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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Accepted Manuscript A rounding algorithm for approximating minimum Manhattan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Karim Nouioua, Yann Vax`es PII: S0304-3975(07)00765-7 DOI: 10.1016/j.tcs.2007.10.013 Reference: TCS 6686 Accepted date: 6 October 2007 Please cite this article as: V. Chepoi, K. Nouioua, Y. Vax`es, A rounding, Yann Vax`es Laboratoire d'Informatique Fondamentale de Marseille, Universit´e de la M

Chepoi, Victor

2

Major in Aerospace Engineering Master of Engineering (with creative component) A minimum of 27 credits of acceptable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major in Aerospace Engineering Master of Engineering (with creative component) ­ A minimum of 27 Engineering along with a minimum of 3 credits of Aer E 599 (creative component) must be taken. The POS Mechanics Master of Engineering (with creative component) ­ A minimum of 24 credits of acceptable course

Lin, Zhiqun

3

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET Prepared by: David Bau - Regional Extension Educator, Agricultural Business Management (August 2012) CROP INCOME EXAMPLE YOUR FARM EXAMPLE YOUR FARM (A) Crop Acres 400 400 176 46 (C) Price

Netoff, Theoden

4

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each...

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination...

McMillan, Marcia Donna

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

6

Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

Terry J. Garino; Tina M. Nenoff; Mark A. Rodriguez

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Global Minimum Determination of the Born-Oppenheimer Surface within Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a novel method, which we refer to as the dual minima hopping method, that allows us to find the global minimum of the potential energy surface (PES) within density functional theory for systems where a fast but less accurate calculation of the PES is possible. This method can rapidly find the ground state configuration of clusters and other complex systems with present day computer power by performing a systematic search. We apply the new method to silicon clusters. Even though these systems have already been extensively studied by other methods, we find new global minimum candidates for Si{sub 16} and Si{sub 19}, as well as new low-lying isomers for Si{sub 16}, Si{sub 17}, and Si{sub 18}.

Goedecker, Stefan; Hellmann, Waldemar; Lenosky, Thomas [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Physics Department, Ohio State University, 1040 Physics Research Building, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States)

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

8

Computing leakage current distributions and determination of minimum leakage vectors for combinational designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach to determine and implicitly represent the leakage value for all input vectors of a combinational circuit is presented. In its exact form, this technique can compute the leakage value of each input vector, by storing these leakage values implicitly...

Gulati, Kanupriya

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

Purchase, Iain F.H. [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ifhp@chadzombe.u-net.com

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Accepted Manuscript Title: A critical approach to the determination of optimal heat rejection pressure in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A commercial refrigeration plant and a heat pump water heater were finally simulated to verify their energy. Keywords: CO2, Transcritical cycle, Optimisation, Refrigeration, Heat pump, Gas cooler. Nomenclature CAccepted Manuscript Title: A critical approach to the determination of optimal heat rejection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

A determination of the acceptability of the liquid media sampler as an alternative to the standard midget impinger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no spillage or breakage, minimal physical entrainment, and collection efficiencies not significantly different from the standard midget impinger. The Liquid Nedia Sampler showed no significant variability in collection efficiency over its flow rate range... impinger in aqueous liquid media absorption method of contaminant collection in air sam- pling. The acceptability of the Liquid Media Sampler was based upon such performance factors as spillage, breakage, physical entrainment, and collection efficiency...

Ruser, Bernard Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Haemers' Minimum Rank.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Haemers' minimum rank was first defined by Willem Haemers in 1979. He created this graph parameter as an upper bound for the Shannon capacity of (more)

Tims, Geoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Minimum Price Contract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A minimum price contract is one of many tools a marketer may use to better manage price and production risk while trying to achieve financial goals and objectives. This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages involved...

Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

14

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

15

Minimum pressure envelope cavitation analysis using two-dimensional panel method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis tool for calculating minimum pressure envelopes was developed using XFOIL. This thesis presents MATLAB executables that interface with a modified version of XFOIL for determining the minimum pressure of a foil ...

Peterson, Christopher J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901...

17

Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to all dams and structures which impound or divert waters on rivers or their tributaries, with some exceptions. The regulations set standards for minimum flow (listed in the...

18

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

Richards, John Alfred

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

Demaine, Erik D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements.

22

Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in CDMA Wireless Sensor Networks Benigno Zurita Ares://www.ee.kth.se/control Abstract. A theoretical framework is proposed for accurate perfor- mance analysis of minimum energy coding energy consumption is analyzed for two coding schemes proposed in the literature: Minimum Energy coding

Johansson, Karl Henrik

23

Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso M´ario Jesus ´Alberto M´arquez Abstract The NP multiple criteria minimum spanning tree as several applications into the network design problems criteria minimum spanning trees. There are several geometric network design and application problems

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

24

Cone penetrometer acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

Boechler, G.N.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is a requirement that the identity of a DOE Digital Identity Subscriber be verified against acceptable identity source documents. A Subscriber must appear in person and present their Federal...

26

Determining Minimum Habitat Areas Habitat Corridors for Cougars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ambiental por un portodo de 100 af~x Usando los pardmeW~ nu~ vtabl~ el mo~lo pmaice r~osgos de extinci6n muy impacto hunum~ Dentro de la cadena montago~ los pumas se ban extingutdo re. ctontemente en un frasmento de

Beier, Paul

27

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

28

Knots and Minimum Distance Energy Rosanna Speller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knots and Minimum Distance Energy Rosanna Speller (Dated: May 11, 2008) Professor Elizabeth Denne have least Minimum Distance Energy. I previously showed that the energy is minimized for convex polygons. We hope relating the energy to chords of polygons will be a helpful step towards showing

Denne, Elizabeth

29

Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines November...

30

SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers,...

31

Minimum rank of graphs that allow loops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The traditional "minimum rank problem" for simple graphs associates a set of symmetric matrices, the zero-nonzero pattern of whose off-diagonal entries are described by the (more)

Mikkelson, Rana C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adjusted Current Employment Statistics data from BLS. TheBureau of Labor Statistics Employment and Earnings Reports.and Statistics 92, 4: 945-64. [27] _________2013. Minimum Wage Shocks, Employment

Allegretto, Sylvia; Dube, Arindrajit; Reich, Michael; Zipperer, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Accepting the T3D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

Corbett, J.E.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000...

36

Blind and Deaf to Acceptance: The Role of Self-Esteem in Capitalizing on Social Acceptance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blind and Deaf to Acceptance: The Role of Self-Esteem inGlaser Spring 2013 Abstract Blind and Deaf to Acceptance:never have been possible. Blind and Deaf to Acceptance: The

Luerssen, Anna Maud

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security at Nuclear Weapons Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

38

ALTERNATE ACCEPTANCE OF WULFENSTEIN PIT AGGREGATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate Wulfenstein fine aggregate for acceptability under ASTM C 33 standard specification.

J. W. Keifer

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

Building Information Modeling - A Minimum Mathematical Configuration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minimum information required to execute the construction of a project. A plain concrete beam element was used as the case study for this research. The results show that a minimal information schema can be developed for a simple building element. Further...

Bhandare, Ruchika

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Learning Minimum Volume Sets Clayton Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Minimum Volume Sets Clayton Scott Statistics Department Rice University Houston, TX 77005 herein are primarily of theoretical interest, although they may be implemented e#eciently for certain measure based on S: # P (G) = (1/n) # n i=1 I(X i # G). Here I(·) is the indicator function. Set µ

Scott, Clayton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Minimum Energy Diagrams for Multieffect Distillation Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the energy use from this process accounts for an estimated 3% of the world energy consumption.1 With rising on the overall plant energy consumption. The use of heat integration combined with complex config- urations distillation ar- rangements. An easy form of comparison for energy consumption is the minimum vapor flow rate

Skogestad, Sigurd

42

Product acceptance environmental and destructive testing for reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine whether a component is meeting its reliability requirement during production, acceptance sampling is employed in which selected units coming off the production line are subjected to additional environmental and/or destructive tests that are within the normal environment space to which the component is expected to be exposed throughout its life in the Stockpile. This report describes what these tests are and how they are scored for reliability purposes. The roles of screens, Engineering Use Only tests, and next assembly product acceptance testing are also discussed, along with both the advantages and disadvantages of environmental and destructive testing.

Dvorack, Michael A.; Kerschen, Thomas J.; Collins, Elmer W.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1 David Eppstein 2 Leonidas J. Guibas 3 Monika R. Henzinger 4 Abstract We consider the parametric minimum spanning tree problem- pute the sequence of minimum spanning trees generated as varies. We also consider the kinetic minimum

Eppstein, David

44

SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describe & report the overall SAPHIRE 8 Software acceptance test paln to offically release the SAPHIRE version 8 software to the NRC custoer for distribution.

Ted S. Wood; Curtis L. Smith

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL counterintelligence FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post Cloyd has most recently served as assistant director of the Counterintelligence Division of the Federal...

46

International Emissions Trading: Design and Political Acceptability.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis discusses the design and political acceptability of international emissions trading. It is shown that there are several designs options for emissions trading at (more)

Boom, Jan Tjeerd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Participant/assessor personality characteristics that influence feedback acceptance in developmental assessment centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of the present study was to determine whether specified factors influenced the acceptance of feedback by participants (N = 113) in an operational developmental assessment center. Specifically, the relationship between participants...

Bell, Suzanne Tamara

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time Bernard Chazelle #3; Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum spanning tree- components algorithm picks O(1=#15; 2 ) vertices in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose

Trevisan, Luca

50

Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks Wei Ren, Xiangyang Xiao, Qing Zhao algorithm with bounded performance guarantee for constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree, which by studying the impact of the traffic load of the primary network on the minimum-energy multicast tree. I

Islam, M. Saif

51

Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern'andez­Baca 1? , Giora with a parameter. The second is an asymptotically optimal algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search problems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree

Eppstein, David

52

Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern´andez-Baca Giora algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search prob- lems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree problem, one is given an n-node, m

Eppstein, David

53

Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi # Computer Science University­1­4503­0682­9/11/06 ...$10.00. Keywords Algorithms, Theory General Terms Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees, Geometric Data and arbitrary but known probability p i . We want to compute the expected length of the minimum spanning tree

Chan, Timothy M.

54

On Two-Stage Stochastic Minimum Spanning Kedar Dhamdhere1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Two-Stage Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees Kedar Dhamdhere1 , R. Ravi2 , and Mohit Singh2 1}@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract. We consider the undirected minimum spanning tree problem in a stochastic optimization setting algorithm. We then consider the Stochastic minimum spanning tree problem in a more general black-box model

Ravi, R.

55

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test.

McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

58

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced...

59

105 K East isolation barrier acceptance analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KE/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan (McCracken 1995c) and acceptance test procedure (McCracken 1995a). The test report (McCracken 1995b) contains the test data. This document compares the test data (McCracken 1995b) against the criteria (McCracken 1995a, c). A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization (Irwin 1995) describes how the flow characteristics and the flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report (McCracken 1995b). The barriers must adequately control the leakage from the main basin to the discharge chute to less than the 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) Safety Analysis Report (SAR 1994) limit.

McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Acceptance Test Plan for the Sludge Pickup Adaptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan documents the acceptance testing of the sludge pickup adapter for potential use during PSI Phases 3 and 4 fuel cleanliness inspection activities. The adaptex is attached to the strainer tip of the vacuum wand and used to suction up residual sludge captured in a sludge collection tray. The material is vacuumed into a chamber of known volume in the sludge pickup adapter. The device serves as an aid in helping to determine whether the observed quantity of sludge is within allowable limits (1.4 cm{sup 3} per fuel assembly). This functionality test involves underwater testing in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility to verify that sludge can be successfully vacuumed from a collection tray. Ancillary activities in this acceptance test include demonstration that the sludge pickup adapter CM be successfully attached to and detached from the vacuum wand underwater.

PITNER, A.L.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K. [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)] [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Minimum concave cost flows in capacitated grid networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the minimum concave cost flow problem over a two-dimensional .... as a building block for the theory of production planning and inventory control.

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Abstract: Transition state searches have been...

64

Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

Benjamin Recht

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

Stewart, Frank J.

66

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA Cybersecurity Program Manager (CSPM...

67

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 -...

69

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting Applications April 13, 2015 - 12:04pm Addthis...

70

Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review of the Literature Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Acceptability of Sustainable...

71

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action...

72

An economic approach to acceptance sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ECONOMIC APPROACH TO ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING A Thesis by ROBERT JUSTIN RUTH Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub... JUSTIN RUTH I Approved as to style and content by& , J ~ W P. H. Newell Head Departmen J McNicho e Mem er 8w~ D. R. Shreve Member May 1973 ABSTRACT An Economic Approach to Acceptance Sampling (&m 1973) Robert Justin Ruth, S. S ~ , Virgin1a...

Ruth, Robert Justin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Department of Energy (DOE) Policies on Accepting Other Federal Agency Funds For Interagency AcquisitionsF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy (DOE) Policies on Accepting Other Federal Agency Funds For Interagency. "Interagency acquisition," as used in this subpart, means a procedure by which an agency needing supplies.503 -- Determinations and Findings Requirements. (a) Each Economy Act order shall be supported by a Determination

75

Algorithms to Compute Minimum Cycle Basis in Directed Graphs #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, . . . ,C d whose incidence vectors permit a unique linear combination of the incidence vector of any cycleAlgorithms to Compute Minimum Cycle Basis in Directed Graphs # Telikepalli Kavitha + Kurt Mehlhorn # Abstract We consider the problem of computing a minimum cycle basis in a di­ rected graph G with m arcs

Mehlhorn, Kurt

76

Approximate Minimum-Energy Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a set of destination nodes, the problem is to build a minimum-energy multicast tree for the requestApproximate Minimum-Energy Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Liang, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--A wireless ad hoc network consists of mobile nodes that are equipped with energy

Liang, Weifa

77

Asymptotically minimum BER linear block precoders for MMSE equalisation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) [3]. For a general block transmission scheme, optimal detection requires a joint decisionAsymptotically minimum BER linear block precoders for MMSE equalisation S.S. Chan, T.N. Davidson and K.M. Wong Abstract: An asymptotically minimum bit error rate (BER) linear block precoder

Davidson, Tim

78

Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time #3; Bernard Chazelle y Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum span- ning tree in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose sizes are speci#12;ed by a stochastic process. From

Goldwasser, Shafi

79

Polynomial Time Algorithms for Minimum Energy Scheduling Philippe Baptiste1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithm for computing the minimum energy schedule when all jobs have unit length. 1 Introduction PowerPolynomial Time Algorithms for Minimum Energy Scheduling Philippe Baptiste1 , Marek Chrobak2 policies is to reduce the amount of energy consumed by computer systems while maintaining satisfactory

Chrobak, Marek

80

Identification of permit and waste acceptance criteria provisions requiring modification for acceptance of commercial mixed waste. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1990, representatives of States and compact regions requested that the US Department of Energy (DOE) explore an agreement with host States and compact regions under which DOE would accept commercial mixed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at DOE`s own treatment and disposal facilities. A program for DOE management of commercial mixed waste is made potentially more attractive in light of the low commercial mixed waste volumes, high regulatory burdens, public opposition to new disposal sites, and relatively high cost of constructing commercial disposal facilities. Several studies were identified as essential in determining the feasibility of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste for disposal. The purpose of this report is to identify any current or proposed waste acceptance criteria (WAC) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provisions that would have to be modified for commercial mixed waste acceptance at specified DOE facilities. Following the introduction, Section 2 of this report (a) provides a background summary of existing and proposed mixed waste disposal facilities at each DOE site, and (b) summarizes the status of any RCRA Part B permit and WAC provisions relating to the disposal of mixed waste, including provisions relating to acceptance of offsite waste. Section 3 provides overall conclusions regarding the current status and permit modifications that must be implemented in order to grant DOE sites authority under their permits to accept commercial mixed waste for disposal. Section 4 contains a list of references.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optimizing Organ Allocation and Acceptance OGUZHAN ALAGOZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it is transplanted is called the cold ischemia time (CIT). During this time, organs are bathed in storage solutions J. SCHAEFER Departments of Industrial Engineering and Medicine University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh of Transplant Recipients states that the acceptable cold ischemia time limit for a liver is 12 to 18 hours [22

Schaefer, Andrew

83

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance Audun Faanes and Sigurd Skogestad for the design of buffer tanks. We consider mainly the case where the objective of the buffer tank is to dampen- trol system. We consider separately design procedures for (I) mixing tanks to dampen quality

Skogestad, Sigurd

85

Minimum error discrimination between similarity-transformed quantum states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the well-known necessary and sufficient conditions for minimum error discrimination (MED), we extract an equivalent form for the MED conditions. In fact, by replacing the inequalities corresponding to the MED conditions with an equivalent but more suitable and convenient identity, the problem of mixed state discrimination with optimal success probability is solved. Moreover, we show that the mentioned optimality conditions can be viewed as a Helstrom family of ensembles under some circumstances. Using the given identity, MED between N similarity transformed equiprobable quantum states is investigated. In the case that the unitary operators are generating a set of irreducible representation, the optimal set of measurements and corresponding maximum success probability of discrimination can be determined precisely. In particular, it is shown that for equiprobable pure states, the optimal measurement strategy is the square-root measurement (SRM), whereas for the mixed states, SRM is not optimal. In the case that the unitary operators are reducible, there is no closed-form formula in the general case, but the procedure can be applied in each case in accordance to that case. Finally, we give the maximum success probability of optimal discrimination for some important examples of mixed quantum states, such as generalized Bloch sphere m-qubit states, spin-j states, particular nonsymmetric qudit states, etc.

Jafarizadeh, M. A. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sufiani, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazhari Khiavi, Y. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AUTOMATIC DAYLIGHTING CONTROL ACCEPTANCE DOCUMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AUTOMATIC DAYLIGHTING CONTROL ACCEPTANCE DOCUMENT CEC-LTG-3A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE LTG-3A Automatic Daylighting Control Acceptance fraction of rated light output. #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA AUTOMATIC DAYLIGHTING CONTROL ACCEPTANCE DOCUMENT

87

Acceptance test procedure for the overview video camera system (OVS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acceptance Test Procedure for testing the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Overview Video Camera System (OVS).

Pardini, A.F.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s).

SHERRELL, D.L.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Quantification of uncertainty in machining operations for on-machine acceptance.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufactured parts are designed with acceptance tolerances, i.e. deviations from ideal design conditions, due to unavoidable errors in the manufacturing process. It is necessary to measure and evaluate the manufactured part, compared to the nominal design, to determine whether the part meets design specifications. The scope of this research project is dimensional acceptance of machined parts; specifically, parts machined using numerically controlled (NC, or also CNC for Computer Numerically Controlled) machines. In the design/build/accept cycle, the designer will specify both a nominal value, and an acceptable tolerance. As part of the typical design/build/accept business practice, it is required to verify that the part did meet acceptable values prior to acceptance. Manufacturing cost must include not only raw materials and added labor, but also the cost of ensuring conformance to specifications. Ensuring conformance is a substantial portion of the cost of manufacturing. In this project, the costs of measurements were approximately 50% of the cost of the machined part. In production, cost of measurement would be smaller, but still a substantial proportion of manufacturing cost. The results of this research project will point to a science-based approach to reducing the cost of ensuring conformance to specifications. The approach that we take is to determine, a priori, how well a CNC machine can manufacture a particular geometry from stock. Based on the knowledge of the manufacturing process, we are then able to decide features which need further measurements from features which can be accepted 'as is' from the CNC. By calibration of the machine tool, and establishing a machining accuracy ratio, we can validate the ability of CNC to fabricate to a particular level of tolerance. This will eliminate the costs of checking for conformance for relatively large tolerances.

Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Su, Jiann-Chemg

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

Dzenitis, J M

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Tree-ring reconstruction of maximum and minimum temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, minimum temperatures, diurnal temperature range, changing tree-ring/climate relationships, b; Vaganov et al. 1999; Bar- ber et al. 2000; Lloyd, Fastie 2002). Similar changes during investigations of tree- ring growth/climate relationships in interior British Columbia (BC

93

Minimum Purchase Price Regulations (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Minimum Purchase Price Regulations establish the price which utilities must pay for power produced by large-scale renewable energy generators that is those capable of producing more than 100...

94

Optimization Online - On the complexity of maximizing the minimum ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 18, 2010 ... ... minimum total Shannon capacity of any mobile user in the system. ... Category 1: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences (Telecommunications ) ... Address: Department of Mathematics, Royal Institute of Technology,...

Mikael Fallgren

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Planning of Minimum-Time Trajectories for Robot Arms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum-time for a robot arm has been a longstanding and unsolved problem of considerable interest. We present a general solution to this problem that involves joint-space tesselation, a dynamic time-scaling ...

Sahar, Gideon

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air...

Tanskyi, O.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

affecting minimum alveolar: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

close to the observed minimum mass. The Hubble mass can also be predicted. It is suggested that assumption 1 above could be tested using a cyclotron to accelerate particles...

98

TOWARD THE MINIMUM INNER EDGE DISTANCE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the minimum distance from a host star where an exoplanet could potentially be habitable in order not to discard close-in rocky exoplanets for follow-up observations. We find that the inner edge of the Habitable ...

Zsom, Andras

99

Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

Kumar, Santosh

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Natural Resources Commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

Strobel, K; Strobel, Klaus; Weigel, Manfred K.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

Klaus Strobel; Manfred K. Weigel

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wind Energy Community Acceptance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay, OR) Jump to:Information WAsP)Acceptance

104

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartmentRestrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the

105

Accepted Manuscript Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites deter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites deter.R., Alexander, C.M., Orthous-Daunay, o-R., Franchi, I.A., Hoppe, P., Abundances of presolar silicon carbide of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS Jemma Davidsona,1,* , Henner

Nittler, Larry R.

106

Order Acceptance and Scheduling Problem in Two-machine Flow ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 29, 2014 ... Order Acceptance and Scheduling Problem in Two-machine Flow Shops: New Mixed Integer Programming Formulations.

Rasul Esmaeilbeigi

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

ForPeerReview PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ForPeerReview PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES Journal: Wind, Andrew; Minerals Management Service Keywords: offshore wind power, public opinion, social acceptancePeerReview 1 PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES Jeremy Firestone*, Willett

Firestone, Jeremy

108

Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses concepts and trends in social acceptance of wind energy, profiles recent research findings, and discussions mitigation strategies intended to resolve wind power social acceptance challenges as informed by published research and the experiences of individuals participating in the International Energy Agencies Working Group on Social Acceptance of Wind Energy

Lantz, E.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-14A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-14A NA7.5.13 Distributed Energy Storage DX AC DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-14A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

110

STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-15A NA7.5.14 Thermal Energy Storage (TES) System THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

111

ASHRAE's Proposed Guideline 14P for Measurement of Energy and Demand Savings: How to Determine What Was Really Saved by the Retrofit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASHRAE has recently completed the development of Guideline 14 to fill a need for a standard set of energy (and demand) savings calculation procedures. Guideline 14 is intended to be a guideline that provides a minimum acceptable level of performance...

Haberl, J. S.; Reeves, G.; Gillespie, K.; Claridge, D. E.; Cowan, J.; Culp, C.; Frazell, W.; Heinemeier, K.; Kromer, S.; Kummer, J.; Mazzucchi, R.; Reddy, A.; Schiller, S.; Sud, I.; Wolpert, J.; Wutka, T.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste Acceptance for Vitrified Sludge from Oak Ridge Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tanks Focus Area of the DOE`s Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) has funded the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to develop formulations which can incorporate sludges from Oak Ridge Tank Farms into immobilized glass waste forms. The four tank farms included in this study are: Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST), Bethel Valley Evaporation Service Tanks (BVEST), Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT), and Old Hydrofracture Tanks (OHF).The vitrified waste forms must be sent for disposal either at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) or the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Waste loading in the glass is the major factor in determining where the waste will be sent and whether the waste will be remote-handled (RH) or contact-handled (CH). In addition, the waste loading significantly impacts the costs of vitrification operations and transportation to and disposal within the repository.This paper focuses on disposal options for the vitrified Oak Ridge Tank sludge waste as determined by the WIPP (1) and NTS (2) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The concentrations for both Transuranic (TRU) and beta/gamma radionuclides in the glass waste form will be presented a a function of sludge waste loading. These radionuclide concentrations determine whether the waste forms will be TRU (and therefore disposed of at WIPP) and whether the waste forms will be RH or CH.

Harbour, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Andrews, M.K.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - antagonists minimum safety Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

minimum safety Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antagonists minimum safety Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Microscopic Kinetics and...

114

Grazing function g and collimation angular acceptance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The grazing function g is introduceda synchrobetatron optical quantity that is analogous (and closely connected) to the Twiss and dispersion functions ?, ?, ?, and ??. It parametrizes the rate of change of total angle with respect to synchrotron amplitude for grazing particles, which just touch the surface of an aperture when their synchrotron and betatron oscillations are simultaneously (in time) at their extreme displacements. The grazing function can be important at collimators with limited acceptance angles. For example, it is important in both modes of crystal collimation operationin channeling and in volume reflection. The grazing function is independent of the collimator typecrystal or amorphousbut can depend strongly on its azimuthal location. The rigorous synchrobetatron condition g=0 is solved, by invoking the close connection between the grazing function and the slope of the normalized dispersion. Propagation of the grazing function is described, through drifts, dipoles, and quadr...

Peggs, Stephen G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The minimum distance of classical and quantum turbo-codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theory of quantum stabilizer turbo-encoders with unbounded minimum distance. This theory is presented under a framework common to both classical and quantum turbo-encoding theory. The main conditions to have an unbounded minimum distance are that the inner seed encoder has to be recursive, and either systematic or with a totally recursive truncated decoder. This last condition has been introduced in order to obtain a theory viable in the quantum stabilizer case, since it was known that in this case the inner seed encoder could not be recursive and systematic in the same time.

Abbara, Mamdouh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The minimum distance of classical and quantum turbo-codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theory of quantum stabilizer turbo-encoders with unbounded minimum distance. This theory is presented under a framework common to both classical and quantum turbo-encoding theory. The main conditions to have an unbounded minimum distance are that the inner seed encoder has to be recursive, and either systematic or with a totally recursive truncated decoder. This last condition has been introduced in order to obtain a theory viable in the quantum stabilizer case, since it was known that in this case the inner seed encoder could not be recursive and systematic in the same time.

Mamdouh Abbara; Jean-Pierre Tillich

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Implementing Minimum Cycle Basis algorithms Kurt Mehlhorn and Dimitrios Michail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Minimum Cycle Basis algorithms Kurt Mehlhorn and Dimitrios Michail Max consider the problem of computing a mini- mum cycle basis of an undirected graph G = (V, E) with n vertices in a significant speedup. Based on our experimental observations, we combine the two fundamen- tally different

Mehlhorn, Kurt

119

Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures Jun Shintake energy structures Jun Shintake*a,b , Samuel Rosseta , Dario Floreanob , Herbert R. Sheaa a Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchâtel, Switzerland b

Floreano, Dario

120

A minimum entropy principle of high order schemes for gas ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The entropy solutions of the compressible Euler equations satisfy a minimum principle for the specific ... where ? is the density, u is the velocity, m is the momentum, E is the total energy and p is the pressure. ... can enforce this condition without destroying conservation. .... achieved under a standard CFL condition ? (|u| + c)...

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

On the Minimum Load Coloring Problem --Extended Abtract--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

# such that the maximum load, l # := max{r# , b #}, is minimized. In the following we shall skip the term ``maximumOn the Minimum Load Coloring Problem --Extended Abtract-- Nitin Ahuja 1 , Andreas Baltz 2 Abstract. Given a graph G = (V, E) with n vertices, m edges and maximum vertex degree #, the load

Doerr, Benjamin

122

Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1 S. Irmak, M.ASCE2 ; A. Irmak3 ; J for predicting daily Rn have been widely used. However, when the paucity of detailed climatological data with National Weather Service climatological datasets that only record Tmax and Tmin on a regular basis. DOI: 10

123

Optimizing rotational acceleration curves for minimum energy use in electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing rotational acceleration curves for minimum energy use in electric motors. 12/15/06 Fall the optimal efficiency of a motor for any input values of motor constants, distance, or time. In every of the inspiration to find which rotational acceleration curve for the used motors would be most efficient. We really

Ruina, Andy L.

124

Localized Minimum-Energy Broadcasting for Wireless Multihop Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tree. We then observe that, for very dense networks, it is more energy-efficient to reach more than oneLocalized Minimum-Energy Broadcasting for Wireless Multihop Networks with Directional Antennas, and Carmen M. Yago Abstract--There are a number of proposals to achieve energy-efficient broadcasting

Stojmenovic, Ivan

125

Minimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an energy- efficient query routing tree. (a) Energy harvesting for battery- less nodes for the (b) Voltree to the querying node. Energy-efficient query routing trees are needed in a plethora of systems such as PeopleMinimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks Georgios Chatzimilioudis Dept

Zeinalipour, Demetris

126

The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Jamming-Aware Minimum Energy Routing in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Jamming-Aware Minimum Energy Routing in Wireless Networks Azadeh Sheikholeslami, Majid Ghaderi; however, energy-aware routing in the presence of active adversary (jammers) has not been considered. We. There has been some study of energy-aware ad hoc routing protocols in the literature [13], [14], [15], [16

Goeckel, Dennis L.

128

BLIND DECONVOLUTION WITH MINIMUM RENYI'S ENTROPY Deniz Erdogmus1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLIND DECONVOLUTION WITH MINIMUM RENYI'S ENTROPY Deniz Erdogmus1 , Jose C. Principe1 , Luis Vielva2-mail: [deniz , principe]@cnel.ufl.edu, luis@dicom.unican.es ABSTRACT Blind techniques attract the attention, from communications to control systems. Blind deconvolution is a problem that has been investigated

Slatton, Clint

129

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser Abstract on three example applications: generating human-interpretable excuses for failure, motion planning under their failures. · In human-robot interaction, semantically meaningful explanations would help people diagnose

Indiana University

130

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser September 13 strategies. It is demonstrated on three example applications: gener- ating human-interpretable excuses, then they provide no explanation for the failure. For several applications, it would be useful for planners

Indiana University

131

Interior Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interior Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite architecture studio course is required for architecture majors enrolled in the interior architecture minor (1 is required for Architecture majors): IARC 484 Interior Design Studio (6), IARC 486 Furniture

132

Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite Notes: Required courses in one's major will not count for the minor with one exception: 1 architecture studio course is required for interior architecture majors enrolled in the architecture minor, and this studio

133

Optimum Wire Tapering for Minimum Power Dissipation in RLC Interconnects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tapering is shown to reduce the (a CMOS inverter) with the driver (a CMOS inverter). The power dissipatedOptimum Wire Tapering for Minimum Power Dissipation in RLC Interconnects Magdy A. El-Moursy and Eby G. Friedman Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Rochester Rochester, New

Friedman, Eby G.

134

Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

» Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

Alpay, S. Pamir

135

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Documentation of acceptable knowledge for Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility TRU waste stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the TRU waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility`s mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC.

Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Foxx, C.L.; Rogers, P.Z.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Documentation of acceptable knowledge for LANL Plutonium Facility transuranic waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site-specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the transuranic waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility`s mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC.

Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Foxx, C.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Electric top drives gain wide industry acceptance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its introduction, the top drive drilling system has gained acceptance as a productive and safe method for drilling oil and gas wells. Originally, the system was used mostly for offshore and higher cost land drilling, and it had to be installed as a permanent installation because of its enormous weight and size. Essentially, a top drive replaces the kelly and rotary table as the means of rotating drillpipe on oil, gas and geothermal rigs and is considered to be 15% to 40% more efficient than a kelly drive. Top drive systems allow the operator to drill and maintain directional orientation for triple stands and provide tripping efficiency because of the ability to ream and circulate with triple stands, to reduce the risk of stuck pipe or lost wells, and to improve well control and pipe handling safety. The paper describes electric top drives with DC motors, top drives with AC motors, top drives with permanent magnet motors, and top drives with permanent magnet brushless synchronous motors.

Riahi, M.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Acceptance test report for the mobile color camera system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present test data recorded during acceptance testing of the Mobile Color Camera System (MCCS).

Castleberry, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

Packer, M.J.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ORISE: Applications being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program at ORNL Students have the opportunity to perform research alongside...

142

The minimum-uncertainty coherent states for Landau levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Glauber minimum-uncertainty coherent states with two variables for Landau levels, based on the representation of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra by two different modes, have been studied about four decades ago. Here, we introduce new two-variable coherent states with minimum uncertainty relationship for Landau levels in three different methods: the infinite unitary representation of su(1, 1) is realized in two different methods, first, by consecutive levels with the same energy gaps and also with the same value for z-angular momentum quantum number, then, by shifting z-angular momentum mode number by two units while the energy level remaining the same. Besides, for su(2), whether by lowest Landau levels or Landau levels with lowest z-angular momentum, just one finite unitary representation is introduced. Having constructed the generalized Klauder-Perelomov coherent states, for any of the three representations, we obtain their Glauber coherency by displacement operator of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra.

Dehghani, A. [Physics Department, Payame Noor University, P. O. Box 19395-4697 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhri, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, P. O. Box 51666-16471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mojaveri, B. [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, P. O. Box 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Investigation of a minimum energy Earth-Mars trajectory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATION OF A MINIMUM ENERGY EARTH-MARS TRAJECTORY A Thesis by Richard Emmett grown Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of the Texas ASM University in partia1 fulfi11ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering INVESTIGATION OF A MINIMIIM ENERGy EARTH MARS TRAJECTORy A Thesis by Richard Emmett Brown Approved as to style and content by; (Co-chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) May I967 TABLE...

Brown, Richard Emett

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Energy-Dependence of GRB Minimum Variability Timescales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain the minimum variability timescales for 938 GRBs observed by the Fermi/GBM instrument prior to July 11, 2012. The tightest constraints on progenitor radii derived from these timescales are obtained from light curves in the hardest energy channel. In the softer bands -- or from measurements of the same GRBs in the hard X-rays from Swift -- we show that variability timescales tend to be a factor 2--3 longer. Applying a survival analysis to account for detections and upper limits, we find median minimum timescale in the rest frame for long-duration and short-duration GRBs of 45 ms and 10 ms, respectively. Fewer than 10% of GRBs show evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. These shortest timescales require Lorentz factors $\\gtrsim 400$ and imply typical emission radii $R \\approx 1 {\\times} 10^{14}$ cm for long-duration GRBs and $R \\approx 3 {\\times} 10^{13}$ cm for short-duration GRBs. We discuss implications for the GRB fireball model and investigate whether GRB minimum timescales evolve w...

Golkhou, V Zach; Littlejohns, Owen M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, Sarbani, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven CT 06520-8101 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Alternatives To the Use of Contractor's Quality Control Data For Acceptance and Payment Purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ........................................................................ 74 Figure B-1 Panel Member Responses to Workload Reducing Alternatives ......... 94 Figure B-2 Panel Member Responses to Alternatives Suggested as Improvement to CAT ....................................................................... 95... instances F and t tests detect a difference between two data sets when it does not exist. Operating Characteristics (OC) curves help determine the total number of samples needed to achieve a particular probability of acceptance. OC curves plot...

Wani, Sujay Sudhir

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

STATE OF CALIFORNIA SUPPLY WATER TEMPERATURE RESET CONTROLS ACCEPTANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA SUPPLY WATER TEMPERATURE RESET CONTROLS ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-9A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-9A NA7.5.8 Supply Water Temperature Reset, under the laws of the State of California, the information provided on this form is true and correct

148

acceptance test plan: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acceptance test plan First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 G4Beamline Acceptance Tests Chris...

149

Accepted Manuscript Title: Metal Current Collector-Free Freestanding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Title: Metal Current Collector-Free Freestanding Silicon-Carbon 1D, Metal Current Collector-Free Freestanding Silicon-Carbon 1D Nanocomposites for Ultralight Anodes that apply to the journal pertain. #12;Page 1 of 20 Accepted M anuscript 1 Metal Current Collector

Cui, Yi

150

Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet.

Crystal, J.B.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process. Data quality requirements for sample collection and analysis of all WAC parameters were specified during the DQO process. There were eighteen key parameters identified with action limits to ensure the feed transfer and receipt would not exceed plant design, safety, permitting, and processing requirements. The remaining WAC parameters were grouped in the category for obtaining data according to WTP contract specifications, regulatory reporting requirements, and for developing the feed campaign processing sequence. (authors)

Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W. [Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (United States); Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G. [Hanford Tank Operations Contractor - Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Articles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . . April 1987 Determining Minimum Acceptable Bid Prices for the Test Sale of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Crude Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

153

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

Hamrick, Todd

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

The impact of minimum age of employment regulation on child labor and schooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Promoting minimum age of employment regulation has been a centerpiece in child labor policy for the last 15 years. If enforced, minimum age regulation would change the age profile of paid child employment. Using micro-data ...

Edmonds, Eric V

157

Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy used to produce liquid steel in today's integrated and electric arc furnace (EAF) facilities is significantly higher than the theoretical minimum energy requirements. This study presents the absolute minimum energy required to produce steel from ore and mixtures of scrap and scrap alternatives. Additional cases in which the assumptions are changed to more closely approximate actual operating conditions are also analyzed. The results, summarized in Table E-1, should give insight into the theoretical and practical potentials for reducing steelmaking energy requirements. The energy values have also been converted to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to indicate the potential for reduction in emissions of this greenhouse gas (Table E-2). The study showed that increasing scrap melting has the largest impact on energy consumption. However, scrap should be viewed as having ''invested'' energy since at one time it was produced by reducing ore. Increasing scrap melting in the BOF mayor may not decrease energy if the ''invested'' energy in scrap is considered.

Fruehan, R.J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H.W.; Brindle, R.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Magnetic Flux Transport Simulations of Solar Surface Magnetic Distributions During a Grand Minimum.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Scotland, KY16 9SS. Abstract. It is well known that magnetic activity on the Sun modulates from one cycle strongly depend on the phase of the cycle in which the grand minimum starts and whether it lasts for an odd or even number of cycles. If the grand minimum starts around cycle minimum then a signi#12;cant amount

Mackay, Duncan

159

Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products and Generalized Petlyuk Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products-component feed into M products has been derived. Interestingly, the minimum-energy solution in a complex solution of minimum energy for distillation of a multicomponent feed into multiple products has not been

Skogestad, Sigurd

160

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy Tamar Kaffe-Abramovich and Ron Unger Background: Proteins seem to have their native structure in a global minimum of free energy is in the global minimum of free energy. The aim of this study is to investigate such evolutionary processes

Unger, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone Hill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone region ionosphere over Millstone Hill with calculations from the IZMIRAN model for solar minimum layer. This phenomenon occurs frequently in the quiet ionosphere at solar minimum during summer

Boyer, Edmond

162

LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

California at Berkeley, University of

163

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi the necessary features of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms the performance of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on

Brown, Timothy X.

164

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their imple- mentation. We of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on-demand ad

165

Acceptance inspection plan 105KW Facility modifications for fuel retrieval subproject  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acceptance inspection of construction by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) is performed to provide assurance that fabrication, construction, and installation are in accordance with approved contract documents. Approved contract documents used to perform inspections may include specifications, drawings, and contractor submittals such as fabrication drawings, procedures, etc. The amount or degree of inspection activity is tailored to the project as determined by the project team so that the effort and cost expended are commensurate with the importance of the facility in terms of function and safety. Inspections are documented to provide verification of the acceptability of the work performed. This document identifies the inspections and documentation forms to be provided. It is prepared and implemented with the understanding that the construction contractor is fully responsible for compliance with contract documents and for the quality of.work performed. Inspections performed are in accordance with approved procedures. The Manager of Acceptance Inspection is responsible for the implementation of this plan and assignment of personnel for the work. Inspections are conducted by personnel who are qualified and certified to perform their assigned task. The Acceptance Inspection Plan is organized in the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format to cross reference design specification sections with sections of the AI Plan. In each AI Plan section the applicable specification section subject will be identified followed by the appropriate inspection requirements. General surveillances will be listed when applicable. Acceptance Inspection Reports are provided to document inspections not documented on a test report (i.e., Soil Test Data, Concrete Test Report, NDE/Weld Record, Leak/Pressure Test Certification, Backflow Device Test Report, Nonconformance Report, Deficiency Report, and/or Contractors testing forms).

