National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determine baseline develop

  1. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  2. Baseline Glass Development for Combined Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

    2009-06-29

    Borosilicate glass was selected as the baseline technology for immobilization of the Cs/Sr/Ba/Rb (Cs), lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) waste steams as part of a cost benefit analysis study.[1] Vitrification of the combined waste streams have several advantages, minimization of the number of waste forms, a proven technology, and similarity to waste forms currently accepted for repository disposal. A joint study was undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop acceptable glasses for the combined Cs + Ln + TM waste streams (Option 1) and Cs + Ln combined waste streams (Option 2) generated by the AFCI UREX+ set of processes. This study is aimed to develop baseline glasses for both combined waste stream options and identify key waste components and their impact on waste loading. The elemental compositions of the four-corners study were used along with the available separations data to determine the effect of burnup, decay, and separations variability on estimated waste stream compositions.[2-5] Two different components/scenarios were identified that could limit waste loading of the combined Cs + LN + TM waste streams, where as the combined Cs + LN waste stream has no single component that is perceived to limit waste loading. Combined Cs + LN waste stream in a glass waste form will most likely be limited by heat due to the high activity of Cs and Sr isotopes.

  3. A SURVEY OF ASTRONOMICAL RESEARCH: A BASELINE FOR ASTRONOMICAL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Russo, P.; Cárdenas-Avendaño, A. E-mail: russo@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2013-12-01

    Measuring scientific development is a difficult task. Different metrics have been put forward to evaluate scientific development; in this paper we explore a metric that uses the number of peer-reviewed, and when available non-peer-reviewed, research articles as an indicator of development in the field of astronomy. We analyzed the available publication record, using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory/NASA Astrophysics Database System, by country affiliation in the time span between 1950 and 2011 for countries with a gross national income of less than 14,365 USD in 2010. This represents 149 countries. We propose that this metric identifies countries in ''astronomical development'' with a culture of research publishing. We also propose that for a country to develop in astronomy, it should invest in outside expert visits, send its staff abroad to study, and establish a culture of scientific publishing. Furthermore, we propose that this paper may be used as a baseline to measure the success of major international projects, such as the International Year of Astronomy 2009.

  4. Determination of the relativistic parameter gamma using very long baseline interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. B. Lambert; C. Le Poncin-Lafitte

    2009-03-09

    Relativistic bending in the vicinity of a massive body is characterized only by the post-Newtonian parameter $\\gamma$ within the standard parameterized post-Newtonian formalism, which is unity in General Relativity. Aiming at estimating this parameter, we use very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) to measure the gravitational deflection of radio waves emitted by distant compact radio sources, by Solar System bodies. We analyze geodetic VLBI observations recorded since 1979. We compare estimates of $\\gamma$ and errors obtained using various analysis schemes including global estimations over several time spans and with various Sun elongation cut-off angles, and analysis of radio source coordinate time series. We arrive at the conclusion that the relativistic parameter $\\gamma$ cannot be estimated at better than $2\\times10^{-4}$. The main factor of limitation is the uncertainty in the determination of (global or session-wise) radio source coordinates. A sum of various instrumental and modeling errors and analysis strategy defects, that cannot be decorrelated and corrected yet, is at the origin of the limitating noise.

  5. Determination of Baselines for Evaluation and Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Wastewater Treatment Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, S. A.; Ganji, A. R.; Fok, S.

    2009-01-01

    efficient technologies is crucial in reducing national energy consumption. A detailed understanding of the current industry standards (baselines) is needed to estimate the energy savings potential for advanced state-of-the-art technologies and to provide...

  6. Tools for Closure Project and Contract Management: Development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, C. M.; Sheppard, F. R.

    2002-02-26

    This paper details the development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline - an innovative project management effort undertaken to ensure proactive management of the Rocky Flats Closure Contract in support of the Department's goal for achieving the safe closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in December 2006. The accelerated closure of RFETS is one of the most prominent projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management program. As the first major former weapons plant to be remediated and closed, it is a first-of-kind effort requiring the resolution of multiple complex technical and institutional challenges. Most significantly, the closure of RFETS is dependent upon the shipment of all special nuclear material and wastes to other DOE sites. The Department is actively working to strengthen project management across programs, and there is increasing external interest in this progress. The development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline represents a groundbreaking and cooperative effort to formalize the management of such a complex project across multiple sites and organizations. It is original in both scope and process, however it provides a useful precedent for the other ongoing project management efforts within the Environmental Management program.

  7. Multi-project baselines for potential clean development mechanism projects in the electricity sector in South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, H.; Spalding-Fecher, R.; Sathaye, J.; Price, L.

    2002-06-26

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) aims to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in order to ''prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system'' and promote sustainable development. The Kyoto Protocol, which was adopted in 1997 and appears likely to be ratified by 2002 despite the US withdrawing, aims to provide means to achieve this objective. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is one of three ''flexibility mechanisms'' in the Protocol, the other two being Joint Implementation (JI) and Emissions Trading (ET). These mechanisms allow flexibility for Annex I Parties (industrialized countries) to achieve reductions by extra-territorial as well as domestic activities. The underlying concept is that trade and transfer of credits will allow emissions reductions at least cost. Since the atmosphere is a global, well-mixed system, it does not matter where greenhouse gas emissions are reduced. The CDM allows Annex I Parties to meet part of their emissions reductions targets by investing in developing countries. CDM projects must also meet the sustainable development objectives of the developing country. Further criteria are that Parties must participate voluntarily, that emissions reductions are ''real, measurable and long-term'', and that they are additional to those that would have occurred anyway. The last requirement makes it essential to define an accurate baseline. The remaining parts of section 1 outline the theory of baselines, emphasizing the balance needed between environmental integrity and reducing transaction costs. Section 2 develops an approach to multi-project baseline for the South African electricity sector, comparing primarily to near future capacity, but also considering recent plants. Five potential CDM projects are briefly characterized in section 3, and compared to the baseline in section 4. Section 5 concludes with a discussion of options and choices for South Africa regarding electricity sector baselines.

  8. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  9. Synthesis and Comparison of Baseline Avian and Bat Use, Raptor Nesting and Mortality Information from Proposed and Existing Wind Developments: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Wallace P.

    2002-12-01

    Primarily due to concerns generated from observed raptor mortality at the Altamont Pass (CA) wind plant, one of the first commercial electricity generating wind plants in the U.S., new proposed wind projects both within and outside of California have received a great deal of scrutiny and environmental review. A large amount of baseline and operational monitoring data have been collected at proposed and existing U.S. wind plants. The primary use of the avian baseline data collected at wind developments has been to estimate the overall project impacts (e.g., very low, low, moderate, and high relative mortality) on birds, especially raptors and sensitive species (e.g., state and federally listed species). In a few cases, these data have also been used for guiding placement of turbines within a project boundary. This new information has strengthened our ability to accurately predict and mitigate impacts from new projects. This report should assist various stakeholders in the interpretation and use of this large information source in evaluating new projects. This report also suggests that the level of baseline data (e.g., avian use data) required to adequately assess expected impacts of some projects may be reduced. This report provides an evaluation of the ability to predict direct impacts on avian resources (primarily raptors and waterfowl/waterbirds) using less than an entire year of baseline avian use data (one season, two seasons, etc.). This evaluation is important because pre-construction wildlife surveys can be one of the most time-consuming aspects of permitting wind power projects. For baseline data, this study focuses primarily on standardized avian use data usually collected using point count survey methodology and raptor nest survey data. In addition to avian use and raptor nest survey data, other baseline data is usually collected at a proposed project to further quantify potential impacts. These surveys often include vegetation mapping and state or federal sensitive-status wildlife and plant surveys if there is a likelihood of these species occurring in the vicinity of the project area. This report does not address these types of surveys, however, it is assumed in this document that those surveys are conducted when appropriate to help further quantify potential impacts. The amount and extent of ecological baseline data to collect at a wind project should be determined on a case-by-case basis. The decision should use information gained from this report, recent information from new projects (e.g., Stateline OR/WA), existing project site data from agencies and other knowledgeable groups/individuals, public scoping, and results of vegetation and habitat mapping. Other factors that should also be considered include the likelihood of the presence of sensitive species at the site and expected impacts to those species, project size and project layout.

