: Acceptance, Location-Based Emergency Services, Privacy, Risk, Service Quality, Technology Acceptance Model TAM, Theory of Reasoned Action TRA, Trust, Visibility

Anas Aloudat, Katina Michael

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Building Information Modeling - A Minimum Mathematical Configuration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current context, the standardization of building construction is not limited to a specific country or to a specific building code. Trade globalization has emphasized the need for standardization in the process of exchange of design information, whether it is in the form of drawings or documents. Building Information Modeling is the latest transformational technology that supports interactive development of design information for buildings. No single Building Information Modeling software package is used in the Architecture Engineering Construction and Facilities Management industries, which is strength as new ideas develop, but a hindrance as the new ideas flow at a different pace into the various programs. The standards divergence of various software results in a limited ability to exchange data between and within projects, especially one sees the difficulty in moving data from one program to another. The Document eXchange File format represents an early attempt to standardize the exchange of drawing information by Autodesk. However, the data was limited to geometric data required for the production of plotted drawings. Metadata in a Building Information Model provides a method to add information to the basic geometric configuration provided in a Document eXchange File. Building Information Model programs use data structures to define smart objects that encapsulate building data in a searchable and robust format. Due to the complexity of building designs eXtensible Markup Language schemas of three dimensional models are often large files that can contain considerable amounts of superfluous information. The aim of this research is to exclude all the superfluous information from the design information and determine the absolute minimum information required to execute the construction of a project. A plain concrete beam element was used as the case study for this research. The results show that a minimal information schema can be developed for a simple building element. Further research is required on more complex elements.

Bhandare, Ruchika

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Minimum error discrimination of Pauli channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the problem of discriminating with minimum error probability two given Pauli channels. We show that, differently from the case of discrimination between unitary transformations, the use of entanglement with an ancillary system can strictly improve the discrimination, and any maximally entangled state allows to achieve the optimal discrimination. We also provide a simple necessary and sufficient condition in terms of the structure of the channels for which the ultimate minimum error probability can be achieved without entanglement assistance. When such a condition is satisfied, the optimal input state is simply an eigenstate of one of the Pauli matrices.

Massimiliano F. Sacchi

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY...

55

Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minimum Efficiency Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

56

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the RSC Publishing peer Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the RSC Publishing peer review process and has been accepted for publication. Accepted Manuscripts are published online shortly after acceptance, which is prior to technical editing, formatting and proof reading. This free service from RSC Publishing allows authors to make their results available to the community, in citable form, before publication of the edited article. This Accepted Manuscript will be replaced by the edited and formatted Advance Article as soon as this is available. To cite this manuscript please use its permanent Digital Object Identifier (DOI®), which is identical for all formats of publication. More information about Accepted Manuscripts can be found in the Information for Authors.

57

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the holiday season approaches, it is important to remember there are restrictions on Federal employees accepting gifts from outside sources and from other Federal employees. Just as there is no "working lunch" exception to the gift prohibition, there is no "holiday party" exception. A gift includes anything of monetary value, including a gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, training, transportation, lodging, and meals. Gifts from outside sources. Generally, as a Federal employee, you may not solicit or accept a gift (1) from a "prohibited source" or (2) if given because of your official position. A "prohibited

58

SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describe & report the overall SAPHIRE 8 Software acceptance test paln to offically release the SAPHIRE version 8 software to the NRC custoer for distribution.

Ted S. Wood; Curtis L. Smith

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Venture Acceleration Fund now accepting 2012 applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 applications Venture Acceleration Fund now accepting 2012 applications The three companies selected will receive up to 100,000 each to commercialize technology and take it to...

60

Multiport riser and flange assemblies acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the multiport riser (MPR) and multiport flange (MPF) assemblies. The accepted MPR and MPF assemblies will be used in support of the hydrogen mitigation project for double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 and other related projects. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and interface features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The objectives of the acceptance testing were as follows: Basic equipment functions and mechanical interfaces were verified; Installation and removal of equipment were demonstrated to the degree possible; Operation of the decon spray system and all valving was confirmed; and the accumulated leak rate of the MPR and MPF assemblies was determined.

Precechtel, D.R.; Schroeder, B.K.

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation containers  

SciTech Connect

The design criteria currently used in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transportation containers are taken from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME, 1992). These load-based criteria are ideally suited for pressure vessels where the loading is quasistatic and all stresses are in equilibrium with externally applied loads. For impact events, the use of load-based criteria is less supportable. Impact events tend to be energy controlled, and thus, energy-based acceptance criteria would appear to be more appropriate. Determination of an ideal design criteria depends on what behavior is desired. Currently there is not a design criteria for inelastic analysis for RAM nation packages that is accepted by the regulatory agencies. This lack of acceptance criteria is one of the major factors in limiting the use of inelastic analysis. In this paper inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress and strain-energy density will be compared for two stainless steel test units subjected to impacts onto an unyielding target. Two different material models are considered for the inelastic analysis, a bilinear fit of the stress-strain curve and a power law hardening model that very closely follows the stress-strain curve. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate discussion and research into the area of strain-energy density based inelastic analysis acceptance criteria.

Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy - Consumer Acceptance Group B Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'B' 'B' Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Consumer Education/Emotion * Vehicle Exposure - butts in seats (ride & drive, car sharing, IT/phones, rental fleets) * Consumers understanding their needs * Range anxiety/opportunity * Customer Personal Value Proposition * Charging Exposure * Start small (battery size and charging level), move complicated * Marketing * Got Milk? * Patriotism, etc., in place of only green focus * Creating Demand * Emphasize fun/cool/patriotism (again) * Make & model availability * Workplace/public Charging * Multi-unit * V2G * Signage * Financial Incentives Consumer Acceptance 'B' July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure

66

Geometric Complexity and Minimum Description Length Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of how one should decide among competing explanations of data is at the heart of the scientific enterprise. Quantitative methods of selecting among models have been advanced over the years without an underlying theoretical framework to guide the enterprise and evaluate new developments. In this paper, we show that differential geometry provides a unified understanding of the model selection problem. Foremost among its contributions is a reconceptualization of the problem as one of counting probability distributions. This reconceptualization naturally leads to development of a "geometric" complexity measure, which turns out to be equal to the Minimum Description Length (MDL) complexity measure Rissanen (1996) recently proposed. We demonstrate an application of the geometric complexity measure to model selection in cognitive psychology, with models of cognitive modeling in three different areas (psychophysics, information integration, categorization).

In Jae Myung; Shaobo Zhang; Mark A. Pitt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Wind Energy Community Acceptance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wind Energy Community Acceptance Jump to: navigation, search In 2012 in Lamar, Colorado, Bob Emick (center, back to camera and Greg Emich (right in cowboy hat) talk about the 98 1.5-megawatt wind turbines on their ranch. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 21768 The following resources address community acceptance topics. Baring-Gould, I. (June 5, 2012). Social Acceptance of Wind Energy: Managing and Evaluating Its Market Impacts. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Accessed August 14, 2013. This presentation offers background information on social acceptance issues, results of surveys conducted by the New England Wind Forum at a

68

Modeling gap acceptance at freeway merges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a merging model that captures the gap acceptance behavior of drivers that merge from a ramp into a congested freeway. Merging can be classified into three types: normal, forced and cooperative lane ...

Lee, Gunwoo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers information about the physical, dielectric, chemical, and environmental properties of transformer fluids and their operational impacts. Companies can use this information to choose environmentally acceptable green fluids.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

The elusive minimum viable population size for white sturgeon  

SciTech Connect

Biological conservation of sturgeon populations is a concern for many species. Those responsible for managing the white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and similar species are interested in identifying extinction thresholds to avoid. Two thresholds that exist in theory are the minimum viable population size (MVP) and minimum amount of suitable habitat. In this paper, we present both model and empirical estimates of these thresholds. We modified a population viability analysis (PVA) model for white sturgeon to include two new Allee mechanisms. Despite this, PVA-based MVP estimates were unrealistically low compared with empirical estimates unless opportunities for spawning were assumed to be less frequent. PVA results revealed a trade-off between MVP and habitat thresholds; smaller populations persisted in longer river segments and vice versa. Our empirical analyses suggested (1) a MVP range based on population trends from 1,194 to 27,700 individuals, and (2) a MVP estimate of 4,000 individuals based on recruitment. Long-term historical population surveys are needed for more populations to pinpoint an MVP based on trends, whereas the available data were sufficient to estimate MVP based on recruitment. Beyond the MVP, we developed a hierarchical model for population status based on empirical data. Metapopulation support was the most important predictor of population health, followed by the length of free-flowing habitat, with habitat thresholds at 26 and 150 km. Together, these results suggest that habitat and connectivity are important determinants of population status that likely influence the site-specific MVP thresholds.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Lepla, Ken B. [Idaho Power Company; Van Winkle, Webb [Van Windle Environmental Consulting; James, Mr Brad [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; McAdam, Dr Steve [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Comparative Study of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures over Argentina: NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis versus Station Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares surface-station temperature observations over Argentina with gridpoint analyses available in the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis dataset. The primary objective is to determine whether the maximum and minimum surface temperatures from the ...

Matilde M. Rusticucci; Vernon E. Kousky

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Lakeview GCAP Acceptance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakeview GCAP Acceptance Lakeview GCAP Acceptance Lakeview GCAP Acceptance July 12, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis The Lakeview, Oregon, Processing Site's groundwater compliance action plan (GCAP) received U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concurrence last month. This makes Lakeview the first Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, as amended, Title I site where a finalized GCAP has selected a "no remediation" compliance strategy because concentration limits for regulated constituents have been met. Lakeview, Oregon, location map. The Lakeview processing site, located in south-central Oregon, was once a privately owned and operated facility that processed uranium ore from the nearby Lucky Lass and White King mines from 1958 through 1960. The 258-acre site, including the areas formerly occupied

73

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is intended to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) consists of three tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, and Technology Verification. As currently conceived, the ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. This report covers activities during the first 6 months of the 3-year ETA program.

Christina B. Behr-Andres

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors October 7, 2013 - 11:28am Addthis Section 313 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 raised Federal minimum efficiency standards for general-purpose, single-speed, polyphase induction motors of 1 to 500 horsepower (hp). This new standard took effect in December 2010. The new minimum efficiency levels match FEMP's performance requirement for these motors. As a result of this increase in mandatory minimum standards and combined with the lack of significant availability of motors exceeding these standards, FEMP is suspending the purchasing specification for electric motors. Federal buyers may select for purchase any motor that meets design requirements.

78

Acceptance test report: Backup power system  

SciTech Connect

Acceptance Test Report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 Backup Power System. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. Backup power includes a single 125 KW diesel generator, three 10-kva uninterruptible power supply units, and all necessary control.

Cole, D.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analyzing Electronic Book Acceptance: A Compatibility Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The digitization is posing great challenges to the European book industry. While some national markets show a fair diffusion of electronic book (ebook) technology, others are still resisting the digital trend. The lack of differentiated knowledge about ... Keywords: Electronic Book Adoption, Technology Acceptance, Compatibility

Jin Gerlach, Peter Buxmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

Pearce, K.L.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

84

Minimum Concave Cost Flow Over a Grid Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 12, 2012 ... Abstract The minimum concave cost network flow problem ... a grid network with a general nonnegative separable concave cost function.

85

Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 11, 2010 ... Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents. Claudia Marini( nicosia ***at*** dia.uniroma3.it) Gaia Nicosia(nicosia ***at*** ...

86

Minimum Concave Cost Flow Over a Grid Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 12, 2012 ... Abstract: The minimum concave cost network flow problem (MCCNFP) is NP- hard, but efficient polynomial-time algorithms exist for some ...

87

Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

do not require qualified personnel, or when internal costs proportional to skills are incurred .... In conclusion, we tackle four different versions of the minimum cost ...

88

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to...

89

Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

Stewart, Frank J.

90

Study on optimal train movement for minimum energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The presented thesis project is a study on train energy consumption calculation and optimal train driving strategies for minimum energy consumption. This study is… (more)

Gkortzas, Panagiotis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts Title Estimate of...

92

An Efficient Algorithm for Computing Robust Minimum Capacity st Cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 20, 2008 ... Abstract: The Minimum Capacity s-t Cut Problem (Min Cut) is an intensively studied problem in combinatorial optimization. In this paper, we ...

93

Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

94

On the complexity of maximizing the minimum Shannon capacity in ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 18, 2010 ... On the complexity of maximizing the minimum Shannon capacity in wireless networks by joint channel assignment and power allocation.

95

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air conditioning in the building are provided using the minimum energy value that does not violate physical law.

Tanskyi, O.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Characterization of imaging phone cameras using minimum description length principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach for the characterization of a mobile phone's color camera is presented. The use of high-order polynomials, Fourier sine series, and artificial neural networks (ANN) for solving this problem ... Keywords: artificial neural network, high-order polynomial, imaging mobile phone, minimum description length

Adrian Burian; Aki Happonen; Mihaela Cirlugea

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem M. Chyba Department of Mathematics 2565 McCarthy Mall for a class of underwater vehicles. We focus on the situation of initial and final configurations at rest In this paper we pursue the analysis of the minimum time problem for a special class of underwater vehicles, see

Sontag, Eduardo

99

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem M. Chyba Department of Mathematics 2565 McCarthy Mall for a class of underwater vehicles. We focus on the situation of initial and final configurations at rest the analysis of the minimum time problem for a special class of underwater vehicles, see [5], [6] for previous

Sussmann, Hector

100

Short title: STOCHASTIC VARIATIONAL APPROACH TO MINIMUM UNCERTAINTY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schrödinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials. PACS numbers:03.65.-w, 03.65.Ca, 03.65.Bz 1.

Fabrizio Illuminati; Lorenza Viola

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing.

Keck, R.D.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

Minimum error discrimination between similarity-transformed quantum states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the well-known necessary and sufficient conditions for minimum error discrimination (MED), we extract an equivalent form for the MED conditions. In fact, by replacing the inequalities corresponding to the MED conditions with an equivalent but more suitable and convenient identity, the problem of mixed state discrimination with optimal success probability is solved. Moreover, we show that the mentioned optimality conditions can be viewed as a Helstrom family of ensembles under some circumstances. Using the given identity, MED between N similarity transformed equiprobable quantum states is investigated. In the case that the unitary operators are generating a set of irreducible representation, the optimal set of measurements and corresponding maximum success probability of discrimination can be determined precisely. In particular, it is shown that for equiprobable pure states, the optimal measurement strategy is the square-root measurement (SRM), whereas for the mixed states, SRM is not optimal. In the case that the unitary operators are reducible, there is no closed-form formula in the general case, but the procedure can be applied in each case in accordance to that case. Finally, we give the maximum success probability of optimal discrimination for some important examples of mixed quantum states, such as generalized Bloch sphere m-qubit states, spin-j states, particular nonsymmetric qudit states, etc.

Jafarizadeh, M. A. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sufiani, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazhari Khiavi, Y. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests.

Watson, T.L.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations

105

The Surface of Acceptability in Virtual Faces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the surface properties of skin and eyes and their importance in the acceptance and success of a digital human face, specifically in relation to the uncanny valley. The uncanny valley hypothesis states that as a human representation approaches photo-realism, subtle differences from reality become unsettling. Recent studies suggest that the uncanny valley could exist over a far greater range, affecting abstract human representations as well. These competing findings are explored by analyzing how changes to the surface of a digital character affect its level of acceptance. A female facial model is used as a base to compare a spectrum of different simulated real-world materials. The variations range from materials that are nearly identical to human skin, to those that are completely divergent from it, thus unnatural. After studying this catalogue of materials, it is concluded that given the right conditions, the uncanny valley can occur when facial representations are very near realism, as well as when human-likeness is quite distant from reality.

Andreason, Scot Philip

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Trends of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in Northern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of testing the homogeneity of the basic data used in this study, that is, the mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature (as derived from daily observations) of several long-term climatological stations of ...

Ramon A. Quintana-Gomez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Theory and Applications of the Minimum Spanning Tree Rank Histogram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A minimum spanning tree (MST) rank histogram (RH) is a multidimensional ensemble reliability verification tool. The construction of debiased, decorrelated, and covariance-homogenized MST RHs is described. Experiments using Euclidean L2, variance, ...

Daniel Gombos; James A. Hansen; Jun Du; Jeff McQueen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in reservoir impoundments or parts...

109

Minimum Purchase Price Regulations (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minimum Purchase Price Regulations establish the price which utilities must pay for power produced by large-scale renewable energy generators – that is those capable of producing more than 100...

110

Minimum Wage Effects Across State Borders: Estimates Using Contiguous Counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on earnings and employment in restaurants and other low-wageOur primary focus is on restaurants, since they are the mostof minimum wages on restaurant earnings, but the local

Dube, Andrajit; Lester, T. William; Reich, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

What Solar Oscillation Tell us About the Solar Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of continuous helioseismic data for two consecutive solar minima has provided a unique opportunity to study the changes in the solar interior that might have led to this unusual minimum. We present preliminary analysis of inter mediate-degree mode frequencies in the 3 mHz band during the current period of minimal solar activity and show that the mode frequencies are significantly lower than those during the previous activity minimum. Our analysis do not show any signature of the beginning of cycle 24 till the end of 2008. In addition, the zonal and meridional flow patterns inferred from inverting frequencies also hint for a delayed onset of a new cycle. The estimates of travel time are higher than the previous minimum confirming a relatively weak solar activity during the current minimum.

Jain, Kiran; Burtseva, O; Hernandez, I Gonzalez; Hill, F; Howe, R; Kholikov, S; Komm, R; Leibacher, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An Efficient Algorithm for Computing Robust Minimum Capacity st Cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2008 ... The Minimum Capacity s-t Cut Problem (Min Cut) is an intensively ... In this paper, we study Min Cut when arc capacities are uncertain but ...

113

Do We Know of Any Maunder Minimum Stars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most stars previously identified as Maunder minimum stars are old stars evolved off of the main sequence. Analysis of activity measurements from the California and Carnegie Planet Search program stars and Hipparcos parallaxes implies that the canonical age-chromospheric activity relation breaks down for stars older than $\\sim 6$ Gyr when activity is calculated from Mount Wilson S values. Stars only 1 magnitude above the main sequence exhibit significantly suppressed activity levels which have been mistaken for examples of Maunder minimum behavior.

Jason T. Wright

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Risk-embedded Bayesian acceptance sampling plans via conditional value-at-risk with Type II censoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acceptance sampling plan is usually determined by minimizing the expectation of the sum of the relevant costs involved. This expected cost minimization approach, however, could result in a great cost at a probability that is unacceptable to a decision ... Keywords: Bayesian acceptance sampling, Conditional value-at-risk, Life distribution, Reliability, Risk aversion, Type II censoring

Chung-Chi Hsieh, Yu-Ting Lu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Satellite power system (SPS) public acceptance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a preliminary perspective on the public acceptability of the Solar Satellite Power System (SPS) Program, and a means to monitor it. A literature review and informal contacts with interest groups likely to take a position on the program reveal a number of concerns (anti-SPS arguments), as well as potential benefits (pro-SPS arguments). The concerns expressed include: environmental issues (microwaves, high altitude air pollution from space launches, land use), the program's cost in dollars, energy and other resources; communications interference; military implications; ownership and control of the system (particularly strengthening the power of utility monopolies); SPS as representing a centralized, high technology hard energy policy (rather than a decentralized smaller-scale soft approach); and the fear that SPS might dominate solar R and D budgets at the expense of decentralized solar technologies. Pro-SPS arguments stress its efficiency compared to terrestrial solar applications (i.e. virtually continuous exposure, no atmospheric attenuation). The program could be a major contributor to solving America's (and the world's) long-term energy crisis. It would improve our balance of payments; create many jobs both directly and through technology spinoffs; advance the space program; strengthen the U.S. position as a world leader in high technology; provide a great boost to American national pride; and would be environmentally preferable to alternative power generation technologies (e.g. coal, nuclear). Several key issues in SPS acceptability are: the outcome (and credibility) of future research into program environmental and non-environmental impacts, and the comparison of SPS impacts with those of alternative energy options. Recommendations for future research are given.

Bachrach, A.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

117

Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027.

Freeman, R.D.

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system. Acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on Flammable Gas Watch List waste tank 104-AN. This document is the acceptance test report for the acceptance testing of the SHMS.

Lott, D.T.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

Automatic Minimum and Maximum Alarm Thresholds for Quality Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated quality control is a necessity for meteorological measurement networks because of an ever-increasing number of measurements. One of the basic quality control tests is to check that the observations fall into a range of acceptable ...

Vesa Hasu; Ari Aaltonen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial SPR Bids Initial SPR Bids DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids April 4, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy today said that it had reviewed, and deemed unacceptable, the bids that it had received in response to a solicitation to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The Office of Fossil Energy determined that the bids were too high and not a reasonable value for taxpayers. In keeping with Secretary Bodman's commitment to fill the SPR in a deliberate, predictable, and transparent manner, consistent with the Department's updated guidelines that were announced in November 2006, the Office of Fossil Energy will issue another solicitation for bids in mid-April.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations apply to all dams and structures which impound or divert waters on rivers or their tributaries, with some exceptions. The

123

Development and Online Opertation of Minimum Bias Triggers in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of minimum bias triggers should allow for a highly efficient selection on pp-collisions, while minimising any possible bias in the event selection. In ATLAS two main minimum bias triggers have been developed using complementary technologies. A hardware based first level trigger, consisting of 32 plastic scintillators, has proven to efficienctly select pp-interactions. In particular during the start-up phase this trigger played a crucial role for the commissioning of the central trigger processor and detector sub-systems. A complementary selection is achieved by a multi-level minimum bias trigger, seeded off a random trigger on filled bunches. For the event selection at higher trigger levels a dedicated algorithm was developed, able to cope with around 86 millions of detector signals per bunch-crossing. We will present these trigger systems and their deployment online, highlighting their performance and trigger efficiencies. We outline as well the operation with increasing beam intensities and lumin...