Shen, E.J.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Acceptance inspection plan 105KE Facility modifications for fuel retrieval subproject  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acceptance inspection of construction by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) is performed to provide assurance that fabrication, construction, and installation are in accordance with approved contract documents. Approved contract documents used to perform inspections may include specifications, drawings, and contractor submittals such as fabrication drawings, procedures, etc. The amount or degree of inspection activity is tailored to the project as determined by the project team so that the effort and cost expended are commensurate with the importance of the facility in terms of function and safety. Inspections are documented to provide verification of the acceptability of the work performed. This document identifies the inspections and documentation forms to be provided. It is prepared and implemented with the understanding that the construction contractor is fully responsible for compliance with contract documents and for the quality of work performed. Inspections performed are in accordance with approved procedures. The Manager of Acceptance Inspection is responsible for the implementation of this plan and assignment of personnel for the work. Inspections are conducted by personnel who are qualified and certified, to perform their assigned task. The Acceptance Inspection Plan is organized in the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format to cross reference design specification sections with sections of the AI Plan. In each AI Plan section the applicable specification section subject will be identified followed by the appropriate inspection requirements. General surveillances will be listed when applicable. Acceptance Inspection Reports are provided to document inspections not documented on a test report (i.e., Soil Test Data, Concrete Test Report, NDE/Weld Record, Leak/Pressure Test Certification, Backflow Device Test Report, Nonconformance Report, Deficiency Report, and/or Contractors testing forms).

Shen, E.J.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

accepting foregin research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Swinburne University of Technology Research Funding Acceptance Form Physics Websites Summary: )...

168

Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator F7 Flight Unit Acceptance Buy Off  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These are viewgraphs from the subject presentation. The LMMS E-7 history is outlined; Qualification and use of the F-7 GPHS-RTG for the Cassini mission; and the F-7 acceptance test program and performance are described.

none,

1997-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Must a Bayesian Accept the Likelihood Principle? Daniel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Must a Bayesian Accept the Likelihood Principle? Daniel Steel Department of Philosophy 503 S. Kedzie Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824-1032 Email: steel@msu.edu #12;1 1

Fitelson, Branden

170

Accepted to the Journal Geophysical Research Laboratory measurements of electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Accepted to the Journal Geophysical Research Laboratory measurements of electrical conductivities measurements of electrical conductivities of natural magma compositions. The electrical conductivities of three. The electrical conductivity increases with temperature and is higher in the order tephrite, phonotephrite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

171

Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview (Presentation), NREL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview AWEA State Wind Energy Forum Eric Lantz January 20, 2015 Lansing, Michigan NRELPR-6A20-63590 2 Presentation Overview 1. Concepts -...

172

Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The role of acceptable knowledge in transuranic waste disposal operations - 11117  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Acceptable Knowledge (AK) process plays a key role in the delineation of waste streams destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). General Electric's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (GEVNC) provides for an ideal case study of the application of AK in a multiple steward environment. In this review we will elucidate the pivotal role Acceptable Knowledge played in segregating Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities from a commercial facility. The Acceptable Knowledge process is a necessary component of waste characterization that determines whether or not a waste stream may be considered for disposal at the WIPP site. This process may be thought of as an effort to gain a thorough understanding of the waste origin, chemical content, and physical form gleaned by the collection of documentation that concerns generator/storage site history, mission, and operations; in addition to waste stream specific information which includes the waste generation process, the waste matrix, the quantity of waste concerned, and the radiological and chemical make up of the waste. The collection and dissemination of relevant documentation is the fundamental requirement for the AK process to work. Acceptable Knowledge is the predominant process of characterization and, therefore, a crucial part of WIPP's transuranic waste characterization program. This characterization process, when conducted to the standards set forth in WIPP's operating permit, requires confirmation/verification by physical techniques such as Non-Destructive Examination (NDE), Visual Examination (VE), and Non-Destructive Assay (NDA). These physical characterization techniques may vary in their appropriateness for a given waste stream; however, nothing will allow the substitution or exclusion of AK. Beyond the normal scope of operations, AK may be considered, when appropriate, a surrogate for the physical characterization techniques in a procedure that appeals to concepts such As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and budgetary savings. This substitution is referred to as an Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination. With a Sufficiency Determination Request, AK may supplant the need for one or all of the physical analysis methods. This powerful procedure may be used on a scale as small as a single container to that of a vast waste stream. Only under the most stringent requirements will an AK Sufficiency Determination be approved by the regulators and, to date, only six such Sufficiency Determinations have been approved. Although Acceptable Knowledge is legislated into the operational procedures of the WIPP facility there is more to it than compliance. AK is not merely one of a long list of requirements in the characterization and verification of transuranic (TRU) waste destined for the WIPP. Acceptable Knowledge goes beyond the regulatory threshold by offering a way to reduce risk, cost, time, and uncertainty on its own laurels. Therefore, AK alone can be argued superior to any other waste characterization technique.

Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Roger [DOE-CARLSBAD

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Strain-Based Acceptance Criteria for Energy-Limited Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code was primarily written with stress-based acceptance criteria. These criteria are applicable to force, displacement, and energy-controlled loadings and ensure a factor of safety against failure. However, stress-based acceptance criteria are often quite conservative for one time energy-limited events such as accidental drops and impacts. For several years, the ASME Working Group on Design of Division 3 Containments has been developing the Design Articles for Section III, Division 3, Containments for Transportation and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Material and Waste, and has wanted to establish strain-based acceptance criteria for accidental drops of containments. This Division 3 working group asked the Working Group on Design Methodology (WGDM) to assist in developing these strain-based acceptance criteria. This paper discusses the current proposed strain-based acceptance criteria, associated limitations of use, its background development, and the current status.

Spencer D. Snow; Dana K. Morton

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Identification of items and activities important to waste form acceptance by Westinghouse GoCo sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has established specifications (Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms, or WAPS) for canistered waste forms produced at Hanford, Savannah River, and West Valley. Compliance with these specifications requires that each waste form producer identify the items and activities which must be controlled to ensure compliance. As part of quality assurance oversight activities, reviewers have tried to compare the methodologies used by the waste form producers to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. Due to the lack of a documented comparison of the methods used by each producer, confusion has resulted over whether the methods being used are consistent. This confusion has been exacerbated by different systems of nomenclature used by each producer, and the different stages of development of each project. The waste form producers have met three times in the last two years, most recently on June 28, 1993, to exchange information on each producer`s program. These meetings have been sponsored by the Westinghouse GoCo HLW Vitrification Committee. This document is the result of this most recent exchange. It fills the need for a documented comparison of the methodologies used to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. In this document, the methodology being used by each waste form producer is summarized, and the degree of consistency among the waste form producers is determined.

Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Dempster, J. [West Valley Demonstration Project, NY (United States); Randklev, E.H. [Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (United States)

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Department Accepting Applications for a $3.6 Million Hydroelect...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Accepting Applications for a 3.6 Million Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program Energy Department Accepting Applications for a 3.6 Million Hydroelectric Production Incentive...

180

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bittencourt, L. S. (2010) Air movement acceptability limitsthermal acceptability and air movement assessments in a hot-e midos. (Applicability of air velocity limits for thermal

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Near minimum-time maneuvers of large space structures using parameter optimization and lyapunov feedback control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameterization for Minimum-Time Control . . . . 28 28 29 35 39 V CONTROL PARAMETER APPROXIMATIONS. . Control Parameter Approximations for Near-Minimum Time Rest-to- Rest Maneuvers . . Rules of Thumb for Minimum-Time Rest-to-Rest Maneuvers Using the Bang-Bang... ControL One-Switch Bang-Bang Control Approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . , , . . . . , . . Switch Time Approximations Bang-Bang Controls with an Even Number of Control Switches...

Carter, Michael Timothy

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

On the Minimum Volume Covering Ellipsoid of Ellipsoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 12, 2005 ... matrix Q and a center c ? Rn and is defined as. E = {x ? Rn : (x ? c)T Q(x ? c) ? 1}. (2). The matrix Q determines the shape and the orientation...

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. (2011), doi: 10 formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa,b, , Roberto F. Ausasa,b a

Frey, Pascal

185

Accepted Manuscript Title: Microstructure of ethylcellulose oleogels and its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early from our food supply requires innovative approaches to the problem since oil by itself does not have(EC) is the only polymer olegelator that is food grade, commercially available in good purity and allowed in food

Dutcher, John

186

acceptance test summary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acceptance test summary First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 LMS Qualification and Flight...

187

Received 11 January 2002 Accepted 1 March 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Received 11 January 2002 Accepted 1 March 2002 Published online 29 May 2002 Deciding on a new home, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK 5 Section of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA nectar sources, ants stub- bornly wasting energy on longer routes--can be adaptive in the long term

Pratt, Stephen

188

www.elsevier.com/locate/csda Author's Accepted Manuscript  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesestimatorsforreliabilitymeasuresingeometric distribution model using masked system life test data Ammar M. Sarhan, Debasis Kundu PII: S0167 distribution model using masked system life test data, Computa- tional Statistics & Data Analysis (2007), doi;Accepted m anuscript Bayes estimators for reliability measures in geometric distribution model using masked

Kundu, Debasis

189

Accepted Manuscript Sustainable manufacturing: Evaluation and Modeling of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in additive manufacturing Florent Le Bourhisa Olivier Kerbrata Jean-Yves Hascoeta Pascal Mognola Accepted of manufacturing processes where great amounts of energy and materials are being consumed. Nowadays, additive manufacturing technologies such as Direct Additive Laser Manufac- turing allow us to manufacture functional

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

190

Accepted Manuscript Title: The Identification of Causal Effects in Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Environmental and energy economists are making greater use of randomized laboratory and field experiments, have engagement, it has maintained a steady course in focusing on environmental and energy policy issuesAccepted Manuscript Title: The Identification of Causal Effects in Environmental and Energy

Kotchen, Matthew J.

191

Received 25 March 2002 Accepted 6 August 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Received 25 March 2002 Accepted 6 August 2002 Published online 9 December 2002 Nuclear markers reveal unexpected genetic variation and a Congolese­Nilotic origin of the Lake Victoria cichlid species flock Ole Seehausen1,2* , Egbert Koetsier2 , Maria Victoria Schneider2 , Lauren J. Chapman3,4 , Colin A

192

Continuous cleanup of oilfield waste in an environmentally acceptable manner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After several years of research and field testing, a process has been developed which can economically treat reserve pit waste. This continuous process converts the reserve pit contents into two environmentally acceptable products: a relatively dry, non-leachable cake-like solid material, and water which is purified for recycle or release directly into the environment.

Wally, R.F.; Dowdy, S.A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Received 9 June 2004 Accepted 25 June 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependent on solar energy input. Previous work demonstrated a sig- nificant correlation between the generalReceived 9 June 2004 Accepted 25 June 2004 Published online 24 September 2004 Environmental energy Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot SL5 7PY, UK 2 Molecular Systematics Section

Davies, Jonathan

194

Accepted for publication in Geopolitics The eco-frontier paradigm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted for publication in Geopolitics The eco-frontier paradigm: rethinking the links between of Limoges, France Sylvain.guyot@unilim.fr Key-words Eco-politics, eco-frontiers, space, nature, territory2010 #12;Table 1: Three generations of eco-frontiers (source: Author) Generations Average start- ing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Campus Outdoor Lighting Standards The following standards provide for minimum safe lighting standards for outdoor area of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Outdoor Lighting Standards The following standards provide for minimum safe lighting with a minimum of 3 foot candles. This lighting level is for daytime and at night. Public Streets Streets must have a minimum of one foot candles average with a minimum of .6 foot candles. Augmented lighting should

de Lijser, Peter

196

INTRODUCTORY LABORATORY 0: DETERMINING AN EQUATION FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

below are designed to help. Once you are satisfied with an equation, press "Accept Fit Function determine the equations that best represent (fit) the measured data, and compare the resulting Fit Equations with your Prediction Equations. This activity will familiarize you with the procedure for fitting equations

Minnesota, University of

197

Lost sunspot cycle in the beginning of Dalton minimum: New evidence and consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the beginning of the Dalton minimum during 1790s [Usoskin et al., 2001]. Earlier, this cycle has been combinedLost sunspot cycle in the beginning of Dalton minimum: New evidence and consequences I. G. Usoskin November 2002; published 24 December 2002. [1] We have recently suggested that one solar cycle was lost

Usoskin, Ilya G.

198

Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures O. A. Araromi*a , I. Gavrilovichb , J. Shintakea , S. Rosseta , H. R. Sheaa a Microsystems For Space Technologies Laboratory, ?cole Polytechnique Fédérale de

Floreano, Dario

199

An Exponential Improvement on the MST Heuristic for Minimum Energy Broadcasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in energy saving. A naturally arising issue in ad hoc wireless networks is that of supporting communicationAn Exponential Improvement on the MST Heuristic for Minimum Energy Broadcasting in Ad Hoc Wireless Abstract. In this paper we present a new approximation algorithm for the Minimum Energy Broadcast Routing

Caragiannis, Ioannis

200

On the Cost and Quality Tradeoff in Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Cost and Quality Tradeoff in Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad Hoc], each having a different complexity and produc- ing a broadcast tree with a different energy cost. Thus to the quality of the trees constructed. II. BUILDING BLOCKS The three ingredients that constitute any minimum-energy

Hu, Y. Charlie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 1. Vmin Diagram for a Two-Product Column  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 1. Vmin Diagram for a Two-Product Column how the minimum energy consumption is related to the feed-component distribution for all possible operating points in a two-product distillation column with a multicomponent feed. The classical Underwood

Skogestad, Sigurd

202

Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this process we present the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR ExperimentsGuidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F Vandesompele,6 Carl T. Wittwer,12 and Stephen A. Bustin13 There is growing interest in digital PCR (dPCR) be

Magee, Joseph W.

203

The Minimum Distance of Turbo-Like Codes Louay Bazzi, Mohammad Mahdian, Daniel A. Spielman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Minimum Distance of Turbo-Like Codes Louay Bazzi, Mohammad Mahdian, Daniel A. Spielman Abstract--Worst-case upper bounds are derived on the minimum distance of parallel concatenated Turbo codes that parallel-concatenated Turbo codes and repeat-convolute codes with sub-linear memory are asymptotically bad

Spielman, Daniel A.

204

Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle to achieve these objectives based on the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle. This principle solutions that are bigger than necessary, contradicting the Occam's razor principle [7] which says that "the

Bacardit, Jaume

205

Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle propose a method to achieve these objectives based on the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle. This principle is a metric which combines in a smart way the accuracy and the complexity of a theory (rule set

Bacardit, Jaume

206

Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees In Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithm, power awareness, ad hoc networks, energy consumption optimization, broad- cast and multicastConstructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees In Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Liang Department related to power consump- tion in this kind of network. One is the minimum-energy broadcast tree problem

Liang, Weifa

207

Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information Backpropagation L;210 Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information Backpropagation L.-Q. Zhang, A- composition approach, for multichannel blind de- convolution of non-minimumphase systems. In 20] we has

Vialatte, Franois

208

On the random 2-stage minimum spanning tree Abraham D. Flaxman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the random 2-stage minimum spanning tree Abraham D. Flaxman Department of Mathematical Sciences random variables, uniformly distributed between 0 and 1, then the expected cost of the minimum spanning tree is asymptotically equal to #16;(3) = P 1 i=1 i 3 . Here we consider the following stochastic two

Krivelevich, Michael

209

FINDING THE GLOBAL MINIMUM FOR BINARY IMAGE RESTORATION Tony F. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- est. In this paper we define the restored image as the global min- imizer of the total-variation (TVFINDING THE GLOBAL MINIMUM FOR BINARY IMAGE RESTORATION Tony F. Chan , Selim Esedo¯glu and Mila and there are no general methods to calculate the global minimum, while local minimziers are very often of limited inter

Esedoglu, Selim

210

Modeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Berkeley, California. Abstract. The recent solar minimum, marking the end of solar cycle 23, has beenModeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum: Model Mikic and Janet G. Luhmann Predictive Science, San Diego, California. Harvard-Smithsonian Center

California at Berkeley, University of

211

Graphical Visualisation of Minimum Energy Requirements for Multi-Effect Distillation Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Graphical Visualisation of Minimum Energy Requirements for Multi-Effect Distillation Arrangements of this paper is to present a simple graphical method for obtaining the energy usage and to compare the energy of Chemical Engineering, 7491 Trondheim, Norway Abstract The minimum energy requirements of six different heat

Skogestad, Sigurd

212

Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Miller, Mark L.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

E. Pasyuk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nakayasu accepts 2013 M.T. Thomas Award | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff NUG 2012Nakayasu accepts 2013

217

EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ Contract ESPC IDIQ ContractConsumer Acceptance Group A Breakout

218

EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ Contract ESPC IDIQ ContractConsumer Acceptance Group A

219

EV Everywhere … Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement Tuesday, September 25-- Consumer Acceptance and

220

CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, andAnalysis1 SolelyCHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA: CommentsEnergy 13, 1968:CampMarissaMarkAcceptance

222

The Potato Radius: a Lower Minimum Size for Dwarf Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational and electronic forces produce a correlation between the mass and shape of objects in the universe. For example, at an average radius of ~ 200 km - 300 km, the icy moons and rocky asteroids of our Solar System transition from a rounded potato shape to a sphere. We derive this potato-to-sphere transition radius -- or "potato radius" -- from first principles. Using the empirical potato radii of asteroids and icy moons, we derive a constraint on the yield strength of these bodies during their formative years when their shapes were determined. Our proposed ~ 200 km potato radius for icy moons would substantially increase the number of trans-Neptunian objects classified as dwarf planets.

Lineweaver, Charles H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

J 4.8 MODELING THE TALLAHASSEE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ANOMALY Kelly G. Godsey*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 J 4.8 MODELING THE TALLAHASSEE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ANOMALY Kelly G. Godsey* 1,2 , Henry E author address: Kelly G. Godsey, NWS, Morristown, TN 37814; email: Kelly.Godsey@noaa.gov #12;2 Fig. 1

Fuelberg, Henry

224

From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Hallam, Steven

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The affine rank minimization problem consists of finding a matrix of minimum rank that satisfies a given system of linear equality constraints. Such problems have appeared in the literature of a diverse set of fields ...

Recht, Benjamin

226

A Cycle Augmentation Algorithm for Minimum Cost Multicommodity Flows on a Ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cycle Augmentation Algorithm for Minimum Cost Multicommodity Flows on a Ring Bruce Shepherd bshep of Ford and Fulkerson [5]. We mention that a similar state of affairs held for generalized

Shepherd, Bruce

227

MINIMUM REJECTION SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi and Mark J. Coates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINIMUM REJECTION SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi and Mark J. Coates Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering McGill University Montreal, QC, Canada E-mail: nahid.saberi

228

Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy-efficient

Khan, Maleq

229

IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

230

Online Supplement to "Bounding Distributions for the Weight of a Minimum Spanning Tree in Stochastic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Supplement to "Bounding Distributions for the Weight of a Minimum Spanning Tree in Stochastic Networks" Kevin R. Hutson · Douglas R. Shier Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, Denison

Shier, Douglas R.

231

Statistical Analysis and Time Series Models for Minimum/Maximum Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, thereby reducing the adverse effect of global warming in the Antarctic Peninsula. Keywords that the observed increase in the minimum temperatures is a consequence of human activity rather than natural causes

Sidorov, Nikita

232

Double active shielded magnetic field gradient design with minimum inductance method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Physics DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Approved as to style and content by: F. R. Huson (Chair of Committee) Steve Wry (Member) Edward...