  10. Development of a Methodology for Baselining the Energy Use of Large Multi-Building Central Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.S.; Beasley, R.; Turner, W.D.; Claridge, D.E

    2002-01-01

    vidual buildings (DOE 1996). In 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) updated the NEMVP and .renamed the document the International Performance Measurement (/lid Verification Protocol (IPMVP) (DOE '1997) to reflect the. part,icipation of other... countries in the development of consensus energy savings measurement. The' IPMVP, which was expanded and revised in 200 I, provides a flexible quasi-consensus document that leaves the choice of : savirigs measurement methodology to the contracting agency...

  11. Assessing the economic impact of indirect liquefaction process improvements: Volume 1, Development of the integrated indirect liquefaction model and baseline case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.C. (Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (USA). Civil Systems Div.)

    1990-10-01

    This report documents the development of an integrated indirect liquefaction system model, which processes input coal to refined liquid products, and the model's application in the analysis of a baseline case. The baseline case uses Shell gasification of coal followed by gas cleaning to produce a clean synthesis gas for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The raw liquid products are refined to produce gasoline and diesel. Costs of liquid products have been estimated for the baseline plant. The model also alloys many sensitivity studies to be performed so that the economic impacts of research and development advances can be quantified. When used in this manner, the model can provide research guidance for future indirect liquefaction studies. 18 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Developing Young Thinkers: Discovering Baseline Understandings of Effective Thinking among Children and Teachers and Intervening to Enhance Thinking Skills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Lynsey A

    2007-01-01

    This thesis considers teachers’ and pupils’ conceptions of effective thinking, and analyses how these are developed through an explicit thinking skills intervention. An analysis of children’s concepts of intelligence has ...

  13. Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  14. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the development of the Baseline Graphite Characterization program from a testing and data collection standpoint through the completion of characterization on the first billet of nuclear-grade graphite. This data set is the starting point for all future evaluations and comparisons of material properties.

  15. Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-24

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup ?1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup ?1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup ?3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup ?3}.

  16. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  17. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  18. Regional Energy Baseline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01

    -09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy Use per Capita (1960-2009) US... SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System 1960-2009 Regional Energy...

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Performance Baseline Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-12

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A and identifies key performance baseline development processes and practices. Does not cancel other directives.

  20. Baseline Test Specimen Machining Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mark Carroll

    2009-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project is tasked with selecting a high temperature gas reactor technology that will be capable of generating electricity and supplying large amounts of process heat. The NGNP is presently being designed as a helium-cooled high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. The graphite baseline characterization project is conducting the research and development (R&D) activities deemed necessary to fully qualify nuclear-grade graphite for use in the NGNP reactor. Establishing nonirradiated thermomechanical and thermophysical properties by characterizing lot-to-lot and billet-to-billet variations (for probabilistic baseline data needs) through extensive data collection and statistical analysis is one of the major fundamental objectives of the project. The reactor core will be made up of stacks of graphite moderator blocks. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the varying characteristics in a wide range of suitable graphites, any of which can be classified as “nuclear grade,” an experimental program has been initiated to develop an extensive database of the baseline characteristics of numerous candidate graphites. Various factors known to affect the properties of graphite will be investigated, including specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation within a billet (either parallel to [P] or transverse to [T] the long axis of the as-produced billet), and billet-to-billet variations within a lot or across different production lots. Because each data point is based on a certain position within a given billet of graphite, particular attention must be paid to the traceability of each specimen and its spatial location and orientation within each billet. The evaluation of these properties is discussed in the Graphite Technology Development Plan (Windes et. al, 2007). One of the key components in the evaluation of these graphite types will be mechanical testing on specimens drawn from carefully controlled sections of each billet. To this end, this report will discuss the machining of the first set of test specimens that will be evaluated in this program through tensile, compressive, and flexural testing. Validation that the test specimens have been produced to the tolerances required by the applicable ASTM standards, and to the quality control levels required by this program, will demonstrate the viability of sending graphite to selected suppliers that will provide valuable and certifiable data to future data sets that are integral to the NGNP program and beyond.

  1. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  2. SRS baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, H.W.; Aadland, R.K. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Sargent, K.A. (Furman Univ., Greenville, SC (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1990-11-01

    Work on the Savannah River Site (SRS) Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation began in 1983 when it was determined that the knowledge of the plant hydrogeologic systems needed to be expanded and improved in response to changing stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic terminology and increased involvement by regulatory agencies (Bledsoe, 1984). Additionally, site-wide data were needed to determine flow paths, gradients, and velocities associated with the different aquifers underlying the plant site. The program was divided into three phases in order to allow the results of one phase to be evaluated and necessary changes and improvements incorporated into the following phases. This report summarizes the results of all three phases and includes modified graphic logs, lithologic descriptions of the different geologic formations, profiles of each cluster site, hydrostratigraphic cross sections, hydrographs of selected wells within each cluster for the first full year of uninterrupted water level measurements, potentiometric maps developed from data collected from all clusters, completion diagrams for each well, and a summary of laboratory tests. Additionally, the proposed new classification of hydrostratigraphic units at SRS (Aadland and Bledsoe, 1990) has been incorporated.

  3. Baseline Control Measures.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Baseline Control Measures at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): Veenis, Steven J....

  4. Development and Mass Production of a Mixture of LAB- and DIN-based Gadolinium-loaded Liquid Scintillator for the NEOS Short-baseline Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ba Ro Kim; Boyoung Han; Eun-ju Jeon; Kyung Kwang Joo; H. J. Kim; Hyunsoo Kim; Jinyu Kim; Yeongduk Kim; Youngju Ko; Jaison Lee; Jooyoung Lee; Moohyun Lee; Kyungju Ma; Yoomin Oh; Hyangkyu Park; Kang-soon Park; Kyungmin Seo; Gwang-Min Seon; Kim Siyeon

    2015-11-16

    A new experiment, which is called as NEOS (NEutrino Oscillation at Short baseline), is proposed on the site of Hanbit reactors at Yonggwang, South Korea, to investigate a reactor antineutrino anomaly. A homogeneous NEOS detector having a 1000-L target volume has been constructed and deployed at the tendon gallery ~25 m away from the reactor core. A linear alkylbenzene (LAB) is used as a main base solvent of the NEOS detector. Furthermore, a di-isopropylnaphthalene (DIN) is added to improve the light output and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) ability. The ratio of LAB to DIN is 90:10. PPO (3 g/L) and bis-MSB (30 mg/L) are dissolved to formulate the mixture of LAB- and DIN-based liquid scintillator (LS). Then, ~0.5% gadolinium (Gd) is loaded into the LS by using the solvent-solvent extraction technique. In this paper, we report the characteristics of Gd-loaded LS (GdLS) for the NEOS detector and the handling during mass production.

  5. Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved Solar Power Forecasting: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Lehman, Brad; Simmons, Joseph; Campos, Edwin; Banunarayanan, Venkat

    2015-08-05

    Accurate solar power forecasting allows utilities to get the most out of the solar resources on their systems. To truly measure the improvements that any new solar forecasting methods can provide, it is important to first develop (or determine) baseline and target solar forecasting at different spatial and temporal scales. This paper aims to develop baseline and target values for solar forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output. forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output.