Martin, T; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

MIT validation probe acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Multi-Functional Instrument Trees (MITs) a Validation Probe is being fabricated by Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). The Validation Probe assembly is equipped with a Winch, depth counter, and a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) which will render a means for verifying the temperature readings of which will render a means for verifying the temperature readings of the MIT thermocouples. The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to provide verification that the Validation Probe functions properly and accordingly to LANL design and specification. This ATP will be used for all Validation Probes procured from LANL. The ATP consists of a receiving inspection, RTD ambient temperature; RTD electrical failure, RTD insulation resistance, and accurate depth counter operation inspections. The Validation Probe is composed of an intank probe, a cable and winching system, and a riser extension (probe guide) which bolts onto the MIT. The validation`s thermal sensor is an RTD that is housed in a 0.062 inch diameter, magnesium oxide fill, 316 stainless steel tube. The sheath configuration provides a means for spring loading the sensor firmly against the validation tube`s inner wall. A 45 pound cylindrical body is connected above the sheath and is used as a force to lower the probe into the tank. This cylindrical body also provides the means to interconnect both electrically and mechanically to the winch system which lowers the probe to a specified location within the validation tube located in the tank.

Escamilla, S.A.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electric top drives gain wide industry acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its introduction, the top drive drilling system has gained acceptance as a productive and safe method for drilling oil and gas wells. Originally, the system was used mostly for offshore and higher cost land drilling, and it had to be installed as a permanent installation because of its enormous weight and size. Essentially, a top drive replaces the kelly and rotary table as the means of rotating drillpipe on oil, gas and geothermal rigs and is considered to be 15% to 40% more efficient than a kelly drive. Top drive systems allow the operator to drill and maintain directional orientation for triple stands and provide tripping efficiency because of the ability to ream and circulate with triple stands, to reduce the risk of stuck pipe or lost wells, and to improve well control and pipe handling safety. The paper describes electric top drives with DC motors, top drives with AC motors, top drives with permanent magnet motors, and top drives with permanent magnet brushless synchronous motors.

Riahi, M.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, D2L102 1, D2L102 Date of this summary: 30 December 2003. This document contains a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets with the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance status: The BNL committee has approved the magnets for shipment to CERN, assuming satisfactory completion of several items: * Survey of the pipe positions [completed-see [1]] * Sign "BNL acceptance" certificate -[signed 17 December 2003] * Make official nameplate - [completed as of 29 Dec.] * Apply "BNL" decal - [completed as of 29 Dec.] The following items are needed for MEB acceptance: * ·Review and acceptance of the survey data by CERN - see [4]

127

ATLAS measurements of minimum bias and soft QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first measurements of charged particle production in proton?proton collisions at center?of?mass energy s ?=?900? GeV and 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Minimum bias distributions are measured for events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic range |?| 500? MeV and compared with the predictions from various Monte Carlo models. Activity in the underlying event was measured with respect to the highest p T track in the event. Both the minimum bias and underlying event measurements are fully corrected for detector effects to obtain distributions at the hadron level.

Maaike Limper; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Compliance of clinical trial registries with the World Health Organization minimum data set: a survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organization minimum data set: a survey Lorenzo P Moja* 1 ,of the WHO minimum data set. Methods: A retrospectivethe launch of the WHO minimum data set seemed to positively

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recent State Minimum Temperature Records in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State minimum temperature records were set or tied in Indiana (?37.8°C) and Kentucky (?38.3°C) in January 1994, and in Illinois (?37.2°C), Iowa (?43.9°C), Minnesota (?51.1°C), and Wisconsin (?48.3°C) in February 1996. The veracity of these ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Minimum-outage broadcast in wireless networks with fading channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of cooperative broadcasting for minimum outage in wireless networks. We consider wireless multihop broadcast as a set of transmitters that transmit in a certain order. The receiving nodes are able to combine all the previous transmissions ... Keywords: broadcast, multicast, outage, wireless networks

Tolga Girici; Gulizar Duygu Kurt

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Power Allocations in Minimum-Energy SER Constrained Cooperative Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Power Allocations in Minimum-Energy SER Constrained Cooperative Networks Behrouz Maham-Spring). Behrouz Maham and Are Hjørungnes are with UNIK ­ University Graduate Center, University of Oslo, Norway. Behrouz Maham is currently a visiting scholar at Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION Seungjin on the variance of decon­ volved signal. We also consider the maximum negen­ tropy principle and show that the CME version, without any prior knowledge (such as channel impulse response, training data). As the demand

Choi, Seungjin

134

A faster distributed protocol for constructing a minimum spanning tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the problem of constructing a minimum-weight spanning tree (MST) in a distributed network. This is one of the most important problems in the area of distributed computing. There is a long line of gradually improving protocols ...

Michael Elkin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Minimum cost multiple multicast network coding with quantized rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider multiple multicast sessions with intra-session network coding where rates over all links are integer multiples of a basic rate. Although having quantized rates over communication links is quite common, conventional minimum ... Keywords: Decomposition algorithm, Multicast networks, Network coding

M. A. Raayatpanah; H. Salehi Fathabadi; B. H. Khalaj; S. Khodayifar

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

THE SOLAR CYCLE AT THE MAUNDER MINIMUM EPOCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE SOLAR CYCLE AT THE MAUNDER MINIMUM EPOCH HIROKO MIYAHARA, DMITRY SOKOLOFF and ILYA G. USOSKIN Solar-Terrestrial Environmental Laboratory, Nagoya University Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601, Japan Department minima, when the solar dynamo was in a special mode. We review available sets of direct and indirect data

Usoskin, Ilya G.

137

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Situ Recovery Uranium Mine based on a statistical analysis of data publicly available to help determine with in-situ uranium mining is the potential for spreading groundwater contamination. There is a dearth of detailed analysis and information regarding the outcome10 of in-situ uranium mine remediation to ascertain

Borch, Thomas

138

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

appendix 5. Present: Anerella, Cozzolino, Escallier, Hocker, Jain, Killian, Muratore, Pilat, Plate, Porretto, Wanderer, Willen Information added after the acceptance meeting is...

139

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Monday, July 30, 2012 - LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA Event Objective: DOE aims to obtain stakeholder input on...

140

March 18, 2005, Department letter accepting Board Recommendation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors as intrinsically safe form or containerization of the nuclear hazards, declining nuclear material inventories, and planned decommissioning in the near future. We accept...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Admission REQUiREmEnTsnsC PROGRAMME MINIMUM ADMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCEPTANCE LEVEL SELECTION PROCEDURES HEALTH SCIENCES · Bachelor of Medicine and Bach- elor of Surgery - MB BCh (6 years) · Bachelor of Pharmacy ­ BPharm (4 years) · Bachelor of Dental Science ­ BDS (5 years) · Bachelor of Science in Physio- therapy ­ BSc(Physiotherapy) (4 years) · Bachelor of Health Sciences (Bio

Wagner, Stephan

142

MINIMUM EMITTANCE LATTICE FOR SYNCHROTRON RADIATION STORAGE RINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MINIMUM EMITTANCE LATTICE FOR MINIMUM EMITTANCE LATTICE FOR SYNCHROTRON RADIATION STORAGE RINGS 1. C. Teng ANL/FNAL LS-17 L. Teng March 18, 1985 The natural emittance of an electron beam in a storage ring is given by (see e.g., M. Sands, SLAC 21) (1) where Cq =~~= 3.832 x 10-l3 m 32/3 mc J x partition factor in the bending plane y = total energy in mc 2 uni ts p orbit radius in bending magnets (assumed the same in all magne ts) H yn 2 - + 2ann ' + Bn I 2 ( a, B, Y = betatron functions ) n, n I dispersion functions <> = averaging over bending magnets We shall calculate for each bending magnet, then average over all magnets. 2 A. General Expression for H This can be calculated in a straightforward manner, but we can save a great deal of arithmetic with some preliminary formal analytical

143

Minimum/maximum excitation limiter performance goals for small generation  

SciTech Connect

Small generators connected to the utility system often act as followers as they tend to follow system bus voltage variations. For the lack of kVA capacity, small machines tend to be susceptible to becoming over or under excited (excessive Vars in or Vars out of the generator) as the voltage regulator tries to maintain its setpoint with variations in system bus voltage. Minimum and maximum excitation limiters are utilized to limit the voltage regulator characteristic response to system bus voltage changes, that can otherwise result in machine overheating and/or pulling out of synchronization. This paper reviews the operating performance of minimum and maximum excitation limiters used on small machines, and provides the user typical performance expectations. The examples will highlight both main field and exciter field applications. Lastly, conditions will be reviewed that may occur during excitation limiter initial startup that can affect their ability to be initially tuned.

Eberly, T.W.; Schaefer, R.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The minimum-uncertainty coherent states for Landau levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Glauber minimum-uncertainty coherent states with two variables for Landau levels, based on the representation of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra by two different modes, have been studied about four decades ago. Here, we introduce new two-variable coherent states with minimum uncertainty relationship for Landau levels in three different methods: the infinite unitary representation of su(1, 1) is realized in two different methods, first, by consecutive levels with the same energy gaps and also with the same value for z-angular momentum quantum number, then, by shifting z-angular momentum mode number by two units while the energy level remaining the same. Besides, for su(2), whether by lowest Landau levels or Landau levels with lowest z-angular momentum, just one finite unitary representation is introduced. Having constructed the generalized Klauder-Perelomov coherent states, for any of the three representations, we obtain their Glauber coherency by displacement operator of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra.

Dehghani, A. [Physics Department, Payame Noor University, P. O. Box 19395-4697 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhri, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, P. O. Box 51666-16471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mojaveri, B. [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, P. O. Box 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

JBIG2 Symbol Dictionary Design Based on Minimum Spanning Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The JBIG2 standard is a very flexible bi-level image coding strategy based on pattern matching. The encoder collects a set of symbols in a dictionary and encodes a page by reference to the dictionary symbols. JBIG2 allows the encoder to view all symbols and choose a good set for the dictionary. In this paper, we examine the bit rate trade-off that arises in choosing different dictionary sizes. In particular, we propose a suboptimal dictionary design technique based on minimum spanning trees. This technique gives competitive compression ratios and allows us to specify the dictionary size almost arbitrarily, thus providing a way to study the bit rate trade-off problem in detail. Keywords: JBIG2, Text image compression, Symbol dictionary, Minimum spanning tree 1

Yan Ye; Pamela Cosman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Impact of Minimum Load Operation on Steam Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some utilities, as part of a fleet management strategy, are keeping baseload-design plants that are not competitive for 24/7 dispatch at minimum loads to increase their ability to respond to changing demand. Units being operated this way face some associated risks and may see an additional drop in availability, further exacerbating supply management issues and increasing O&M costs. This report seeks to capture ...

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

Minimum weight perfect matching in O(1) parallel time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a 2-D square array of qubits of infinite extent. We provide a formal proof that the infinite size minimum weight perfect matching problem associated with running a particular class of topological quantum error correction codes on this array can be exactly solved with a corresponding infinite 2-D square array of classical computing devices in constant average time per round of error detection provided physical error rates are below fixed nonzero values, and other physically reasonable assumptions.

Austin G. Fowler

2013-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A model of organizational employees' e-learning systems acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the factors that influence employees' adoption and use of e-learning systems and tests the applicability of the technology acceptance model (TAM) in the organizational context. We examined the relationship of employees' perceptions ... Keywords: Computer self-efficacy, Organizational support, Subjective norm, Task equivocality, Technology acceptance model

Yi-Hsuan Lee; Yi-Chuan Hsieh; Chun-Yuan Ma

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing It is a requirement that the identity of a DOE Digital Identity Subscriber be verified against acceptable identity source documents. A Subscriber must appear in person and present their Federal Agency Identification Badge or HSPD-12 Badge as proof of identity. Either of these badges individually are sufficient identification. Lacking a Federal Agency Identification Badge or HSPD-12 Badge, a Subscriber must appear in person and provide two forms of identity source documents in original form unless otherwise noted. One of these two identity source documents must be a photo ID. Acceptable documents are listed below. Please note that all of these documents can be used to establish identity:

151

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Computing leakage current distributions and determination of minimum leakage vectors for combinational designs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Analyzing circuit leakage and minimizing leakage during the standby mode of oper- ation of a circuit are important problems faced during contemporary circuit design. Analysis… (more)

Gulati, Kanupriya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An Obstacle-avoiding Minimum Variation B-spline Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of computing a planar curve, restricted to lie between two given polygonal chains, such that the integral of the square of arc-length derivative of curvature along the curve is minimized. We introduce the Minimum Variation B-spline problem which is a linearly constrained optimization problem over curves defined by Bspline functions only. An empirical investigation indicates that this problem has one unique solution among all uniform quartic B-spline functions. Furthermore, we prove that, for any B-spline function, the convexity properties of the problem are preserved subject to a scaling and translation of the knot sequence defining the B-spline. 1

Tomas Berglund; Inge Söderkvist

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Minimum bias and underlying event studies at CDF  

SciTech Connect

Soft, non-perturbative, interactions are poorly understood from the theoretical point of view even though they form a large part of the hadronic cross section at the energies now available. We review the CDF studies on minimum-bias ad underlying event in p{bar p} collisions at 2 TeV. After proposing an operative definition of 'underlying event', we present part of a systematic set of measurements carried out by the CDF Collaboration with the goal to provide data to test and improve the QCD models of hadron collisions. Different analysis strategies of the underlying event and possible event topologies are discussed. Part of the CDF minimum-bias results are also presented: in this sample, that represent the full inelastic cross-section, we can test simultaneously our knowledge of all the components that concur to form hadronic interactions. Comparisons with MonteCarlo simulations are always shown along with the data. These measurements will also contribute to more precise estimates of the soft QCD background of high-p{sub T} observables.

Moggi, Niccolo; /INFN, Bologna

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Now Accepting 2010 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications April 20, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and visits to a power plant and coal mine. Topics cover the range of CCS

156

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

157

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - With the goal of expanding development of renewable energy projects throughout the United States and creating new jobs, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced they are now accepting applications for a program that will make direct payments in lieu of tax credits to companies that create and place in service renewable energy facilities. The two Departments estimate distributing at least $3 billion in financial support to approximately 5,000 bio-mass, solar, wind, and other types of renewable energy production

158

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - With the goal of expanding development of renewable energy projects throughout the United States and creating new jobs, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced they are now accepting applications for a program that will make direct payments in lieu of tax credits to companies that create and place in service renewable energy facilities. The two Departments estimate distributing at least $3 billion in financial support to approximately 5,000 bio-mass, solar, wind, and other types of renewable energy production

159

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications March 12, 2013 - 1:43pm Addthis Washington, DC - Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2013, scheduled for June 2-12, in Birmingham, AL. The deadline to apply is April 20. An intensive science and field-based program, RECS 2013 will combine background briefings with group exercises and field activities at an

160

NETL: News Release - NETL and NETL-Sponsored Innovations Accept...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and NETL-Sponsored Innovations Accept R&D 100 Awards MORGANTOWN, WV - At a black-tie banquet to be held this week at Chicago's Navy Pier, researchers from the National Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Acceptance test procedure MICON software exhaust fan control modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This acceptance test verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, and the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor.

SILVAN, G.R.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

162

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Abhinav Bhatele, a 2009 George...

163

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

FREQUENCY OF MAUNDER MINIMUM EVENTS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS INFERRED FROM ACTIVITY AND METALLICITY OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the common proposition that the fraction of chromospherically very inactive stars in a solar-type sample is analogous to the fraction of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime spent in a grand minimum state. In a new approach to this proposition, we examine chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} in a stellar sample having Hipparcos parallax measurements, and having spectroscopically determined metallicity close to solar (-0.1 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} 0.1). We evaluate height above the Hipparcos main sequence, and estimate age using isochrones, to identify the most Sun-like stars in this sample. As a threshold below which a star is labeled very inactive, we use the peak of the HK activity distribution mapped over the quiet Sun during the 1968 epoch. We estimate the fraction of Maunder Minimum (MM) analog candidates in our sample at 11.1%. Given the 70 yr duration of the historical MM, this suggests that in any given year there is a 1/630 chance of entering a similar grand minimum. There are three important cautions with this type of estimate. First, recent investigation using actual activity and photometric time series has suggested that very low activity may not be a necessary criterion for identifying a non-cycling MM analog candidate. Second, this type of estimate depends very strongly on the choice of very low activity threshold. Third, in instantaneous measurements of log R'{sub HK}, it is not always clear whether a star is a viable MM analog candidate or merely an older star nearing the end of its main-sequence lifetime.

Lubin, Dan [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0221 (United States); Tytler, David; Kirkman, David [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

166

New England Wind Forum: Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Wind farm proponents seek to identify locations with the greatest wind resource and the smallest population. This approach mitigates human interaction and impact whenever possible. Uninhabited areas are scarce in New England, however. Due to the region's population density, many of the region's windy locations - which include coastal areas and high elevations - are in view of nearby communities or valued for their natural beauty or recreational value. As a result, the importance of public acceptance is magnified in determining the viability of wind power installations. Further complicating public acceptance of wind power installations is the local nature of wind project impacts compared to wind power's substantial benefits. All forms of energy have impacts on their surroundings, and our society requires power plants to satisfy its demand for electricity. On a regional and broader scale, wind power's benefits are considerable, and surveys show that the majority of the population supports wind power when compared to the alternatives. In light of these benefits and the broad public support, some communities focus on the question of "compared to what?" and then embrace wind power proposals.

167

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

The impact of minimum age of employment regulation on child labor and schooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Promoting minimum age of employment regulation has been a centerpiece in child labor policy for the last 15 years. If enforced, minimum age regulation would change the age profile of paid child employment. Using micro-data ...

Edmonds, Eric V

169

A New Perspective on Recent Global Warming: Asymmetric Trends of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures for over 50% (10%) of the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere landmass, accounting for 37% of the global landmass, indicate that the rise of the minimum temperature has occurred at a rate three times that ...

Thomas R. Karl; Richard W. Knight; Kevin P. Gallo; Thomas C. Peterson; Philip D. Jones; George Kukla; Neil Plummer; Vyacheslav Razuvayev; Janette Lindseay; Robert J. Charlson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Contracting Officer Warrant Requirements Function Experience Minimum Training Continuous Learning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACMP Flash 2011-62 ACMP Flash 2011-62 Contracting Officer Warrant Requirements Function Experience Minimum Training Continuous Learning GS-1105s with a warrant for purchases up to $25,000 At least 6 months of Government Purchase Card experience Certified to Level I in the ACMP Purchasing Program 80 hours every two years GS-1105s with a warrant for purchases $25,000 up to the simplified acquisition threshold At least 1 year of Government Purchase Card experience Certified to Level II in the ACMP Purchasing Program 80 hours every two years GS-1105s with a warrant for purchases over the simplified acquisition threshold At least 5 years of progressively complex contracting experience Certified to Level III in the ACMP Purchasing Program 80 hours every two years

171

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

Hamrick, Todd

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The quadratic minimum spanning tree problem: A lower bounding procedure and an efficient search algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the quadratic minimum spanning tree problem (QMSTP) which is known to be NP-hard. Given a complete graph, the QMSTP consists of finding a minimum spanning tree (MST) where interaction costs between pairs of edges are prescribed. ... Keywords: Lagrangian relaxation, Local search, Quadratic minimum spanning tree problem

Temel Öncan; Abraham P. Punnen

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy Tamar Kaffe-Abramovich and Ron Unger Background: Proteins seem to have their native structure in a global minimum of free energy is in the global minimum of free energy. The aim of this study is to investigate such evolutionary processes

Unger, Ron

176

Minimum Multicolored Subgraph Problem in Multiplex PCR Primer Set Selection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum Multicolored Subgraph Problem in Multiplex PCR Primer Set Selection and Population is a common generalization of minimum cost multiplex PCR primer set selection and maximum likeli- hood and its variants model two important bioinformatics problems: minimum cost multiplex PCR primer set

Mandoiu, Ion

177

NOTE: This list was prepared as a courtesy to assist students in finding local dentists who are: accepting new patients, accept Delta Dental, have hygiene services and are available for emergency care.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: accepting new patients, accept Delta Dental, have hygiene services and are available for emergency care

California at Santa Cruz, University of

178

Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples  

SciTech Connect

We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Program Now Training Program Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting Applications March 26, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - A Department of Energy (DOE) program that helps graduate students and early career professionals gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) is accepting applications until April 15. The Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) initiative is supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory. A collaboration between EnTech Strategies, Southern Company and SECARB-Ed, RECS 2012 isscheduled for June 3-13, in Birmingham, AL. An intensive science and field-based program, RECS 2012 will combine

180

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MINUTES - ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet: D1L101 Date of meeting: 29 January 2004 Date of these minutes: 30 January 2004 Attending: M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, J. Durnan, J. Escallier, H. Hocker, A. Jain, J. Muratore, S. Plate, C. Porretto, P. Wanderer, E. Willen Summary. The acceptance committee previously reviewed this magnet in March 2003 and May 2003. Since the last review, the magnet has been cold-tested to check whether the high- resistance short between one of the two strip heaters and the magnet coil affected the magnet operation (including quench performance). It was concluded that the heater-to- coil short did not affect the magnet operation during the cold test. The committee also reviewed the field quality data, which indicated that the yoke keys were stainless steel,

182

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

On the minimum temperature of the quiet solar chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aims: We aim to provide an estimate of the minimum temperature of the quiet solar chromosphere. methods: We perform a 2D radiation-MHD simulation spanning the upper convection zone to the lower corona. The simulation includes non-LTE radiative transfer and {an equation-of-state that includes non-equilibrium ionization of hydrogen and non-equilibrium H_2 molecule formation}. We analyze the reliability of the various assumptions made in our model in order to assess the realism of the simulation. results: Our simulation contains pockets of cool gas with down to 1660 K from 1 Mm up to 3.2 Mm height. It overestimates the radiative heating, and contains non-physical heating below 1660 K. Therefore we conclude that cool pockets in the quiet solar chromosphere might have even lower temperatures than in the simulation, provided that there exist areas in the chromosphere without significant magnetic heating. We suggest off-limb molecular spectroscopy to look for such cool pockets and 3D simulations including a local dy...