Wang, Xu

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

History of Uranium-233(sup233U)Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant. In support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the processing of Uranium-233 at the Rocky Flats Plant (Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site). The information may be used to meet Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)and for determining potential Uranium-233 content in applicable residue waste streams.

Moment, R.L.; Gibbs, F.E.; Freiboth, C.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Accepted Manuscript Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco-Environmental assessment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco- Environmental assessment Corre O, Feidt M, Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco- Environmental assessment of cleaner ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 CARBON FOOTPRINT AND EMERGY COMBINATION FOR ECO- ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF CLEANER

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the ASHRAE 55 adaptive models 90% acceptabilityASHRAE comfort database, it was possible to de?ne 80% and 90%90% thermal acceptability was found within the prescriptions of the ASHRAE

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Dynamic Localized Minimum-Energy Agent Tree-Based Data Dissemination Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Dynamic Localized Minimum-Energy Agent Tree-Based Data Dissemination Scheme for Wireless Sensor this prob- lem by proposing a minimum-energy tree-based data dissemination scheme, Dynamic Localized Minimum-Energy Agent Tree-Based Scheme (DLATS). We exploit the fact that sensor nodes are stationary and location

Holliday, JoAnne

237

1906 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 53, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2005 Minimum-Energy Multicast in Mobile Ad Hoc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in polynomial time, in sharp con- trast with the NP-hardness of constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree with a single tree is presented. The minimum energy-per-bit for multicasting with routing is found by an integer in the Steiner tree literature, can now be interpreted as the optimization for minimum energy multicasting

Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

238

TECHNICAL REPORT TR-09-04, UC DAVIS, SEPTEMBER 2009. 1 Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL REPORT TR-09-04, UC DAVIS, SEPTEMBER 2009. 1 Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive guarantee for constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree, which transforms the multicast problem load of the primary network on the minimum-energy multicast tree. I. INTRODUCTION Multicast can provide

Islam, M. Saif

239

Strain energy minimum and vibrational properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes Suchitra Konduri, Sanjoy Mukherjee, and Sankar Nair*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strain energy minimum and vibrational properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes study the origin of the strain energy minimum in a single-walled aluminosilicate nanotube via a har- persity in the nanotube diameter is explained in terms of a minimum in the strain energy due

Nair, Sankar

240

Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software project Westronics Driver acceptance test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acceptance test for the Westronics driver. This driver connects the Westronics Smart Multiplexer with the TMACS monitoring system.

Glasscock, J.A.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

la República, Uruguay, Montevideo 11200, Uruguay, and Accounting and Finance Department, Norte Construcciones, Punta del Este, Maldonado 20100, Uruguay Luis Fuentes García Departamento de Métodos Matemáticos

Colominas, Ignasi

242

Accept Reject Accept Reject  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. publication 420-012 Introduction Aquaculture, the practice of growing finfish and shell- fish under controlled America farmed fish for food and rec- reation prior to 2000 BC. They constructed ponds and raised fish much as fish are raised today. Both freshwa- ter and saltwater fish are currently raised commercially

Liskiewicz, Maciej

243

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison this article as: Gascoin N, Navarro-Rodriguez A, Gillard P, Mangeot A, Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene.polymdegradstab.2012.05.008 #12;M ANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics Lida Jauregui transformer top-oil thermal models are examined vis-à-vis training with measured data. Acceptability is unacceptable for model identification purposes. The linear top-oil model is acceptable for FOFA transformers

245

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

Becken, G.W.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

247

Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication accepte: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997Communication acceptée: Healthy Buildings/IAQ'97 Washington DC, septembre 1997 DISCRIMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC manuscript, published in "4th International Conference on Healthy Buildings'97, Washington : United States

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

On the origin of the low temperatures resistivity minimum in Cr thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient, ? and R{sub H}, in Cr films of different thicknesses grown on MgO (100) substrates, as a function of temperature T and applied magnetic field H. The results show a low temperature minimum in ?(T), which is thickness dependent. From 40?K to 2?K, the Hall coefficient is a monotonous increasing function as T is reduced with no particular signature at the temperature T{sub min} where the minimum develops. We explain the resistivity minimum assuming an imperfect nesting of the Fermi surface leading to small electron and hole pockets. We introduce a phenomenological model which supports this simple physical picture.

Osquiguil, E.; Tosi, L.; Kaul, E. E.; Balseiro, C. A. [Centro Atmico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisin Nacional de Energa Atmica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

RH-TRU Waste Characterization by Acceptable Knowledge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is conducting an effort to characterize approximately 620 drums of remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste currently in its inventory that were generated at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) between 1971 and 1995. The waste was generated at the AGHCF during the destructive examination of irradiated and unirradiated fuel pins, targets, and other materials from reactor programs at ANL-West (ANL-W) and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors. In support of this effort, Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure (formerly IT Corporation) developed an acceptable knowledge (AK) collection and management program based on existing contact-handled (CH)-TRU waste program requirements and proposed RH-TRU waste program requirements in effect in July 2001. Consistent with Attachments B-B6 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) and th e proposed Class 3 permit modification (Attachment R [RH-WAP] of this permit), the draft AK Summary Report prepared under the AK procedure describes the waste generating process and includes determinations in the following areas based on AK: physical form (currently identified at the Waste Matrix Code level); waste stream delineation; applicability of hazardous waste numbers for hazardous waste constituents; and prohibited items. In addition, the procedure requires and the draft summary report contains information supporting determinations in the areas of defense relationship and radiological characterization.

Schulz, C.; Givens, C.; Bhatt, R.; Whitworth, J.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

New current control concept -- Minimum time current control in the three-phase PWM converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a new current controller that guarantees the fastest transient response is proposed. The basic concept is to find the optimal control voltage for tracking the reference current with minimum time under the voltage limit constraint. Though this minimum time control concept is also applicable to all the machine drive systems, this paper focuses on the current regulation in the three-phase pulse width modulation (PWM) converter. In the simulation and experimental results, it is observed that the proposed controller has much less transient time than the conventional synchronous PI regulator and the performance of the dc link voltage control is also greatly improved with the proposed current controller.

Choi, J.W. [LG Industrial Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sul, S.K. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). School of Electrical Engineering

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

255

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Bachelor of Science with Major in Geology (Minimum of 120 credits required)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science with Major in Geology (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree is designed for students planning professional careers in geology, hydrogeology work in geology, geosciences and environmental science. Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students

Fernandez, Eduardo

257

Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Geology (Earth Science) is designed for students planning professional 2053 & 2048L 5 College Algebra MAC 1105 3 Introductory Statistics STA 2023 3 Total 19 Geology (Earth

Belogay, Eugene A.

258

HIGH-LEVEL MULTI-STEP INVERTER OPTIMIZATION, USING A MINIMUM NUMBER OF POWER TRANSISTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH-LEVEL MULTI-STEP INVERTER OPTIMIZATION, USING A MINIMUM NUMBER OF POWER TRANSISTORS. Juan 56-41-246-999 e-mail lmoran@renoir.die.udec.cl ABSTRACT Multilevel inverters with a large number-5]. Multi-level inverters can operate not only with PWM techniques but also with amplitude modulation (AM

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

259

Exploiting Schedule Slacks for RateOptimal PowerMinimum Software Pipelining #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­engineered compiler on Wattch power simulator, we observe that our approach can reduce dynamic energy consumptionExploiting Schedule Slacks for Rate­Optimal Power­Minimum Software Pipelining # Hongbo Yang + R systems de­ mand new compiler techniques geared toward both high performance and low power. Software

Gao, Guang R.

260

Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial Chang Woo Kang to derive sizing rules for buffered chains, which optimize the overall energy-delay product. Categories result in a poor solution in terms of the energy-delay product. The focus of this work is on multi

Pedram, Massoud

263

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 8, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 985 Minimum Energy Coding in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which minimizes the total energy consumption by controlling the radio power, is developed. Numerical Networks (WSNs). Energy consumption and reliability are analyzed for two coding schemes: Minimum Energy ME with respect to energy consumption and bit error rate. It is concluded that MME is more energy

Johansson, Karl Henrik

264

Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude estimator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude In this paper we investigate the enhancement of speech by applying MMSE short-time spectral magnitude estimation on the quality of enhanced speech, and find that this method works better with speech uncertainty. Finally we

265

Comparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

second fast latitude scan (near the solar maximum) with the wave observations during the first fast Experiments (URAP) of Ulysses during its first orbit, which occurred when the solar activity was approachingComparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum: Ulysses

California at Berkeley, University of

266

Achieving MinimumCost Multicast: A Decentralized Approach Based on Network Coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a monetary or energy cost must be paid for each link usage) and the other that applies for strictly convex­to­point links, and consider the problem of minimum­energy multicast in wireless networks as well as the case generally means finding the shortest tree connecting a set of points in a directed graph; in other words

Médard, Muriel

267

MinimumEnergy Mobile Wireless Networks Revisited Li Li Joseph Y. Halpern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at maximum power. Transmitting at maximum power requires a great deal of energy. To minimize energy usage, we for a graph to have this minimum­energy property. We use this characterization to construct a protocol called, SMECN has lower link main­ tenance costs than MECN and can achieve a significant saving in energy usage

Li, Li Erran

268

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 026115 (2012) Optimizing controllability of complex networks by minimum structural perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Beijing 100875, China 2 School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University the practical usage of our approach, its implementation elucidates, interestingly, the intricate relationship dynamics, which is based on the classical control and graph theories [9­11]. The basic goal of the minimum

Lai, Ying-Cheng

269

String method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

York University, New York, New York 10012 Giovanni Ciccottid INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica in the free energy. Provided that the number of collective variables is large enough, the new techniqueString method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces Luca

Van Den Eijnden, Eric

270

The Potato Radius: a Lower Minimum Size for Dwarf Planets Charles H. Lineweaver & Marc Norman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Potato Radius: a Lower Minimum Size for Dwarf Planets Charles H. Lineweaver & Marc Norman a rounded potato shape to a sphere. We derive this potato-to-sphere transition radius -- or "potato radius" -- from first principles. Using the empirical potato radii of asteroids and icy moons, we derive

Lineweaver, Charles H.

271

eVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, to pedestrians has become an important issue for public policy [1], car a localization paradigm to test the detectability of hybrid and internal combustion cars by measuring listenereVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars. Ryan

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

272

A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding Huan-Xiang Zhoua; published online 20 May 2008 Master equations are widely used for modeling protein folding. Here- ceptual and quantitative models for protein folding.1­15 In such models, the conformational space

Weston, Ken

273

Autopilot for a Nonlinear Non-Minimum Phase Tail-Controlled Missile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autopilot for a Nonlinear Non-Minimum Phase Tail-Controlled Missile Anshu Narang controlled missiles: 1. Exploiting the full physical capabilities of the missile system Fulfilling demanding aerodynamics is expensive and inaccurate Only certain states can be measured #12;3 Acceleration Control

Valasek, John

274

A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen Computer are a popular method for acquiring three-dimensional geometry due to their accuracy and robustness. Maximizing a two camera range scanner design, specifically chosen to minimize calibration complexity and cost

Stanford University

275

Requirements for the MINOR in Environmental Science Five courses required. Total credits = minimum of 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements for the MINOR in Environmental Science Five courses required. Total credits = minimum to Environmental Science OR NRC 100 Environment and Society OR GEO-SCI 100 Global Environmental Change Select two (2) of following four courses ENVIRSCI 213 Introduction to Environmental Policy ENVIRSCI 214

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

276

Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints Yoni in a fast circuit by the same factor does not yield an energy-efficient design, and we characterize efficient. A design implementation is considered to be energy efficient when it has the highest performance

Kolodny, Avinoam

277

The Blob Code is Competitive with EdgeSets in Genetic Algorithms for the Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with those of, a GA that encodes spanning trees as edge-sets on Euclidean instances of the minimum rout- ing Spanning Tree Problem Bryant A. Julstrom Department of Computer Science St. Cloud State University St. Cloud, MN, 56301 USA julstrom@stcloudstate.edu ABSTRACT Among the many codings of spanning trees

Julstrom, Bryant A.

278

The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work David Levinson a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work David Levinson a, , Ahmed El-Geneidy b,1 economic theory, this suggests locators wish to locate on the frontier with the largest residential lot to be uniform, we cannot assume that all possible home­work pairs are on the frontier. This finding, developed

Levinson, David M.

279

LOWER BOUNDS ON THE GLOBAL MINIMUM OF A M. GHASEMI, J.B. LASSERRE, M. MARSHALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOWER BOUNDS ON THE GLOBAL MINIMUM OF A POLYNOMIAL M. GHASEMI, J.B. LASSERRE, M. MARSHALL Abstract. We extend the method of Ghasemi and Marshall [SIAM. J. Opt. 22(2) (2012), pp 460-473], to obtain compare this bound with the (global) lower bound fgp ob- tained by Ghasemi and Marshall, and also

Marshall, Murray

280

Power Controlled Minimum Frame Length Scheduling in TDMA Wireless Networks with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Controlled Minimum Frame Length Scheduling in TDMA Wireless Networks with Sectored Antennas controlled min- imum frame length scheduling for TDMA wireless networks. Given a set of one-hop transmission scheduling and power control was first addressed by Tamer and Ephremides in [1, 2]. Given a set of one

Arabshahi, Payman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The stackelberg minimum spanning tree game on planar and bounded-treewidth graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Stackelberg Minimum Spanning Tree Game is a two-level combinatorial pricing problem introduced at WADS07. The game is played on a graph, whose edges are colored either red or blue, and where the red edges have a given ...

Cardinal, Jean

282

BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION F12 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION ­ F12 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Ph.D. (hernan@umich.edu) Biomedical Imaging: BIOMEDE 5161 Medical Imaging Systems (3) (I)2 General: BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I

Kamat, Vineet R.

283

BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION F11 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION ­ F11 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Ph.D. (hernan@umich.edu) Biomedical Imaging: BIOMEDE 5161 Medical Imaging Systems (3) (I)2 General: BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I

Eustice, Ryan

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance scintillator detector Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

THE DEUTERON Summary: the experiment 003 experimental setup. Experiment003 used the Saskatchewan-Alberta Large AcceptanceDetector... .1 SALAD E scintillator geometry in GEANT. . ....

285

Acceptance test report, 241-AW air inlet filter station pressure decay test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the acceptance test report for pressure decay tests performed on newly-installed 241-AW Tank Farm primary ventilation system air inlet filter stations.

Tuck, J.A.

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Systems acceptance and operability testing for rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for the system acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling system, modified for use in flammable gas tanks.

Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - air movement acceptability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Theory Disposal: Science and Theory Summary: in animal feed Transportation logistics Movement of infectious material Reluctance to accept... methods...

288

ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing -...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance product specifications Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we... the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis acceptance criteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

also did not result in acceptable criteria. In general... Analysis (PVA) approachphilosophy; and (5) explicitly identify the ... Source: Alaska Fisheries Science Center...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance criteria analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

also did not result in acceptable criteria. In general... Analysis (PVA) approachphilosophy; and (5) explicitly identify the ... Source: Alaska Fisheries Science Center...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance threshold hypothesis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for threshold... Parametrization of the increase of the aeolian erosion threshold wind friction velocity due to soil... February 1998 Revised: 11 May 1998 Accepted: 25...

293

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of these rules is to protect public health and the environment by establishing minimum standards for the proper location, design, construction and maintenance of onsite wastewater...

294

A Procedure for Determination of Degradation Acceptance Criteria for Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory since 2007 to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This collaboration program aims at providing technical support to a five-year KAERI research project, which includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment: (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. The understanding and assessment of age-related degradations of structures, systems, and components and their impact on plant safety is the major goal of this KAERI-BNL collaboration. Four annual reports have been published before this report as a result of the collaboration research.

Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Hahm, D.; Choi, I-K.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

DEPENDENT PROOF DOCUMENT REQUIREMENTS Use the chart below to determine acceptable proof documentation. Submit a copy of the proof  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#3790 for examples Biological Child Birth Certificate of Biological Child, if Birth Certificate Agreement for an adopted child, or Birth Certificate Stepchild Child's Birth Certificate stating the child Partner Child's Birth Certificate showing the child's biological or adoptive parent. UNM Affidavit

New Mexico, University of

296

PROJECT GOALS Determine what simple measures could be introduced to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they would be willing to accept and at what cost TYPE OF PROJECT International Alliance of ResearchPROJECT GOALS · Determine what simple measures could be introduced to Bruce Hall's dining options available at Bruce Hall DESCRIPTION The Bruce Hall Dining Project investigated the sustainable practices

297

Talanta 63 (2004) 12131223 Immunochemical determination of dioxins in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Talanta 63 (2004) 1213­1223 Immunochemical determination of dioxins in sediment and serum samples; received in revised form 27 April 2004; accepted 7 May 2004 Abstract Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins the application of an immunoassay that uses 2,3,7-trichloro-8-methyldibenzo-p-dioxin (TMDD) as a surrogate

Hammock, Bruce D.

298

The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study Four courses at the 3000/4000 level from any faculty A minimumThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length) and Statistics 1770. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

Seldin, Jonathan P.

299

DOE Accepted Carriers Date: April 8, 2008 POC: Dave Lopez, MA-30  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airline 24 Air Arabia United Arab Emirates ICAO Designated Cat 1 Carrier 25 Air Astana Kazakhstan IATA Inc United States DoD-Accepted Air Carrier 36 Air Charters Inc United States DOE-Accepted Charter 37 with United Airlines & IATA Member 39 Air Creebec, Inc. Canada ICAO Designated Cat 1 Carrier 40 Air Deccan

300

Sociobiology in Sweden from taboo to partial acceptance Birgitta S. Tullberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sociobiology in Sweden­ from taboo to partial acceptance Birgitta S. Tullberg Department of Zoology Stockholm University S-10691 Stockholm Sweden Svante Folin Army Museum Stockholm Sweden Abstract. In a secularized country such as Sweden one could perhaps expect that sociobiology was readily accepted as another

Tullberg, Birgitta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT The behaviour of Rare-Earth Elements, Zr and Hf during biologically-mediated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 The behaviour of Rare-Earth Elements, Zr and Hf during.a,b* , Cangemi M.a , Brusca L.c , Madonia P.c , Saiano F.d , Zuddas P.e a) Department of Earth and Marine at the solid-liquid interface influencing the distribution of trace elements onto microbial surfaces. Since

302

2007 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report Status: Accepted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report Status: Accepted Date Accepted: 08/27/08 2007 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report 1 to programming and a re-newed vision to Colorado Extension work. The changing economy resulted in a new emphasis

303

Accepted Manuscript Title: Evolving a Bayesian Classifier for ECG-based Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Title: Evolving a Bayesian Classifier for ECG-based Age Classification, A. Saad, B. Litt, G. Vachtsevanos, Evolving a Bayesian Classifier for ECG-based Age Classification that apply to the journal pertain. #12;AcceptedManuscript 1 Evolving a Bayesian Classifier for ECG-based Age

Litt, Brian

304

Device Sizing for Minimum Energy Operation in Subthreshold Circuits Benton H. Calhoun, Alice Wang, and Anantha Chandrakasan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Minimum Energy Sizing influences the energy consumption of a circuit in two primary ways. First, sizing have low energy as the primary concern instead of performance. Minimum energy operation for low directly affects energy consumption by changing switched capacitance and leakage current. Sec- ondly

Calhoun, Benton H.

305

Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc- demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their implementation. We highlight of an 'energy aware' link cache for storing this information. We also compare the performance of an on-demand

Brown, Timothy X.

306

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

Michalek, Jeremy J.