  6. Development of alternate methods of determining integrated SMR source terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Kenneth

    2014-06-10

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Task Force (TF) has been evaluating licensing issues unique and important to iPWRs, ranking these issues, and developing NEI position papers for submittal to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during the past three years. Papers have been developed and submitted to the NRC in a range of areas including: Price-Anderson Act, NRC annual fees, security, modularity, and staffing. In December, 2012, NEI completed a draft position paper on SMR source terms and participated in an NRC public meeting presenting a summary of this paper, which was subsequently submitted to the NRC. One important conclusion of the source term paper was the evaluation and selection of high importance areas where additional research would have a significant impact on source terms. The highest ranked research area was iPWR containment aerosol natural deposition. The NRC accepts the use of existing aerosol deposition correlations in Regulatory Guide 1.183, but these were developed for large light water reactor (LWR) containments. Application of these correlations to an iPWR design has resulted in greater than a ten-fold reduction of containment airborne aerosol inventory as compared to large LWRs. Development and experimental justification of containment aerosol natural deposition correlations specifically for the unique iPWR containments is expected to result in a large reduction of design basis and beyond-design-basis accident source terms with concomitantly smaller dose to workers and the public. Therefore, NRC acceptance of iPWR containment aerosol natural deposition correlations will directly support the industry’s goal of reducing the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for SMRs. Based on the results in this work, it is clear that thermophoresis is relatively unimportant for iPWRs. Gravitational settling is well understood, and may be the dominant process for a dry environment. Diffusiophoresis and enhanced settling by particle growth are the dominant processes for determining DFs for expected conditions in an iPWR containment. These processes are dependent on the areato-volume (A/V) ratio, which should benefit iPWR designs because these reactors have higher A/Vs compared to existing LWRs.

  7. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  8. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  9. SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1988-08-01

    The SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation was implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the SRP site. Phase III, which is discussed in this report, includes the drilling of 7 deep coreholes (sites P-24 through P-30) and the installation of 53 observation wells ranging in depth from approximately 50 ft to more than 970 ft below the ground surface. In addition to the collection of geologic cores for lithologic and stratigraphic study, samples were also collected for the determination of physical characteristics of the sediments and for the identification of microorganisms.

  10. A development and comparison of two methods of orbit determination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Harry Louis

    1967-01-01

    are based on the original methods of Olbers for comet orb1ts, and Gauss and Laplace for planetary orbits. Historically astronomers lost interest in Laplace's method until Leuschner7* modified his method using differential corrections. Since... then there have been many contr1butions on' variations of the improvement procedures for the first approximat1on to the preliminary orbit. Gibbs and Encke 3 7 have developed methods for second and higher approximations to Gauss' method. A surv...

  11. A baseline model for utility bill analysis using both weather and non-weather-related variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.C. [SRC Systems, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Many utility bill analyses in the literature rely only on weather-based correlations. While often the dominant cause of seasonal variations in utility consumption, weather variables are far from the only determinant factors. Vacation shutdowns, plug creep, changes in building operation and square footage, and plain poor correlation are all too familiar to the practicing performance contractor. This paper presents a generalized baseline equation, consistent with prior results by others but extended to include other, non-weather-related independent variables. Its compatibility with extensive prior research by others is shown, as well as its application to several types of facilities. The baseline equation, as presented, can accommodate up to five simultaneous independent variables for a maximum of eight free parameters. The use of two additional, empirical degree-day threshold parameters is also discussed. The baseline equation presented here is at the base of a commercial utility accounting software program. All case studies presented to illustrate the development of the baseline equation for each facility are drawn from real-life studies performed by users of this program.

  12. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle ?23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  13. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) Conceptual Design Report (CDR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LBNE Collaboration

    2012-04-10

    Conceptual Design Report developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment.

  14. TWRS privatization process technical baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orme, R.M.

    1996-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is planning a two-phased program for the remediation of Hanford tank waste. Phase 1 is a pilot program to demonstrate the procurement of treatment services. The volume of waste treated during the Phase 1 is a small percentage of the tank waste. During Phase 2, DOE intends to procure treatment services for the balance of the waste. The TWRS Privatization Process Technical Baseline (PPTB) provides a summary level flowsheet/mass balance of tank waste treatment operations which is consistent with the tank inventory information, waste feed staging studies, and privatization guidelines currently available. The PPTB will be revised periodically as privatized processing concepts are crystallized.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A RAPID TEST TO DETERMINE MOISTURE SENSTIVITY OF HMA (SUPERPAVE) MIXTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiwakoti, Harihar

    2007-12-14

    Exiting test methods to determine moisture sensitivity in hot mix asphalt are time consuming and inconsistent. This research focused on wheel tracking devices to develop a rapid test method to evaluate moisture sensitivity. The Asphalt Pavement...

  16. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

    2008-05-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

  17. Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; Lefranc, Maurice; Roy, Joyashree; Winkler, Harald; Spalding-Fecher, Randall

    2003-03-12

    Calculating greenhouse gas emissions reductions from climate change mitigation projects requires construction of a baseline that sets emissions levels that would have occurred without the project. This paper describes a standardized multiproject methodology for setting baselines, represented by the emissions rate (kg C/kWh), for electric power projects. A standardized methodology would reduce the transaction costs of projects. The most challenging aspect of setting multiproject emissions rates is determining the vintage and types of plants to include in the baseline and the stringency of the emissions rates to be considered, in order to balance the desire to encourage no- or low-carbon projects while maintaining environmental integrity. The criteria for selecting power plants to include in the baseline depend on characteristics of both the project and the electricity grid it serves. Two case studies illustrate the application of these concepts to the electric power grids in eastern India and South Africa. We use hypothetical, but realistic, climate change projects in each country to illustrate the use of the multiproject methodology, and note the further research required to fully understand the implications of the various choices in constructing and using these baselines.

  18. Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better...

  19. UCSF Sustainability Baseline Assessment: Carbon Footprint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    UCSF Sustainability Baseline Assessment: Carbon Footprint Analysis Final Issue Date: March 21, 2010 #12;Carbon Footprint Analysis Background This chapter of the Sustainability Assessment focuses on UCSF

  20. Energy baseline and energy efficiency resource opportunities for the Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzucchi, R.P.; Richman, E.E.; Parker, G.B.

    1993-08-01

    This report provides recommendations to improve the energy use efficiency at the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin. The assessment focuses upon the four largest buildings and central heating plant at the facility comprising a total of approximately 287,000 square feet. The analysis is comprehensive in nature, intended primarily to determine what if any energy efficiency improvements are warranted based upon the potential for cost-effective energy savings. Because of this breadth, not all opportunities are developed in detail; however, baseline energy consumption data and energy savings concepts are described to provide a foundation for detailed investigation and project design where warranted.

  1. Scientific Opportunities with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, C.; et al.,

    2013-07-28

    In this document, we describe the wealth of science opportunities and capabilities of LBNE, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. LBNE has been developed to provide a unique and compelling program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of particle physics. Chief among the discovery opportunities are observation of CP symmetry violation in neutrino mixing, resolution of the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination of maximal or near-maximal mixing in neutrinos, searches for nucleon decay signatures, and detailed studies of neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae. To fulfill these and other goals as a world-class facility, LBNE is conceived around four central components: (1) a new, intense wide-band neutrino source at Fermilab, (2) a fine-grained `near' neutrino detector just downstream of the source, (3) the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota at an optimal distance (~1300 km) from the neutrino source, and (4) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) deployed there as a 'far' detector. The facilities envisioned are expected to enable many other science opportunities due to the high event rates and excellent detector resolution from beam neutrinos in the near detector and atmospheric neutrinos in the far detector. This is a mature, well developed, world class experiment whose relevance, importance, and probability of unearthing critical and exciting physics has increased with time.