Leenaarts, Jorrit; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

India’s Credible Minimum Deterrence A Decade Later  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deterrence in the most conventional sense implies the making of military threats in order to prevent an adversary from taking aggressive actions (Buzan 1987). According to Barry Buzan (1987: 136), deterrence as a concept purports to stop an unwanted action by the adversary before they occur and encompasses both denial and the possibility of retaliation. The introduction of nuclear weapons into this complex dynamic of deterrence does not stabilise the crisis situation, as conventional wisdom suggests, but makes it even more threatening. The core of nuclear deterrence involves convincing the adversary that the cost of an undesirable action is more than the rewards. This requires a comprehensive understanding of not only the adversary’s motives, decision-making processes and objectives, but also one’s own capability to influence the calculus of costs and benefits that an adversary attaches to his own belligerence. Therefore, nuclear deterrence also takes into account the credibility of one’s own nuclear threat that is aimed at convincing the adversary that his belligerence will be ‘punished ’ by unacceptable damage through nuclear means. It is in the wake of this that India evolved its own nuclear doctrine which seeks to uphold the notion of credible minimum deterrence.

Tanvi Kulkarni; Alankrita Sinha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Improved isolation of the p-p underlying event based on minimum-bias trigger-associated hadron correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some aspects of hadron production in p-p collisions remain unresolved, including the low-hadron-momentum structure of high-parton-energy dijets, separation of triggered dijets from the underlying event (UE), the systematics of multiple parton interactions and possible systematic underestimation of dijet contributions to high-energy nuclear collisions. In this study we apply a minimum-bias trigger-associated (TA) correlation analysis to p-p collisions. We extract a hard component from TA correlations that can be compared with measured jet fragment systematics derived from e-e collisions. The kinematic limits on jet fragment production may be determined. The same method may be extended to A-A collisions where the role of minimum-bias jets in spectra and correlations is strongly contested.

Thomas A. Trainor; Duncan J. Prindle

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The role of acceptable knowledge in transuranic waste disposal operations - 11117  

SciTech Connect

The Acceptable Knowledge (AK) process plays a key role in the delineation of waste streams destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). General Electric's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (GEVNC) provides for an ideal case study of the application of AK in a multiple steward environment. In this review we will elucidate the pivotal role Acceptable Knowledge played in segregating Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities from a commercial facility. The Acceptable Knowledge process is a necessary component of waste characterization that determines whether or not a waste stream may be considered for disposal at the WIPP site. This process may be thought of as an effort to gain a thorough understanding of the waste origin, chemical content, and physical form gleaned by the collection of documentation that concerns generator/storage site history, mission, and operations; in addition to waste stream specific information which includes the waste generation process, the waste matrix, the quantity of waste concerned, and the radiological and chemical make up of the waste. The collection and dissemination of relevant documentation is the fundamental requirement for the AK process to work. Acceptable Knowledge is the predominant process of characterization and, therefore, a crucial part of WIPP's transuranic waste characterization program. This characterization process, when conducted to the standards set forth in WIPP's operating permit, requires confirmation/verification by physical techniques such as Non-Destructive Examination (NDE), Visual Examination (VE), and Non-Destructive Assay (NDA). These physical characterization techniques may vary in their appropriateness for a given waste stream; however, nothing will allow the substitution or exclusion of AK. Beyond the normal scope of operations, AK may be considered, when appropriate, a surrogate for the physical characterization techniques in a procedure that appeals to concepts such As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and budgetary savings. This substitution is referred to as an Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination. With a Sufficiency Determination Request, AK may supplant the need for one or all of the physical analysis methods. This powerful procedure may be used on a scale as small as a single container to that of a vast waste stream. Only under the most stringent requirements will an AK Sufficiency Determination be approved by the regulators and, to date, only six such Sufficiency Determinations have been approved. Although Acceptable Knowledge is legislated into the operational procedures of the WIPP facility there is more to it than compliance. AK is not merely one of a long list of requirements in the characterization and verification of transuranic (TRU) waste destined for the WIPP. Acceptable Knowledge goes beyond the regulatory threshold by offering a way to reduce risk, cost, time, and uncertainty on its own laurels. Therefore, AK alone can be argued superior to any other waste characterization technique.

Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Roger [DOE-CARLSBAD

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Acceptance test report MICON software exhaust fan control modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results the acceptance test HNF-4108 which verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor, and the generator sequencer logic.

SILVAN, G.R.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

Test driven: practical tdd and acceptance tdd for java developers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In test driven development, you first write an executable test of what your application code must do. Only then do you write the code itself and, with the test spurring you on, you improve your design. In acceptance test driven development (ATDD), you ...

Lasse Koskela

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the results of the field Acceptance Testing of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System on the waste tank exhaust stacks in 241-AW and 241-AN tank farm. The monitors will be used to measure hydrogen and ammonia from the exhaust stacks.

Lott, D.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Gas characterization system 241-AN-105 field acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AN-105. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Use of Operational Comparability Techniques to Determine Realtime Acceptability of Meteorological Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparability techniques have been applied operationally to processing meteorological measurements. Examples of comparability statistics are presented for both typical and atypical (instrument problem) situations. The comparability techniques ...

A. Edgar Mitchell Jr.; Robert W. Jubach; Ayhan Malkoc; Ray F. Zucker

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Minimum Assumption Tornado-Hazard Probability Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the principle applications of climatological tornado data is in tornado-hazard assessment. To perform such a hazard-potential determination, historical tornado characteristics in either a regional or tom area are complied. A model is then ...

Joseph T. Schaefer; Donald L. Kelly; Robert F. Abbey

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Impact of Minimum Quality Standards on Firm Entry, Exit and Product Quality: The Case of the Child Care Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Theory of Minimum Standards,” Journal of Politi- calto Minimum Quality Standards Regulation,” NBER working paperDuopoly and Quality Standards,” European Economic Review,

Hotz, V. Joseph; Xiao, Mo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Date of meeting: 2 May 2003 Date of these minutes: 6 May 2003 Attending: M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, J. Escallier, M. Gaffney, G. Ganetis, H. Hocker, A. Jain, S. Plate, C. Porretto, P. Wanderer, E. Willen Summary. The meeting was called to review the results of the electrical tests and options for use for this magnet. This information will be transmitted to LHC staff. The magnet has a failed temperature sensor that must be replaced if the magnet is to be the spare. (Other acceptance issues for this magnet were considered at a previous meeting of the acceptance committee.) Electrical test results. J. Escallier summarized the electrical tests of the quench protection heaters. The results are formally documented in deviation waiver M0303.

196

Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

198

MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

SHERRELL, D.L.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

Minimum Cost Flow Problems with Value-at-Risk and Conditional ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic minimum cost flow (SMCF) problems have been studied for applica- tions involving random ...... approach to stochastic programming of heating oil.

200

Minimum Bias Measurements with the ATLAS Detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency at the Event Filter MBTS trigger efficiency atand counted at the Event Filter trigger level. Any eventsCHAPTER 3. MINIMUM BIAS TRIGGER Event Selection The analysis

Leyton, Michael A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico minimum efficiency performance standard million tons (of CO 2 ) national energyand Mexico, produces the largest savings of all the end uses: 780 TWh. The baseline energy

Letschert, Virginie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

E. Pasyuk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Acceptance Strategy for Nuclear Power Plant In Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia has planned to build nuclear power plants. Some feasibility studies have been conducted intensively. However, the processes of NPP introduction are still uncertain. National Energy Plan in Indonesia, which has been made by some governmental agencies, does not yet give positive impact to the government decision to construct the nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper discusses the process of NPP introduction in Indonesia, which has been colored with debate of stakeholder and has delayed decision for go-nuclear. The technology paradigm is used to promote NPP as an alternative of reliable energy resources. This paradigm should be complemented with international politic-economic point of view. The international politic-economic point of view shows that structural powers, consisting of security, production, finance, and knowledge structures, within which the NPP is introduced, have dynamic characteristics. The process of NPP introduction in Indonesia contains some infrastructure development (R and D, legislation, regulation, energy planning, site study, public acceptance efforts, etc), but they need a better coherent NPP implementation program and NPP Acceptance Program. Strategic patterns for NPP acceptance described in this paper are made by considering nuclear regulation development and the interest of basic domestic participation. The first NPP program in Indonesia having proven technology and basic domestic participation is and important milestone toward and optimal national energy-mix.

Suhaemi, Tjipta [Centre for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia); Syaukat, Achmad [Centre for Nuclear Technology Business, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang Selatan (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

ASU/Mesa Pilot Development Minimum Flight Program Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas use in electricity generation, prompted by repeal of the Fuel Use Act, low gas prices-profit research management organization formed in 1976 and funded through a FERC-sanctioned surcharge placed on interstate pipeline gas volumes. The surcharge was determined on an annual basis according to a 5-year

Shumway, John

205

The relationship between information technology acceptance and organizational agility in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examined the influence of information technology (IT) acceptance on organizational agility. The study was based on a well-established theoretical model, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). We attempted to identify the relationships between IT acceptance ... Keywords: IT acceptance, IT adoption, Malaysia, Organizational agility, Structural equation models

Mohamed Zain; Raduan Che Rose; Iskandar Abdullah; Maslin Masrom

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Acceptance test report for project C-157 ``T-Plant electrical upgrade``  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ``Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 `T Plant Electrical Upgrade``` The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions.

Jeppson, L.A.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Two-Point Boundary Value Problems for Curves: The Case of Minimum Free Energy Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-Point Boundary Value Problems for Curves: The Case of Minimum Free Energy Paths corrected.S.A. Abstract The calculation of a minimum free energy path can be considered as a two-point boundary value box solvers. The second paragraph of Section 1 is corrected. Because free energy is defined in terms

Skeel, Robert

208

Minimum Energy Compensation Strategy and Characteristic Analysis for Dynamic Voltage Restorer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum energy compensation strategy and its characteristic for Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR) considering the equipment’s voltage limitation are discussed. The strategy when the injection voltage is under or especially above the voltage limitation ... Keywords: dynamic voltage restorer, minimum energy compensation, compensation strategy, compensation characteristic, voltage limitation

Yingying Liu; Xu Yonghai; Xiao Xiangning; Guo Chunlin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fast Algorithms for Specially Structured Minimum Cost Flow Problems with Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the classical minimum cost flow problem is to send units of a good that reside at one or more points in a network (sources or supply nodes) with arc capacities to one or more other points in the network (sinks or demand nodes), incurring ... Keywords: analysis of algorithms, applications, computational complexity, flow algorithms, minimum cost flow problem, networks

Balachandran Vaidyanathan; Ravindra K. Ahuja

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Acceptability of DUF6 Converison Products at Envirocare Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

55 55 Chemical Technology Division EVALUATION OF THE ACCEPTABILITY OF POTENTIAL DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION PRODUCTS AT THE ENVIROCARE DISPOSAL SITE Allen G. Croff, J. Robert Hightower, and Nancy L. Ranek* *Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois December 2000 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. LICENSE RECEIPT LIMITS

211

Acceptability of risk from radiation: Application to human space flight  

SciTech Connect

This one of NASA`s sponsored activities of the NCRP. In 1983, NASA asked NCRP to examine radiation risks in space and to make recommendations about career radiation limits for astronauts (with cancer considered as the principal risk). In conjunction with that effort, NCRP was asked to convene this symposium; objective is to examine the technical, strategic, and philosophical issues pertaining to acceptable risk and radiation in space. Nine papers are included together with panel discussions and a summary. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Use of explosives for boiler deslagging gains acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines an unconventional technique for removing slag from solid-fuel-fired boilers, used for more than two decades, that recently has exploded in popularity. The risks are very real; extensive damage at several recent jobs confirms that all blasters are not created equal. At solid-fuel-fired powerplants, slag removal can be a constant battle. Conventional weapons include picks, jackhammers, shotguns fired through portholes, hydro-blasting, and CO{sub 2}-blasting. But each of these methods is labor intensive, consumes substantial amounts of downtime, and may not dislodge severe deposits. In the 1960s, a midwestern plant superintendent, short of personnel because of a labor strike and frustrated by seemingly immovable slagging, resorted to dynamite. The good results surprised both the superintendent and the blasting contractor who had been called in from a nearby civil engineering job. Over the next two decades or so, the technique spread through a core group of believers at powerplants who largely relied on the one original blasting contractor. In recent years, explosive deslagging has become more widely accepted as a state-of-the-art combat technique and several hundred powerplants through the US now make use of it during annual outages. As the technique`s acceptance has grown, so has the number of contractors entering the field. Some veterans worry that the industry has expanded too fast, and unqualified blasters are being allowed into the powerplant.

Swanekamp, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Socio-cultural acceptability of cadaver Transplantation in Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organ transplantation is known to be a new and innovative treatment for patients with progressive organ failures. The present study investigates the current status of transplantation from cadaver along with its socio-cultural acceptability in Iran. The present study is a descriptive research in a systematic review method. Here, by investigating previously conducted researches in Iran during the period 2002-2010, the status of transplantation from cadaver and its socio-cultural acceptability in Iran has been investigated. To collect the data, the access to Iranmedex website, the premier medical data center in Iran, was made possible using the related keywords. The obtained data indicate whereas there is an increase in the number of organ donations from cadaver, it is still low in comparison to other countries. The lack of consent from families of brain-dead patients is a major hurdle on the way of organ transplantation in Iran. In the cases of willingness to donate organs, the major effective factors were the deceased’s religious beliefs and prior tendency. In 66 % of the cases, the donors ’ families deemed organ donation phenomenon effective in alleviating the sorrow after the death of their beloved ones. The number of organ donation from cadaver in Iran is low contrary to other countries. It seems that general instructions to raise the knowledge on the subject and lay the foundation to increase the tendency towards posthumous organ donation are necessary.

Mobasser N; Zahmatkeshan N; Farhadi N; Nikeghbalian S; Hasankhani H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

PVUSA procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for photovoltaic power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is one in a series of PVUSA reports on PVUSA experiences and lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California, and from participating utility host sites. During the course of approximately 7 years (1988--1994), 10 PV systems have been installed ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW. Six 20-kW emerging module technology arrays, five on universal project-provided structures and one turnkey concentrator, and four turnkey utility-scale systems (200 to 500 kW) were installed. PVUSA took a very proactive approach in the procurement of these systems. In the absence of established procurement documents, the project team developed a comprehensive set of technical and commercial documents. These have been updated with each successive procurement. Working closely with vendors after the award in a two-way exchange provided designs better suited for utility applications. This report discusses the PVUSA procurement process through testing and acceptance, and rating of PV turnkey systems. Special emphasis is placed on the acceptance testing and rating methodology which completes the procurement process by verifying that PV systems meet contract requirements. Lessons learned and recommendations are provided based on PVUSA experience.

Dows, R.N.; Gough, E.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary  

SciTech Connect

On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Contested environmental policy infrastructure: Socio-political acceptance of renewable energy, water, and waste facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of new infrastructure is hotly contested. This paper presents a comparative study on three environmental policy domains in the Netherlands that all deal with legitimising building and locating infrastructure facilities. Such infrastructure is usually declared essential to environmental policy and claimed to serve sustainability goals. They are considered to serve (proclaimed) public interests, while the adverse impact or risk that mainly concerns environmental values as well is concentrated at a smaller scale, for example in local communities. The social acceptance of environmental policy infrastructure is institutionally determined. The institutional capacity for learning in infrastructure decision-making processes in the following three domains is compared: 1.The implementation of wind power as a renewable energy innovation; 2.The policy on space-water adaptation, with its claim to implement a new style of management replacing the current practice of focusing on control and 'hard' infrastructure; 3.Waste policy with a focus on sound waste management and disposal, claiming a preference for waste minimization (the 'waste management hierarchy'). All three cases show a large variety of social acceptance issues, where the appraisal of the impact of siting the facilities is confronted with the desirability of the policies. In dealing with environmental conflict, the environmental capacity of the Netherlands appears to be low. The policies are frequently hotly contested within the process of infrastructure decision-making. Decision-making on infrastructure is often framed as if consensus about the objectives of environmental policies exists. These claims are not justified, and therefore stimulating the emergence of environmental conflicts that discourage social acceptance of the policies. Authorities are frequently involved in planning infrastructure that conflicts with their officially proclaimed policy objectives. In these circumstances, they are often confronted with local actors who support alternatives that are in fact better in tune with the new policy paradigm.

Wolsink, Maarten, E-mail: M.P.Wolsink@uva.n [Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, 1018 VZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . April 1987 Determining Minimum Acceptable Bid Prices for the Test Sale of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Crude Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

219

X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . April 1987 Determining Minimum Acceptable Bid Prices for the Test Sale of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Crude Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

220

Articles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . April 1987 Determining Minimum Acceptable Bid Prices for the Test Sale of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Crude Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . April 1987 Determining Minimum Acceptable Bid Prices for the Test Sale of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Crude Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

222

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

223

www.wine-economics.org Restaurant Prices and the Minimum Wage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the e¤ect of the minimum wage on restaurant prices. For that purpose, we estimate a price rigidity model by exploiting a unique dataset of individual price quotes used to calculate the Consumer Price Index in France. We …nd a positive and signi…cant impact of the minimum wage on prices. We obtain that the e¤ect of the minimum wage on prices is very protracted. The aggregate impact estimated with our model takes more than a year to fully pass through to retail prices.

Denis Fougère; Erwan Gautier; Hervé Le Bihan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit  

SciTech Connect

The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

Becken, G.W.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

Solonick, W. [Electric Boat Corp., Groton, CT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

W.R. Solonick

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Worlds First Ever Cooling Tower Acceptance Test Using Process Data Reconciliation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cooling capacity of cooling towers is influenced by multiple constructive and atmospheric parameters in a very complex way. This leads to strong variations of the measured cold-water temperature and causes unacceptable unreliability of conventional acceptance tests, which are based on single point measurements. In order to overcome this lack of accuracy a new approach to acceptance test based on process data reconciliation has been developed by BTB Jansky and applied at a nuclear power plant. This approach uses process data reconciliation according to VDI 2048 to evaluate datasets over a long period covering different operating conditions of the cooling tower. Data reconciliation is a statistical method to determine the true process parameters with a statistical probability of 95% by considering closed material-, mass-and energy balances. Datasets which are not suitable for the evaluation due to strong transient gradients are excluded beforehand, according to well-defined criteria. The reconciled cold-water temperature is then compared, within a wet bulb temperature range of 5 deg. C to 20 deg. C to the manufacturer's guaranteed temperature. Finally, if the average deviation between reconciled and guaranteed value over the evaluated period is below zero, the cooling tower guarantee is fulfilled. (authors)

Magnus Langenstein; Jan Hansen-Schmidt [BTB-Jansky GmbH, Gerlingerstrasse 151, D-71229 Leonberg (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet D4L102  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Date of this summary: September 2, 2004 This document contains a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets within the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance status: The BNL Acceptance Committee met on September 2, 2004 and approved the magnet for shipment to CERN. On July 28, R. Ostojic reported that CERN accepted the waiver on QQS locations (M0324). The survey data were sent to D. Missiaen on July 28, 2004. The field quality data have been loaded into the CERN data base. It is planned that the ID card will be sent by Sept. 15. MINUTES OF ACCEPTANCE MEETING Date of acceptance meeting: September 2, 2004

231

Risk analysis for new nuclear waste sites: Will it generate public acceptance?  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses public acceptance of radioactive waste facilities and what seems to be increasingly militant stances against such facilities. The role of risk assessment in possibly enhancing public acceptance is investigated.

Inhaber, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Acceptance Test Report for AMS-4 Continuous Air Monitors (CAM) at 241AN Exhausters  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the completed copy and test results of the Acceptance Test Procedure (TWR-4713). Test results were actually hand written in the ATP including redline changes. All acceptance criteria steps were completed satisfactorily without exceptions.

SCAIEF, C.C.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Predictive Models For Time To Acceptance: An Example Using “Hurricane” Articles in AMS Journals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate a statistical model for the time it takes a manuscript to be accepted for publication. The manuscript received and accepted dates from published manuscripts with the term “hurricane” in the title are obtained from the American ...

Robert E. Hodges; James B. Elsner; Thomas H. Jagger

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Recent Trends of Minimum and Maximum Surface Temperatures over Eastern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated recent trends in the mean surface minimum and maximum air temperatures over eastern Africa by use of both graphical and statistical techniques. Daily records for 71 stations for the period 1939–92 were used.