307

Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

Lechtenberg, Thomas (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Communication: Minimum in the thermal conductivity of supercooled water: A computer simulation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a computer simulation study of the thermodynamic properties and the thermal conductivity of supercooled water as a function of pressure and temperature using the TIP4P-2005 water model. The thermodynamic properties can be represented by a two-structure equation of state consistent with the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the supercooled region. Our simulations confirm the presence of a minimum in the thermal conductivity, not only at atmospheric pressure, as previously found for the TIP5P water model, but also at elevated pressures. This anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water appears to be related to the maximum of the isothermal compressibility or the minimum of the speed of sound. However, the magnitudes of the simulated thermal conductivities are sensitive to the water model adopted and appear to be significantly larger than the experimental thermal conductivities of real water at low temperatures.

Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Chemical Physics Section, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom and Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Biddle, J. W.; Sengers, J. V.; Anisimov, M. A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

A minimum hypothesis explanation for an IMF with a lognormal body and power law tail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a minimum hypothesis model for an IMF that resembles a lognormal distribution at low masses but has a distinct power-law tail. Even if the central limit theorem ensures a lognormal distribution of condensation masses at birth, a power-law tail in the distribution arises due to accretion from the ambient cloud, coupled with a non-uniform (exponential) distribution of accretion times.

Shantanu Basu; C. E. Jones

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Feedback control design for smooth, near-minimum time rotational maneuvers of flexible spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' Rest ? to-Rest Maneuver LQR Control: 15' Rest ? to-Rest Maneuver Initial Displacement Angle vs. Maneuver Time Minimum Time and LQR Control Control Profiles and Frequency Spectra Smoothing Functions Smooth Feedback Control with Parabolic Switching... is approximated by the hyperbolic tangent (tanh) function. The parabolic switching line associated with the rigid body control is replaced by one which, also using the hyperbolic tangent function, exploits the symmetry of the rigid body state trajectory about...

Byers, Robert Michael

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

System and method employing a minimum distance and a load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types, each of the different electric load types including a first load feature vector having at least four different load features; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; determining a second load feature vector comprising at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the different electric loads; and identifying by a processor one of the different electric load types by determining a minimum distance of the second load feature vector to the first load feature vector of the different electric load types of the load feature database.

Lu, Bin; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

THINNING OF THE SUN'S MAGNETIC LAYER: THE PECULIAR SOLAR MINIMUM COULD HAVE BEEN PREDICTED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar magnetic activity cycle causes changes in the Sun on timescales that are equivalent to human lifetimes. The minimum solar activity that preceded the current solar cycle (cycle 24) was deeper and quieter than any other recent minimum. Using data from the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), we show that the structure of the solar sub-surface layers during the descending phase of the preceding cycle (cycle 23) was very different from that during cycle 22. This leads us to believe that a detailed examination of the data would have led to the prediction that the cycle 24 minimum would be out of the ordinary. The behavior of the oscillation frequencies allows us to infer that changes in the Sun that affected the oscillation frequencies in cycle 23 were localized mainly to layers above about 0.996 R{sub Sun }, depths shallower than about 3000 km. In cycle 22, on the other hand, the changes must have also occurred in the deeper-lying layers.

Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Role of pilot projects and public acceptance in developing wireless power transmission as an enabling technology for space solar power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In all system concepts for delivering space solar power to terrestrial power systems, wireless power transmission (WPT) is identified as a critical link in the technology chain. To realize the full potential of WPT as an enabling technology for the development of space power systems, the technology needs to (1) be demonstrated as a commercially viable, low risk technology, and (2) be shown to be acceptable to the public. If WPT`s full potential is to be realized, its initial applications must be carefully chosen and demonstrated through a series of pilot projects which will develop both the technology and its public acceptance. This paper examines the role of pilot projects and how they will play an increasingly important role in the development and acceptance of WPT as an enabling technology for space solar power systems. Recognizing that public acceptance is the ultimate determinant of the commercial success or failure of a technology, the paper then explores the role of public opinion in the commercialization process of space solar power systems utilizing WPT. A framework that begins to define the process required to realize the full commercial potential of wireless power transmission is established. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Woodell, M.I. [Bivings Woodell, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)] [Bivings Woodell, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Schupp, B.W. [Raytheon Electronic Systems, Marlborough, MA (United States)] [Raytheon Electronic Systems, Marlborough, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Method for Determining Optimal Residential Energy Efficiency Retrofit Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Businesses, government agencies, consumers, policy makers, and utilities currently have limited access to occupant-, building-, and location-specific recommendations for optimal energy retrofit packages, as defined by estimated costs and energy savings. This report describes an analysis method for determining optimal residential energy efficiency retrofit packages and, as an illustrative example, applies the analysis method to a 1960s-era home in eight U.S. cities covering a range of International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate regions. The method uses an optimization scheme that considers average energy use (determined from building energy simulations) and equivalent annual cost to recommend optimal retrofit packages specific to the building, occupants, and location. Energy savings and incremental costs are calculated relative to a minimum upgrade reference scenario, which accounts for efficiency upgrades that would occur in the absence of a retrofit because of equipment wear-out and replacement with current minimum standards.

Polly, B.; Gestwick, M.; Bianchi, M.; Anderson, R.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Judkoff, R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Multi-discipline Waste Acceptance Process at the Nevada National Security Site - 13573  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site low-level radioactive waste disposal facility acceptance process requires multiple disciplines to ensure the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. These disciplines, which include waste acceptance, nuclear criticality, safety, permitting, operations, and performance assessment, combine into the overall waste acceptance process to assess low-level radioactive waste streams for disposal at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. Four waste streams recently highlighted the integration of these disciplines: the Oak Ridge Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project material, West Valley Melter, and classified waste. (authors)

Carilli, Jhon T. [US Department Of Energy, Nevada Site Office, P. O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 (United States)] [US Department Of Energy, Nevada Site Office, P. O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 (United States); Krenzien, Susan K. [Navarro-Intera, LLC, P. O. Box 98952, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8952 (United States)] [Navarro-Intera, LLC, P. O. Box 98952, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8952 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method for determining formation quality factor from seismic data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for calculating the quality factor Q from a seismic data trace. The method includes calculating a first and a second minimum phase inverse wavelet at a first and a second time interval along the seismic data trace, synthetically dividing the first wavelet by the second wavelet, Fourier transforming the result of the synthetic division, calculating the logarithm of this quotient of Fourier transforms and determining the slope of a best fit line to the logarithm of the quotient.

Taner, M. Turhan; Treitel, Sven

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Acceptable approaches for beneficial use of cement kiln dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One beneficial use of cement kiln dust (CKD) is application of CKD to cropland as agricultural lime or fertilizer. However, the EPA has expressed a concern over land application of CKD when the metals constituents in the CKD are above the industry-wide median levels presented in EPA`s Report to Congress on Cement Kiln Dust. Under the Clean Water Act, EPA has established limits for metals concentrations in sewage sludge that is applied to the land for beneficial use of the nitrogen in the sludge. The limits for land application of sewage sludge were established based on the results of exposure risk assessments. A comparison of the median industry-wide metals concentrations in CKD to the metals concentration limits for land application of sewage sludge indicates that all trace metal concentrations IN CKD are below the corresponding sewage sludge land application limit, with the exception of the median level of arsenic from one data set. EPA has determined that land application of CKD with metals concentration limits at or below the industry-wide median concentrations does not pose a significant human cancer or non-cancer health risk. Therefore, with appropriate limits, CKD can be beneficially reused for land application on agricultural land in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.

Schreiber, R.J.; Smeenk, S.D. [Schreiber, Yonley and Associates, St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across...

323

Geologic Storage of carbon dioxide : risk analyses and implications for public acceptance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology has the potential to enable large reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, but one of the unanswered questions about CCS is whether it will be accepted by the public. In ...

Singleton, Gregory R. (Gregory Randall)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptability asme section Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acceptability asme section Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Model Checking Abstract State Machines Marc Spielmann Summary: , for example, ASMs defined by means of a single rule of the...

325

Project W-320, tank 241-C-106 sluicing acceptance for beneficial use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify the Project W-320 Chiller Documentation required to be turned over from the Projects Organization to Tank Farm Operations as part of the acceptance of the new equipment for beneficial use.

BAILEY, J.W.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Applicant Accepts Application Instructions Page 1 Sustainable Energy Revolving Loan Fund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_________________ Applicant Accepts Application Instructions Page 1 Sustainable Energy Revolving Loan Fund INFORMATION & INSTRUCTIONS FOR APPLICANTS Introduction The Sustainable Energy Revolving Loan sustainable energy projects at Oregon State University. Projects should provide student learning opportunities

Escher, Christine

327

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic modelling of high density polyethylene pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction of existing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic modelling of high density polyethylene pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction density polyethylene pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction of existing detailed mechanism, Polymer Degradation Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction of existing detailed mechanism. N

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Dependability and acceptability of handheld computers in school-based data collection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given the increasing influence of technology and the explosion in data collection demands, the acceptance and assimilation of new paradigms and technologies require todays educators, researchers, and evaluators to select appropriate tools and apply...

Adiguzel, Tufan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION 1 Stochastic Information Management in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy sup- ply for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in the foreseeable future. However, to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in energy consumption, electricity customers have beenIEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION 1 Stochastic Information

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

330

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) Substation C3-3 Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to demonstrate that the newly installed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system functions as intended by the design.

ZAKRAJSEK, M.F.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Accepted Manuscript Studying the sensitivity of the pollutants concentrations caused by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based sensitivity analysis, Sobol' bal sensitivity indices, Air pollution modeling, Multidimensional numericalAccepted Manuscript Studying the sensitivity of the pollutants concentrations caused by variations. Georgieva, S. Ivanovska, T. Ostromsky, Z. Zlatev, Studying the sensitivity of the pollutants concentrations

Dimov, Ivan

332

Acceptance test report for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Report is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System. This test verified that the data logger and data converter for the gamma detector system functions as intended.

Dowell, J.L.

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance criteria ntswac Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The bit noise must be 0 +- 4 bitsOK 1.9.2 ADC Noise at zero... conditions as test 1.9.2). Acceptance criteria: Check for a continuous response, no discontinuity...

334

New cost structure approach in green buildings : cost-benefit analysis for widespread acceptance and long-term practice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the concepts of sustainable building have been widely accepted in the market, there are unavoidable challenges toward widespread acceptance and long-term practice. Crossing green building development, there is ...

Wang, Zhiyong, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dynamic Conic Finance: Pricing and Hedging in Market Models with Transaction Costs via Dynamic Coherent Acceptability Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a theoretical framework for determining dynamic ask and bid prices of derivatives using the theory of dynamic coherent acceptability indices in discrete time. We prove a version of the First Fundamental Theorem of Asset Pricing using the dynamic coherent risk measures. We introduce the dynamic ask and bid prices of a derivative contract in markets with transaction costs. Based on these results, we derive a representation theorem for the dynamic bid and ask prices in terms of dynamically consistent sequence of sets of probability measures and risk-neutral measures. To illustrate our results, we compute the ask and bid prices of some path-dependent options using the dynamic Gain-Loss Ratio.

Bielecki, Tomasz R; Iyigunler, Ismail; Rodriguez, Rodrigo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Department of Physics and the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer`s (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing.

Pedersen, L.T.

1998-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Correlation in fermion or boson systems as the minimum of entropy relative to all free states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of many-fermion systems, "correlation" refers to the inadequacy of an independent-particle model. Using "free" states as archetypes of our independent-particle model, we have proposed a measure of correlation that we called "nonfreeness" [Int. J. Quant. Inf. 5, 815 (2007)]. The nonfreeness of a many-fermion state was defined to be its entropy relative to the unique free state with the same 1-matrix. In this article, we prove that the nonfreeness of a state is the minimum of its entropy relative to all free states. We also extend the definition of nonfreeness to many-boson states and discuss a couple of examples.

Alex D. Gottlieb; Norbert J. Mauser

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

The secondary minimum in YY Her: Evidence for a tidally distorted giant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present and analyze quiescent UBVRI light curves of the classical symbiotic binary YY Her. We show that the secondary minimum, which is clearly visible only in the quiescent VRI light curves, is due to ellipsoidal variability of the red giant component. Our simple light curve analysis, by fitting of the Fourier cosine series, resulted in a self-consistent phenomenological model of YY Her, in which the periodic changes can be described by a combination of the ellipsoidal changes and a sinusoidal changes of the nebular continuum and line emission.

J. Mikolajewska; E. A. Kolotilov; S. Yu. Shugarov; B. F. Yudin

2002-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

TRU (transuranic) waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of contact-handled wastes retrieved from storage to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid defense wastes retrieved from storage at DOE sites meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated CH waste to be shipped to the WIPP are addressed in another document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Determination of fracture toughness of AZ31 Mg alloy using the cohesive finite element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of fracture toughness of AZ31 Mg alloy using the cohesive finite element method X Received in revised form 21 June 2012 Accepted 11 August 2012 Keywords: Fracture toughness Cohesive finite is to develop a micromechanical approach for determining the fracture toughness. A phase-field model for grain

Chen, Long-Qing

342

A Mandated Minimum Competency Testing Program and Its Impact on Learning Disabled Students: Curricular Validity and Comparative Performances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, LD specialists, regular class teachers, and parents of LD students judged that the objectives of the Kansas Minimum Competency Specifications prescribed for nonhandicapped students were applicable to LD ...

Meyen, Edward L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Scannell, Dale P.; Harnden, G. Mack; Miller, Kelly F.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Diversity and Spatial Distribution of Hydrazine Oxidoreductase (hzo) Gene in the Oxygen Minimum Zone Off Costa Rica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) as an important nitrogen loss pathway has been reported in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), but the community composition and spatial distribution of anammox bacteria in the eastern ...

Kong, Liangliang

344

Treatment Acceptability of Social Skills Programs for Children with Autism: The Influence of Ethnicity, Age, and Problem Severity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regarding treatment acceptability issues. Frederick (2002) examined the treatment acceptability of behavioral interventions, structured teaching, social skills training, and medical interventions 22 commonly used with children with autism. The influence... of age of child and problem severity on acceptability ratings was also investigated in the study. Frederick (2002) found that psychosocial treatments were ranked more favorably than medical interventions. Furthermore, Frederick (2002) found...

Fragioudakis, Maria

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy appendix B -revised 04-11.doc Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not intended for you. Computing University computing resources include but are not limited to desktops, serversAcceptable Use of IT Resources Policy appendix B - revised 04-11.doc Page 1 of 2 Acceptable Use of IT Resources (Network and Computing) Policy Appendix B Examples of the Acceptable Use of IT Resources

Qian, Ning

346

ASHRAE's Guideline 14-2002 for Measurement of Energy and Demand Savings: How to Determine What Was Really Saved by the Retrofit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed standards for the laboratory measurement of temperature, pressure, airflow, liquid flow, power, thermal energy, and the testing standards for chillers, fans, pumps, motors, boilers, and furnaces. Guideline 14 also relied on the previous work... Guideline 14-2002 to fill a need for a standard set of energy (and demand) savings calculation procedures. Guideline 14-2002 is intended to be a guideline that provides a minimum acceptable level of performance in the measurement of energy and demand...

Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Culp, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

Bernard, Jr., John A. (72 Paul Revere Rd., Needham Heights, MA 02194)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pecularities of cosmic ray modulation in the solar minimum 23/24  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study changes of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for the ending period of the solar cycle 23 and the beginning of the solar cycle 24 using neutron monitors experimental data. We show that an increase of the GCR intensity in 2009 is generally related with decrease of the solar wind velocity U, the strength B of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and the drift in negative (Aneg) polarity epoch. We present that temporal changes of rigidity dependence of the GCR intensity variation before reaching maximum level in 2009 and after it, do not noticeably differ from each other. The rigidity spectrum of the GCR intensity variations calculated based on neutron monitors data (for rigidities greaten than 10 GV) is hard in the minimum and near minimum epoch. We do not recognize any non-ordinary changes in the physical mechanism of modulation of the GCR intensity in the rigidity range of GCR particles to which neutron monitors respond. We compose 2-D non stationary model of transport equation to describe v...

Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Standards and Rebate Incentive Programs for Domestic Refrigerators in the Pacific Northwest.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refrigerator-freezers (R/Fs) and freezers (FRs) account for 16% of the electricity consumed in the residential sector of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) forecast region (Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Western Montana). After space and water heating, R/Fs are the largest residential electrical end-use. There is great potential for reducing electricity consumption in a cost-effective manner through the purchase and use of more energy-efficient R/Fs and FRs. For example, if every household in the BPA region had the best R/F model now mass-produced, the electricity savings would be about 5 billion kWh/yr, approximately the power supplied annually by 1000 MW of nuclear or coal-fired generating capacity. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and BPA recognize the savings potential from efficient R/Fs and FRs as well as the barriers to their use. In the 1983 regional power plan, the Council directed BPA to develop and implement incentive and promotion programs for efficient appliances. The NPPC also called for the evaluation of minimum efficiency standards for appliances sold in the region. In response to this directive, the Office of Conservation in BPA funded an evaluation of both rebate incentive programs and minimum efficiency standards for R/Fs and FRs. The results are presented in this report.

Geller, Howard S.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a 'best' spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere. 14 figs.

Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Visscher, W.M.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Salt spray testing of sacrificial and barrier type coatings for the purpose of finding a corrosion resistant and environmentally acceptable replacement for cadmium plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium plate is used to protect various components of offshore oil and gas production equipment from surface marine environments such as salt spray. This research project was performed to find an environmentally acceptable coating which provides equivalent or superior resistance to surface marine corrosion when compared to cadmium plate. In order to find a replacement for cadmium plate, a large number of sacrificial and barrier type coatings were exposed to an accelerated salt spray test in accordance with ASTM B117-94. The only sacrificial coating which resisted 1,000 hours of accelerated salt spray testing without any indication of failure was the 0.0006-in. thick zinc-nickel plate with an olive drab chromate treatment. Based on these test results, zinc-nickel plate is recommended as a corrosion resistant and environmentally acceptable replacement for cadmium plate for use in surface marine environments. Electroless nickel coatings with a minimum applied thickness of 0.002-in. also resisted 1,000 hours of accelerated salt spray testing without indication of failure. Electroless nickel is not recommended for corrosion resistance in salt spray environments for two reasons. Electroless nickel is susceptible to microcracking when heat treated at moderate to high temperatures. Heat treatment improves the hardness and resultant wear resistance of the coating. Microcracking will compromise the integrity of the coating resulting in pitting, cracking or crevice corrosion of the substrate in corrosive environments. Secondly, any significant mechanical damage to the coating or disbonding of the coating substrate interface will also result in corrosive attack of the substrate.

Schultz, E.J.; Haeberle, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

ENVIROCARE OF UTAH: EXPANDING WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA TO PROVIDE LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED WASTE DISPOSAL OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Envirocare of Utah operates a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility 80 miles west of Salt Lake City in Clive, Utah. Accepted waste types includes NORM, 11e2 byproduct material, Class A low-level waste, and mixed waste. Since 1988, Envirocare has offered disposal options for environmental restoration waste for both government and commercial remediation projects. Annual waste receipts exceed 12 million cubic feet. The waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the Envirocare facility have significantly expanded to accommodate the changing needs of restoration projects and waste generators since its inception, including acceptable physical waste forms, radiological acceptance criteria, RCRA requirements and treatment capabilities, PCB acceptance, and liquids acceptance. Additionally, there are many packaging, transportation, and waste management options for waste streams acceptable at Envirocare. Many subcontracting vehicles are also available to waste generators for both government and commercial activities.

Rogers, B.; Loveland, K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

Tamhane, Ajit C.

356

Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

C. Bouchiat

2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Forman, Miriam A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

The effects of R/X ratios on power system minimum loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 8 ]0 19 ' B+]40?5 Approx. 1/2 X17 Angle (degrees) I R TOTAL I X I Z I R IX IZ PZR CZ, NT LOSS ' 2?5 5 ' 0 -7 ' 5 -10 -15 2. 88 5 43 2 ' 09 2. 00 2. 54 3 ' 43 6. 69 0 ' 91 2 ~ 51 O. o3 0. 97 1. 96 3 ' 17 7 ?14 2 ~ 98 5. 99... 2. 18 2?22 3 ' 20 4. 67 9. 76 148. 0 278. 0 107. 1 103. 0 130 5 176. 0 343 ' o 144?4 139. 0 398 ' 0 278. 5 700, 5 101. 3 154 ' 0 103 ' 2 311 ~ 5 14. 9 ~ 0 504?0 216?5 1033. 0 455. 0 kt minimum point, ths system I R loss is 7. 3...