  2. BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC).

  3. 200-BP-5 operable unit Technical Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, I.D.; Kent, S.K.

    1991-10-01

    This report supports development of a remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit. The report summarizes baseline information for waste sites and unplanned release sites located in the 200-BP-5 operable unit. The sites were investigated by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The investigation consisted of review and evaluation of current and historical Hanford Site reports, drawings, and photographs, and was supplemented with recent inspections of the Hanford Site and employee interviews. No field investigations or sampling were conducted.

  4. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  5. New Physics Effects in Long Baseline Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osamu Yasuda

    2007-10-13

    We discuss the implications of new physics, which modifies the matter effect in neutrino oscillations, to long baseline experiments, particularly the MINOS experiment. An analytic formula in the presence of such a new physics interaction is derived for $P(\

  6. Determining Baseline and Avoided Costs for UESC Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for "normal" weather, hours of operation, occupancy, etc. From recent years' utility data (building level) or sub- metered utility consumption (system level) Base for...

  7. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky has contracted with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to design, build and operate a first-of-its-kind plant demonstrating the economic, environmental, socioeconomic and technical feasibility of the direct coal liquefaction process known as SRC-I. ICRC has made a massive commitment of time and expertise to design processes, plan and formulate policy, schedules, costs and technical drawings for all plant systems. These fully integrated plans comprise the Project Baseline and are the basis for all future detailed engineering, plant construction, operation, and other work set forth in the contract between ICRC and the DOE. Volumes I and II of the accompanying documents constitute the updated Project Baseline for the SRC-I two-stage liquefaction plant. International Coal Refining Company believes this versatile plant design incorporates the most advanced coal liquefaction system available in the synthetic fuels field. SRC-I two-stage liquefaction, as developed by ICRC, is the way of the future in coal liquefaction because of its product slate flexibility, high process thermal efficiency, and low consumption of hydrogen. The SRC-I Project Baseline design also has made important state-of-the-art advances in areas such as environmental control systems. Because of a lack of funding, the DOE has curtailed the total project effort without specifying a definite renewal date. This precludes the development of revised accurate and meaningful schedules and, hence, escalated project costs. ICRC has revised and updated the original Design Baseline to include in the technical documentation all of the approved but previously non-incorporated Category B and C and new Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals.

  8. Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

  9. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Conceptual Design ReportThe LBNE Water Cherenkov DetectorApril 13 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S. H.; Bishai, M.; Brown, R.; Chen, H.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J., Geronimo, G.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R.; Hahn, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D.; Junnarkar, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Lanni,F.; Li, Y.; Ling, J.; Littenberg, L.; Makowiecki, D.; Marciano, W.; Morse, W.; Parsa, Z.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Samios, N.; Sharma, R.; Simos, N.; Sondericker, J.; Stewart, J.; Tanaka, H.; Themann, H.; Thorn, C.; Viren, B., White, S.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Yu, B.; Zhang, C.

    2012-04-13

    Conceptual Design Report (CDR) developed for the Water Cherekov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  10. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: User guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, J.C. [Bower Software Services, Kennewick, WA (United States); Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.; Wood, B.M.

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. This User Guide explains how to start and use the IBS Program, which is designed to help civilian emergency management personnel to plan for and support their responses to a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. The intended audience for this document is all users of the IBS, especially emergency management planners and analysts.

  11. Development of Analytical Methods for the Determination of Methylarginines in Serum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linz, Thomas

    2013-05-31

    .3.1.1 Electrochemical Response of NDA-Labeled Analytes……...….173 6.3.1.2 Evaluation of Alternative Nucleophiles……………………..….175 6.3.1.2.1 Electrokinetic Flow Injection Analysis……………….176 6.3.1.2.2 Cyclic Voltammetry……………………...…………...181 6.3.1.2.3 Microchip... setting. During development of this procedure, several different parameters were evaluated to determine the conditions that produced the most efficient extraction. Following optimization, the heat-assisted extraction was compared to a traditional solid...

  12. Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction...

  13. South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and...

  14. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, R .G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in 1958. The paper described a three stage plan for a sustainable nuclear energy program consistent with India's limited uranium but abundant thorium natural resources. In the first stage, natural uranium would be used to fuel graphite or heavy water moderated reactors. Plutonium extracted from the spent fuel of these thermal reactors would drive fast reactors in the second stage that would contain thorium blankets for breeding uranium-233 (U-233). In the final stage, this U-233 would fuel thorium burning reactors that would breed and fission U-233 in situ. This three stage blueprint still reigns as the core of India's civil nuclear power program. India's progress in the development of nuclear power, however, has been impacted by its isolation from the international nuclear community for its development of nuclear weapons and consequent refusal to sign the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). Initially, India was engaged in numerous cooperative research programs with foreign countries; for example, under the 'Atoms for Peace' program, India acquired the Cirus reactor, a 40 MWt research reactor from Canada moderated with heavy water from the United States. India was also actively engaged in negotiations for the NPT. But, on May 18, 1974, India conducted a 'peaceful nuclear explosion' at Pokharan using plutonium produced by the Cirus reactor, abruptly ending the era of international collaboration. India then refused to sign the NPT, which it viewed as discriminatory since it would be required to join as a non-nuclear weapons state. As a result of India's actions, the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was created in 1975 to establish guidelines 'to apply to nuclear transfers for peaceful purposes to help ensure that such transfers would not be diverted to unsafeguarded nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear explosive activities. These nuclear export controls have forced India to be largely self-sufficient in all nuclear-related technologies.

  15. Baseline Risk Assessment Supporting Closure at Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site Washington - 15332

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, Kristin M.

    2015-01-07

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C under the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO). A baseline risk assessment (BRA) of current conditions is based on available characterization data and information collected at WMA C. The baseline risk assessment is being developed as a part of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) at WMA C that is mandatory under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and RCRA corrective action. The RFI/CMS is needed to identify and evaluate the hazardous chemical and radiological contamination in the vadose zone from past releases of waste from WMA C. WMA C will be under Federal ownership and control for the foreseeable future, and managed as an industrial area with restricted access and various institutional controls. The exposure scenarios evaluated under these conditions include Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Method C, industrial worker, maintenance and surveillance worker, construction worker, and trespasser scenarios. The BRA evaluates several unrestricted land use scenarios (residential all-pathway, MTCA Method B, and Tribal) to provide additional information for risk management. Analytical results from 13 shallow zone (0 to 15 ft. below ground surface) sampling locations were collected to evaluate human health impacts at WMA C. In addition, soil analytical data were screened against background concentrations and ecological soil screening levels to determine if soil concentrations have the potential to adversely affect ecological receptors. Analytical data from 12 groundwater monitoring wells were evaluated between 2004 and 2013. A screening of groundwater monitoring data against background concentrations and Federal maximum concentration levels was used to determine vadose zone contamination impacts on groundwater. Waste Management Area C is the first of the Hanford tank farms to begin the closure planning process. The current baseline risk assessment will provide valuable information for making corrective actions and closure decisions for WMA C, and will also support the planning for future tank farm soil investigation and baseline risk assessments.

  16. Waste management project technical baseline description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1997-08-13

    A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

  17. Development of a method for determination of radon emanation from small soil samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madonia, Michael Vincent

    1990-01-01

    the optimization of statistical considerations was discussed and implemented into a computer code developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The evaluated system and computer code were used to measure radon emanation from a variety of Danish soil types... in the closed loop system is determined and the radon emanation power calculated. 'n 11 n 11 n n ' n The Rn-222 concentration in the Lucas cell during each measurement is calculated by counting the rate of light flashes enutted in the cell over a...