S. M. King’uyu; L. A. Ogallo; E. K. Anyamba

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Use of Polar-orbiting Satellite Sounding Data to Estimate Rural Maximum and Minimum Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric sounding products from NOAA's polar-orbiting satellites were used to derive and test predictive equations of rural shelter-level maximum and minimum temperatures. Sounding data from both winter and summer months were combined with ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Jerry M. Davis; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; J. Dan Tarpley; Peter Bloomfield

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Local Minimum Aliasing Method for Use in Nonlinear Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local spectral method is a minimum aliasing technique for the discretization and numerical integration of prognostic systems consisting of nonlinear partial differential equations. The technique embodies many features of both spectral ...

John R. Anderson

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Recent Trends in Maximum and Minimum Temperature Threshold Exceedences in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the annual number of daily maximum and minimum temperature threshold exceedences between 1951 and 1993 are assessed at a network of 22 primarily rural sites in the northeastern United States. After adjusting the annual time series for ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Hallam, Steven

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Minimum bayes risk decoding with enlarged hypothesis space in system combination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new system combination strategy in Statistical Machine Translation. Tromble et al. (2008) introduced the evidence space into Minimum Bayes Risk decoding in order to quantify the relative performance within lattice or n-best output ...

Tsuyoshi Okita; Josef van Genabith

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Minimum Spanning Tree Histogram as a Verification Tool for Multidimensional Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum spanning tree (MST) histogram is a multivariate extension of the ideas behind the conventional scalar rank histogram. It tabulates the frequencies, over n forecast occasions, of the rank of the MST length for each ensemble, within the ...

D. S. Wilks

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Systematic Biases in Manual Observations of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate that manual observations of daily maximum and minimum temperature are strongly biased toward temperatures ending in certain digits. The nature and severity of these biases are quantified using standard statistical methods. ...

Jon M. Nese

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Optimising maximum power output and minimum entropy generation of Atkinson cycle using mutable smart bees algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is optimising maximum power output (MPO) and minimum entropy generation (MEG) of an Atkinson cycle as a multi-objective constraint thermodynamic problem by a new improved artificial bee colony algorithm which utilises 'mutable ...

Mofid Gorji; Ahmad Mozaffari; Sina Mohammadrezaei Noudeh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Method to Estimate Missing Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate missing daily maximum and minimum temperatures is presented. Temperature estimates are based on departures from daily temperature normals at the three closest stations with similar observation times. Although applied to ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Keith L. Eggleston; Warren W. Knapp

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Reconstructed Annual Minimum Temperatures for the Gulf States, 1799–1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very long series of minimum winter temperatures for the United States Gulf Coast region was developed. A search was made through sources of archival data to locate early temperature records for the region. Records from a number of different ...

Robert D. Erhardt Jr.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Minimum Uncertainty, Coherence and Squeezing in Diffusion Processes, and Stochastic Quantization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that uncertainty relations, as well as minimum uncertainty coherent and squeezed states, are structural properties for diffusion processes. Through Nelson stochastic quantization we derive the stochastic image of the quantum mechanical coherent and squeezed states.

Salvatore De Martino; Silvio De Siena; Fabrizio Illuminati; Giuseppe Vitiello

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

MINIMUM UNCERTAINTY AND SQUEEZING IN DIFFUSION PROCESSES AND STOCHASTIC QUANTIZATION 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that uncertainty relations, as well as minimum uncertainty coherent and squeezed states, are structural properties for diffusion processes. Through Nelson stochastic quantization we derive the stochastic image of the quantum mechanical coherent and squeezed states. 1

S. De Martino; S. De Siena; F. Illuminati; G. Vitiello

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

DiffServ node with join minimum cost queue policy and multiclass traffic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DiffServ, the vehicle for providing relative QoS in the Internet is also easily amenable to simple and effective pricing mechanisms. By pricing access to a relative QoS, we can model a DiffServ node as a 'Join Minimum Cost Queue' in which an arriving ... Keywords: diffServ, finite buffer queues, join minimum cost queue, join shortest queue, network pricing, quasi-birth--death processes, queue control

Rahul Tandra; N. Hemachandra; D. Manjunath

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

On-Off Minimum-Time Control With Limited Fuel Usage: Global Optima Via Linear Programming  

SciTech Connect

A method for finding a global optimum to the on-off minimum-time control problem with limited fuel usage is presented. Each control can take on only three possible values: maximum, zero, or minimum. The simplex method for linear systems naturally yields such a solution for the re-formulation presented herein because it always produces an extreme point solution to the linear program. Numerical examples for the benchmark linear flexible system are presented.

DRIESSEN,BRIAN

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Disoriented Chiral Condensates: A White Paper for the Full Acceptance Detector at the SSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical speculations and experimental data suggesting the possibility of observing disoriented chiral condensates at a Full Acceptance Detector are reviewed.

K. L. Kowalski; C. C. Taylor

1992-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics Lida Jauregui transformer top-oil thermal models are examined vis-à-vis training with measured data. Acceptability is unacceptable for model identification purposes. The linear top-oil model is acceptable for FOFA transformers

251

Acceptance test specifications for test number eleven: sodium system filling, heatup, pressurization, and drain. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the general instructions for performing acceptance test number eleven as indicated in the Acceptance Test Index (TI-022-130-003). Also indicated are the plant conditions and special equipment required to conduct the test. The acceptance criteria for each portion of the test are specified.

Bell, C.R.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Acceptance-test specifications for Test Number Four: process sensor and display test. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the general instructions for performing acceptance Test Number Four as indicated in the Acceptance Test Index (TI-022-130-003). Also indicated are the plant conditions and special equipment required to conduct the test. The acceptance criteria for each portion of the test are specified.

Bell, C.R.

1975-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases May 2, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has rejected all offers received from the second solicitation issued this spring that sought to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the United States' crude oil reserve. Both solicitations resulted in no awards because the Department determined that the bids were too high and not a reasonable value for taxpayers. The solicitations for the purchase of crude oil were meant to replace oil sold on an emergency basis after Hurricane Katrina caused significant damage to the production, distribution, and refining capabilities of the

254

THE EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS ON A CORONAL SOURCE SURFACE AT 2.3 R{sub Sun} DURING SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 R{sub Sun} from Sun-center and are organized by Carrington Rotations during the solar minimum period at the start of solar cycle 23. We use the outflow velocity and density maps to show that while the solar minimum corona is relatively stable during its early stages, the shrinkage of the north polar hole in the later stages leads to changes in both the global areal expansion of the coronal hole and the derived internal flux tube expansion factors of the solar wind. The polar hole areal expansion factor and the flux tube expansion factors (between the coronal base and 2.3 R{sub Sun }) start out as super-radial but then they become more nearly radial as the corona progresses away from solar minimum. The results also support the idea that the largest flux tube expansion factors are located near the coronal hole/streamer interface, at least during the deepest part of the solar minimum period.

Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Kohl, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lamy, P., E-mail: lstrachan@cfa.harvard.edu [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS/Universite de Provence, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Standard-B hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test Engineering was supported by Tank Waste Remediation System Safety Programs Engineering Support in the performance of an Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) to qualify the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinet installed on waste tank 241-SY-103. The June 7, 1994 ATP performance was controlled by West Waste Tank Farms work package 2W-94-322. The ATP was conducted following the final installation of a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring cell. The cabinet had been sited on the waste tank two years earlier, but never connected to the exhaust vent header to monitor Tank 241-SY-103 vent header exhaust gases. The cabinet was then modified, to remove two undesirable solid state hydrogen monitors and install a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring sensor and signal conditioning. The ATP was used to assure that the cabinet wiring and components were properly installed and labeled and that the two years without operation had not seriously damaged the installed equipment. Electrical and pneumatic tests were performed to assure system integrity.

Tran, T.T.

1994-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices Guide: Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : B e s t P r a c t i c e s Modeling exhaust dispersion for specifying acceptable exhaust/intake designs Introduction This guide provides general information on specify- ing acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also offers various quantitative approaches (dispersion modeling) that can be used to determine expected concentration (or dilution) levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint pro- gram of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

258

DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

had received in response to a solicitation to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The Office of Fossil Energy determined...

259

Impact of CIR Storms on Thermosphere Density Variability during the Solar Minimum of 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar minimum of 2008 was exceptionally quiet, with sunspot numbers at their lowest in 75 years. During this unique solar minimum epoch, however, solar wind high - speed streams emanating from near-equatorial coronal holes occurred frequently and were the primary contributor to the recurrent geomagnetic activity at Earth. These conditions enabled the isolation of forcing by geomagnetic activity on the preconditioned solar minimum state of the upper atmosphere caused by Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs). Thermosphere density observations around 400 km from the CHAMP satellite are used to study the thermosphere density response to solar wind high - speed streams/CIRs. Superposed epoch results show that thermosphere density responds to high - speed streams globally, and the density at 400 km changes by 75% on average. The relative changes of neutral density are comparable at different latitudes, although its variability is largest at high latitudes. In addition, the response of thermosphere density to hi...

Lei, Jiuhou; Wang, Wenbin; McPherron, Robert L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Testing minimum energy with powerful radio sources in clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze ROSAT data for cluster gas surrounding powerful radio galaxies, which is well fitted by a ``beta-model'' gas distribution, after allowing for a compact central source. The cluster thermal pressure at the distance of the radio lobes is typically an order of magnitude larger than the lobe minimum pressure. Since radio lobes are sharply-bounded, the missing pressure is not simply entrained intra-cluster gas. Thus the minimum energy in the lobes is a severe underestimate of the actual energy content. We argue that the extra energy is mostly in the form of particles, so that the magnetic field is below equipartition and thus not a major factor in the lobe dynamics. The large departure from minimum energy has far-reaching implications for the nature of AGN central engines and the supply of mechanical energy to the cluster gas.

J. P. Leahy; Nectaria A. B. Gizani

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

Eberhard, Philippe H. (El Cerrito, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

History of Uranium-233(sup233U)Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant. In support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the processing of Uranium-233 at the Rocky Flats Plant (Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site). The information may be used to meet Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)and for determining potential Uranium-233 content in applicable residue waste streams.

Moment, R.L.; Gibbs, F.E.; Freiboth, C.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Landsea heating contrast in an idealized Asian summer monsoon Received: 18 January 2002 / Accepted: 30 December 2002 / Published online: 4 March 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land­sea heating contrast in an idealized Asian summer monsoon Received: 18 January 2002 / Accepted determining the tropospheric temperature gradient that is related to the intensity of the Asian summer monsoon tropospheric temperature gradient thus a weak Asian summer monsoon circulation. Higher pre- scribed heating

Chou, Chia

265

LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES AT THE MINIMUM OF THE 23rd SOLAR CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

Low- and mid-latitude coronal holes (CHs) observed on the Sun during the current solar activity minimum (from 2006 September 21, Carrington rotation (CR) 2048, to 2009 June 26, CR 2084) were analyzed using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and STEREO-A SECCHI EUVI data. From both the observations and Potential Field Source Surface modeling, we find that the area occupied by CHs inside a belt of +-40{sup 0} around the solar equator is larger in the current 2007 solar minimum relative to the similar phase of the previous 1996 solar minimum. The enhanced CH area is related to a recurrent appearance of five persistent CHs, which survived during 7-27 solar rotations. Three of the CHs are of positive magnetic polarity and two are negative. The most long-lived CH was being formed during 2 days and existed for 27 rotations. This CH was associated with fast solar wind at 1 AU of approximately 620 +- 40 km s{sup -1}. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modeling for this time period shows an open field structure above this CH. We conclude that the global magnetic field of the Sun possessed a multi-pole structure during this time period. Calculation of the harmonic power spectrum of the solar magnetic field demonstrates a greater prevalence of multi-pole components over the dipole component in the 2007 solar minimum compared to the 1996 solar minimum. The unusual large separation between the dipole and multi-pole components is due to the very low magnitude of the dipole component, which is three times lower than that in the previous 1996 solar minimum.

Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Luhmann, Janet; Lee, Christina O. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities  

SciTech Connect

There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent 2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across the ocean in spent fuel transportation casks from the country of origin to one or more United States eastern seaboard ports. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

268

Ubiquitous Computing Acceptance Model: end user concern about security, privacy and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study integrates cognitive and affective attitudes as the primary factors of influence to formulate a Ubiquitous Computing Acceptance Model (UCAM), which is intended to predict whether potential users will accept ubiquitous computing (u-computing). ... Keywords: UCAM, behavioural intention, mobile communications, perceived ease of use, perceived risk, pervasive computing, privacy, security, trust, ubiquitous city, ubiquitous computing acceptance model, ubiquitous u-city, usefulness, user attitudes, user intentions

Dong-Hee Shin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Why did the people of New Brunswick fail to accept the agreement between the governments of New Brunswick and Québec to sell NB Power to… (more)

Bourque, Angelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Healthful LipidsChapter 2 Safety, Regulatory Aspects, and Public Acceptance of Genetically Modified Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 2 Safety, Regulatory Aspects, and Public Acceptance of Genetically Modified Lipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf o

271

Social Acceptance of Wind Power in the United States: Evaluating Stakeholder Perspectives (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the wind industry strives to achieve 20% wind energy by 2030, maintaining high levels of social acceptance for wind energy will become increasingly important. Wind Powering America is currently researching stakeholder perspectives in the U.S. market and reviewing findings from wind energy projects around the world to better understand social acceptance barriers. Results from European studies show that acceptance varies widely depending on local community values. A preliminary survey shows similar results in the United States. Further research will be conducted to refine our understanding of key social acceptance barriers and evaluate the best ways to mitigate negative perspectives on wind power.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid- June 6, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid, approved at the June 5-6, 2013 EAC Meeting.

273

Stochastic Modelling and 3D Minimum Variance RecursiveEstimation of Image Sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the 3D minimum variance filtering problem is considered. The proposed spatiotemporal filter is derived according to the assumption that the 3D signal can be modelled by an ensemble of smooth 3D gaussian random fields. The resulting ... Keywords: image processing, optimal filtering, stochastic modelling

L. Jetto

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Battery Sizing for Grid Connected PV Systems with Fixed Minimum Charging/Discharging Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery Sizing for Grid Connected PV Systems with Fixed Minimum Charging/Discharging Time Yu Ru, Jan Kleissl, and Sonia Martinez Abstract-- In this paper, we study a battery sizing problem for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems assuming that the battery charging/discharging limit scales linearly with its

Martínez, Sonia

275

A hierarchical application of the Minimum Current Corona C. Beveridge and D.W. Longcope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hierarchical application of the Minimum Current Corona C. Beveridge and D.W. Longcope Department. Beveridge, C.: 2003, Ph.D. Thesis, University of St. Andrews. Beveridge, C. and Longcope, D.W.: 2005, Solar.M.: 1990, Astrophys. J., 366, 577. Longcope, D.W.: 1996, Solar Phys, 169, 91. Longcope, D.W.: 2001, Phys

Longcope, Dana

276

Improved Fixed-Parameter Algorithms for Minimum-Flip Consensus Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In computational phylogenetics, the problem of constructing a consensus tree for a given set of rooted input trees has frequently been addressed. In this article we study the Minimum-Flip Problem: the input trees are transformed into a binary ... Keywords: Phylogenetics, consensus tree, fixed-parameter algorithm

Sebastian Böcker; Quang Bao Anh Bui; Anke Truss

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mobility-assisted minimum connected cover in a wireless sensor network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All properties of mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs) are inherited from static wireless sensor networks (WSNs) and meanwhile have their own uniqueness and node mobility. Sensor nodes in these networks monitor different regions of an area of interest ... Keywords: Energy-aware selection method, Minimum connected sensor cover set, Mobile wireless sensor networks, Redundant node, Relocation

Ahmed M. Khedr; Walid Osamy

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A robust forced dynamic sliding mode minimum energy position controller for permanent magnet synchronous motor drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a contribution towards improving the environment, a new position controller for vector controlled electric drives employing permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) is presented that achieves approximately 27% less frictional energy loss than a ... Keywords: forced dynamic control, minimum energy manoeuvres, sliding mode control, synchronous motor drives

Stephen J. Dodds; Gunaratnam. Sooriyakumar; Roy Perryman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A stochastic minimum principle and an adaptive pathwise algorithm for stochastic optimal control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a numerical method for finite-horizon stochastic optimal control models. We derive a stochastic minimum principle (SMP) and then develop a numerical method based on the direct solution of the SMP. The method combines Monte Carlo pathwise simulation ... Keywords: Electric power systems, Monte Carlo simulation, Stochastic control

Panos Parpas, Mort Webster

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Statistical inference of minimum BD estimators and classifiers for varying-dimensional models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic modeling for large-scale datasets usually involves a varying-dimensional model space. This paper investigates the asymptotic properties, when the number of parameters grows with the available sample size, of the minimum-BD estimators and classifiers ... Keywords: A diverging number of parameters, Exponential family, Hemodynamic response function, Loss function, Optimal Bayes rule, primary, secondary

Chunming Zhang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A steady-state L-mode tokamak fusion reactor : large scale and minimum scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform extensive analysis on the physics of L-mode tokamak fusion reactors to identify (1) a favorable parameter space for a large scale steady-state reactor and (2) an operating point for a minimum scale steady-state ...

Reed, Mark W. (Mark Wilbert)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analysis on Achieving a Minimum Bunch Length in LCLS Bunch Compressor One  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra-short bunch is required by different applications in many aspects. In this paper, the condition to achieve a minimum bunch length at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) [1] bunch compressor one (BC1) is analyzed analytically and evaluated by simulation. The space charge, wake field and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects are not discussed here.

Sun, Yipeng

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Externally Forced and Internal Variability in Ensemble Climate Simulations of the Maunder Minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the climate system to natural, external forcing during the Maunder Minimum (ca. a.d. 1645–1715) is investigated using a comprehensive climate model. An ensemble of six transient simulations is produced in order to examine the ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Thomas F. Stocker; Christoph C. Raible; Manuel Renold

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Optimal Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle Namwook Kim. INTRODUCTION he optimal control of HEVs (Hybrid Electric Vehicles) is an important topic not only because, Sukwon Cha, Huei Peng Abstract - A number of strategies for the power management of HEVs (Hybrid Electric

Peng, Huei

285

GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR MAXIMUM (2000)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR on geomagnetic activity, quantified by the maximum hourly Dst and tri-hourly ap indices, in a period of 3 days after the shock, are evaluated. Correlations between shock parameters and Dst and ap geomagnetic indices

286

OPTIMIZED FUEL INJECTOR DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM IN-FURNACE NOx REDUCTION AND MINIMUM UNBURNED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

Reaction Engineering International (REI) has established a project team of experts to develop a technology for combustion systems which will minimize NO x emissions and minimize carbon in the fly ash. This much need technology will allow users to meet environmental compliance and produce a saleable by-product. This study is concerned with the NO x control technology of choice for pulverized coal fired boilers, ?in-furnace NO x control,? which includes: staged low-NO x burners, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and hybrid approaches (e.g., reburning with SNCR). The program has two primary objectives: 1) To improve the performance of ?in-furnace? NO x control processes. 2) To devise new, or improve existing, approaches for maximum ?in-furnace? NO x control and minimum unburned carbon. The program involves: 1) fundamental studies at laboratory- and bench-scale to define NO reduction mechanisms in flames and reburning jets; 2) laboratory experiments and computer modeling to improve our two-phase mixing predictive capability; 3) evaluation of commercial low-NO x burner fuel injectors to develop improved designs, and 4) demonstration of coal injectors for reburning and low-NO x burners at commercial scale. The specific objectives of the two-phase program are to: 1 Conduct research to better understand the interaction of heterogeneous chemistry and two phase mixing on NO reduction processes in pulverized coal combustion. 2 Improve our ability to predict combusting coal jets by verifying two phase mixing models under conditions that simulate the near field of low-NO x burners. 3 Determine the limits on NO control by in-furnace NO x control technologies as a function of furnace design and coal type. 5 Develop and demonstrate improved coal injector designs for commercial low-NO x burners and coal reburning systems. 6 Modify the char burnout model in REI?s coal combustion code to take account of recently obtained fundamental data on char reactivity during the late stages of burnout. This will improve our ability to predict carbon burnout with low-NO x firing systems.

A.F. SAROFIM; BROWN UNIVERSITY. R.A. LISAUSKAS; D.B. RILEY, INC.; E.G. EDDINGS; J. BROUWER; J.P. KLEWICKI; K.A. DAVIS; M.J. BOCKELIE; M.P. HEAP; REACTION ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL. D.W. PERSHING; UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. R.H. HURT

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called {open_quotes}Acceptance Standards{close_quotes} is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (US); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called [open quotes]Acceptance Standards[close quotes] is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Designs; Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This publication is one in series of best practice guides for ''Laboratories for the 21st Century,'' a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions.