Denison, John Scott

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih, E-mail: giorgio.busoni@sissa.it, E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it, E-mail: wei-chih.huang@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

TRU waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of contact-handled wastes retrieved from storage to be shipped to the WIPP. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid defense wastes retrieved from storage at DOE sites meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). All applicable DOE orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for certified waste retrieved from certified storage are addressed in another document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Order acceptance and scheduling at a make-to-order system using revenue management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity cost for processing the order. Discrete time formulations based on stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) approach are common in RM literature [14]. The way this approach is executed is as follows. Under the assumptions of a Poisson arrival process... is rejected and is 21 accepted is compared with the profits earned by processing the order at hand. If the comparison is in favor of the order, the order is accepted, otherwise it is rejected. Following this general approach, we develop SDP formulation for our...

Jalora, Anshu

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Vaidya Solution in General Covariant Ho?ava-Lifshitz Gravity with the Minimum Coupling and without Projectability: Infrared Limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we have studied nonstationary radiative spherically symmetric spacetime, in general covariant theory ($U(1)$ extension) of {the} Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with the minimum coupling, in the post-newtonian approximation (PPN), without the projectability condition and in the infrared limit. The Newtonian prepotential $\\varphi$ was assumed null. We have shown that there is not the analogue of the Vaidya's solution in the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz Theory (HLT) with the minimum coupling, as we know in the General Relativity Theory (GRT).

O. Goldoni; M. F. A. da Silva; R. Chan; G. Pinheiro

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Two color laser fields for studying the Cooper minimum with phase-matched high-order harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We experimentally study the observation of the Cooper minimum in a semi-infinite argon-filled gas cell using two-color laser fields at wavelengths of 1400?nm and 800?nm. The experimental results show that the additional 800?nm field can change the macroscopic phase-matching condition through change of the atomic dipole phase associated with the electron in the continuum state and that this approach can be used to control the appearance of the Cooper minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum in order to study the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

Ba Dinh, Khuong, E-mail: kdinh@swin.edu.au; Vu Le, Hoang; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science and Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic 3122 (Australia)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY Thomas E create major problems that will require major mitigation efforts. #12;SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally industry believe it could constrain the penetration of gridconnected PV. The U.S. Department of Energy

Perez, Richard R.

367

Accepted Manuscript Title: Vasorelaxing Effects and Inhibition of Nitric Oxide in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CORM-319) was rendered water-soluble by reacting the iron- carbonyl with hydrogen tetrafluoroborate. We that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom Corresponding authors: Roberto Motterlini

Boyer, Edmond

368

Accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering and System Safety Analyzing the topological, electrical and reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering and System Safety Analyzing the topological, electrical and reliability characteristics of a power transmission system for identifying its critical of the system the reliability and electrical characteristics of its components. In each phase of the analysis: i

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

369

Eligibility Acceptance into the full-time Advanced Standing MSW program at SU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eligibility Acceptance into the full-time Advanced Standing MSW program at SU School of Social of Social Welfare, members of the consortium are the MSW Programs at: University at Buffalo, University University. Unique opportunity for Advanced Standing MSW students interested in social work practice

McConnell, Terry

370

Accepted in Methods Mol Biol. 2010 3D-structural models of transmembrane proteins.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transmembrane proteins is a major research area. Due to the lack of available 3D structures, automatic homology1 Accepted in Methods Mol Biol. 2010 3D-structural models of transmembrane proteins. Alexandre G proteins are macromolecules implicated in major biological process and diseases. Due to their specific

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

371

SUBJECT: ACCEPTANCE OF THE FINAL SITE OBSERVATIONAL WORK PLAN FOR THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and concludes that it is generally acceptable as DOEs proposed strategy for compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards in 40 CFR Part 192. The staffs detailed review of the Grand Junction SOWP is documented in the enclosed

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicles (PHEV), extended-range electric vehicle (EREV), battery electric vehicles (BEV) and fuel cell Vehicles by 2015 Using MA3T Model." The 26th International Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive

373

Accepted for publicaton in The Astrophysical Journal NearInfrared Spectroscopy of Molecular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: reflection --- nebulae: individual (NGC 7023) #12; -- 3 -- 1. Introduction Nearinfrared spectroscopic these authors apply to NGC 2023. We present nearinfrared spectroscopy of H 2 emission in NGC 7023, a reflectionAccepted for publicaton in The Astrophysical Journal NearInfrared Spectroscopy of Molecular

Martini, Paul

374

Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary;1 A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled- rotary kilns with secondary air flow and recycled industrial applications suggests examining the heat transfer phenomena in order to improve the multi

Boyer, Edmond

375

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geometrical effects on divertor erosion dynamics. Lithium expansion in divertor and SOL areas may potentiallyAccepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi

Harilal, S. S.

376

Accepted Manuscript Laboratory-based recording of holographic fine structure in x-ray absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be only performed using synchrotron radiation. Keywords: x-ray absorption, atomic structure, xAccepted Manuscript Laboratory-based recording of holographic fine structure in x-ray absorption structure in x-ray absorption anisotropy using polycapillary optics, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B

Korecki, Pawe³

377

LSPE Qualification and Flight Acceptance T /V Test Su.m..mary and Thermal Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. 2 5. 3 5.4 5.5 5. 6 5.7 Nodal Description Thermal Resistances Solar Heating Lunar SurfaceLSPE Qualification and Flight Acceptance T /V Test Su.m..mary and Thermal Design Final Report NO Thermal Control Systems. The report is divided into three sections. The first section introduces

Rathbun, Julie A.

378

Ultrathin, high-efficiency, broad-band, omni-acceptance, organic solar cells enhanced by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Three of central challenges in solar cells are high light coupling into solar cell, high light trappingUltrathin, high-efficiency, broad-band, omni- acceptance, organic solar cells enhanced by plasmonic and demonstration of a new ultra-thin high- efficiency organic solar cell (SC), termed "plasmonic cavity

379

ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANS. IMAGE PROCESSING. AUGUST 2007 1 EntropyControlled Quadratic Markov Measure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANS. IMAGE PROCESSING. AUGUST 2007 1 Entropy­Controlled Quadratic Markov Measure analy- sis and image editing tasks. Its importance for low-level image processing stems from several, reduction in memory requirements or error reduction will have an important impact in many image processing

Rivera, Mariano

380

Accepted Manuscript Title: Advanced computational tools for pem fuel cell design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Title: Advanced computational tools for pem fuel cell design ­ Part 1.C. Sui, S. Kumar, N. Djilali, Advanced computational tools for pem fuel cell design ­ Part 1: Development TOOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELL DESIGN ­ Part 1: Development and Base Case Simulations P.C. Sui , S. Kumar and N

Djilali, Ned

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy (February 2009). Environmental climate instruments in Romania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Accepted for publication in Energy Policy (February 2009). Environmental climate instruments by some energy- intensive sectors, such as glass and cement. Keywords: tradable permits, Romania, 2003). As in most Eastern European countries, energy consumption in Romania has undergone a significant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Accepted Manuscript High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment-Bianchi, D., Oppliger, A., High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants MANUSCRIPT Highlights Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was searched in raw and treated wastewater in Switzerland

Alvarez, Nadir

383

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic air pollutants emitted from wastewater and solids handling

384

Physical Education majors must be accepted to the College of Education Physical Education Teacher Education Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education Program Physical Education Admissions to College of Education Requirements 1. Completion of 45Physical Education majors must be accepted to the College of Education Physical Education Teacher of Education - Institution Code 5814). Praxis I information: http://www.ets.org/ 6. Compliance with College

Milchberg, Howard

385

Accepted on August 29, 2008 for publication in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The accuracy of most air pollution modeling and the efficiency of emission standard reinforcement depend and might mislead the political discussions. The European MEET (Methodologies for Estimating air pollutant1 Accepted on August 29, 2008 for publication in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management

Boyer, Edmond

386

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response, and electric vehicles. Advances in photovoltaic (PV) inverters offer new opportunitiesIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power are being challenged by reverse power flows and voltage fluctuations due to renewable generation, demand

Giannakis, Georgios

387

Acceptance test report for high pressure water jet system feed pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes results of WHC-SD-SNF-ATP-016, Rev. 0 ``Acceptance Test Procedure High Pressure Water Jet System``, conducted on December 20, 1995 and December 22, 1995. This jet supplies water at 15,000 psi @ 15 gpm to nozzles to clean surfaces of empty fuel storage canisters.

Crystal, J.B.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

University Policy 00-1 Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Policy 00-1 Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources 1.0 Purpose This policy, and other information technology resources at Wayne State University. 2.0 Guiding Principles 2 resources in a manner that recognizes both the rights and the obligations of academic freedom. 2.2 Wayne

Berdichevsky, Victor

389

GENOMIC RESOURCES NOTE Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 201331 March  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENOMIC RESOURCES NOTE Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 201331 March 2013 GENOMIC RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM,1 MATTHEW G. KING,2 SE BASTIEN RENAUT,3 LOREN H. RIESEBERG2,4 and HEATHER C. ROWE3 1 Molecular Ecology Resources Editorial Office, 6270 University Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Rieseberg, Loren

390

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE The National Cancer Institute is accepting applications for its Fall 2011 HCIP class.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE The National Cancer Institute is accepting applications for its Fall 2011 by March 1st. Apply online! See website for further details. http://hcip.nci.nih.gov The National Cancer (NIH), is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training. The NCI

Cinabro, David

391

Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article Accepted version (v1, Jul. 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article Accepted version (v1, Jul. 2012) 1 THE SG2-00725987,version1-16Oct2012 Author manuscript, published in "Solar Energy 88, 10 (2012) Pages 3072-3083" DOI : 10.1016/j.solener.2012.07.018 #12;Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance Audun Faanes and Sigurd Skogestad*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance Audun Faanes and Sigurd Skogestad* Department provides a systematic approach for the design of buffer tanks. We consider mainly the case where the objective of the buffer tank is to dampen ("average out") the fast (i.e., high- frequency) disturbances

Skogestad, Sigurd

393

Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Accepted for publication in Journal of the ACM Compositional Shape Analysis by means of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted for publication in Journal of the ACM Compositional Shape Analysis by means of Bi-Abduction. The analysis rests on a generalized form of abduction (inference of explanatory hypotheses) which we call bi-abduction. Bi-abduction displays abduction as a kind of inverse to the frame problem: it jointly infers anti

O'Hearn, Peter

395

Citizen acceptance of new fossil fuel infrastructure: Value theory and Canada's Northern Gateway Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bakken shale oil) to the Texas Gulf coast for refinement. This study explores citizen acceptance), which would transport unconventional oil (bitumen) 1,172 km from Alberta's oil sands to British Columbia Pipeline system) which would transport oil from Canada and the northern U.S. (including oil sands bitumen

396

241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

WERRY, S.M.

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Canadian and International Environmental Management Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study FourThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length in Year One. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

Seldin, Jonathan P.

398

The road to renewables : a case study of wind energy, local ownership and social acceptance at Sams.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this thesis is to investigate how local participation and local ownership enhances social acceptance of wind energy. In Norway many planned wind (more)

Jakobsen, Ina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

400

On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

Modzelewska, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Can minimum-bias distributions on transverse energy test hadron production models?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recent study reports measurements of transverse-energy $E_t$ distributions at mid-rapidity for several high-energy nuclear collision systems. The $E_t$ data are analyzed in the context of constituent-quark (CQ) participants estimated with a Glauber-model simulation. The study concludes that systematic variations of hadron and $E_t$ yields previously interpreted in terms of a two-component soft+hard model (TCM) of hadron production including a dijet (hard) contribution are actually the result of CQ participant trends with only soft production. It is claimed that deviations from linear scaling with the number of nucleon participants of hadron yields vs A-A centrality do not actually arise from dijet production as previously assumed. In the present study we examine the new $E_t$ data in the context of the TCM and compare those results with previous differential spectrum and minimum-bias correlation analysis. We present substantial evidence supporting a significant dijet contribution to all high-energy nuclear collisions consistent with the TCM and conclude that the $E_t$ data, given their systematic uncertainties, fail to support claimed CQ model interpretations.

Thomas A. Trainor

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Minimum Ultraviolet Light Dose Determination and Characterization of Stress Responses that Affect Dose for Listeria monocytogenes Suspended in Distilled Water, Fresh Brine, and Spent Brine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Foodborne illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes have long been associated with ready-to-eat (RTE) meats contaminated after the primary thermal process has been applied. It is (more)

McKinney, Julie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

Nielsen, Steven O.

405

Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based Minimum Mean-Square Error Estimators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based mean-square error es- timators have been applied to speech enhancement in the tem- poral, transform (e estimator for 8 kHz telephone-quality speech. Index Terms: Speech enhancement, minimum mean-square er- ror

406

Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral amplitude, log-spectral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral Keywords: Acoustic arrays Speech enhancement Amplitude estimation Phase estimation Parameter estimation a b on the development and implementation of speech enhancement algorithms. Whereas the current state-of-the-art methods

Johnson, Michael T.

407

Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& Map

408

In 2006 International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP). SPARSE FORWARD-BACKWARD USING MINIMUM DIVERGENCE BEAMS FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORWARD-BACKWARD USING MINIMUM DIVERGENCE BEAMS FOR FAST TRAINING OF CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELDS Chris Pal, however, training can be expensive, because it often requires many iterations of forward-backward. Beam-backward, standard beam heuristics can be danger- ous, as they can make training unstable. We introduce sparse

Pal, Chris

409

Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen increased animal activity associated with increasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. We examined faunal community responses to oxygen and organic matter gradients across the lower oxygen minimum zone (OMZ

Levin, Lisa

410

An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum Creditable Coverage Standards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum, as part of the Massachusetts Health Care Reform Law. HMO Blue New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits Williams College #12;Your Care Your Primary Care Provider. When you enroll in HMO Blue New England, you must choose

Aalberts, Daniel P.

411

The Nuclear Energy Option for the U.S.--How Far Are We from Public Acceptance?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent rise of oil and gasoline prices accompanied by reluctant acknowledgement that traditional sources of energy are limited has renewed public interest in renewable energy sources. This perspective on energy is focusing attention on and facilitating acceptance of alternative energy concepts, such as solar, wind, and biomass. The nuclear energy alternative, while clean with potentially abundant fuel supplies and associated with low costs, is burdened with the frequently negative public opinion reserved for things nuclear. Coincident with the heightened examination of alternative energy concepts, 2004 marks the 25-year anniversary of the Three Mile Island accident. Since this pivotal accident in 1979, no new reactor licenses have been granted in the U.S. The resolution of the issues of nuclear waste management and disposition are central to and may advance public discussions of the future use of nuclear energy. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently preparing the licensing application for Yucca Mountain, which was designated in 2003 as the site for a high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository in the U.S. The DOE also has been operating a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The operational status of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a repository for TRU waste was successfully realized along with the lesson learned that stakeholder trust and acceptance are as critical to the success of a repository program as the resolution of technical issues and obtaining regulatory approvals. For the five years of its operation and for decades prior, the challenge of attaining public acceptance of the WIPP has persisted for reasons aligned with the opposition to nuclear energy. Due to this commonality, the nuclear waste approach to public acceptance, with its pros and cons, provides a baseline for the examination of an approach for the public acceptance of nuclear energy in the U.S. This paper will present these concepts and discuss the future of nuclear energy in the U.S. in light of the challenge of gaining public acceptance.

Biedscheid, J.A.; Devarakonda, M.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

Das, Rhiju

413

Accepting Gifts of Building Materials Page 1 of 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 12105 Rev.: 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects and wishing to take advantage of the benefits derived from the gifting of materials, has materials for university construction projects may be accepted if the donated materials meet university and state specifications for the project for which they are donated. THE ACCEPTANCE OF GIFTED MATERIALS

Virginia Tech

414

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hochmair, H. H., Zielstra, D., and Neis, P. (accepted). Assessing the Completeness of Bicycle Trails and Designated Lane Features in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hochmair, H. H., Zielstra, D., and Neis, P. (accepted). Assessing the Completeness of Bicycle of the National Academies. Hochmair, H. H. (accepted). Assessment of Bicycle Service Areas around Transit Stations Hochmair, H.H. (2012). Identification of Bicycle Demand from Online Routing Requests. In Jekel, T., A. Car

Hill, Jeffrey E.

416

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF COMETS 8P/TUTTLE AND 17P/HOLMES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results for Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of two comets made during the minimum of solar cycle 24. The two comets, 17P/Holmes (17P) and 8P/Tuttle (8P), were very different in their activity and geometry. 17P was observed, for 30 ks right after its major outburst, on 2007 October 31 (10:07 UT), and comet 8P/Tuttle was observed in 2008 January for 47 ks. During the two Chandra observations, 17P was producing at least 100 times more water than 8P but was 2.2 times further away from the Sun. Also, 17P was at a relatively high solar latitude (+19.{sup 0}1) while 8P was observed at a lower solar latitude (3.{sup 0}4). The X-ray spectrum of 17P is unusually soft with little significant emission at energies above 500 eV. Depending on our choice of background, we derive a 300-1000 eV flux of 0.5-4.5 x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with over 90% of the emission in the 300-400 eV range. This corresponds to an X-ray luminosity between 0.4 and 3.3 x 10{sup 15} erg s{sup -1}. However, we cannot distinguish between this significant excess emission and possible instrumental effects, such as incomplete charge transfer across the CCD. 17P is the first comet observed at high latitude during solar minimum. Its lack of X-rays in the 400-1000 eV range, in a simple picture, may be attributed to the polar solar wind, which is depleted in highly charged ions. 8P/Tuttle was much brighter, with an average count rate of 0.20 counts s{sup -1} in the 300-1000 eV range. We derive an average X-ray flux in this range of 9.4 x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and an X-ray luminosity for the comet of 1.7 x 10{sup 14} erg s{sup -1}. The light curve showed a dramatic decrease in flux of over 60% between observations on January 1 and 4. When comparing outer regions of the coma to inner regions, its spectra showed a decrease in ratios of C VI/C V, O VIII/O VII, as predicted by recent solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission models. There are remarkable differences between the X-ray emission from these two comets, further demonstrating the qualities of cometary X-ray observations, and SWCX emission in general as a means of remote diagnostics of the interaction of astrophysical plasmas.

Christian, D. J. [Eureka Scientific, 2420 Delmer Ave, Suite 100, Oakland, CA, 94602 (United States); Bodewits, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lisse, C. M. [Planetary Exploration Group, Space Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Dennerl, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1603, 85740 Garching (Germany); Wolk, S. J. [Chandra X-Ray Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hsieh, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Belfast, Astronomy Research Centre, Belfast (United Kingdom); Zurbuchen, T. H.; Zhao, L. [Department of Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)], E-mail: damian.christ@gmail.com, E-mail: damian.christian@csun.edu, E-mail: Dennis.Bodewits@nasa.gov, E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: kod@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: swolk@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: h.hseih@qub.c.uk, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu, E-mail: lzh@umich.edu

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Algebraic Structure of the Minimum Error Discrimination Problem for Linearly Independent Density Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum error discrimination problem for ensembles of linearly independent pure states are known to have an interesting structure; for such a given ensemble the optimal POVM is given by the pretty good measurment of another ensemble which can be related to the former ensemble by a bijective mapping $\\mathscr{R}$ on the "space of ensembles". In this paper we generalize this result to ensembles of general linearly independent states (not necessarily pure) and also give an analytic expression for the inverse of the map, i.e., for $\\mathscr{R}^{-1}$. In the process of proving this we also simplify the necessary and sufficient conditions that a POVM needs to satisfy to maximize the probability of success for the MED of an LI ensemble of states. This simplification is then employed to arrive at a rotationally invariant necessary and sufficient conditions of optimality. Using these rotationally invariant conditions it is established that every state of a LI mixed state ensemble can be resolved to a pure state decomposition so that the corresponding pure state ensemble (corresponding to pure states of all mixed states together) has as its optimal POVM a pure state decomposition of the optimal POVM of mixed state ensemble. This gives the necessary and sufficient conditions for the PGM of a LI ensemble to be its optimal POVM; another generalization for the pure state case. Also, these rotationally invariant conditions suggest a technique to give the optimal POVM for an ensemble of LI states. This technique is polynomial in time and outpeforms standard barrier-type interior point SDP in terms of computational complexity.