  18. State-Of-The-Art in Permeability Determination From Well Log Data: Part 1-A Comparative Study, Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Determination From Well Log Data: Part 1- A Comparative Study, Model Development Balan, B., Mohaghegh, S., Ameri use of empirically determined models, multiple variable regression, and artificial neural networks present only the model develop- ment phase in which we are testing the capability of each method to match

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  20. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  1. An evaluation of baseline conditions at lease tract C-a, Rio Blanco County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barteaux, W.L.; Biezugbe, G.

    1987-09-01

    An analysis was made of baseline groundwater quality data from oil shale lease tract C-a, managed by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company. The data are limited in several respects. All conclusions drawn from the data must be qualified with these limitations. Baseline conditions were determined by analyzing data from wells in the upper bedrock and lower bedrock aquifers and from the alluvial wells. Baseline data were considered all data collected before mining operations began. The water quality was then evaluated using the 1987 Colorado State Basic Standards for Ground Water as a basis. The maximum baseline values for several parameters in each aquifer exceed the standard values. The quality of the upper lower bedrock aquifers varies from region to region within the site. Data on the lower bedrock aquifer are insufficient for speculation on the cause of the variations. Variations in the upper bedrock aquifer are possibly caused by leakage of the lower bedrock aquifer. 16 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Utilities Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Williams, J.R.; Bower, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Utilities Guide explains how you can use the IBS utility programs to manage and manipulate various kinds of IBS data. These programs include utilities for creating, editing, and displaying maps and other data that are referenced to geographic location. The intended audience for this document are chiefly data managers but also system managers and some emergency management planners and analysts.

  3. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 1.03: Utilities guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Pottier, M.C.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that was developed under the direction of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This Utilities Guide explains how to operate utility programs that are supplied as a part of the IBS. These utility programs are chiefly for managing and manipulating various kinds of IBS data and system administration files. Many of the utilities are for creating, editing, converting, or displaying map data and other data that are related to geographic location.

  4. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Models guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Models Guide summarizes the IBS use of several computer models for predicting the results of emergency situations. These include models for predicting dispersion/doses of airborne contaminants, traffic evacuation, explosion effects, heat radiation from a fire, and siren sound transmission. The guide references additional technical documentation on the models when such documentation is available from other sources. The audience for this manual is chiefly emergency management planners and analysts, but also data managers and system managers.

  5. Super-NOnuA: A Long-baseline neutrino experiment with two off-axis detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena Requejo, Olga; /Fermilab; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; /Vanderbilt U.; Pascoli, Silvia; /CERN

    2005-04-01

    Establishing the neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the fundamental questions that will have to be addressed in the next future. Its determination could be obtained with long-baseline experiments but typically suffers from degeneracies with other neutrino parameters. We consider here the NOvA experiment configuration and propose to place a second off-axis detector, with a shorter baseline, such that, by exploiting matter effects, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy could be determined with only the neutrino run. We show that the determination of this parameter is free of degeneracies, provided the ratio L/E, where L the baseline and E is the neutrino energy, is the same for both detectors.

  6. Development of a flow injection analysis method for the determination of acrylamide copolymers in oilfield brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, K.C.; Burke, R.A.; Schramm, L.L. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01

    An automated method for the determination of acrylamide polymers by flow injection analysis (FIA) has been developed and optimized for routine use. The method has been extensively tested for interferences common in oilfield brines. Potential interferences were examined from Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 3+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}}, OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, sample coloration, and commonly used surfactants. The analysis is specific for amides, and the sensitivity to concentration of amide groups in the polymer was shown to be constant as the degree of polymer hydrolysis was varied. The range of the method is 0.1 to 100 mg/L. Sample throughput is 30 samples/h with triplicate analysis. Relative standard deviations of 0.2% are readily obtained from standard solutions and 0.5% from complex samples (at 50 mg/L). The method is applicable to the determination of aqueous, acrylamide-based polymers in process streams, surface waters and oilfield brines.

  7. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-11-01

    As discussed in the program plan for the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, this program has been implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the current state of knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The objective of the program is to install a series of observation well clusters (wells installed in each major water bearing formation at the same site) at key locations across the plant site in order to: (1) provide detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and groundwater hydrology, (2) provide observation wells to monitor the groundwater quality, head relationships, gradients, and flow paths.

  8. Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael; Addy, Nathan; Jump, David

    2013-09-01

    The overarching goal of this work is to advance the capabilities of technology evaluators in evaluating the building-level baseline modeling capabilities of Energy Management and Information System (EMIS) software. Through their customer engagement platforms and products, EMIS software products have the potential to produce whole-building energy savings through multiple strategies: building system operation improvements, equipment efficiency upgrades and replacements, and inducement of behavioral change among the occupants and operations personnel. Some offerings may also automate the quantification of whole-building energy savings, relative to a baseline period, using empirical models that relate energy consumption to key influencing parameters, such as ambient weather conditions and building operation schedule. These automated baseline models can be used to streamline the whole-building measurement and verification (M&V) process, and therefore are of critical importance in the context of multi-measure whole-building focused utility efficiency programs. This report documents the findings of a study that was conducted to begin answering critical questions regarding quantification of savings at the whole-building level, and the use of automated and commercial software tools. To evaluate the modeling capabilities of EMIS software particular to the use case of whole-building savings estimation, four research questions were addressed: 1. What is a general methodology that can be used to evaluate baseline model performance, both in terms of a) overall robustness, and b) relative to other models? 2. How can that general methodology be applied to evaluate proprietary models that are embedded in commercial EMIS tools? How might one handle practical issues associated with data security, intellectual property, appropriate testing ‘blinds’, and large data sets? 3. How can buildings be pre-screened to identify those that are the most model-predictable, and therefore those whose savings can be calculated with least error? 4. What is the state of public domain models, that is, how well do they perform, and what are the associated implications for whole-building measurement and verification (M&V)? Additional project objectives that were addressed as part of this study include: (1) clarification of the use cases and conditions for baseline modeling performance metrics, benchmarks and evaluation criteria, (2) providing guidance for determining customer suitability for baseline modeling, (3) describing the portfolio level effects of baseline model estimation errors, (4) informing PG&E’s development of EMIS technology product specifications, and (5) providing the analytical foundation for future studies about baseline modeling and saving effects of EMIS technologies. A final objective of this project was to demonstrate the application of the methodology, performance metrics, and test protocols with participating EMIS product vendors.

  9. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    diesel). The baseline scenario is based upon the output of the CalCars model with the middle fuel price

  10. US Biofuels Baseline and impact of extending the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    June 2011 US Biofuels Baseline and impact of extending the $0.45 ethanol blenders baseline projections for agricultural and biofuel markets.1 That baseline assumed current biofuel policy for cellulosic biofuels was assumed to expire at the end of 2012. This report compares a slightly modified

  11. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5096E Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated of California. #12;Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR

  12. 200-UP-2 Operable Unit technical baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deford, D.H.