Petersen, R. L.; Carter, J. J.; Cochran, B. C.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

How Will An Increase From $6.75 to $7.75 in the California Minimum Wage Impact the California Economy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of the 2001 California Minimum Wage Increase."Statistics and Research, California Industrial Relationsthe Minimum Wage in California," memorandum, Institute for

Vassalotti, Amy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Science as an Anomaly-Driven Enterprise: A Computational Approach to Generating Acceptable Theory Revisions in the Face of Anomalous Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous data lead to scientific discoveries. Although machine learning systems can be forced to resolve anomalous data, these systems use general learning algorithms to do so. To determine whether anomaly-driven approaches to discovery produce more accurate models than the standard approaches, we built a program called Kalpana. We also used Kalpana to explore means for identifying those anomaly resolutions that are acceptable to domain experts. Our experiments indicated that anomaly-driven approaches can lead to a richer set of model revisions than standard methods. Additionally we identified semantic and syntactic measures that are significantly correlated with the acceptability of model revisions. These results suggest that by interpreting data within the context of a model and by interpreting model revisions within the context of domain knowledge, discovery systems can more readily suggest accurate and acceptable anomaly resolutions.

Will Bridewell; Will Bridewell Phd

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Technology acceptance in learning settings from a student perspective: a theoretical framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As learning and training with internet technologies and web-based distance learning become more and more popular, more emerging technologies are utilized in delivering instructional material to students. User acceptance of technology has been an important ... Keywords: TAM, technology acceptance, technology-mediated learning, virtual worlds

Chi Zhang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Information kiosk based Indian e-governance service delivery: value chain based measurement and acceptance modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, e-governance systems are evolving towards wider acceptance. Almost all the countries have embraced e-governance as part of their long term policy. Contemporary e-governance implementation efforts however, are not free from challenges. While ... Keywords: e-governance, information kiosk based services, modeling citizen acceptance, user centered services, user interfaces, value chain

Harekrishna Misra

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Acceptance Product EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony Kluk/Ken Picha 2 Background * Originally Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications were Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) documents and project specific: - Defense Waste Processing Facility (PE-03, July 1989) - West Valley Demonstration Project (PE-04, January 1990) * Included many of same specifications as current version of WAPS * First version of RW Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document in January 1993 (included requirements for both SNF and HLW) * EM decided to extract requirements for HLW and put into the WAPS document 3 Background (Cont'd) * Lists technical specifications for acceptance of borosilicate HLW

295

THE TURBULENT CASCADE AND PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently protracted solar minimum provided years of interplanetary data that were largely absent in any association with observed large-scale transient behavior on the Sun. With large-scale shear at 1 AU generally isolated to corotating interaction regions, it is reasonable to ask whether the solar wind is significantly turbulent at this time. We perform a series of third-moment analyses using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the solar wind at 1 AU is just as turbulent as at any other time in the solar cycle. Specifically, the turbulent cascade of energy scales in the same manner proportional to the product of wind speed and temperature. Energy cascade rates during solar minimum average a factor of 2-4 higher than during solar maximum, but we contend that this is likely the result of having a different admixture of high-latitude sources.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CA (United States); Forman, Miriam A., E-mail: jtu46@wildcats.unh.edu, E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu, E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu, E-mail: Joshua.Stawarz@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Miriam.Forman@sunysb.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Boulder, Colorados SmartRegs: Minimum Performance Standards for Residential Rental Housing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov March 20, 2012 Boulder, Colorado's SmartRegs: Minimum Performance Standards for Residential Rental Housing The Case for Performance Standards The City of Boulder's Climate Action Plan calls for greenhouse gas emissions reductions across all sectors of the community (e.g., buildings, transportation and industry). Energy conservation in new and existing buildings plays a key role in the plan's ambitious goals. In 2006, Boulder residents overwhelmingly approved a Climate Action Tax to fund Climate Action Plan efforts. For more than a decade the city has been incrementally strengthening minimum energy efficiency standards for residential

297

Investigation of Catalyst Deactivation from Operation Below the Minimum Operating Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expanding use of alternative and renewable energy sources is forcing large coal-fired power plants to operate at low load more frequently and for longer periods. For units with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems and without economizer bypass capabilities, low-load operation requires the SCR system to operate at reduced flue gas temperatures. For units burning high-sulfur coal, these lower temperatures are often below the minimum operating temperature defined by SCR catalyst vendors. ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

THE EFFECT OF A MINIMUM WEIGHT RADIAL REFLECTOR ON SNAP SHIELDING REQUIREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

A model was derived for a minimum-weight radial reflector for SNAP reactors. The effect, which the use of this optimal reflector has on radiation shield weight requirements is investigated. Weights of systems employing conventional and optimal radial reflectors are compared using the FARSE and FARSER computer codes. It is found that for the configuration under study additional shield weight required when the optimal reflector is used is in excess of the reflector weight savings. (auth)

Bernick, R.L.

1963-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more ...

Régnier, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Classical capacity of bosonic broadcast communication and a new minimum output entropy conjecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work on the classical information capacities of bosonic channels has established the capacity of the single-user pure-loss channel, bounded the capacity of the single-user thermal-noise channel, and bounded the capacity region of the multiple-access channel. The latter is a multi-user scenario in which several transmitters seek to simultaneously and independently communicate to a single receiver. We study the capacity region of the bosonic broadcast channel, in which a single transmitter seeks to simultaneously and independently communicate to two different receivers. It is known that the tightest available lower bound on the capacity of the single-user thermal-noise channel is that channel's capacity if, as conjectured, the minimum von Neumann entropy at the output of a bosonic channel with additive thermal noise occurs for coherent-state inputs. Evidence in support of this minimum output entropy conjecture has been accumulated, but a rigorous proof has not been obtained. In this paper, we propose a new minimum output entropy conjecture that, if proved to be correct, will establish that the capacity region of the bosonic broadcast channel equals the inner bound achieved using a coherent-state encoding and optimum detection. We provide some evidence that supports this new conjecture, but again a full proof is not available.

Saikat Guha; Jeffrey H. Shapiro; Baris I. Erkmen

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

THINNING OF THE SUN'S MAGNETIC LAYER: THE PECULIAR SOLAR MINIMUM COULD HAVE BEEN PREDICTED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar magnetic activity cycle causes changes in the Sun on timescales that are equivalent to human lifetimes. The minimum solar activity that preceded the current solar cycle (cycle 24) was deeper and quieter than any other recent minimum. Using data from the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), we show that the structure of the solar sub-surface layers during the descending phase of the preceding cycle (cycle 23) was very different from that during cycle 22. This leads us to believe that a detailed examination of the data would have led to the prediction that the cycle 24 minimum would be out of the ordinary. The behavior of the oscillation frequencies allows us to infer that changes in the Sun that affected the oscillation frequencies in cycle 23 were localized mainly to layers above about 0.996 R{sub Sun }, depths shallower than about 3000 km. In cycle 22, on the other hand, the changes must have also occurred in the deeper-lying layers.

Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

The exact distribution of the maximum, minimum and the range of Multinomial/Dirichlet and Multivariate Hypergeometric frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact distribution of the maximum and minimum frequencies of Multinomial/Dirichlet and Multivariate Hypergeometric distributions of n balls in m urns is compactly represented as a product of stochastic matrices. This representation ... Keywords: Dirichlet multinomial, Multinomial maximum, minimum, range, Multinomial outliers, inliers, Multivariate hypergeometric, Stochastic matrix

Charles J. Corrado

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low

Michalek, Jeremy J.

305

A Procedure for Determination of Degradation Acceptance Criteria for Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory since 2007 to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This collaboration program aims at providing technical support to a five-year KAERI research project, which includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment: (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. The understanding and assessment of age-related degradations of structures, systems, and components and their impact on plant safety is the major goal of this KAERI-BNL collaboration. Four annual reports have been published before this report as a result of the collaboration research.

Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Hahm, D.; Choi, I-K.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Method for selecting minimum width of leaf in multileaf adjustable collimator while inhibiting passage of particle beams of radiation through sawtooth joints between collimator leaves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for selecting the minimum width of individual leaves of a multileaf adjustable collimator having sawtooth top and bottom surfaces between adjacent leaves of a first stack of leaves and sawtooth end edges which are capable of intermeshing with the corresponding sawtooth end edges of leaves in a second stack of leaves of the collimator. The minimum width of individual leaves in the collimator, each having a sawtooth configuration in the surface facing another leaf in the same stack and a sawtooth end edge, is selected to comprise the sum of the penetration depth or range of the particular type of radiation comprising the beam in the particular material used for forming the leaf; plus the total path length across all the air gaps in the area of the joint at the edges between two leaves defined between lines drawn across the peaks of adjacent sawtooth edges; plus at least one half of the length or period of a single sawtooth. To accomplish this, in accordance with the method of the invention, the penetration depth of the particular type of radiation in the particular material to be used for the collimator leaf is first measured. Then the distance or gap between adjoining or abutting leaves is selected, and the ratio of this distance to the height of the sawteeth is selected. Finally the number of air gaps through which the radiation will pass between sawteeth is determined by selecting the number of sawteeth to be formed in the joint. The measurement and/or selection of these parameters will permit one to determine the minimum width of the leaf which is required to prevent passage of the beam through the sawtooth joint.

Ludewigt, Bernhard (Berkeley, CA); Bercovitz, John (Hayward, CA); Nyman, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Chu, William (Lafayette, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Growth Of Cloud Drops by Condensation: A Criticism of Currently Accepted Theory and a New Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The currently accepted theory of the growth of cloud drops by condensation employs an equation for the rate of increase of drop mass and an equation for the supersaturation. The latter equation gives the average supersaturation over a large ...

R. C. Srivastava

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Acceptance of Lightning Detectors and Localization Systems under Different Damping Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acceptance of individual lightning detectors, idealized detection networks using both loop antenna and time of arrival techniques, and the Swedish lightning localization network have been investigated. The calculations were based on Weibull-...

Th Schütte; E. Pišler; D. Filipovic; S. Israelsson

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

DOE Accepted Carriers Date: April 8, 2008 POC: Dave Lopez, MA-30  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States DOE-Accepted Charter 138 Axis Airways France ICAO Designated Cat 1 Carrier 139 Azerbaijan Airlines Azerbaijan IATA Member Airline 140 Bahamasair Bahamas ICAO Designated Cat 1 Carrier 141 Bangkok

310

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model, MA3T Project U.S. consumer demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among various light-duty vehicle technologies for hundreds of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/contactus.shtml References Retrieved from

311

Presentation to the EAC - Smart Grid Customer Acceptance Paper Outline - Wanda Reder  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Acceptance Customer Acceptance Paper Outline Electricity Advisory Committee October 16,2012 ∗ Wanda Reder ∗ Susan Kelly ∗ Bob Curry ∗ Phyllis Reha ∗ Elliot Roseman ∗ Paula Klein Thanks To ∗ In Smart Grid Committee, Conclusion That Issues & Challenges Associated With Consumer Acceptance Required More Detailed Discussion ∗ Reaching This Conclusion Close To October EAC Meeting Resulted In A Detailed Outline Of A Paper Being Achievable Why Separate Paper On Consumer Acceptance & Why An Outline? ∗ Brief Discussion Of Detailed Outline & Draft Recommendations To Guide Developing A Full Paper For EAC Review ∗ Comments Can Be Submitted Over The Next Two Weeks ∗ Develop An Approach & Schedule To Develop Full Paper For EAC Review

312

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) Substation C3-3 Acceptance Test Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to demonstrate that the newly installed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system functions as intended by the design.

ZAKRAJSEK, M.F.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) Substation C3S4 Acceptance Test Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to demonstrate that the newly installed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system functions as intended by the design.

ZAKRAJSEK, M.F.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Constructing optimal drug-testing plans using a Bayesian acceptance sampling model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drug testing has become an accepted strategy for controlling drug use, particularly among individuals in the custody of the criminal justice system. Emphasis has been placed on testing those free in the community, either on pretrial release, probation, ...

Joanna R Baker; Pamela K Lattimore; Lance A Matheson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Geologic Storage of carbon dioxide : risk analyses and implications for public acceptance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology has the potential to enable large reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, but one of the unanswered questions about CCS is whether it will be accepted by the public. In ...

Singleton, Gregory R. (Gregory Randall)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system software (submittal {number_sign} 216)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System software will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP 1 with final testing on the glovebox software being completed in December 1996. The software tests will be broken out into five sections; one for each of the four Local Control Units and one for the supervisory software modules. The acceptance test report will contain completed copies of the software tests along with the applicable test log and completed Exception Test Reports.

Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 1 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the Phase 1 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). This acceptance test consisted of a pressure-decay/leak test of the containment bag to verify that the seams along the length of the bag had been adequately sealed. The sealing integrity of the FRS must be verified to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at Lancs Industries in Kirkland, Washington on January 17, 1995. The bag temperature-compensated pressure loss of 575 Pa was below the acceptance criteria of 625 Pa and the test results were therefore found to be acceptable. The bag manufacturer estimates that 80--90% of the pressure loss is attributed to leakage around the bag inflation valve where the pressure gage was connected. A leak detector was applied over the entire bag during the pre-tests and no leakage was found. Furthermore, the leak rate corresponding to this pressure loss is very small when compared to the acceptable leak rate of the completely assembled FRS. The sealing integrity of the assembled FRS is verified in Phase 3 testing.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Performance of the ATLAS Minimum Bias Trigger in pp collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early physics program at the ATLAS experiment includes measuring the basic properties of proton proton collisions, such as charged particle multiplicities, in order to constrain phenomenological models of soft interactions in the LHC energy regime. An inclusive and well understood trigger is crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. The ATLAS experiment uses two complementary types of minimum bias triggers. A scintillator trigger sensitive to the forward regions of 2.1trigger based on counting hits in the inner tracking detector has provided a useful control sample. The performance and efficiency measurements of these triggers and detectors will be presented.

Lauren Tompkins

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Performance of the ATLAS Minimum Bias Trigger in pp collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early physics program at the ATLAS experiment includes measuring the basic properties of proton proton collisions, such as charged particle multiplicities, in order to constrain phenomenological models of soft interactions in the LHC energy regime. An inclusive and well understood trigger is crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. The ATLAS experiment uses two complementary types of minimum bias triggers. A scintillator trigger sensitive to the forward regions of 2.1trigger based on counting hits in the inner tracking detector has provided a useful control sample. The performance and efficiency measurements of these triggers and detectors will be presented.

Tompkins, Lauren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Sunspot minimum between solar cycles No 23 and 24. Prediction of solar cycle No 24 magnitude on the base of "Waldmeier's rule"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is the determination of solar minimum date of the new sunspot cycle No 24. It is provided by using of four types of mean daily data values for the period Jan 01. 2006 - Dec 31. 2009: (1) the solar radioindex F10.7; (2) the International sunspot number Ri; (3) the total solar irradiance index (TSI), and (4) the daily number of X-ray flares of classes from "B" to "X" from the soft X-ray GOES satellite channel (0.1 - 0.8 nm). It is found that the mean starting moment of the upward solar activity tendency (the mean solar minimum) is Nov. 06th, 2008. So, the solar cycle No 23 length is estimated to ~12.6 years. A conclusion for a relatively weak general magnitude of solar cycle No 24 is made. By using of relationship based on the "Waldmeier's rule" a near maximal mean yearly sunspot number value of 72 \\pm 27 has been determined.

Komitov, B; Stoychev, K; Dechev, M; Koleva, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Guideline for Underwater Welding to Achieve Acceptable Ferrite Number (FN) for Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ferrite number (FN) of stainless steel weld metal is critical in maintaining resistance to IGSCC (Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) in a BWR environment. In addition the carbon level of the stainless steel weld metal directly affects the level of ferrite necessary to assure IGSCC resistance. NUREG-0313 and Code Case N-503-1 recommends a maximum carbon content not to exceed 0.035 wt. percent and a minimum FN of 7.5. The regulations also require that the first layer FN meets the minimum requirem...

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Determining the Ocean Circulation and Improving the Geoid from Satellite Altimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined problem of determining the ocean circulation and improving the geoid from satellite altimetry is formulated and studied. Minimum variance estimation is used to form optimum estimates of the ocean topography and the geoid. These ...

John C. Marshall

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Accepted by………………………………………………………………………………...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer-calcium phosphate composites for use as an injectable bone substitute Polymer-calcium phosphate composites for use as an injectable bone substitute by

Rafal Adam Mickiewicz; Anne M. Mayes; Harry L. Tuller; Rafal Adam Mickiewicz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Accepted by...................................................................................................................................  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology and Policy Rural economic development is a national priority in many developing countries. However, rural areas frequently lack the safe and reliable electricity supply that is needed for the development of numerous economic activities. At the same time, the remoteness, isolation, and low electricity demand of many rural communities make them very unlikely to be reached by the extension of the grid. Therefore, off-grid generation systems are required to provide electricity services to those isolated rural communities. The traditional solution to this problem has been the use of internal combustion engines. However, combustion engines are short-lived and expensive to maintain, require a regular supply of fuel, and have a significant impact on the environment. In recent years, renewable energy systems (RES) have emerged as a clean and easy-to-maintain alternative to the use of

Ricardo Forcano; Stephen R. Connors; Daniel E. Hastings

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Model Diagnosis of Nighttime Minimum Temperature Warming during Summer due to Irrigation in the California Central Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the mechanisms of nighttime minimum temperature warming in the California Central Valley during summer due to irrigation. The Scripps Experimental Climate Prediction Center (ECPC) Regional Spectral Model (RSM) was used to ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Masao Kanamitsu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Relative Importance of Solar and Anthropogenic Forcing of Climate Change between the Maunder Minimum and the Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate during the Maunder Minimum is compared with current conditions in GCM simulations that include a full stratosphere and parameterized ozone response to solar spectral irradiance variability and trace gas changes. The Goddard Institute ...

David Rind; Drew Shindell; Judith Perlwitz; Jean Lerner; Patrick Lonergan; Judith Lean; Chris McLinden

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Spatial Interpolation of Daily Maximum and Minimum Air Temperature Based on Meteorological Model Analyses and Independent Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly meteorological forecast model initializations are used to guide the spatial interpolation of daily cooperative network station data in the northeastern United States. The hourly model data are transformed to daily maximum and minimum ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Brian N. Belcher

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Southeastern South American Daily Gridded Dataset of Observed Surface Minimum and Maximum Temperature for 1961–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a southeastern South American gridded dataset of daily minimum and maximum surface temperatures for 1961–2000. The data used for the gridding are observed daily data from meteorological stations in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and ...

Bárbara Tencer; Matilde Rusticucci; Phil Jones; David Lister

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

333

Multicasting in Large Wireless Networks: Bounds on the Minimum Energy per Bit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider scaling laws for maximal energy efficiency of communicating a message to all the nodes in a wireless network, as the number of nodes in the network becomes large. Two cases of large wireless networks are studied -- dense random networks and constant density (extended) random networks. In addition, we also study finite size regular networks in order to understand how regularity in node placement affects energy consumption. We first establish an information-theoretic lower bound on the minimum energy per bit for multicasting in arbitrary wireless networks when the channel state information is not available at the transmitters. Upper bounds are obtained by constructing a simple flooding scheme that requires no information at the receivers about the channel states or the locations and identities of the nodes. The gap between the upper and lower bounds is only a constant factor for dense random networks and regular networks, and differs by a poly-logarithmic factor for extended random networks. Further...

Jain, Aman; Verdu, Sergio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Image transmission over OFDM channel with rate allocation scheme and minimum peak-toaverage power ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes new scheme for efficient rate allocation in conjunction with reducing peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) in orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. Modification of the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) image coder is proposed to generate four different groups of bit-stream relative to its significances. The significant bits, the sign bits, the set bits and the refinement bits are transmitted in four different groups. The proposed method for reducing the PAPR utilizes twice the unequal error protection (UEP), using the Read-Solomon codes (RS), in conjunction with bit-rate allocation and selective interleaving to provide minimum PAPR. The output bit-stream from the source code (SPIHT) will be started by the most significant types of bits (first group of bits). The optimal unequal error protection (UEP) of the four groups is proposed based on the channel destortion. The proposed structure provides significant improvement in bit error rate (BER) performance. Per...

Mohammed, Usama S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nonradiating and minimum energy sources and their fields: Generalized source inversion theory and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A new general framework for characterizing scalar and electromagnetic (EM) nonradiating (NR) and minimum energy (ME) sources and their fields is developed that is of interest for both radiation and source reconstruction problems. NR sources are characterized in connection with the concept of reciprocity as nonreceptors. Localized ME sources are shown to be free fields truncated within the source’s support. A new source analysis tool is developed that is based on the decomposition of a source and its field into their radiating and NR components. The individual radiating and reactive energy roles of the radiating and NR parts of a source are characterized. The general theory is illustrated with a time-harmonic EM example. Index Terms—Inverse problems.

Edwin A. Marengo; Richard W. Ziolkowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Forman, Miriam A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

C. Bouchiat

2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

Thomas, L.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

Wang, Linghua [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: wanglhwang@gmail.com [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Analysis of health aspects, food acceptability, and economics benefits of the solar box cooker in Sierra Leone. Rept. for 1 Oct 88-31 May 90 (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides the results of a project whose aim was ascertaining the effectiveness of the Solar Box Cooker as an instrument for cooking and pasteurizing water, as well as, the degree to which it and its products are acceptable to the people of Sierra Leone. Specific Objectives were as follows: (1) To ascertain the extent of reduction of pathogenic micro-organism of foods cooked and water pasteurized via the solar box cooker in the village environment; (2) To determine the acceptability of solar box cooked food as compared with foods cooked via the traditional methods; (3) To estimate the costs savings of fuel and labor for foods cooked via the solar box cooker; and (4) To adopt Solar Box Cooker technologyfor successful use in a designated developing country.

Carpenter, B.W.; Davis, L.