Tanmay Singal; Sibasish Ghosh

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

Application of a MHD hybrid solar wind model with latitudinal dependences to Ulysses data at minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a previous work, Ulysses data was analyzed to build a complete axisymmetric MHD solution for the solar wind at minimum including rotation and the initial flaring of the solar wind in the low corona. This model has some problems in reproducing the values of magnetic field at 1 AU despite the correct values of the velocity. Here, we intend to extend the previous analysis to another type of solutions and to improve our modelling of the wind from the solar surface to 1 AU. We compare the previous results to those obtained with a fully helicoidal model and construct a hybrid model combining both previous solutions, keeping the flexibility of the parent models in the appropriate domain. From the solar surface to the Alfven, point, a three component solution for velocity and magnetic field is used, reproducing the complex wind geometry and the well-known flaring of the field lines observed in coronal holes. From the Alfven radius to 1 AU and further, the hybrid model keeps the latitudinal dependences as flexible as possible, in order to deal with the sharp variations near the equator and we use the helicoidal solution, turning the poloidal streamlines into radial ones. Despite the absence of the initial flaring, the helicoidal model and the first hybrid solution suffer from the same low values of the magnetic field at 1 AU. However, by adjusting the parameters with a second hybrid solution, we are able to reproduce both the velocity and magnetic profiles observed by Ulysses and a reasonable description of the low corona, provided that a certain amount of energy deposit exists along the flow. The present paper shows that analytical axisymmetric solutions can be constructed to reproduce the solar structure and dynamics from 1 solar radius up to 1 AU.

A. Aibeo; J. Lima; C. Sauty

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Glassy slags for minimum additive waste stabilization. Interim progress report, May 1993--February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) for supporting DOE`s environmental restoration efforts. The glassy slag waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. The MAWS approach was adopted by blending multiple waste streams to achieve up to 100% waste loadings. The crystalline phases, such as spinels, are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. These crystalline phases may account for up to 80% of the total volume of slags having over 80% metal loading. The structural bond strength model was used to quantify the correlation between glassy slag composition and chemical durability so that optimized slag compositions were obtained with limited crucible melting and testing. Slag compositions developed through crucible melts were also successfully generated in a pilot-scale Retech plasma centrifugal furnace at Ukiah, California. Utilization of glassy slag waste forms allows the MAWS approach to be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than glass waste forms. The initial work at ANL has indicated that glassy slags are good final waste forms because of (1) their high chemical durability; (2) their ability to incorporate large amounts of metal oxides; (3) their ability to incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components; (4) their less stringent requirements on processing parameters, compared to glass waste forms; and (5) their low requirements for purchased additives, which means greater waste volume reduction and treatment cost savings.

Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Gong, M.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A preliminary examination of variables which influence the public acceptance of potable water reuse applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION OF VARIABLES WHICH INFLUENCE THE PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF POTABLE WATER REUSE APPLICATIONS A Thesis MICHELE GARTEISER FOSS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... FOSS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Ronald A. Kaiser (Chair of Committee) rthur L. Sullrvan (Member) William P. Stewart...

Foss, Michele Garteiser

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Development of Waste Acceptance Criteria at 221-U Building: Initial Flow and Transport Scoping Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents numerical flow and transport simulations performed that establish initial waste acceptance criteria for the potential waste streams that may be safely sequestered in the 221-U Building and similar canyon structures. Specifically, simulations were executed to identify the maximum loading of contaminant mass (without respect to volume) that can be emplaced within the 221-U Building with no more than 1 pCi/m2 of contaminant migrating outside the structure within a 1,000 year time period. The initial scoping simulations were executed in one dimension to assess important processes, and then two dimensions to establish waste acceptance criteria. Two monolithic conditions were assessed: (1) a grouted canyon monolith; and (2) a canyon monolith filled with sand, both assuming no cracks or fissures were present to cause preferential transport. A three-staged approach was taken to account for different processes that may impact the amount of contaminant that can be safely sequestered in canyon structure. In the first stage, flow and transport simulations established waste acceptance criteria based on a linear (Kd) isotherm approach. In the second stage, impacts on thermal loading were examined and the differences in waste acceptance criteria quantified. In the third stage of modeling, precipitation/dissolution reactions were considered on the release and transport of the contaminants, and the subsequent impact on the maximum contaminant loading. The reactive transport modeling is considered a demonstration of the reactive transport capability, and shows the importance of its use for future performance predictions once site-specific data have been obtained.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Chen, Yousu

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Acceptance and resolution simulation studies for the dielectron spectrometer HADES at GSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design studies for a second generation Dilepton Spectrometer to be built at the SIS accelerator of GSI are presented. The basic design parameters of this system are specified and the different detector components for charged particle tracking and for lepton identification are described. The geometrical acceptance for lepton pairs is given. Results on single track momentum resolution and on lepton pair mass resolution are reported.

R. Schicker; A. Brenschede; K. Garrow; H. Schoen; A. Balanda; H. Bokemeyer; J. Friese; W. Karig; P. Kienle; W. Koenig; W. Kuehn; F. Lefevre; V. Metag; G. Roche; P. Salabura; A. Schroeter; J. Stroth; H. Tsertos

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Empirical Determination of the Time Constant, Heat Capacity, and Sensitivity of Earth's Climate System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Energy balance models permit determination by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. BNL-77303-2006-AB #12;

429

Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

An Extended Dead-End Elimination Algorithm to Determine Gap-Free Lists of Low Energy States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling; global energy minimum; bacteriorhodopsin; protonation state; pH titration; X-DEE; dead of lowest free energy is the most prob- able and thus of primary interest in structural research. ProteinsAn Extended Dead-End Elimination Algorithm to Determine Gap-Free Lists of Low Energy States EDDA

Ullmann, G. Matthias

432

The relative grain boundary area and energy distributions in a ferritic steel determined from three-dimensional electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relative grain boundary area and energy distributions in a ferritic steel determined from three The relative grain boundary area and energy distributions of a ferritic steel were characterized as a function planes with the (111) orientation had the minimum energy and the largest relative areas. The most

Rohrer, Gregory S.

433

JHEP06(1999)001 Received: March 16, 1999, Accepted: June 2, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constituent monopoles, their mass ratios directly determined by the holon- omy [1, 2]. These solutions differ

van Baal, Pierre

434

Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

THE DETERMINATION OF REDDENING FROM INTRINSIC VR COLORS OF RR LYRAE STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New R-band observations of 21 local field RR Lyrae variable stars are used to explore the reliability of minimum light (V - R) colors as a tool for measuring interstellar reddening. For each star, R-band intensity mean magnitudes and light amplitudes are presented. Corresponding V-band light curves from the literature are supplemented with the new photometry, and (V - R) colors at minimum light are determined for a subset of these stars as well as for other stars in the literature. Two different definitions of minimum light color are examined, one which uses a Fourier decomposition to the V and R light curves to find (V - R) at minimum V-band light, (V - R) {sup F} {sub min}, and the other which uses the average color between the phase interval 0.5-0.8, (V - R){sup {phi}}{sup (0.5-0.8)} {sub min}. From 31 stars with a wide range of metallicities and pulsation periods, the mean dereddened RR Lyrae color at minimum light is (V - R) {sup F} {sub min,0} = 0.28 {+-} 0.02 mag and (V - R){sup {phi}}{sup (0.5-0.8)} {sub min,0} = 0.27 {+-} 0.02 mag. As was found by Guldenschuh et al. using (V - I) colors, any dependence of the star's minimum light color on metallicity or pulsation amplitude is too weak to be formally detected. We find that the intrinsic (V - R) of Galactic bulge RR Lyrae stars are similar to those found by their local counterparts and hence that bulge RR0 Lyrae stars do not have anomalous colors as compared to the local RR Lyrae stars.

Kunder, Andrea; Chaboyer, Brian [Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Layden, Andrew [Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States)], E-mail: Andrea.M.Kunder@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.Chaboyer@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: layden@baade.bgsu.edu

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Minimum-Free-Energy Distribution of RNA Secondary Structures: Entropic and Thermodynamic Properties of Rare Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simpler than protein fold- ing, because the formation of secondary structures (the topology of the folded]. This implies that the primary structure determines the sec- ondary structure and, in contrast to the protein folding problem, the tertiary structure can then be seen as a perturbation to the secondary struc- ture

Peinke, Joachim

437

Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (?f) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the ?f(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the ?f signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of ?f with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the ?f with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the ?f(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the ?f minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup }4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Khnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp, E-mail: rahe@uni-mainz.de [Institut fr Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitt Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut fr Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitt Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Development of test acceptance standards for qualification of the glass-bonded zeolite waste form. Interim annual report, October 1995--September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass-bonded zeolite is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the Electrometallurgical Treatment Program as a potential ceramic waste form for the disposition of radionuclides associated with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. The utility of standard durability tests [e.g. Materials Characterization Center Test No. 1 (MCC-1), Product Consistency Test (PCT), and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT)] are being evaluated as an initial step in developing test methods that can be used in the process of qualifying this material for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. A broad range of potential repository conditions are being evaluated to determine the bounding parameters appropriate for the corrosion testing of the ceramic waste form, and its behavior under accelerated testing conditions. In this report we provide specific characterization information and discuss how the durability test results are affected by changes in pH, leachant composition, and sample surface area to leachant volume ratios. We investigate the release mechanisms and other physical and chemical parameters that are important for establishing acceptance parameters, including the development of appropriate test methodologies required to measure product consistency.

Simpson, L.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Fortner, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energy/spin-flip density functional theory approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examining photochemical processes in solution requires understanding the solvent effects on the potential energy profiles near conical intersections (CIs). For that purpose, the CI point in solution is determined as the crossing between nonequilibrium free energy surfaces. In this work, the nonequilibrium free energy is described using the combined method of linear-response free energy and collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory. The proposed approach reveals the solvent effects on the CI geometries of stilbene in an acetonitrile solution and those of thymine in water. Polar acetonitrile decreases the energy difference between the twisted minimum and twisted-pyramidalized CI of stilbene. For thymine in water, the hydrogen bond formation stabilizes significantly the CI puckered at the carbonyl carbon atom. The result is consistent with the recent simulation showing that the reaction path via this geometry is open in water. Therefore, the present method is a promising way of identifying the free-energy crossing points that play an essential role in photochemistry of solvated molecules.

Minezawa, Noriyuki, E-mail: minezawa@fukui.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8103 (Japan)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs.

Bevins, R.R.

1998-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

443

Sterile acceptable milk (SAM): a major energy-saving technology. Summary and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Milk consumption, its nutritial values, and its sanitation and preservation are reviewed. The production of sterile milk as an alternative to pasteurized milk is discussed. A technical assessment of the feasibility of introducing sterile acceptable milk (SAM) into the American economy and the energy and economic impacts that would result are summarized. Research has demonstrated that milk sterilized as a free falling film in a saturated steam environment producea product which consumers would find comparable to existing pasteurized milk. This bulletin provides an overview of the research project and presents highlights of the analysis. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Sterile acceptable milk (SAM): a major energy-saving technology. Summary and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Milk consumption, its nutritive values, and its sanitation and preservation are reviewed. The production of sterile milk as an alternative to pasteurized milk is discussed. A technical assessment of the feasibility of introducing sterile acceptable milk (SAM) into the American economy and the energy and economic impacts that would result are summarized. Research has demonstrated that milk sterilized as a free falling film in a saturated steam environment produced a product which consumers would find comparable to existing pasteurized milk. This bulletin provides an overview of the research project and presents highlights of the analysis. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Determination of glomerular filtration rate by external counting methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparing the DTPA to other accepted methods; the results were very favorable for the use of ggmTC-DTPA. Klopper et al. , sa1d mTc-DTPA ". . . rapidly prepared by a kit method, is a useful addition to the list of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used... points. First, the external counting method is suitable as a true means of determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Second, the method is applicable to cats. To do this, five dogs were injected with ggmTc(Sn)-DTPA. Plasma samples were drawn...

Sartor, Tammy Lee

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gender determination in populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Received 19 Dec 2013 | Accepted 14 May 2014 | Published 17 Jun 2014 Encapsulation kinetics and dynamics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Received 19 Dec 2013 | Accepted 14 May 2014 | Published 17 Jun 2014 Encapsulation kinetics is a potentially important constituent in the solar system. In contrast to the well-established relation between

Wang, Wei Hua

450

Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the effects that individual personality traits have on technology acceptance. Previous research on technology acceptance focuses primarily on exogenous variables such as trustors perceptions, attitudes, computer anxiety...

Brown, Houghton Gregory

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

TRU (transuranic) waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated contact-handled wastes to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, newly generated (NG), contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes from defense programs meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Where appropriate, transportation and interim storage requirements are incorporated; however, interim storage sites may have additional requirements consistent with these requirements. All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for stored or buried waste are not addressed in this document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

TRU waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated contact-handled wastes to be shipped to the WIPP. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, newly generated, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes from defense programs meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Where appropriate, transportation and interim storage requirements are incorporated, however, interim storage sites may have additional requirements consistent with these requirements. All applicable DOE orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for stored or buried waste are not addressed in this document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Standard practice for qualification and acceptance of boron based metallic neutron absorbers for nuclear criticality control for dry cask storage systems and transportation packaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice provides procedures for qualification and acceptance of neutron absorber materials used to provide criticality control by absorbing thermal neutrons in systems designed for nuclear fuel storage, transportation, or both. 1.2 This practice is limited to neutron absorber materials consisting of metal alloys, metal matrix composites (MMCs), and cermets, clad or unclad, containing the neutron absorber boron-10 (10B). 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

Shafer, A.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Technical basis for acceptance criteria on the susceptibility of digital systems to electromagnetic interference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the development of the technical basis for establishing acceptance criteria on the susceptibility of digital systems to electromagnetic interference (EMI). The effort is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and stems from the safety-related issues that need to be addressed with the application of digital instrumentation and controls systems in nuclear power plants. Designers of digital circuits are incorporating increasingly higher clock frequencies and lower logic voltage levels, thereby leading to the risk of susceptibility when spurious interference is misinterpreted as legitimate logic. Development of the technical basis for acceptance criteria centers around establishing good engineering practices to ensure that sufficient levels of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) are maintained between the nuclear power plant`s electronic and electromechanical systems. First, good EMC design and installation practices are needed to control the emissions from interference sources and their impact on other nearby circuits and systems. Then, a test and evaluation program is needed to outline the EMI tests to be performed, the associated test methods to be followed, and adequate test limits to ensure that the circuit or system under test meets the recommended guidelines. Test and evaluation should be followed by periodic maintenance to assess whether the recommended EMI control practices continue to be adhered to as part of the routine operation of the nuclear power plant. By following these steps, the probability of encountering safety-related problems associated with EMI will be greatly reduced.

Ewing, P.D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Antonescu, C. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (US). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Acceptance of fluorescence detectors and its implication in energy spectrum inference at the highest energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Along the years HiRes and AGASA experiments have explored the fluorescence and the ground array experimental techniques to measure extensive air showers, being both essential to investigate the ultra-high energy cosmic rays. However, such Collaborations have published contradictory energy spectra for energies above the GZK cut-off. In this article, we investigate the acceptance of fluorescence telescopes to different primary particles at the highest energies. Using CORSIKA and CONEX shower simulations without and with the new pre-showering scheme, which allows photons to interact in the Earth magnetic field, we estimate the aperture of the HiRes-I telescope for gammas, iron nuclei and protons primaries as a function of the number of simulated events and primary energy. We also investigate the possibility that systematic differences in shower development for hadrons and gammas could mask or distort vital features of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at energies above the photo-pion production threshold. The impact of these effects on the true acceptance of a fluorescence detector is analyzed in the context of top-down production models.

Vitor de Souza; Gustavo Medina-Tanco; Jeferson A. Ortiz

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues for Materials Used in New Generation Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To achieve its goal of producing vehicles that use two thirds less fuel than current vehicles, the Partnership of a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is designing vehicles that will use lightweight materials in place of heavier materials used in current vehicles. using new materials in automobiles will require the development of a supporting infrastructure to produce both the substitute materials and the components of the substitute materials, as well as the automotive parts constructed from the new materials. This report documents a set of analyses that attempt to identify potential barriers--economic, infrastructure, and public acceptance barriers--to the materials substitution in New Generation Vehicles. The analyses rely on hypothetical vehicle market penetration scenarios and material composition. The approach is comprehensive, examining issues ranging from materials availability to their eventual disposition and its effect on the automobile recycling industry, and from supporting industries' capacity to the public acceptability of these vehicles. The analyses focus on two likely substitute materials, aluminum and glass-reinforced polymer composites.

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.E.; Rubin, J.D.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG - Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Via Enrico Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Genon, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.genon@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Zanetti, Maria Chiara, E-mail: mariachiara.zanetti@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

CX-000924: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Accreditation Certification Program for Installation and Acceptance of Photovoltaic Systems CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02232010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determining minimum acceptable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Acceptance testing of the eddy current probes for measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thickness on K West Basin fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a recent visual inspection campaign of fuel elements stored in the K West Basin, it was noted that fuel elements contained in sealed aluminum canisters had a heavy translucent type coating on their surfaces (Pitner 1997a). Subsequent sampling of this coating in a hot cell (Pitner 1997b) and analysis of the material identified it as aluminum hydroxide. Because of the relatively high water content of this material, safety related concerns are raised with respect to long term storage of this fuel in Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). A campaign in the basin is planned to demonstrate whether this coating can be removed by mechanical brushing (Bridges 1998). Part of this campaign involves before-and-after measurements of the coating thickness to determine the effectiveness of coating removal by the brushing machine. Measurements of the as-deposited coating thickness on multiple fuel elements are also expected to provide total coating inventory information needed for MCO safety evaluations. The measurement technique must be capable of measuring coating thicknesses on the order of several mils, with a measurement accuracy of 0.5 mil. Several different methods for quantitatively measuring these thin coatings were considered in selecting the most promising approach. Ultrasonic measurement was investigated, but it was determined that due to the thin coating depth and the high water content of the material, the signal would likely pass directly through to the cladding without ever sensing the coating surface. X-ray fluorescence was also identified as a candidate technique, but would not work because the high gamma background from the irradiated fuel would swamp out the low energy aluminum signal. Laser interferometry could possibly be applied, but considerable development would be required and it was considered to be high risk on a short term basis. The consensus reached was that standard eddy current techniques for coating thickness measurement had the best chance for success in this endeavor. If proper placement and alignment of the eddy current measurement probe on the coating could be achieved, the thickness of this non-conductive coating over the conductive fuel cladding (Zircaloy 2) should be measurable based on magnetic stand-off aspects. Eddy current devices are routinely used to measure paint coating thicknesses on metal surfaces in this regard. The purpose of this report is to document the development and acceptance testing of the eddy current system conducted to qualify its use for the measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thicknesses on fuel stored in the K West Basin.

Pitner, A.L.

1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

A Study of the Use of a Lossless Lattice for the Synthesis of a Minimum Impedance Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This extra condit. icn will stated in the next. section. Tbe proposed Circuit lt seems reasonable thai. a driving point impedance realization procedure for minimum functions might be developed using a loaslesa latti. ce as a two-terminal pal. r degree...: Por Piguxe 7 ~ R R L Lfl, +, 1 For Pigure 8 S Cg(R?*Rg)* I The circuits shown in Figures 7 and 8 are the only possible circuits that have a ratio of, polynomials of the first degree in s for their impedance functions. The latti, ce of Figure 6...