    1991-02-01

    This report is prepared in support of the development of a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit by EBASCO Environmental, Incorporated. It provides a technical baseline of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit and results from an environmental investigation undertaken by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Technical Baseline Report is based on review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, Hanford Site drawings and photographs and is supplemented with Hanford Site inspections and employee interviews. No field investigations or sampling were conducted. Each waste site in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit consists of liquid-waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, U Plant operations in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The U Plant'' refers to the 221-U Process Canyon Building, a chemical separations facility constructed during World War 2. It also includes the Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which was constructed at the same time and, like the 221-U Process Canyon Building, was later converted for other missions. Waste sites in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit are associated with the U Plant Uranium Metal Recovery Program mission that occurred between 1952 and 1958 and the UO{sub 3} Plant's ongoing uranium oxide mission and include one or more cribs, reverse wells, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, waste vaults, and the lines and encasements that connect them. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Baseline requirements of the proposed action for the Transportation Management Division routing models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important to shippers, carriers, and the general public. This is particularly true for shipments of radioactive material. The shippers are primarily concerned with safety, security, efficiency, and equipment requirements. The carriers are concerned with the potential impact that radioactive shipments may have on their operations--particularly if such materials are involved in an accident. The general public has also expressed concerns regarding the safety of transporting radioactive and other hazardous materials through their communities. Because transportation routes are a central concern in hazardous material transport, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward resolution of these issues. In response to these routing needs, several models have been developed over the past fifteen years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HIGHWAY routing model is used to predict routes for truck transportation, the INTERLINE routing model is used to predict both rail and barge routes, and the AIRPORT locator model is used to determine airports with specified criteria near a specific location. As part of the ongoing improvement of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Transportation Management Division`s (EM-261) computer systems and development efforts, a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models was held at ORNL on April 27, 1994. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the existing capabilities of the models and data bases and to review enhancements of the models and data bases to expand their usefulness. The results of the Baseline Requirements Assessment Section will be discussed in this report. The discussions pertaining to the different models are contained in separate sections.

  14. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded datasets suitable for analysis (sample types 3 and 4). The intact saltstone sample (sample type 1) did not yield any measureable outflow over the pressure range of the outflow test (0-1000 cm H{sub 2}O). This was expected because the estimated air entry pressure for intact saltstone is on the order of 100,000 cm H{sub 2}O (Dixon et al., 2009). The intact saltstone sample with a single saw cut smooth surface fracture (sample type 2) did not produce useable data because the fracture completely drained at less than 10 cm H{sub 2}O applied pressure. The cumulative outflow data from sample types 3 and 4 were analyzed using an inverse solution of the Richard’s equation for water flow in variably saturated porous media. This technique was implemented using the computer code Hydrus-1D (Šim?nek et al., 2008) and the resulting output included the van Genuchten-Mualem water retention and relative permeability parameters and predicted saturated hydraulic conductivity (Van Genuchten, 1980; Van Genuchten et al., 1991). Estimations of relative permeability and saturated conductivity are possible because the transient response of the sample to pressure changes is recorded during the multi-step outflow extraction test. Characteristic curves were developed for sample types 3 and 4 based on the results of the transient outflow method and compared to that of intact saltstone previously reported by Dixon et al. (2009). The overall results of this study indicate that the outflow extraction method is suitable for measuring the hydraulic properties of micro-fractured porous media. The resulting cumulative outflow data can be analyzed using the computer code Hydrus-1D to generate the van Genuchten curve fitting parameters that adequately describe fracture drainage. The resulting characteristic curves are consistent with blended characteristic curves that combine the behaviors of low pressure drainage associated with fracture flow with high pressure drainage from the bulk saltstone matrix.

  15. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Water Cherenkov Detector Schedule and Cost Books LBNE Far Site Internal Review(December 6-9,2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09

    Schedule and Cost Books developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  16. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Water Cherenkov Detector Basis of Estimate Forms and Backup Documentation LBNE Far Site Internal Review (December 6-9, 2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09

    Basis of Estimate (BOE) forms and backup documentation developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  17. Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

    1996-01-01

    ) + f3 c * DD(r J (3) where DD (r ) are the degree-days to the base r, and the subscripts c and h stand for cooling and heating respectively. Note that eqs. (1) and (2) represent a model with three regression parameters, i.e, a 3-P model, while eq...

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 INDUSTRIAL ENERGY USE BASELINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    known as the Consumption of Purchased Fuels and Electricity (CPFE), which is generated from the Annual of consumption on the generation of emissions and the monitoring of changes in consumption levels has captured national and international public interest. In any analysis of total energy consumption, changes in energy

  19. Uncertainty in Clean Development Mechanism Baselines: Sources, Ramifications, and Negotiations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushey, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    project.   For example, if a wind farm project is  expected energy  generation  from  a  wind  farm  which  are,  in 

  20. Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

    1996-01-01

    -available weather data for Temple, Texas covered only through May 1994. In view of the objectives of this study, it was decided to limit the present analysis at the cantonment area level from January 1989 to December 1993 data only. the effects of parameters... of the presence of functional discontinuities, called "change points". A widely adopted convention is to refer to a single variable model with, say, three parameters as a 3-P SV model. This study will limit itself to SV models only, and consequently the term...

  1. Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153DanielthroughDeterminingmanagement to suppress helium

  2. Energy reconstruction in the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich Mosel; Olga Lalakulich; Kai Gallmeister

    2014-04-24

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the $CP$-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies.

  3. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-05-25

    As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

  4. Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: Modular baseline health surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, Mirko S.; Divall, Mark J.; Krieger, Gary R.; Schmidlin, Sandro; Magassouba, Mohamed L.; Knoblauch, Astrid M.; Singer, Burton H.; Utzinger, Juerg

    2012-02-15

    The quantitative assessment of health impacts has been identified as a crucial feature for realising the full potential of health impact assessment (HIA). In settings where demographic and health data are notoriously scarce, but there is a broad range of ascertainable ecological, environmental, epidemiological and socioeconomic information, a diverse toolkit of data collection strategies becomes relevant for the mainly small-area impacts of interest. We present a modular, cross-sectional baseline health survey study design, which has been developed for HIA of industrial development projects in the humid tropics. The modular nature of our toolkit allows our methodology to be readily adapted to the prevailing eco-epidemiological characteristics of a given project setting. Central to our design is a broad set of key performance indicators, covering a multiplicity of health outcomes and determinants at different levels and scales. We present experience and key findings from our modular baseline health survey methodology employed in 14 selected sentinel sites within an iron ore mining project in the Republic of Guinea. We argue that our methodology is a generic example of rapid evidence assembly in difficult-to-reach localities, where improvement of the predictive validity of the assessment and establishment of a benchmark for longitudinal monitoring of project impacts and mitigation efforts is needed.

  5. Development and analysis of a small satellite attitude determination and control system testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowell, Corey Whitcomb

    2011-01-01

    Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) are critical to the operation of satellites that require attitude knowledge and/or attitude control to achieve mission success. Furthermore, ADCS systems only operate as ...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  7. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  8. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  9. Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Addy, Nathan; Kiliccote, Sila; Mathieu, Johanna; Callaway, Duncan S.

    2012-06-13

    Accurate evaluation of the performance of buildings participating in Demand Response (DR) programs is critical to the adoption and improvement of these programs. Typically, we calculate load sheds during DR events by comparing observed electric demand against counterfactual predictions made using statistical baseline models. Many baseline models exist and these models can produce different shed calculations. Moreover, modelers implementing the same baseline model can make different modeling implementation choices, which may affect shed estimates. In this work, using real data, we analyze the effect of different modeling implementation choices on shed predictions. We focused on five issues: weather data source, resolution of data, methods for determining when buildings are occupied, methods for aligning building data with temperature data, and methods for power outage filtering. Results indicate sensitivity to the weather data source and data filtration methods as well as an immediate potential for automation of methods to choose building occupied modes.

  10. Report of the DOE Review Committee on the baseline validation of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Secretary of Energy directed that an independent review of the current cost and schedule baseline for the SSC be conducted. The purpose of this independent review was to validate the current cost and schedule baseline and to ensure that the project status is accurate as currently reported. Through May 1993, approximately $1.5 billion of the baseline cost of $8.249 billion had been expended, with project completion forecasted on the baseline schedule as of September 1999. This report documents the findings of the SSC Baseline Validation Review Committee (the Committee). The report is organized into five parts. The first section is the Executive Summary. This introduction is followed by a discussion of the project progress/status as determined by the Committee. The next section describes the Committee`s estimate of the cost at completion for the SSC project, followed by an assessment of the adequacy of the business management systems currently being used to manage the project. The final section presents the Committee`s conclusions and recommendations. The main body of the report is followed by the subcommittee reports and appendices.