1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Underwriters Laboratories now accepting certification investigation requests for E85 fuel dispensing equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Hirschmugl Global Media Relations Supervisor Underwriters Laboratories Phone: +1 847 830-1404 E-mail: Joseph.F.Hirschmugl@us.ul.com PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Underwriters Laboratories Announces Development of Certification Requirements for E85 Dispensers Now Accepting Product Submittals for Certification Investigation NORTHBROOK, Ill. Oct. 16, 2007 - Underwriters Laboratories (UL), North America's leading safety testing and certification organization, announced the establishment of safety requirements for E85 fuel dispensing equipment, and is now accepting submittals for certification investigations. The establishment of safety requirements follows the completion of UL's comprehensive research program to investigate potential safety concerns associated with dispensing

343

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Group E Charging Infrastructure Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Domicile & Workplace Charging: Being available were vehicles spend a lot of time (Level 1/2) * Gas Station model * Fast charging * Battery Swap * Flow Batteries: Electrolyte swap for long distance traveling * Dynamic Wireless Charging * Strategically placed and visible * Widespread and visible Charging Infrastructure (Group E) July 30, 2012 Breakout Session #2 - Refine Consumer Acceptance Concepts and Infrastructure Scenarios * DOE Actions for Fast Charging Scenario: * R&D on power transfer rates for batteries * Energy storage research to minimize grid impacts and demand charges

344

Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP`s performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12.

Lott, D.T.

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Hanford Corrosion Probe Tree Assembly  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe tree assembly. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion probe tree assembly. The test will consist of a pressure test to verify leak tightness of the probe tree body, a continuity test of the probe tree wiring, a test of the high level detector wiring, and a test of the operation of the Type K thermocouples.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data from ancillary systems was collected manually and recorded on log sheets.

Berglin, B.G.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

A conceptual framework and propositions for the acceptance of mobile services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile services are heralded to create a tremendous spectrum of business opportunities. User acceptance of these services is of paramount importance. Consequently, a deeper insight into theory-based research is required to better understand the underlying ... Keywords: innovation adoption, mCommerce, mobile services

Sally Rao; Indrit Troshani

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor Valeryi Sizyuk

Harilal, S. S.

349

Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

KOCH, M.R.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Using acceptance tests as a support for clarifying requirements: A series of experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main reasons for the failure of many software projects is the late discovery of a mismatch between the customers' expectations and the pieces of functionality implemented in the delivered system. At the root of such a mismatch is often a set ... Keywords: Acceptance testing, Empirical studies, Fit tables, Requirements

Filippo Ricca; Marco Torchiano; Massimiliano Di Penta; Mariano Ceccato; Paolo Tonella

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Profiling the non-user: Rethinking policy initiatives stimulating ICT acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business strategies and policies that were successful in increasing internet penetration in the early days may no longer be appropriate. This is most probably so in countries where a bigger proportion of the population is already connected to the internet. ... Keywords: E-inclusion, ICT acceptance, ICT literacy, Non-users, PC and internet penetration, Policy initiatives, User research

Pieter Verdegem; Pascal Verhoest

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

AcceptedArticleGlobal modes of climate variability O. de Viron,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process as doi: 10.1002/grl.50386 c 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. #12;Accepted-scale variations of sea surface tem- peratures. c 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. #12

Ghil, Michael

354

Accepted to Energy Policy, December 2011. A generic framework for the description and analysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted to Energy Policy, December 2011. ERG/201104 A generic framework for the description policies. The framework can be employed to capture the evolution of energy security in an energy system associated with the system's constituent processes. Energy security policies are treated as flows

Hughes, Larry

355

Citizen acceptance of new fossil fuel infrastructure: Value theory and Canada's Northern Gateway Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Bakken shale oil) to the Texas Gulf coast for refinement. This study explores citizen acceptance), which would transport unconventional oil (bitumen) 1,172 km from Alberta's oil sands to British Columbia Pipeline system) which would transport oil from Canada and the northern U.S. (including oil sands bitumen

356

Applicant Accepts Application Instructions Page 1 Sustainable Energy Revolving Loan Fund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy efficiency and renewable energy. In fiscal years 2010-2014, $100,000 in funding is made available projects that decrease OSU's use of non-renewable energy and create competent graduates in the areas_________________ Applicant Accepts Application Instructions Page 1 Sustainable Energy Revolving

Escher, Christine

357

Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article Accepted version (v1, Jul. 2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article Accepted version (v1, Jul. 2012) 1 THE SG2-00725987,version1-16Oct2012 Author manuscript, published in "Solar Energy 88, 10 (2012) Pages 3072-3083" DOI : 10.1016/j.solener.2012.07.018 #12;Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article

358

Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report  

SciTech Connect

The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory.

Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks.

Waldo, E.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION 1 A Review on Distributed Application Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offload computational intensive applications to remote servers by employing different cloud models SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION remote server nodes. Current offloading procedures employ Provider UMSC Universal Mobile Service Cell URL Uniform Resource Locator VM Virtual Machine Wi-Fi Wireless

Melbourne, University of

363

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 2 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the Phase 2 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the test mixer pump currently installed in Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the strength of the containment bag and bag bottom cinching mechanism. It is postulated that 68 gallons of waste could be trapped inside the pump internals. The bag must be capable of supporting this waste if it shakes loose and drains to the bottom of the bag after the bag bottom has been cinched closed. This acceptance test was performed at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) Facility in the 400 area on January 23, 1995. The bag assembly supported the weight of 920 kg (2,020 lbs) of water with no leakage or damage to the bag. This value meets the acceptance criteria of 910 kg of water and therefore the results were found to be acceptable. The maximum volume of liquid expected to be held up in the pump internals is 258 L (68 gallons), which corresponds to 410 kg. This test weight gives just over a safety factor of 2. The bag also supported a small shock load while it was filled with water when the crane hoisted the bag assembly up and down. Based on the strength rating of the bag components, the bag assembly should support 2--3 times the test weight of 910 kg.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

breaker replacement breaker replacement and power and control cable addition within the fenced area of the Flagstaff Substation located in Coconino County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes on removing 4 existing 345-kV circuit breakers and installing 4 new 362-kV circuit breakers as well as adding new power and control cables in existing cable trenches to the control building. Excavation of the old trench to a minimum depth of 18 inches and 3 feet wide will be required. The disturbed ground will be use as backfill. The proposed action within the fenced area of the Flagstaff Substation is necessary to maintain the safety and reliability of the bulk electrical system . Western will use existing access roads and vehicles such as

365

Exact and approximate solutions for the quantum minimum-Kullback-entropy estimation problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum Kullback entropy principle (mKE) is a useful tool to estimate quantum states and operations from incomplete data and prior information. In general, the solution of a mKE problem is analytically challenging and an approximate solution has been proposed and employed in different context. Recently, the form and a way to compute the exact solution for finite dimensional systems has been found, and a question naturally arises on whether the approximate solution could be an effective substitute for the exact solution, and in which regimes this substitution can be performed. Here, we provide a systematic comparison between the exact and the approximate mKE solutions for a qubit system when average data from a single observable are available. We address both mKE estimation of states and weak Hamiltonians, and compare the two solutions in terms of state fidelity and operator distance. We find that the approximate solution is generally close to the exact one unless the initial state is near an eigenstate of the measured observable. Our results provide a rigorous justification for the use of the approximate solution whenever the above condition does not occur, and extend its range of application beyond those situations satisfying the assumptions used for its derivation.

Carlo Sparaciari; Stefano Olivares; Francesco Ticozzi; Matteo G. A. Paris

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

The effect of longitudinal spacer ribs on the minimum pressure drop in a heated annulus  

SciTech Connect

When evaluating a heated flow passage for vulnerability to static flow excursions, special note should be taken of flow restrictions which might allow premature vapor generation. In this study, measurements of steady state pressure drop were made for the downward flow of water in a vertical annulus. The outer wall was uniformly heated to allow subcooled boiling. Minima in the pressure drop characteristics were compared for test sections with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. For a given power and inlet temperature, the minimum occurred at a higher flow rate in the ribbed test section. This is attributed to vapor generation at the ribs. The work cited in this document show how a restriction in a heated channel can produce vapor which would not be observed in the absence of the restriction. In the present study, the effect of a flow restriction on the tendency to flow excursion is explored by finding demand curves for a heated annulus in subcooled boiling flow. The annulus is heated from the outside, and alternately equipped with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. These ribs separate the heated and unheated walls; in pressing against the heated wall they provide a means for premature vapor production.

Johnston, B.S.; Neff, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Revised equipartition & minimum energy formula for magnetic field strength estimates from radio synchrotron observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The commonly used classical equipartition or minimum-energy estimate of total magnetic fields strengths from radio synchrotron intensities is of limited practical use because it is based on the hardly known ratio K of the total energies of cosmic ray protons and electrons and also has inherent problems. We present a revised formula, using the number density ratio K for which we give estimates. For particle acceleration in strong shocks K is about 40 and increases with decreasing shock strength. Our revised estimate for the field strength gives larger values than the classical estimate for flat radio spectra with spectral indices of about 0.5-0.6, but smaller values for steep spectra and total fields stronger than about 10 muG. In very young supernova remnants, for example, the classical estimate may be too large by up to 10x. On the other hand, if energy losses of cosmic ray electrons are important, K increases with particle energy and the equipartition field may be underestimated significantly. Our revised larger equipartition estimates in galaxy clusters and radio lobes are consistent with independent estimates from Faraday rotation measures, while estimates from the ratio between radio synchrotron and X-ray inverse Compton intensities generally give much weaker fields. This may be explained e.g. by a concentration of the field in filaments. Our revised field strengths may also lead to major revisions of electron lifetimes in jets and radio lobes estimated from the synchrotron break frequency in the radio spectrum.

Rainer Beck; Marita Krause

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Minimum Energy Dwelling (MED) workbook: an investigation of techniques and materials for energy conscious design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workbook is based upon information gathered during the design phase of the Minimum Energy Dwelling. The objective of the project, sponsored by the Southern California Gas Co., Department of Energy, and Mission Viejo is to substantially reduce energy use by the incorporation of energy conservation and solar techniques in a single-family detached dwelling. The Project will demonstrate to builders, as well as to the general public, a number of technological innovations that can, at reasonable cost, be included in a dwelling design. The problem facing Southern California Gas Co., along with most other gas utilities, is ever-decreasing amounts of gas at increasing prices. The dwelling designed has approximately 1,150 ft/sup 2/, consistent with current home-building trends. Through the optimum use of energy-conserving appliances, insulation, window and wall shading, exterior coloring, and thermal mass, the yearly energy usage has been reduced by over 50%. Of the remaining 50% of the energy required for heating, cooling, and domestic hot water, the majority is supplied by the solar-energy system. Three hundred twenty square feet (270 effective) of evacuated tube collector are incorporated into the building structure. The hot water provided by the collectors is used to run an absorption chiller for cooling, the domestic hot water, and the heating system. The remaining energy requirements are met by an auxiliary natural gas energy system and a cool-air-economizer cycle.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The extended minimum of solar cycle 23 as seen by radial velocity (GOLF, GONG) and intensity (VIRGO) helioseismic instruments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the variability of the solar oscillation spectrum during solar cycle 23 and its extended minimum. We use simultaneous observations of the low-degree solar p modes collected by the space-based, Sun-as-a-star GOLF (radial velocity) and VIRGO (intensity) instruments, and by the ground-based, multi-site network GONG. We investigate in particular the response of the p-mode eigenfrequencies to the observed peculiar deep solar minimum of surface activity of 2007-2009 as compared with the previous solar cycle 23. We study the different temporal variations of the p-mode frequencies with individual angular degrees.

Salabert, D; Palle, P L; Jimenez-Reyes, S J; Jimenez, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Nuclear Energy Option for the U.S.--How Far Are We from Public Acceptance?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent rise of oil and gasoline prices accompanied by reluctant acknowledgement that traditional sources of energy are limited has renewed public interest in renewable energy sources. This perspective on energy is focusing attention on and facilitating acceptance of alternative energy concepts, such as solar, wind, and biomass. The nuclear energy alternative, while clean with potentially abundant fuel supplies and associated with low costs, is burdened with the frequently negative public opinion reserved for things nuclear. Coincident with the heightened examination of alternative energy concepts, 2004 marks the 25-year anniversary of the Three Mile Island accident. Since this pivotal accident in 1979, no new reactor licenses have been granted in the U.S. The resolution of the issues of nuclear waste management and disposition are central to and may advance public discussions of the future use of nuclear energy. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently preparing the licensing application for Yucca Mountain, which was designated in 2003 as the site for a high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository in the U.S. The DOE also has been operating a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The operational status of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a repository for TRU waste was successfully realized along with the lesson learned that stakeholder trust and acceptance are as critical to the success of a repository program as the resolution of technical issues and obtaining regulatory approvals. For the five years of its operation and for decades prior, the challenge of attaining public acceptance of the WIPP has persisted for reasons aligned with the opposition to nuclear energy. Due to this commonality, the nuclear waste approach to public acceptance, with its pros and cons, provides a baseline for the examination of an approach for the public acceptance of nuclear energy in the U.S. This paper will present these concepts and discuss the future of nuclear energy in the U.S. in light of the challenge of gaining public acceptance.

Biedscheid, J.A.; Devarakonda, M.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

371

The road to renewables : a case study of wind energy, local ownership and social acceptance at Samsø.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is to investigate how local participation and local ownership enhances social acceptance of wind energy. In Norway many planned wind… (more)

Jakobsen, Ina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Appendix C: DOE Super-ESPC Project Acceptance Guidelines and Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of DOE Super-ESPC Projects  ECM Installation: All ECMs are installed in accordance with plans, specifications, standards, and other contract documents (sometimes by the Contractor, often by a subcontractor and always over a period of months).  Inspection, start-up, testing and commissioning. All ECMs are inspected, brought on line, tested, and commissioned interactively with all related Government-owned or Contractor-installed ECMs. Again, the ECMs should be operating in accordance with the design, plans, specifications, standards and other contract documents and manufacturer's recommendations. Individual ECMs may go through start-up and testing, but all interrelated

373

Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 August 2010 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (938 KB) Technical Report Example Procedures for NREL/TP-550-47502 Developing Acceptance-Range August 2010 Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Prepared under Task No. ARRB.1000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

374

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/26/2012 7/26/2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Monday, July 30, 2012 - LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA Event Objective: DOE aims to obtain stakeholder input on the consumer acceptance and charging infrastructure barriers associated with the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. This input will help guide the Challenge and the next-generation technology development necessary to enable U.S. companies to be the first in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles - and to do so within the next 10 years. 8:00-8:30AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 8:30-8:35 AM CALL TO ORDER Mr. Patrick Davis, DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program

375

Model Acceptability Measure for the Identification of Failures in Qualitative Fault Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with two of the main tasks of Fault Monitoring Systems (FMS): fault detection and fault identification. During fault detection, the FMS should recognize that the plant behavior is abnormal, and therefore, that the plant is not working properly. During fault identification, the FMS should conclude which type of failure has occurred. The first goal of this work is to consolidate a new fault detection technique, called enveloping, that was developed in the context of the Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning Fault Monitoring System (FIRFMS). The second and primary goal of this paper is to introduce the model acceptability measure as a tool to enhance and make more robust the fault identification process in the context of FIRFMS. The enveloping technique and the model acceptability measure are applied to an electric circuit model previously used for such purpose in the literature. It is shown that the new methods outperform the ones previously advocated in FIRFMS for that purpose 1 ...

Antoni Escobet Angela; Angela Nebot; Francois E. Cellier

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Acceptance test plan for the 241-AN-105 multi-function corrosion monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe tree assembly destined for installation into tank 241-AN-105. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion probe tree assembly to be installed into tank 241-AN-105. The test will consist of a pressure test to verify leak tightness of the probe tree body, a continuity test of the probe tree wiring, a test of the high level detector wiring, a test of the operation of the Type K thermocouples along the probe body, and verification of operation of corrosion monitoring computer and instrumentation.

EDGEMON, G.L.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler (ISVS) system. This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This ABU documents items for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ultrasonic Acceptance Small Diameter Boiler Tube Butt Weld: Project Status Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim report documenting the progress of a multiyear project for developing an alternative ultrasonic testing (UT) acceptance guideline for small diameter boiler tube butt welds.BackgroundHistorically, small diameter boiler tube butt welds have either been examined for defects using radiography or not inspected, with the owner relying only on a hydrostatic pressure test at 1.5 times the design pressure to assess weld quality. This reliance is ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

User Acceptance of Agile Information Systems: A Model and Empirical Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the rapid changes in users' requirements, a new generation of information systems (IS), namely, agile IS, has emerged. Agile IS, defined as information systems developed using agile methods, are characterized by frequent upgrades with ... Keywords: Agile Methods, Agile Systems, Availability Heuristic, Comfort With Change, Habit, Information Systems Continuance, Omission Bias, Personal Innovativeness, Status Quo Bias, Unified Theory Of Acceptance And Use Of Technology (Utau T)

Weiyin Hong; James Thong; Lewis Chasalow; Gurpreet Dhillon

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Enhancing Curriculum Acceptance among Students with E-learning 2.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E-learning; enhanced by communicating and interacting is becoming increasingly accepted and this puts Web 2.0 at the center of the new educational technologies. E-Learning 2.0 emerges as an innovative method of online learning for its incorporation of Web 2.0 tools. For any academic study, the curriculum provides overview of intact learning area. The Curriculum provides overview to content of the Subject. Many institutions place student interaction as a priority of their online curriculum design. It is proved that interaction has a great effect on the students' involvement in learning and acceptance of Curriculum. Students are accepting curriculum that is designed by teacher; whereas E-learning 2.0 enabled Curriculum management system allows student to involve in learning activities. It works as a stimulus and increases their dedication to the Curriculum. While Institute adapts E-Learning 2.0 as Learning Management System, it also provides Social Networking services and provides direct and transparent interac...

Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I; Gandhi, Ankita

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo mission. ETG acceptance test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrically-Heated Thermoelectric Generators (ETGs) shall be subjected to a flight level acceptance test program to certify the design of the SIG/Galileo flight generator. Each test in the test program is designed to simulate critical conditions and environments associated with generator ground handling, spacecraft launch and in-space operations. Successful completion of the test program shall be evidenced by the satisfactory performance of the ETG during and after the application of the various test environments. The ETG Acceptance Test Plan is designed to specify the testing sequence, the severity of the applied test environments and the acceptance criteria for assessing generator performance. Two test facilities shall be required for the execution of the proposed test program. The Teledyne Energy Systems (TES) facility in Timonium, Maryland shall be the site for the ETG thermal performance evaluation testing; and the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) facility in White Oak, Maryland, shall be the site of the dynamic, mass-properties and magnetic properties testing.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

Nielsen, Steven O.

386

An exact solution for finding minimum recombinant haplotype configurations on pedigrees with missing data by integer linear programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of reconstructing haplotype configurations from genotypes on pedigree data with missing alleles under the Mendelian law of inheritance and the minimum recombination principle, which is important for the construction of haplotype ... Keywords: branch-and-bound algorithm, haplotyping, integer linear programming, missing data imputation, pedigree analysis, recombination

Jing Li; Tao Jiang

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Minimum Temperatures, Diurnal Temperature Ranges, and Temperature Inversions in Limestone Sinkholes of Different Sizes and Shapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature data from five enclosed limestone sinkholes of various sizes and shapes on the Hetzkogel Plateau near Lunz, Austria (1300 m MSL), have been analyzed to determine the effect of sinkhole geometry on temperature minima, diurnal ...

C. D. Whiteman; T. Haiden; B. Pospichal; S. Eisenbach; R. Steinacker

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dependability and acceptability of handheld computers in school-based data collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given the increasing influence of technology and the explosion in data collection demands, the acceptance and assimilation of new paradigms and technologies require today’s educators, researchers, and evaluators to select appropriate tools and apply them effectively. One of these technologies—handheld computers—makes the benefits of computerized data collection more accessible to field-based researchers. Three related studies were conducted to evaluate handheld-based data collection system for use in special education settings and to highlight the acceptability factors to effectively use this emerging technology. The first study reviewed the recent literature on the dependability and willingness of teachers to adopt handheld data collection systems and emphasized five important factors: (1) perceived ease of use; (2) perceived usefulness; (3) intention to use; (4) dependability; and (5) subjective norms. The second study discussed the dependability of handheld computers used by special education teachers for collecting self-report data by addressing four dependability attributes: reliability, maintainability, availability, and safety. Data were collected from five sources: (1) self-reports of time use by 19 special education teachers using Pocket PC computers, (2) observations of time use from eight external data collectors, (3) teacher interviews, (4) technical reports prepared by the researcher, and (5) teacher satisfaction. Results indicated that data collection via handheld computers yielded accurate, complete, and timely data, and was appropriate for these four dependability attributes. The last study investigated teachers’ acceptance of handheld computer use by testing the relationship among five factors that influence intention to use this technology which was based on a modified version of the technology acceptance model using the handheld computer acceptance survey responses from 45 special education teachers. The results showed that intention to use handheld computer was directly affected by the devices’ perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. The issue of dependability had a direct and indirect statistically significant effect on perceived ease of use and usefulness, and intention to use a handheld computer, respectively. Overall, three studies demonstrated that handheld computers can be effectively used in the direct observation of behavior in a school environment, without requirements of any settings.