Barnard, Herbert Marvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

The INTERVAL Trial to determine whether intervals between blood donations can be safely and acceptably decreased to optimise blood supply: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the questionnaire within 7 days and received two email reminders and a phone call between days 7 and 14 if they did not respond. The baseline questionnaire has been designed to take approximately 15 minutes to complete and includes the following: 1. Compulsory... haematology analyser (Sysmex UK Limited, Milton Keynes, UK) to generate an extended profile of blood cell indices. Full blood count results of all participants were reviewed by the Haematology Review Group to identify clinically significant results...

Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Walker, Matthew; Tolkien, Zoe; Kaptoge, Stephen; Allen, David; Mehenny, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Thompson, Simon G.; Ouwehand, Willem; Roberts, David J.; Danesh, John

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

THE ROCHE LIMIT FOR CLOSE-ORBITING PLANETS: MINIMUM DENSITY, COMPOSITION CONSTRAINTS, AND APPLICATION TO THE 4.2 hr PLANET KOI 1843.03  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The requirement that a planet must orbit outside of its Roche limit gives a lower limit on the planet's mean density. The minimum density depends almost entirely on the orbital period and is immune to systematic errors in ...

Rogers, Leslie A.

465

Oxygen at Nanomolar Levels Reversibly Suppresses Process Rates and Gene Expression in Anammox and Denitrification in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Northern Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O[subscript 2] and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N[subscript 2]-producing processes of anammox ...

Dalsgaard, Tage

466

Automatic scanning of nuclear emulsions with wide-angle acceptance for nuclear fragment detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear emulsion, a tracking detector with sub-micron position resolution, has played a successful role in the field of particle physics and the analysis speed has been substantially improved by the development of automated scanning systems. This paper describes a newly developed automated scanning system and its application to the analysis of nuclear fragments emitted almost isotropically in nuclear evaporation. This system is able to recognize tracks of nuclear fragments up to |tan{\\theta}|nuclear emulsion is the first trial. Furthermore the track recognition algorithm is performed by a powerful Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for the first time. This GPU has a sufficient computing power to process large area scanning data with a wide angular acceptance and enough flexibil...

Fukuda, T; Ishida, H; Kodama, K; Matsuo, T; Mikado, S; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Sudo, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

Brockbank, B.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

Kearney, D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was issued that recommended that the mixed acid method be replaced by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method for the measurement of magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and zirconium (Zr) with additional testing of the method by DWPF Laboratory being needed before further implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method at that laboratory. While the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok does not address any of the open issues remaining after the publication of the recommendation for the replacement of the mixed acid method by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method (since those issues are to be addressed by the DWPF Laboratory), the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} testing associated with the Isolok testing does provide additional insight into the performance of the method as conducted by SRNL. The performance is to be investigated by looking to the composition measurement data generated by the samples of a standard glass, the Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1), that were prepared by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method and included in the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. The measurements of these samples were presented as part of the study results, but no statistical analysis of these measurements was conducted as part of those results. It is the purpose of this report to provide that analysis, which was supported using JMP Version 7.0.2.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

472

Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated facility life of WTP.

Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Standard guide for determining corrosivity of crude oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide presents some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for determining the corrosivity of crude oil. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather a range of approaches that have found application in evaluating the corrosivity of crude oil. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in crude oil corrosivity evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide does not address the change in oil/water ratio caused by accumulation of water at low points in a pipeline system. 1.5 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for determining the corrosivity of crude oil under conditions in which water is present in the liquid state (typically up to 100C). These conditions normally occur during oil and gas production, storage, and transportation in the pipelines. 1.6 This guide does not cover the evaluation of corrosivity of crude oil at higher temperatures (typically above 300C) that oc...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Standards and Rebate Incentive Programs for Domestic Refrigerators in the Pacific Northwest, Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refrigerator-freezers (R/Fs) and freezers (FRs) account for 16% of the electricity consumed in the residential sector of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) forecast region (Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Western Montana). After space and water heating, R/Fs are the largest residential electrical end-use. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and BPA recognize the savings potential from efficient R/Fs and FRs as well as the barriers to their use. In the 1983 regional power plan, the Council directed BPA to develop and implement incentive and promotion programs for efficient appliances. The NPPC also called for the evaluation of minimum efficiency standards for appliances sold in the region. In response to this directive, the Office of Conservation in BPA funded an evaluation of both rebate incentive programs and minimum efficiency standards for R/Fs and FRs. The results are presented in this report. The energy savings potential and economic feasibility of rebate programs and efficiency standards are the primary issues considered.

Geller, Howard S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Level and length of cyclic solar activity during the Maunder minimum as deduced from the active day statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Maunder minimum (MM) of greatly reduced solar activity took place in 1645-1715, but the exact level of sunspot activity is uncertain as based, to a large extent, on historical generic statements of the absence of spots on the Sun. Here we aim, using a conservative approach, to assess the level and length of solar cycle during the Maunder minimum, on the basis of direct historical records by astronomers of that time. A database of the active and inactive days (days with and without recorded sunspots on the solar disc respectively) is constructed for three models of different levels of conservatism (loose ML, optimum MO and strict MS models) regarding generic no-spot records. We have used the active day fraction to estimate the group sunspot number during the MM. A clear cyclic variability is found throughout the MM with peaks at around 1655--1657, 1675, 1684 and 1705, and possibly 1666, with the active day fraction not exceeding 0.2, 0.3 or 0.4 during the core MM, for the three models. Estimated sunspot nu...

Vaquero, J M; Usoskin, I G; Carrasco, V M S; Gallego, M C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Ultratrace determination of curium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a method for detection of curium at near single atom levels is being undertaken as a part of the Advanced Concepts Project at Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. Ultratrace determination of curium, with the ability to quantify the fraction that is curium-242, provides a signature method of detecting clandestine reprocessing of recently irradiated uranium targets. Curium initially present in any of a variety of materials such as air filters, solid or liquid process waste, soil, flora, or fauna can be recovered via current chemical separations processing techniques. Using the ultratrace method being developed, such recovered curium will be quantified with thousand-fold higher sensitivity than the best currently available method which is alpha counting. This high sensitivity arises because, on average, a given trivalent curium (Cm{sup 3+}) ion can emit a very large number of fluorescence photons before alpha decay occurs.

Beitz, J.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Significant Radionuclides Determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

Jo A. Ziegler

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN SEAWATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total {sup 89}Sr + {sup 90}Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of {sup 90}Y to differentiate {sup 89}Sr from {sup 90}Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for {sup 89}Sr and {sup 90}Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for {sup 90}Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of {sup 90}Y only. If {sup 89}Sr and other fission products are present, then {sup 91}Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. {sup 91}Y interferes with attempts to collect {sup 90}Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and {sup 90}Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine {sup 90}Sr, and if {sup 91}Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA Resin again to collect {sup 90}Y can be performed. An MDA for {sup 90}Sr of <1 mBq/L for an 8 hour count may be obtained using 10 liter seawater sample aliquots.

Maxwell, S.

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of a Performance and Processing Property Acceptance Region for Cementitious Low-Level Waste Forms at Savannah River Site - 13174  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (SPF and SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been treating decontaminated salt solution, a low-level aqueous waste stream (LLW) since facility commissioning in 1990. In 2012, the Saltstone Facilities implemented a new Performance Assessment (PA) that incorporates an alternate design for the disposal facility to ensure that the performance objectives of DOE Order 435.1 and the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal Year 2005 Section 3116 are met. The PA performs long term modeling of the waste form, disposal facility, and disposal site hydrogeology to determine the transport history of radionuclides disposed in the LLW. Saltstone has been successfully used to dispose of LLW in a grout waste form for 15 years. Numerous waste form property assumptions directly impact the fate and transport modeling performed in the PA. The extent of process variability and consequence on performance properties are critical to meeting the assumptions of the PA. The SPF has ensured performance property acceptability by way of implementing control strategies that ensure the process operates within the analyzed limits of variability, but efforts continue to improve the understanding of facility performance in relation to the PA analysis. A similar understanding of the impact of variability on processing parameters is important from the standpoint of the operability of the production facility. The fresh grout slurry properties (particularly slurry rheology and the rate of hydration and structure formation) of the waste form directly impact the pressure and flow rates that can be reliably processed. It is thus equally important to quantify the impact of variability on processing parameters to ensure that the design basis assumptions for the production facility are maintained. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been pursuing a process that will ultimately establish a property acceptance region (PAR) to incorporate elements important to both processability and long-term performance properties. This process involves characterization of both emplaced product samples from the disposal facility and laboratory-simulated samples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the lab simulation. With that basis confirmed, a comprehensive variability study using non-radioactive simulants will define the acceptable PAR, or 'operating window' for Saltstone production and disposal. This same process will be used in the future to evaluate new waste streams for disposal or changes to the existing process flowsheet. (authors)

Staub, Aaron V. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanism of the interactions between polymer/surfactant and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of chemical molecular structure on critical solid/liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and surface tension in mineral/surfactant systems were investigated. The final aim is to build a guideline to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interface. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) was studied. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption were determined under relevant conditions. pH was found to play a critical role in controlling total adsorption and mineral wettability. Previous studies have suggested significant surfactant loss by adsorption at neutral pH. But at certain pH, bilayer was found at lower adsorption density, which is beneficial for enhanced oil recovery. Analytical ultracentrifuge technique was successfully employed to study the micellization of DM/C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na mixtures. Compositional changes of the aggregates in solution were observed when two species were mixed. Surfactant mixture micellization affects the conformation and orientation of adsorption layer at mineral/water interface and thus the wettability and as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes. Three surfactants C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}, AOT and SLE3 and one polymer were selected into three different binary combinations. Equilibrium surface tension measurement revealed complexation of polymer/surfactant under different conditions. Except for one combination of SLE3/ PVCAP, complexation was observed. It is to be noted that such complexation is relevant to both interfacial properties such as adsorption and wettability as well as rheology. Higher activity of the polymer/surfactant complexes is beneficial for EOR.

P. Somasundaran

2005-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical EOR can be an effective method for increasing oil recovery and reducing the amount of produced water; however, reservoir fluids are chemically complex and may react adversely to the polymers and surfactants injected into the reservoir. While a major goal is to alter rock wettability and interfacial tension between oil and water, rock-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions must be understood and controlled to minimize reagent loss, maximize recovery and mitigate costly failures. The overall objective of this project was to elucidate the mechanisms of interactions between polymers/surfactants and the mineral surfaces responsible for determining the chemical loss due to adsorption and precipitation in EOR processes. The role of dissolved inorganic species that are dependent on the mineralogy is investigated with respect to their effects on adsorption. Adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension are studied with the aim to control chemical losses, the ultimate goal being to devise schemes to develop guidelines for surfactant and polymer selection in EOR. The adsorption behavior of mixed polymer/surfactant and surfactant/surfactant systems on typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) was correlated to their molecular structures, intermolecular interactions and the solution conditions such as pH and/or salinity. Predictive models as well as general guidelines for the use of polymer/surfactant surfactant/surfactant system in EOR have been developed The following tasks have been completed under the scope of the project: (1) Mineral characterization, in terms of SEM, BET, size, surface charge, and point zero charge. (2) Study of the interactions among typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) and surfactants and/or polymers in terms of adsorption properties that include both macroscopic (adsorption density, wettability) and microscopic (orientation/conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

P. Somasundaran

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 19.6$ and 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectra, where the known hadronic sources have been subtracted from the inclusive dielectron mass spectra, are reported for the first time at mid-rapidity $|y_{ee}|<1$ in minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 19.6 and 200 GeV. The excess mass spectra are consistently described by a model calculation with a broadened $\\rho$ spectral function for $M_{ee}<1.1$ GeV/$c^{2}$. The integrated dielectron excess yield at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 19.6 GeV for $0.4

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez; J. M. campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; S. Gupta; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; B. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; X. Li; W. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; C. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; L. Ma; R. Ma; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Smirnov; D. Solanki; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. J. Summa; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; X. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; Y. Wang; F. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; G. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Z. Xu; Q. H. Xu; N. Xu; H. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Y. Yang; C. Yang; S. Yang; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; S. Zhang; J. Zhang; Z. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

483

Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 19.6$ and 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectra, where the known hadronic sources have been subtracted from the inclusive dielectron mass spectra, are reported for the first time at mid-rapidity $|y_{ee}|<1$ in minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 19.6 and 200 GeV. The excess mass spectra are consistently described by a model calculation with a broadened $\\rho$ spectral function for $M_{ee}<1.1$ GeV/$c^{2}$. The integrated dielectron excess yield at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 19.6 GeV for $0.4

Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; S'anchez, M Calder'on de la Barca; campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng,; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, X; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, L; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solanki, D; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B J; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, X; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Z; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Y F; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, X P; Zhang, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

Fritz, R.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

485

Kinetically determined shapes of grain boundaries in CVD graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the shape of grain boundaries is essential to control results of the growth of large graphene crystals. A global energy minimum search predicting the most stable final structure contradicts experimental observations. Here we present Monte Carlo simulation of kinetic formation of grain boundaries (GB) in graphene during collision of two growing graphene flakes. Analysis of the resulting GBs for the full range of misorientation angles $\\alpha$ allowed us to identify a hidden (from post facto analysis such as microscopy) degree of freedom - the edge misorientation angle $\\beta$. Edge misorientation characterizes initial structure rather than final structure and therefore provides more information about growth conditions. Use of $\\beta$ enabled us to explain disagreements between the experimental observations and theoretical work. Finally, we report an analysis of an interesting special case of zero-tilt GBs for which structure is determined by two variables describing the relative shift of initial isl...

Bets, Ksenia V; Yakobson, Boris I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Automatic scanning of nuclear emulsions with wide-angle acceptance for nuclear fragment detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear emulsion, a tracking detector with sub-micron position resolution, has played a successful role in the field of particle physics and the analysis speed has been substantially improved by the development of automated scanning systems. This paper describes a newly developed automated scanning system and its application to the analysis of nuclear fragments emitted almost isotropically in nuclear evaporation. This system is able to recognize tracks of nuclear fragments up to |tan{\\theta}|nuclear emulsion is the first trial. Furthermore the track recognition algorithm is performed by a powerful Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for the first time. This GPU has a sufficient computing power to process large area scanning data with a wide angular acceptance and enough flexibility to allow the tuning of the recognition algorithm. This new system will in particular be applied in the framework of the OPERA experiment : the background in the sample of tau decay candidates due to hadronic interactions will be reduced by a better detection of the emitted nuclear fragments.

T. Fukuda; S. Fukunaga; H. Ishida; K. Kodama; T. Matsuo; S. Mikado; S. Ogawa; H. Shibuya; J. Sudo

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

487

Waste acceptance and waste loading for vitrified Oak Ridge tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Science and Technology of the DOE has funded a joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to evaluate vitrification and grouting for the immobilization of sludge from ORNL tank farms. The radioactive waste is from the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT), the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST), the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST), and the Old Hydrofractgure Tanks (OHF). Glass formulation development for sludge from these tanks is discussed in an accompanying article for this conference (Andrews and Workman). The sludges contain transuranic radionuclides at levels which will make the glass waste form (at reasonable waste loadings) TRU. Therefore, one of the objectives for this project was to ensure that the vitrified waste form could be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In order to accomplish this, the waste form must meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). An alternate pathway is to send the glass waste forms for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A sludge waste loading in the feed of 6 wt percent will lead to a waste form which is non-TRU and could potentially be disposed of at NTS. The waste forms would then have to meet the requirements of the NTS WAC. This paper presents SRTC`s efforts at demonstrating that the glass waste form produced as a result of vitrification of ORNL sludge will meet all the criteria of the WIPP WAC or NTS WAC.

Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

1997-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

488

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage Control in Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage) problem associated with reactive power and voltage control in distribution systems to minimize daily--Distribution systems, reactive power control, voltage control, optimal switching operations, mixed integer nonlinear

Cañizares, Claudio A.

489

Application for CHE-CCE 2012 Summer Internship Title of project: "Public Acceptance of Congestion Pricing of Transportation"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pricing of Transportation" Worksite Location: Ithaca, NY Faculty sponsor: Rick Geddes County Cornell standards for cars and light trucks reduce greenhouse gas emissions and enhance energy independence the acceptance of variable transportation pricing. This includes extant studies that utilize data from telephone

Keinan, Alon

490

PAPER ACCEPTED TO THE IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Sensitivity-based Security-constrained OPF Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAPER ACCEPTED TO THE IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Sensitivity-based Security-constrained OPF Market Clearing Model F. Milano, Member, IEEE, C. A. Ca~nizares, Senior Member, IEEE, and A. J constraints that properly include voltage stability limits in the operation of competitive electricity markets

Cañizares, Claudio A.

491

A Model of Attitudes toward the Acceptance of Mobile Phone Use in Public Places Brenda Mak, San Francisco State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology with a fast diffusion rate (Kim, 2005). Mobile phones have brought about improvements and Ratten, 2007), and mobile customer relationship management (Moedritscher and Mussnig, 2005), offering1 A Model of Attitudes toward the Acceptance of Mobile Phone Use in Public Places Brenda Mak, San

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

492

SUBJECT: ACCEPTANCE OF THE FINAL SITE OBSERVATIONAL WORK PLAN FOR THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT SITE AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and concludes that it is generally acceptable as DOEs proposed strategy for compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards in 40 CFR Part 192. The staffs detailed review of the Grand Junction SOWP is documented in the enclosed

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

It is now generally accepted that ATP can act as a fast excitatory neurotransmitter at the autonomic neuromuscular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is now generally accepted that ATP can act as a fast excitatory neurotransmitter a class of ligand-gated cation channels, the P2X receptors. ATP also plays a role in presynaptic North & Barnard, 1997). Thus, P2X1 and P2X? receptors are activated by á,â_methyleneATP (áâ_MeATP

Burnstock, Geoffrey

494

Accepted to Diamond and Related Materials A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide interlayer formation during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted to Diamond and Related Materials A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA Abstract The presence of thin silicon carbide diffusion of carbon atoms into the silicon carbide layer, and the morphology and orientation of the diamond

Dandy, David

495

Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment on 13 March 2013 Stochastic and epistemic uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 #12;4 1. Introduction Life cycle assessment (LCA) aims at modelling complex systems that usually1 Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment on 13 March 2013 of Life Cycle Assessment (2013) 1-10" DOI : 10.1007/s11367-013-0572-6 #12;2 Abstract Purpose: When

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

496

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock-581-3468 Garfield City of Enid Landfill 580-249-4917 Garvin Foster Waste Disposal Landfill 405-238-2012 Jackson City-436-1403 Call ahead, may limit qty. Pottawatomie Absolute Waste Solutions 405-598-3893 Call ahead Seminole

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

497

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 1 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new of a combined nuclear-wind-hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity

Cañizares, Claudio A.

498

Compliance with Waste Acceptance Criteria of WIPP and NTS for Vitrified Low-Level and TRU Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been established to evaluate vitrification as an option for the immobilization of waste within ORNL tank farms. This paper presents details of calculations based on current best available analyses of the Oak Ridge Tanks on the limits for waste loadings imposed by the waste acceptance criteria.

Harbour, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Andrews, M.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Abstract --With the increasing acceptance, micro-grid, combined with distributed generation (DG), may be operated in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract --With the increasing acceptance, micro-grid, combined with distributed generation (DG generation (DG) technology [1-3]. DG units may be located in distribution network or on the local load side), may be operated in two modes: grid-connected mode and island mode. In grid connected mode, energy

Chen, Zhe

500

Preprint: Clip Art Rendering of Smooth Isosurfaces Accepted pending revision for IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Preprint: Clip Art Rendering of Smooth Isosurfaces Accepted pending revision for IEEE with numerous renderings used to illustrate the paper itself. Index Terms-- particle systems, non-photorealistic rendering, line art drawing I. INTRODUCTION COMPUTER GRAPHICS is largely the study of com- putational tools

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de