  11. LTC vacuum blasting machine (concrete): Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

  12. LTC vacuum blasting machine (metal): Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The LTC coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC coating removal system consisted of several hand tools, a Roto Peen scaler, and a needlegun. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. These hand tools are used with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. The dust exposure was minimal but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  13. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  14. Gated integrator with signal baseline subtraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, X.

    1996-12-17

    An ultrafast, high precision gated integrator includes an opamp having differential inputs. A signal to be integrated is applied to one of the differential inputs through a first input network, and a signal indicative of the DC offset component of the signal to be integrated is applied to the other of the differential inputs through a second input network. A pair of electronic switches in the first and second input networks define an integrating period when they are closed. The first and second input networks are substantially symmetrically constructed of matched components so that error components introduced by the electronic switches appear symmetrically in both input circuits and, hence, are nullified by the common mode rejection of the integrating opamp. The signal indicative of the DC offset component is provided by a sample and hold circuit actuated as the integrating period begins. The symmetrical configuration of the integrating circuit improves accuracy and speed by balancing out common mode errors, by permitting the use of high speed switching elements and high speed opamps and by permitting the use of a small integrating time constant. The sample and hold circuit substantially eliminates the error caused by the input signal baseline offset during a single integrating window. 5 figs.

  15. Gated integrator with signal baseline subtraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Xucheng (Lisle, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An ultrafast, high precision gated integrator includes an opamp having differential inputs. A signal to be integrated is applied to one of the differential inputs through a first input network, and a signal indicative of the DC offset component of the signal to be integrated is applied to the other of the differential inputs through a second input network. A pair of electronic switches in the first and second input networks define an integrating period when they are closed. The first and second input networks are substantially symmetrically constructed of matched components so that error components introduced by the electronic switches appear symmetrically in both input circuits and, hence, are nullified by the common mode rejection of the integrating opamp. The signal indicative of the DC offset component is provided by a sample and hold circuit actuated as the integrating period begins. The symmetrical configuration of the integrating circuit improves accuracy and speed by balancing out common mode errors, by permitting the use of high speed switching elements and high speed opamps and by permitting the use of a small integrating time constant. The sample and hold circuit substantially eliminates the error caused by the input signal baseline offset during a single integrating window.

  16. The development of a correlation for determining oil density in high temperature reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, Thurman William

    1987-01-01

    -hydrocarbon components. The correlations were developed using non- linear regression methods on laboratory data from 1310 reservoir fluid samples. DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to the following people who have been very important in my life: My daughter... OF LITERATURE IDEAL SOLUTION THEORY DATA BASE DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS OF DATA AND DEVELOPMENT QF EQUATIONS CORRECTION TO DENSITY DUE TO THERMAL EXPANSION CALCULATION OF PSEUDOLIQUID DENSITY FROM COMPOSITION Page 1V V1 V11 Xii 12 15 15 25 NON...

  17. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino FacilityDeep Underground Neutrino...

  18. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 27, 2015 EA-1943: Draft Environmental Assessment Long Baseline Neutrino FacilityDeep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNFDUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the...

  19. Updates to the International Linear Collider Damping Rings Baseline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Updates to the International Linear Collider Damping Rings Baseline Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Updates to the International Linear Collider Damping Rings...

  20. Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Power...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blocks together into a new, revolutionary concept for future coal-based power and energy production. Objective To establish baseline performance and cost estimates for today's...

  1. UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    inventory Resource Type: Guidemanual Website: cdm.unfccc.intpublicinputsmethacm0001index.html Cost: Free Language: English References: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and...

  2. Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  3. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    CEC (2005b) Energy demand forecast methods report.growth in California energy demands forecast in the baseline2006-2016: Staff energy demand forecast (Revised September

  4. Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic...

  5. ITP Distributed Energy: 2008 Combined Heat and Power Baseline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2008 Combined Heat and Power Baseline Assessment and Action Plan for the Nevada Market Final Project Report September 30, 2008 Prepared By: Pacific Region Combined Heat and...

  6. New developments for the determination of the response function for a BC501A compact neutron spectrometer for fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, D-38116, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The compact neutron spectrometer project was initiated to develop a device able to study fast neutrons produced by fusion reactions in a tokamak. The goal is to provide a fully characterized BC501A detector using a digital acquisition system developed by ENEA. The pulse height resolution and the response matrix of the detector are determined using experimental data acquired at the PTB facility. To achieve this goal, methods of data analysis involving entropy maximization and new software were developed. The methods are described and the current results for the pulse height resolution are presented. (authors)

  7. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission initial updated baseline summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swita, W.R.

    1998-01-05

    This document provides a summary of the proposed Tank Waste Remediation System Retrieval and Disposal Mission Initial Updated Baseline (scope, schedule, and cost) developed to demonstrate the Tank Waste Remediation System contractor`s Readiness-to-Proceed in support of the Phase 1B mission.

  8. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction using advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design. Develop a process flow sheet simulation (PFS) model. This report summarizes the activities completed during the period December 23, 1992 through March 15, 1992. In Task 1, Baseline Design and Alternates, the following activities related to the tradeoff studies were completed: approach and basis; oxygen purity; F-T reactor pressure; wax yield; autothermal reformer; hydrocarbons (C{sub 3}/C{sub 4}s) recovery; and hydrogenrecovery. In Task 3, Engineering Design Criteria, activities were initiated to support the process tradeoff studies in Task I and to develop the environmental strategy for the Illinois site. The work completed to date consists of the development of the F-T reactor yield correlation from the Mobil dam and a brief review of the environmental strategy prepared for the same site in the direct liquefaction baseline study.Some work has also been done in establishing site-related criteria, in establishing the maximum vessel diameter for train sizing and in coping with the low H{sub 2}/CO ratio from the Shell gasifier. In Task 7, Project Management and Administration, the following activities were completed: the subcontract agreement between Amoco and Bechtel was negotiated; a first technical progress meeting was held at the Bechtel office in February; and the final Project Management Plan was approved by PETC and issued in March 1992.

  9. Policy Building Blocks: Helping Policymakers Determine Policy Staging for the Development of Distributed PV Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2012-04-01

    There is a growing body of qualitative and a limited body of quantitative literature supporting the common assertion that policy drives development of clean energy resources. Recent work in this area indicates that the impact of policy depends on policy type, length of time in place, and economic and social contexts of implementation. This work aims to inform policymakers about the impact of different policy types and to assist in the staging of those policies to maximize individual policy effectiveness and development of the market. To do so, this paper provides a framework for policy development to support the market for distributed photovoltaic systems. Next steps include mathematical validation of the framework and development of specific policy pathways given state economic and resource contexts.