Adiguzel, Tufan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Review: A meta-analysis of e-learning technology acceptance: The role of user types and e-learning technology types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing literature in the field of e-learning technology acceptance reflects a significant number of independent studies that primarily investigate the causal relationships proposed by technology acceptance theory, such as the technology acceptance ... Keywords: Acceptance, E-learning, Meta-analysis, Moderator analysis

BošTjan ŠUmak; Marjan Heri?Ko; Maja PušNik

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Book and Journals Donation Policy Books: The Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Library accepts book donations that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book and Journals Donation Policy Books: The Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Library accepts book donations that support the collection. If the Library is unable to accept your donation, due to space and staffing limitations, the alternative disposition list http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/education/library/about/departments/journal-and-book

Chapman, Michael S.

391

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

CX-000924: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000924: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Accreditation Certification Program for Installation and Acceptance of Photovoltaic Systems CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/23/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Department of Energy is proposing to continue to provide funding to the recipient for Solar Photovoltaic and Solar Thermal Installer Certification Testing. North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners currently is the only industry accepted Certifying body for solar photovoltaic and solar thermal installers. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000924.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000920: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000923: Categorical Exclusion Determination

393

DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

Dessauer, G.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure infrastructure Group D Charging Infrastucture Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Limited infrastructure * PHEVs (110V infrastructure suitable) * AEVs (tethered to home) * Make commercial charging free (to consumers) - Google model * Utilities are compensated * Value proposition for site host? Infrastructure provider? * Parking garage - put EVSEs on high floors * Free parking for EVs * Fast charging - needs to be worked from the vehicle OEMs * Premature to discuss at this point - "you gotta sell cars" - chicken & egg * Issues: installation costs, standards, vehicle availability, energy costs/demand costs * Electrification and automation * Wireless charging, platooning, let the grid be the energy carrier

396

An application of the Threshold Accepting metaheuristic for curriculum based course timetabling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article presents a local search approach for the solution of timetabling problems in general, with a particular implementation for competition track 3 of the International Timetabling Competition 2007 (ITC 2007). The heuristic search procedure is based on Threshold Accepting to overcome local optima. A stochastic neighborhood is proposed and implemented, randomly removing and reassigning events from the current solution. The overall concept has been incrementally obtained from a series of experiments, which we describe in each (sub)section of the paper. In result, we successfully derived a potential candidate solution approach for the finals of track 3 of the ITC 2007.

Geiger, Martin Josef

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 216)  

SciTech Connect

Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System Hardware will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP I with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests will be broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DNS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document will contain completed copies of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

Alternative Minimum Levels for Utility Aqueous Discharges: Chemical Analytical Measurement Guide for National Pollutant Discharge El imination System (NPDES) Permits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act requires the electric utility industry to monitor their wastewater discharges to ensure compliance with discharge permit limits. EPRI developed a new definition of quantitation level appropriate to water quality compliance monitoring and used data from its previous studies on trace element analysis of utility wastewaters to calculate Alternative Minimum Levels (AMLs). The approach developed in this report will help utilities define reasonable pollutant discharge limits to meet effluen...

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

THE BEHAVIOR OF THE 17 GHz SOLAR RADIUS AND LIMB BRIGHTENING IN THE SPOTLESS MINIMUM XXIII/XXIV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current solar minimum has surprised the entire solar community because the spotless period is presently almost 2-3 years longer than the usual minima. To better understand this, we studied the variation of the solar radius and the polar limb brightening at 17 GHz, comparing the results from the minimum at the end of cycle XXIII with those of the previous one. Daily maps obtained by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) from 1992 through 2010 were analyzed. Whereas the variation of the solar radius at radio frequencies indicates the heating of the solar atmosphere due to solar activity, the limb brightening intensity depends on the organization of the polar magnetic field of the Sun, including the global dipole and the features formed around it. These features are more prominent during minima periods. As a common result, researchers have observed a decrease in both radius and limb brightness intensity at 17 GHz during the present minimum when compared with the previous one. The mean solar radius is 0.''9 {+-} 0.''6 smaller and the limb brightening reduced its intensity by around 20%. Both decrements are interpreted in terms of the weaker solar chromospheric activity of the present cycle. Measurement of the radius and limb brightening at 17 GHz can be used as an alternative solar activity index and should be included in the set of parameters used to predict future cycles.

Selhorst, C. L. [IP and D-Universidade do Vale do ParaIba-UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A. [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, J. E. R. [CEA, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Shibasaki, K., E-mail: caius@univap.br [NoRH, Nobeyama Radioheliograph (Japan)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V  

SciTech Connect

A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components.

Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG - Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Via Enrico Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Genon, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.genon@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Zanetti, Maria Chiara, E-mail: mariachiara.zanetti@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

An estimate for the sum of a Dirichlet series in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a vertical line segment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behaviour of the sum of an entire Dirichlet series is analyzed in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a system of vertical line segments. Also a more general problem, connected with the Polya conjecture is posed and solved. It concerns the minimum modulus of an entire function with Fabri gaps and its growth along curves going to infinity. Bibliography: 33 titles.

Gaisin, Ahtyar M; Rakhmatullina, Zhanna G

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cost analysis in support of minimum energy standards for clothes washers and dryers  

SciTech Connect

The results of the cost analysis of energy conservation design options for laundry products are presented. The analysis was conducted using two approaches. The first, is directed toward the development of industrial engineering cost estimates of each energy conservation option. This approach results in the estimation of manufacturers costs. The second approach is directed toward determining the market price differential of energy conservation features. The results of this approach are shown. The market cost represents the cost to the consumer. It is the final cost, and therefore includes distribution costs as well as manufacturing costs.

1979-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

408

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: Phase I State-of-the-Art Review; Phase II Laboratory Testing of Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this investigation were to identify, obtain, and test environmentally acceptable dielectric fluids for power transformers. In addition, the report provides a resource guide to the environmental qualities and performances of conventional transformer oils and environmentally acceptable alternatives. A literature review was conducted to identify appropriate candidates and, once identified, samples of the oil were obtained and tested. The findings of the literature review and the laboratory...

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

Shafer, A.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Initial Acceptance Criteria Concepts and Data for Assessing Longevity of Low-Voltage Cable Insulations and Jackets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cables installed in nuclear plants have long lives in most applications. However, the service conditions for some applications can cause the jackets and insulations of cables to age more rapidly than normal. It is desirable to have acceptance criteria for continued service of those cables experiencing significant aging. This report establishes a basis for acceptance criteria, provides a method for estimating remaining cable life, and provides aging profiles under various thermal and radiation conditi...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Solar-Cycle Characteristics Examined in Separate Hemispheres: Phase, Gnevyshev Gap, and Length of Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research results from solar-dynamo models show the northern and southern hemispheres may evolve separately throughout the solar cycle. The observed phase lag between the hemispheres provides information regarding the strength of hemispheric coupling. Using hemispheric sunspot-area and sunspot-number data from Cycles 12 - 23, we determine how out of phase the separate hemispheres are during the rising, maximum, and declining period of each solar cycle. Hemispheric phase differences range from 0 - 11, 0 - 14, and 2 - 19 months for the rising, maximum, and declining periods, respectively. The phases appear randomly distributed between zero months (in phase) and half of the rise (or decline) time of the solar cycle. An analysis of the Gnevyshev gap is conducted to determine if the double-peak is caused by the averaging of two hemispheres that are out of phase. We confirm previous findings that the Gnevyshev gap is a phenomenon that occurs in the separate hemispheres and is not due to a superposition of sunspot in...

Norton, A A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Tropical Determinant of Integer Doubly-Stochastic Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let D(m,n) be the set of all the integer points in the m-dilate of the Birkhoff polytope of doubly-stochastic n by n matrices. In this paper we find the sharp upper bound on the tropical determinant over the set D(m,n). We define a version of the tropical determinant where the maximum over all the transversals in a matrix is replaced with the minimum and then find the sharp lower bound on thus defined tropical determinant over D(m,n).

Dinitz, Thomas; Soprunova, Jenya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Method for Determining Optimal Residential Energy Efficiency Retrofit Packages  

SciTech Connect

Businesses, government agencies, consumers, policy makers, and utilities currently have limited access to occupant-, building-, and location-specific recommendations for optimal energy retrofit packages, as defined by estimated costs and energy savings. This report describes an analysis method for determining optimal residential energy efficiency retrofit packages and, as an illustrative example, applies the analysis method to a 1960s-era home in eight U.S. cities covering a range of International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate regions. The method uses an optimization scheme that considers average energy use (determined from building energy simulations) and equivalent annual cost to recommend optimal retrofit packages specific to the building, occupants, and location. Energy savings and incremental costs are calculated relative to a minimum upgrade reference scenario, which accounts for efficiency upgrades that would occur in the absence of a retrofit because of equipment wear-out and replacement with current minimum standards.

Polly, B.; Gestwick, M.; Bianchi, M.; Anderson, R.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Judkoff, R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DOE-STD-1167-2003; Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1167-2003 OCTOBER 2003 DOE STANDARD THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESPIRATORY ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM FOR SUPPLIED-AIR SUITS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii DOE-STD-1167-2003 FOREWORD This non-mandatory Technical Standard provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor

415

Technical Barriers and Reasonable Price Solutions to Contractor Acceptance in the Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barriers and Reasonable Barriers and Reasonable Price Solutions to Contractor Acceptance in the Field Ben Schoenbauer, Research Engineer, Center for Energy and Environment February 22, 2012 Gaps and Barriers in High Efficiency Space and Water Heating - System Optimization and Improved Installation What have we achieved so far? - This presentation will look at laboratory work used to address this gap - Risks that needed to be managed were a lack of familiarity of contractors and homeowner comfort - The major benefit of this project is high efficiency space and water heating as well as combustion safety What is left to achieve? - The highest priority issue remaining to be solved is to analyze actual installed efficiency and energy savings - We plan to continue to close this gap by doing a 20 site

416

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Office of Science Announces the Early Career Research Program for FY 2011 News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 07.01.10 Office of Science Announces the Early Career Research Program for FY 2011 Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page dept of science logo ------------------------------------------------------------------------ WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting proposals for the second year of the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program to support the research of outstanding scientists early in their careers. Up to $15 million in funding will be

417

EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was issued that recommended that the mixed acid method be replaced by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method for the measurement of magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and zirconium (Zr) with additional testing of the method by DWPF Laboratory being needed before further implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method at that laboratory. While the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok does not address any of the open issues remaining after the publication of the recommendation for the replacement of the mixed acid method by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method (since those issues are to be addressed by the DWPF Laboratory), the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} testing associated with the Isolok testing does provide additional insight into the performance of the method as conducted by SRNL. The performance is to be investigated by looking to the composition measurement data generated by the samples of a standard glass, the Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1), that were prepared by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method and included in the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. The measurements of these samples were presented as part of the study results, but no statistical analysis of these measurements was conducted as part of those results. It is the purpose of this report to provide that analysis, which was supported using JMP Version 7.0.2.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect

In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

Brockbank, B.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

Kearney, D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect

Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is, in some cases, similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for successful methods of remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders` requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at and DOE sites throughout the West -- issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment.

Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Niesen, K.; Serie, P. [Environmental Issues Management, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in solutions and at mineral/solution interfaces were investigated by monitoring micropolarity of the aggregates using fluorescence technique. Compositional changes of the aggregates in solution were observed with the increase in surfactant concentration. The importance of this lies in that the resulting polarity/hydrophobicity change of the mixed micelles will affect the adsorption of surfactant mixtures on reservoir minerals, surfactant/oil emulsion formation and wettability, as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes in EOR.

P. Somasundaran

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 50 SLURRY FOR SALTSTONE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, APRIL 2007 SAMPLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results from the characterization of the second quarter April 2007 sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Six one liter samples were taken in polyethylene bottles to analyze for the WAC contaminants and a 200 mL sample was taken in a steel container for analysis of volatile organic compounds. The information from this characterization will be given to Waste Solidification Engineering personnel to qualify the transfer of aqueous waste to the Saltstone Facility. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) All six of the one liter samples taken in April 2007 from the mixed slurry in Tank 50 have the same compositions within the experimental uncertainty of the analyses. (2) Of the ninety-one process, chemical, and radioactive WAC target or limit contaminants listed in Revision 7 of the 'Waste Acceptance Criteria for Aqueous Waste sent to the Z-Area Saltstone Production Facility', eighty-nine had concentrations that were unequivocally less than the WAC limit or target. (3) The two contaminants whose concentrations could not be shown to be less than their WAC targets were methanol and radioactive Nb-93m. Currently the AD Section of SRNL does not have a method for measuring methanol in caustic solutions. For Nb-93m the results are ambiguous due to possible interferences in the ICP-MS analysis from Zr-93 or Mo-93. (4) Of the six additional chemical and radioactive contaminants requested in the TTR for Saltstone qualification, five were measured or calculated. These were Sb, Be, Tl, along with total beta and gamma. The AD Section does not have a method to measure the 6th contaminant which was the cyanide ion.

Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Calculation of MCPR (minimum critical power ratio) for BWR transients using the BNL plant analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The critical power ratio (CPR) is used for determining the thermal limits of boiling water reactors. In this study, critical power ratios for a series of transients run on the Brookhaven Plant Analyzer (BPA) (1) have been calculated. The transients include nominal base case simulations, simulations with variations in relief valve setpoints and the number of failed feedwater heaters, simulations at the 100% power, 75% flow point on the extended load line of the MEOD, and a simulation with partial feedwater heating. The plant represented with the BPA is a BWR/4 rated at 3293 MW with a 6.38 m (251'') vessel. Data were obtained by the Plant Analyzer Development Group at BNL from a variety of sources describing the Browns Ferry Plant.

Horak, W.C.; Diamond, D.J.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Real time cross-layer adaptation for minimum energy wireless image transport using bit error rate control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wireless multimedia systems, significant power is consumed in processing image/video content This research looks specifically at the energy cost of wireless image/video transport focusing on image quality as an end metric. The quality of received ... Keywords: PSNR values, real-time cross-layer adaptation, minimum-energy wireless image transport, bit error rate control, wireless multimedia systems, wireless image-video content processing, communication channel, image-video data compression, received signal quality, minimal RF energy consumption, optimization procedure, varying channel conditions, baseband signal, RF power amplifier, RF PA, optimal transmission bit error rate value, closed loop feedback control

J. Natarajan; S. Sen; A. Chatterjee

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Implication of a covenant to diligently develop and mine in hard mineral leases that provide for minimum rents or royalties  

SciTech Connect

An examination of the status of the implied covenant to develop in hard mineral leases which contain minimum royalty provisions discusses the rationale for the implied development covenant, restrictions on its use, and scenarios under which mining delays occur. Later sections delineate the rules of construction and interpretative tests used in various mining jurisdictions. The author then analyzes the logic of these tests in light of the regulatory and economic climate of today's mining industry. He finds that this climate forces prudent mining companies to delay mine development in many instances. The substantial relation test considers all factors that are indicative of the original parties expectations; the demand for development rule does not.

Bender, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

An Experimental Shield Test Facility for the Development of Minimum Weight Shields for Compact Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Discussions are given of the characteristics of fission-source plate, graphite reactor, and pool-type reactor facilities applicable to development studies of minimum weight shielding materials. Advantages of a proposed SNAP dual-purpose shielding facility are described in terms of a disk-shaped fission-source plate, reactor, and building. A program for the study of advanced shielding materials is discussed for materials and configuations to be evaluted with the fission-source plate, the testing of the prototype at high-power levels, and full-power tests on the actual reactor.

Tomlinson, R.L.

1959-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Treatment Acceptability of Social Skills Programs for Children with Autism: The Influence of Ethnicity, Age, and Problem Severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compared the treatment acceptability of four social skills interventions that are commonly used with children with autism, as rated by parents of children with autism spectrum disorders, general education teachers, and special education teachers. Using the survey method and the Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form, ratings of the acceptability of social stories, cognitive-behavorial programs, peer-mediated interactions, and technological devices were explored. The influence of ethnicity of respondent, age of child, and problem severity on acceptability ratings was also investigated. Major findings were as follows: (a) all four of the social skills programs were viewed as acceptable interventions; (b) treatment acceptability ratings were not influenced by group membership, ethnicity (Caucasian/Non-Caucasian), child age, and problem severity; (c) peer-mediated interactions and cognitive-behavioral programs received the highest rankings, followed by social stories and technological devices; (d) significant associations were found between group membership and the overall rankings of cognitive-behavioral programs and technological devices. Study limitations and implications for intervention are also discussed.

Fragioudakis, Maria

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Chemical EOR can be an effective method for increasing oil recovery and reducing the amount of produced water; however, reservoir fluids are chemically complex and may react adversely to the polymers and surfactants injected into the reservoir. While a major goal is to alter rock wettability and interfacial tension between oil and water, rock-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions must be understood and controlled to minimize reagent loss, maximize recovery and mitigate costly failures. The overall objective of this project was to elucidate the mechanisms of interactions between polymers/surfactants and the mineral surfaces responsible for determining the chemical loss due to adsorption and precipitation in EOR processes. The role of dissolved inorganic species that are dependent on the mineralogy is investigated with respect to their effects on adsorption. Adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension are studied with the aim to control chemical losses, the ultimate goal being to devise schemes to develop guidelines for surfactant and polymer selection in EOR. The adsorption behavior of mixed polymer/surfactant and surfactant/surfactant systems on typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) was correlated to their molecular structures, intermolecular interactions and the solution conditions such as pH and/or salinity. Predictive models as well as general guidelines for the use of polymer/surfactant surfactant/surfactant system in EOR have been developed The following tasks have been completed under the scope of the project: (1) Mineral characterization, in terms of SEM, BET, size, surface charge, and point zero charge. (2) Study of the interactions among typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) and surfactants and/or polymers in terms of adsorption properties that include both macroscopic (adsorption density, wettability) and microscopic (orientation/conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

P. Somasundaran

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Effects of Data Gaps on the Calculated Monthly Mean Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in the Continental United States: A Spatial and Temporal Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaps in otherwise regularly scheduled observations are often referred to as missing data. This paper explores the spatial and temporal impacts that data gaps in the recorded daily maximum and minimum temperatures have on the calculated monthly ...

David E. Stooksbury; Craig D. Idso; Kenneth G. Hubbard

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Comparison among Strategies for Interpolating Maximum and Minimum Daily Air Temperatures. Part I: The Selection of “Guiding” Topographic and Land Cover Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the derivation and selection of a comprehensive set of continuous topographic and land cover–related variables to guide the interpolation of daily maximum and minimum temperatures over England and Wales, for an entire annual ...

Claire H. Jarvis; Neil Stuart

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A Comparison among Strategies for Interpolating Maximum and Minimum Daily Air Temperatures. Part II: The Interaction between Number of Guiding Variables and the Type of Interpolation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a comparative experiment, the sequence of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for 1976 was interpolated over England and Wales to a resolution of 1 km using partial thin plate splines, ordinary kriging, trend surface, and an automatic ...

Claire H. Jarvis; Neil Stuart

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluation of the AR4 Climate Models’ Simulated Daily Maximum Temperature, Minimum Temperature, and Precipitation over Australia Using Probability Density Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coupled climate models used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are evaluated. The evaluation is focused on 12 regions of Australia for the daily simulation of precipitation, minimum temperature, ...

S. E. Perkins; A. J. Pitman; N. J. Holbrook; J. McAneney

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Prediction of Summer Maximum and Minimum Temperature over the Central and Western United States: The Roles of Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical model based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to explore climatic associations and predictability of June–August (JJA) maximum and minimum surface air temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) as well as the frequency of Tmax ...

Eric J. Alfaro; Alexander Gershunov; Daniel Cayan

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development and Testing of Canada-Wide Interpolated Spatial Models of Daily Minimum–Maximum Temperature and Precipitation for 1961–2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of trivariate thin-plate smoothing splines to the interpolation of daily weather data is investigated. The method was used to develop spatial models of daily minimum and maximum temperature and daily precipitation for all of ...

Michael F. Hutchinson; Dan W. McKenney; Kevin Lawrence; John H. Pedlar; Ron F. Hopkinson; Ewa Milewska; Pia Papadopol

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

TRU waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to delineate the criteria by which unclassified waste will be accepted for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and describe the bases upon which these criteria were established. These criteria are not intended to be specifications but rather limits that will allow waste generating and shipping sites to develop their own procedures and specifications for preparation of TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. These criteria will also allow waste generating sites to plan future facilities for waste preparation that will produce TRU waste forms compatible with WIPP waste emplacement and isolation requirements. These criteria only apply to contract-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste forms and are not intended to apply to beta-gamma wastes, spent fuel, high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), low specific activity (LSA) waste, or forms of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. Specifications for receipt of experimental waste forms will be prepared by the responsible projects in conjunction with the staff of the WIPP project at a later date. In addition, these criteria only apply to waste emplaced in bedded rock salt. Technical bases for these criteria may differ significantly from those for other host rocks. 25 refs. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cross-Site Transfer System at Hanford: long-term strategy for waste acceptance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of a technical panel review of the current methodology for accepting waste for transport through the Hanford Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS), which was constructed to replace the existing pipelines that hydraulically connect the 200 West and 200 East areas. This report is a complement to an existing document (Hudson 1996); the methodology proposed in that document was refined based on panel recommendations. The refinements were focused around predicting and preventing the 3 main modes suspected of plugging the existing CSTS: precipitation, gelation, particle dropout/settling. The proposed analysis will require integration of computer modeling and laboratory experiments to build a defensible case for transportability of a proposed slurry composition for a given tank. This will be validated by recirculating actual tank waste, in-tank and in-farm, prior to transport. The panel`s recommendation was that the probability of success of waste transfer would be greatly improved by integrating the predictive analysis with real-time control during RCSTS operation. The methodology will be optimized.

Shekarriz, A; Onishi, Y.; Smith, P.A.; Sterner, M.; Rector, D.R.; Virden, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Final Report Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA. Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components 2 Acknowledgments Thanks to Don Sheaffer, Department 8120, Mark Powell, Department 9611, and Marcey Abate, Department 12323, for their contributions to this final report. Thanks to Tony Bryce, and Dennis Clingan, Department 1484, Phil Skogmo, Department 2645, and Charles Steinhaus, Department 8240, for their assistance in writing this report. Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components 3 Contents 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................

Naomi Christensen Precision; Naomi G. Christensen; Lane D. Harwell; Andrew Hazelton

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenoir City, TN); Hudson, Joseph D. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination  

SciTech Connect

Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Minimum-Mass Extrasolar Nebula: In-Situ Formation of Close-In Super-Earths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Close-in super-Earths, with radii R = 2-5 R_Earth and orbital periods P < 100 days, orbit more than half, and perhaps nearly all Sun-like stars in the universe. We use this omnipresent population to construct the minimum-mass extrasolar nebula (MMEN), the circumstellar disk of solar-composition solids and gas from which such planets formed, if they formed near their current locations and did not migrate. In a series of back-of-the-envelope calculations, we demonstrate how in-situ formation in the MMEN is fast, efficient, and can reproduce many of the observed properties of close-in super-Earths, including their gas-to-rock fractions. Testable predictions are discussed.

Chiang, E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber  

SciTech Connect

Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U., IIHE /CERN /Punjab U. /Fermilab /Hawaii U. /Imperial Coll., London /IIT, Chicago /Jammu U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stevens Tech. /Tufts U.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Accepting Mixed Waste as Alternate Feed Material for Processing and Disposal at a Licensed Uranium Mill  

SciTech Connect

Certain categories of mixed wastes that contain recoverable amounts of natural uranium can be processed for the recovery of valuable uranium, alone or together with other metals, at licensed uranium mills, and the resulting tailings permanently disposed of as 11e.(2) byproduct material in the mill's tailings impoundment, as an alternative to treatment and/or direct disposal at a mixed waste disposal facility. This paper discusses the regulatory background applicable to hazardous wastes, mixed wastes and uranium mills and, in particular, NRC's Alternate Feed Guidance under which alternate feed materials that contain certain types of mixed wastes may be processed and disposed of at uranium mills. The paper discusses the way in which the Alternate Feed Guidance has been interpreted in the past with respect to processing mixed wastes and the significance of recent changes in NRC's interpretation of the Alternate Feed Guidance that sets the stage for a broader range of mixed waste materials to be processed as alternate feed materials. The paper also reviews the le gal rationale and policy reasons why materials that would otherwise have to be treated and/or disposed of as mixed waste, at a mixed waste disposal facility, are exempt from RCRA when reprocessed as alternate feed material at a uranium mill and become subject to the sole jurisdiction of NRC, and some of the reasons why processing mixed wastes as alternate feed materials at uranium mills is preferable to direct disposal. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of the specific acceptance, characterization and certification requirements applicable to alternate feed materials and mixed wastes at International Uranium (USA) Corporation's White Mesa Mill, which has been the most active uranium mill in the processing of alternate feed materials under the Alternate Feed Guidance.

Frydenland, D. C.; Hochstein, R. F.; Thompson, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

444

Social acceptability of Satellite Power Systems (SPS): the near-term outlook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is important, at this early stage in the concept development and evaluation of Satellite Power Systems, to explore aspects of contemporary social change that may be expected to complicate the process of achieving the necessary support of the American public for this new technological venture. Current public attitudes make it appear unlikely that a consensus will evolve during the 1980s favoring costly efforts to develop vast new supplies of conventional energy. Opinion polls reveal a pervasive worry over inflation, a broadening of aspirations to encompass quality-of-life concerns, a growing distrust of central governments, large corporations, big science and technology, and a continuing commitment to environmental protection - all of which suggests a social environment that is likely to resist the development of a major new high-technology energy system such as the SPS. Opposition to satellite power will focus on the high front-end development costs, on environmental and technical uncertainties, and on a generalized distrust of large bureaucracies and esoteric technologies. The SPS concept is also likely to be viewed with skepticism by those with vested interests in the long-run uses of coal, shale, fission, fusion, or on-site solar technologies. The growing commitment to energy conservation and the spreading deployment of dispersed renewable-energy systems strongly suggest that the unmet US demand for centrally generated electricity is unlikely to grow sufficiently over the next twenty years to convince a reluctant public of the need for so large an investment of scarce resources in the SPS program. Satellite Power Systems will have a problem in the area of public acceptability.

Klineberg, S.L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydrogen Vehicles: Impacts of DOE Technical Targets on Market Acceptance and Societal Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen vehicles (H2V), including H2 internal combustion engine, fuel cell and fuel cell plugin hybrid, could greatly reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. The U.S. Department of Energy has adopted targets for vehicle component technologies to address key technical barriers towidespread commercialization of H2Vs. This study estimates the market acceptance of H2Vs and the resulting societal benefits and subsidy in 41 scenarios that reflect a wide range of progress in meeting these technical targets. Important results include: (1) H2Vs could reach 20e70% market shares by 2050, depending on progress in achieving the technical targets.With a basic hydrogen infrastructure (w5% hydrogen availability), the H2V market share is estimated to be 2e8%. Fuel cell and hydrogen costs are the most important factors affecting the long-term market shares of H2Vs. (2) Meeting all technical targets on time could result in about an 80% cut in petroleumuse and a 62% (or 72% with aggressive electricity de-carbonization) reduction in GHG in 2050. (3) The required hydrogen infrastructure subsidy is estimated to range from $22 to $47 billion and the vehicle subsidy from $4 to $17 billion. (4) Long-term H2V market shares, societal benefits and hydrogen subsidies appear to be highly robust against delay in one target, if all other targets are met on time. R&D diversification could provide insurance for greater societal benefits. (5) Both H2Vs and plug-in electric vehicles could exceed 50% market shares by 2050, if all targets are met on time. The overlapping technology, the fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, appears attractive both in the short and long runs, but for different reasons.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University; Greene, David L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage Control in Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage) problem associated with reactive power and voltage control in distribution systems to minimize daily on the number of switching operations of transformer load tap changers (LTCs) and capacitors, which are modeled

Cañizares, Claudio A.

447

Are American astrophysics papers accepted more quickly than others? Part II: correlations with citation rates, subdisciplines, and author numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We continue the investigation for more than 2,150 astrophysics papers published from July 2007 to June 2008 of various possible correlations among time from submission to acceptance; nationalities of lead authors; numbers of citations to the papers in ... Keywords: Astronomical journals, Citations, Publications

Virginia Trimble; Jose A. Ceja

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Guidelines for the Selection, Procurement, and Acceptance of Nuclear Safety-Related Mild Environment Motor Insulation for Rewinds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As existing nuclear power plants mature, a need exists to provide high quality repair services for safety-related electric motors. This guideline supplements previous EPRI efforts to provide guidance on the selection, procurement, acceptance, and dedication of the insulating materials used during the rewinding of motors located in mild environment plant areas.

1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

A review on evolution of e-commerce user acceptant behaviour under collaborative commerce: a study based on Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is to identify mobile payment opportunities and what factors affect the user acceptance of mobile payments in Sri Lanka. This study was carried out through a situational analysis and an in-depth questionnaire survey. This ...

  Dasanayaka;   Samarawickrama

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The use of technology as one of the possible means of performing instructor tasks: Putting technology acceptance in context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many instructors in higher education, use of a learning management system (LMS) is de facto mandatory. Nevertheless, instructors often have much freedom in deciding which functionalities of the LMS they use; that is, whether they perform each individual ... Keywords: Higher education, Instructor tasks, Learning management systems, Task importance, Technology acceptance model

Judith Schoonenboom

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 1 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new of a combined nuclear-wind-hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity

Cañizares, Claudio A.

452

Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

trenching of conduit trenching of conduit within the fenced area of the Signal Tap Substation (SIG) located in Pinal County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes to trench a 2-inch conduit from Electrica l District No. 2's Signal Substation yard to Western's Signal Tap Substation yard and terminate on the north side of Western's control building. The trenching will be a minimum of 18 inches deep and approximately 3 feet wide. The disturbed ground will be used for backfill. We will use existing access roads and vehicles such as pickup trucks, crew trucks, backhoes, and bucket trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. The attached map shows the project area location. The legal description is Section 6

453

Social influence on the use of Clinical Decision Support Systems: Revisiting the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology by the fuzzy DEMATEL technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of study is to examine whether social influence affects medical professionals' behavioral intention to use while introducing a new Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS). The series of Technology Acceptance Models (TAMs) have been widely applied ... Keywords: Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS), Fuzzy Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (fuzzy DEMATEL), Social influence, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT)

Don Jyh-Fu Jeng; Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

CX-010491: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/21/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

455

CX-007393: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007393: Categorical Exclusion Determination DeSoto Photovoltaic Variability Study CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9, B1.11 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office The Project goal would be for this site to be instrumented and used for research into photovoltaic (PV) variability and forecasting. Specifically, the goals of this project would be to: (1) Understand how PV plant output variability is impacted by change in the physical size and production capacity of a power plant; (2) Investigate the possibility of using satellite based information to estimate PV plant production especially larger plants comparable to the satellite footprint; and (3) Determine the minimum sensor configuration needed to model plant output and its

456

Four Central Air Conditioners Determined Noncompliant With Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Four Central Air Conditioners Determined Noncompliant With Energy Four Central Air Conditioners Determined Noncompliant With Energy Efficiency Standard Four Central Air Conditioners Determined Noncompliant With Energy Efficiency Standard October 3, 2011 - 9:21am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Enforcement issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination (Notice) on September 27, 2011, to AeroSys, Inc. (AeroSys) regarding four models of central (through-the-wall) air conditioners that fail to meet Federal energy efficiency requirements. DOE tests revealed that AeroSys through-the-wall air conditioner models THDC-18S, THDC-18T, THDC-24S, and THDC-24T do not meet the minimum energy efficiency requirements set forth in DOE regulations. The Notice provides that AeroSys must inform those to whom it has sold the models that they do

457

CX-007359: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

359: Categorical Exclusion Determination 359: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007359: Categorical Exclusion Determination McNary-Horse Heaven 230-kilovolt Transmission Line Raise (Structures 15/2 to 16/3) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to add six wooden prop structures to the McNary-Horse Heaven No. 1 230-kilovolt transmission line between structures 15/2-16/3. The prop structures are needed to raise the existing line so that the conductor meets the necessary Minimum Approach Distance from the orchard below. An augur truck would use existing BPA roads to access the site and install wooden poles. More Documents & Publications CX-006582: Categorical Exclusion Determination

458

CX-006649: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: Categorical Exclusion Determination 49: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006649: Categorical Exclusion Determination T-2-11 Skim Box Reclamation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 10/14/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC We will dig around the cement box and cap or remove any pipes that are in the ground in the area. All of the area we will be disturbing has already been dug up before, so the impact to the environment will be kept to a minimum. We will remove the cement containment that is approximately six feet on all sides and take it to the cement pile behind the shop, or crush it and use it as backfill on location, at the discretion of the environmental department. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006649.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006667: Categorical Exclusion Determination

459

CX-007916: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

916: Categorical Exclusion Determination 916: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for( Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide lamp Fixtures CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/04/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE proposes amended energy conservation standards for metal halide lamp fixtures. The proposed standards are the minimum allowable ballast efficiency based on fixture location, ballast type. and the rated wattage of the lamp. These proposed standards, if adopted, would apply to all products listed in Table 1.1 of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and manufactured in, or imported into, the United States on or after January 1, 2015. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

460

Using a Family of Dividing Surfaces Normal to the Minimum EnergyPath for Quantum Instanton Rate Constants  

SciTech Connect

One of the outstanding issues in the quantum instanton (QI) theory (or any transition state-type theory) for thermal rate constants of chemical reactions is the choice of an appropriate ''dividing surface'' (DS) that separates reactants and products. (In the general version of the QI theory, there are actually two dividing surfaces involved.) This paper shows one simple and general way for choosing DS's for use in QI Theory, namely using the family of (hyper) planes normal to the minimum energy path (MEP) on the potential energy surface at various distances s along it. Here the reaction coordinate is not one of the dynamical coordinates of the system (which will in general be the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms), but rather simply a parameter which specifies the DS. It is also shown how this idea can be implemented for an N-atom system in 3d space in a way that preserves overall translational and rotational invariance. Numerical application to a simple system (the colliner H + H{sub 2} reaction) is presented to illustrate the procedure.

Li, Yimin; Miller, Wlliam H.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Negative ion rich plasmas in continuous and pulsed wave modes in a minimum-B magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generation of hydrogen negative ion rich plasmas is investigated in continuous wave (CW) and pulse modulated (PM) wave modes of 2.45 GHz in a minimum-B magnetic field. The waves are launched directly into the plasma device and utilize wave particle resonances for high density plasma generation. In CW operation, the chamber is divided into two sections, namely, the source and downstream region, separated by a transverse magnetic field that allows only cold electrons ({approx}1 eV) into the downstream region helpful for the generation of negative ions. The H{sup -} density is measured by the second derivative beat method and is compared with the values obtained from a steady state model and the extracted current density. In the pulsed mode, temporal filtering generates negative ion rich plasmas in the afterglow phase. The H{sup -} density in the afterglow is estimated using saturation current ratio method and the results are compared with a time dependent model using particle balance equations. The essential idea in both the filtering techniques is to assist generation of negative ions and prevent its destruction by hot electrons.

Sahu, Debaprasad; Pandey, Shail; Aneja, Jyoti; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Changes in quasi-periodic variations of solar photospheric fields: precursor to the deep solar minimum in the cycle 23?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using both wavelet and Fourier analysis, a study has been undertaken of the changes in the quasi-periodic variations in solar photospheric fields in the build-up to one of the deepest solar minima experienced in the past 100 years. This unusual and deep solar minimum occurred between solar cycles 23 and 24. The study, carried out using ground based synoptic magnetograms spanning the period 1975.14 to 2009.86, covered solar cycles 21, 22 and 23. A hemispheric asymmetry in periodicities of the photospheric fields was seen only at latitudes above $\\pm45{^{\\circ}}$ when the data was divided, based on a wavelet analysis, into two parts: one prior to 1996 and the other after 1996. Furthermore, the hemispheric asymmetry was observed to be confined to the latitude range 45${^{\\circ}}$ to 60${^{\\circ}}$. This can be attributed to the variations in polar surges that primarily depend on both the emergence of surface magnetic flux and varying solar surface flows. The observed asymmetry when coupled with the fact that bot...

Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Chakrabarty, D; Ananthakrishnan, S; Divekar, Ankur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since beginning operations in 1954, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site FB-Line conducted atomic energy defense activities consistent with the listing in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The facility mission was to process and convert dilute plutonium solution into highly purified weapons grade plutonium metal. As a result of various activities conducted in support of the mission (e.g., operation, maintenance, repair, clean up, and facility modifications), the facility generated transuranic waste. This document, along with referenced supporting documents, provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration,equipment, process operations, and waste management practices.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

464

CX-007837: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007837: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Energy Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Kentucky Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. Frankfort, KY proposes to replace the roof on city hall with an energy efficient roof. The city hall is listed on the on the Historic Register. This ex determination is conditioned on the submission of documentation of the Kentucky SHPO approval of the particular rood replacement on this city hall to the DOE. No physical work on the project may begin until the DOE has reviewed and accepted such documentation. The no extraordinary conditions determination is dependent on meeting this condition."

465

CX-000891: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000891: Categorical Exclusion Determination Handling of Bulk Background Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/12/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office This activity involves the handling of both small and large quantities of kaolin clay, granite gravel, and potassium chloride pellets (KCl). Laboratory testing will be performed on small quantities of each to determine that they are acceptable common background radiation emitters. After laboratory testing large quantities of each (approximately 40 tons) will be purchased. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000891.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000560: Categorical Exclusion Determination

466

CX-000884: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84: Categorical Exclusion Determination 84: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000884: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establishing Waste Acceptance Criteria for DeconGel 1101 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A task to characterize the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of a closed container with dried DeconGel 1101 (MSDS 38502). The tests described here are designed to simulate the disposal of this decontamination agent in a waste package after some predetermined drying time and packaging time. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000884.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002995: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002547: Categorical Exclusion Determination

467

What Predicts Commercial Bank Leaders' Intention to Use Mobile Commerce?: The Roles of Leadership Behaviors, Resistance to Change, and Technology Acceptance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles leadership behaviors have on technology acceptance models, focusing on bank leaders' intention to use mobile-commerce. The study included responses from 101 senior-level managers working at FDIC-insured ... Keywords: Business Management, Electronic Commerce, Leadership Competencies, Mobile Commerce, Resistance to Change, Technology Acceptance Model, Transformational Leadership

Maddy Halbach; Tao Gong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Connecting blackbody radiation and zero-point radiation within classical physics: A new minimum principle and a status review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new thermodynamic analysis is presented for the intimate connections between blackbody radiation and zero-point radiation within classical physics. First, using the thermodynamic behavior of an oscillator under an adiabatic change of frequency, we show that the thermodynamic functions can all be derived from a single function of w/T, analogous to Wien's displacement theorem. The high- and low-frequency limits allow asymptotic energy forms involving T alone or w alone, corresponding to energy equipartition and zero-point energy. It is then suggested that the actual thermodynamic behavior for a harmonic oscillator is given by the function satisfying the Wien displacement result which provides the smoothest possible interpolation between scale-decoupled energy equipartition at low frequency and scale-invariant zero-point energy at high frequency. This leads to the Planck spectrum. Second, we turn to radiation in a box with conducting walls and a conducting partition so that the discrete normal mode structure of the box becomes important. The contrasting Casimir energies are explored for the Rayleigh-Jeans and zero-point spectra. The Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum involves no change of energy with partition position, and the zero-point spectrum involves no change of entropy. It is suggested that the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation satisfies a natural minimum principle which corresponds to greatest independence of the system energy from the position of the partition for a fixed temperature. Numerical calculation is used for confirmation. Third, we review the previous derivations of the Planck radiation spectrum in classical physics, all of which involve zero-point radiation.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

SATURATION LEVELS FOR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES OF FLARE STARS: VARIATION OF MINIMUM FLARE DURATION FOR SATURATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking into account results obtained from models and from statistical analyses of obtained parameters, we discuss flare activity levels and flare characteristics of five UV Ceti stars. We present the parameters of unpublished flares detected over two years of observations of V1005 Ori. We compare parameters of the U-band flares detected over several seasons of observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, V1054 Oph, and V1005 Ori. Flare frequencies calculated for all program stars and maximum energy levels of the flares are compared, and we consider which is the most correct parameter as an indicator of flare activity levels. Using the One Phase Exponential Association function, the distributions of flare equivalent duration versus flare total duration are modeled for each program star. We use the Independent Samples t-Test in the statistical analyses of the parameters obtained from the models. The results reveal some properties of flare processes occurring on the surfaces of UV Ceti type stars. (1) Flare energies cannot be higher than a specific value regardless of the length of the flare total duration. This must be a saturation level for white-light flares occurring in flare processes observed in the U band. Thus, for the first time it is shown that white-light flares have a saturation in a specific energy range. (2) The span values, which are the difference between the equivalent durations of flares with the shortest and longest total durations, are almost equal for each star. (3) The half-life values, minimum flare durations for saturation, increase toward the later spectral types. (4) Both maximum total durations and maximum rise times computed from the observed flares decrease toward the later spectral types among the UV Ceti stars. According to the maximum energy levels obtained from the models, both EV Lac and EQ Peg are more active than the other three program stars, while AD Leo is the most active flare star according to the flare frequencies.

Dal, H. A.; Evren, S., E-mail: ali.dal@ege.edu.tr [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Minimum bed parameters for in situ processing of oil shale. Second quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of quarterly reports on the Minimum Bed Parameters for In Situ Processing of Oil Shale Program (FE Control No. 4-79 ET 14165.000). It describes activities during the period January 1 to March 31, 1980, including modification of the laboratory retorting system to eliminate problems with the ignition and product collecttion systems and the successful retorting of a 16% void sample. The sample consisted of a 7.6 cm diameter by 23 cm competent core of oil shale with three 0.64 cm slices of material removed parallel to the axis of the cylinder. The 1.4 cm thick slabs constituted 70% of the sample volume, while oil shale rubble (-.32 + .16 cm) was used to occupy nearly half the remaining volume (14%), leaving 16% void. The sample was instrumented, sealed in an insulated retort vessel, ignited with hot (700/sup 0/C) air, and combustion-retorted with air. The observed retorting rate was 10 cm/hr, the local heating rate near the block surface in the retorting zone was 18/sup 0/C/min, and peak temperatures were about 825/sup 0/C. Temperature profiles across the retort cross-section indicated some limited heat loss. Oil yield was 92% of Fischer Assay. Results of block retort model calculations (without rubble in the fracture) are in good agreement with those observed, namely a retorting rate of 12 cm/hr, a local heating rate of 7/sup 0/C/min, peak temperatures around 900/sup 0/C, and a yield of 90% FA.

Tyner, C.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Initiative Life-cycle Cost Analysis Canada and Mexico –baseline energy consumption. Canada’s and Mexico’s marketsMexico minimum efficiency performance standard million tons (of CO 2 ) national equipment cost National Electric Manufacturers Association national energy

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable fac