  10. The LBNO long-baseline oscillation sensitivities with two conventional neutrino beams at different baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAGUNA-LBNO Collaboration; :; S. K. Agarwalla; L. Agostino; M. Aittola; A. Alekou; B. Andrieu; F. Antoniou; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; A. Balik; P. Ballett; I. Bandac; D. Banerjee; W. Bartmann; F. Bay; B. Biskup; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; E. Borriello; I. Brancus; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Calviani; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; G. Cata-Danil; S. Chakraborty; N. Charitonidis; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; F. Chipesiu; P. Crivelli; J. Dawson; I. De Bonis; Y. Declais; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; A. Eliseev; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; K. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; A. N. Erykalov; T. Esanu; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; G. Gavrilov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; S. Gilardoni; B. Goddard; C. M. Gomoiu; Y. A. Gornushkin; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; K. Huitu; A. Izmaylov; A. Jipa; K. Kainulainen; Y. Karadzhov; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; A. N. Kopylov; A. Korzenev; S. Kosyanenko; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; C. Lazaridis; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin-Mari; V. Matveev; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; A. Mirizzi; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; S. Narita; D. A. Nesterenko; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; E. Noah; Yu. Novikov; A. Oprima; J. Osborne; T. Ovsyannikova; Y. Papaphilippou; S. Pascoli; T. Patzak; M. Pectu; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; F. Resnati; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Rummukainen; A. Saftoiu; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez-Galan; J. Sarkamo; N. Saviano; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; E. Shaposhnikova; M. Slupecki; D. Smargianaki; D. Stanca; R. Steerenberg; A. R. Sterian; P. Sterian; S. Stoica; C. Strabel; J. Suhonen; V. Suvorov; G. Toma; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; K. Tuominen; M. Valram; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; F. Velotti; P. Velten; V. Venturi; T. Viant; S. Vihonen; H. Vincke; A. Vorobyev; A. Weber; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

    2014-12-02

    The proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Observatory (LBNO) initially consists of $\\sim 20$ kton liquid double phase TPC complemented by a magnetised iron calorimeter, to be installed at the Pyh\\"asalmi mine, at a distance of 2300 km from CERN. The conventional neutrino beam is produced by 400 GeV protons accelerated at the SPS accelerator delivering 700 kW of power. The long baseline provides a unique opportunity to study neutrino flavour oscillations over their 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima exploring the $L/E$ behaviour, and distinguishing effects arising from $\\delta_{CP}$ and matter. In this paper we show how this comprehensive physics case can be further enhanced and complemented if a neutrino beam produced at the Protvino IHEP accelerator complex, at a distance of 1160 km, and with modest power of 450 kW is aimed towards the same far detectors. We show that the coupling of two independent sub-MW conventional neutrino and antineutrino beams at different baselines from CERN and Protvino will allow to measure CP violation in the leptonic sector at a confidence level of at least $3\\sigma$ for 50\\% of the true values of $\\delta_{CP}$ with a 20 kton detector. With a far detector of 70 kton, the combination allows a $3\\sigma$ sensitivity for 75\\% of the true values of $\\delta_{CP}$ after 10 years of running. Running two independent neutrino beams, each at a power below 1 MW, is more within today's state of the art than the long-term operation of a new single high-energy multi-MW facility, which has several technical challenges and will likely require a learning curve.

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project technical baseline document. Fiscal year 1995: Volume 1, Baseline description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womack, J.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cramond, R. [TRW (United States); Paedon, R.J. [SAIC (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    This document is a revision to WHC-SD-SNF-SD-002, and is issued to support the individual projects that make up the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project in the lower-tier functions, requirements, interfaces, and technical baseline items. It presents results of engineering analyses since Sept. 1994. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safety, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner that stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel, although other SNF is involved also.

  12. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Effective September 26, 1991, Bechtel, with Amoco as the main subcontractor, initiated a study to develop a computer model and baseline design for advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology; prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design; and develop a process flow sheet simulation (PI-S) model. The baseline design, the economic analysis, and the computer model win be the major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide, and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction. for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. This report is Bechtel`s third quarterly technical progress report covering the period from March 16, 1992 through June 21, 1992. This report consists of seven sections: Section 1 - introduction; Section 2 - summary; Section 3 - carbon dioxide removal tradeoff study; Section 4 - preliminary plant designs for coal preparation; Section 5 - preliminary design for syngas production; Section 6 - Task 3 - engineering design criteria; and Section 7 - project management.

  13. The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivers, Jon Blake

    1991-01-01

    , was calculated in each of these directions to determine the distance between correlated and uncorrelated porosity values. The results show that the German Sandstone is correlated for about 5 mm in all three directions considered. In the Austin Chalk, porosity..., Y-I WRITE(7, *) A(H), C(H), G(H) 60 CO~ STOP 72 APPENDIX D CORE SAMPLE GEOLOGY The Austin Chalk is best characterized as a very fine- grained carbonate mud containing coarser skeletal tests and fragments. The grain size of the chalk...

  14. Development and testing of a standard procedure for determining the viscous properties of crosslinked fracture fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worlow, David Wayne

    1987-01-01

    treatment. The application of' the published data to fracture design assumes that the power law model is applicable for all shear rates. A testing procedure has been developed which adequately models the shear and temperature history of a typical... fracture treatment. The data required to calculate the power law parameters are obtained at the shear rates expected in the i'racture during a tr eatment. This testing procedure has been designed i' or use with a Farm Model 50C Rotational Viscometer...

  15. Super-NO{nu}A: A long-baseline neutrino experiment with two off-axis detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Requejo, Olga Mena [Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States); Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Pascoli, Silvia [Physics Department, Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    Establishing the neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the fundamental questions that will have to be addressed in the near future. Its determination could be obtained with long-baseline experiments but typically suffers from degeneracies with other neutrino parameters. We consider here the NO{nu}A experiment configuration and propose to place a second off-axis detector, with a shorter baseline, such that, by exploiting matter effects, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy could be determined with only the neutrino run. We show that the determination of this parameter is free of degeneracies, provided the ratio L/E, where L is the baseline and E is the neutrino energy, is the same for both detectors.

  16. Free-piston Stirling engine experimental program: Part 1. Baseline test summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, R.; Moynihan, T.

    1983-06-01

    Free-Piston Stirling Engine experimental data are presented from a series of tests that establish the operating characteristics of the engine and determine performance repeatability. The operating envelope of the engine was to determine maximum parameter range and repeatability. Tests were then carried out in which individual operating parameters were varied while others were maintained constant. These data establish the baseline operation of the engine as a preliminary to a series of tests in which several suspected sources of energy loss are investigated by changing the engine geometry to isolate and magnify each suspected loss mechanism. Performance with the geometry change is compared against baseline operation to quantify the magnitude of the loss mechanism under investigation. The results of the loss mechanism investigation are presented in Part 2 of this report.

  17. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  18. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2013-05-15

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  19. Use of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) to determine the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, M.F.; Chadwick, R.W.; Cooke, N.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Hill, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The compound lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) has been used to study the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing Fischer 344 rat. The distribution and metabolic fate of lindane at 2, 9, 16, and 23 d of age was investigated following subcutaneous administration of lindane at 20 mg/kg containing 0.5 microCi (U-/sup 14/C)lindane in peanut oil. Groups of 10 pups (5 male and 5 female) were sacrificed at 4-h intervals during the 24-h period following dosing. Adrenals, blood, brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidneys were analyzed for radioactivity. Urine samples were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites of lindane. There was a significant age-dependent increase in the metabolism of lindane in the rat. High levels of radioactivity in the lung and increased reductive dechlorination suggest that the lung may play a greater role in metabolism of lindane by young rats. Oxidative phase I reactions increased significantly, while anaerobic reductive dechlorination of lindane to 4-chlorophenylmercapturic acid decreased significantly with age. Phase II sulfate and glutathione conjugations decreased significantly and glucuronide conjugation increased significantly with age. Metabolism and excretion of lindane appear to parallel development of the hepatic enzymes involved in phase I and phase II reactions.

  20. Use of. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) to determine the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, M.F.; Chadwick, R.W.; Cooke, N.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Hill, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The compound lindane (..gamma..-hexachlorocyclohexane) has been used to study the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing Fischer 344 rat. The distribution and metabolic rate of lindane at 2, 9, 16, and 23 d of age was investigated following subcutaneous administration of lindane at 20 mg/kg containing 0.5 ..mu..Ci (U-/sup 14/C)lindane in peanut oil. Groups of 10 pups (5 male and 5 female) were sacrificed at 4-h intervals during the 24-h period following dosing. Adrenals, blood, brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidneys were analyzed for radioactivity. Urine samples were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites of lindane. There was a significant age-dependent increase in the metabolism of lindane in the rat. High levels of radioactivity in the lung and increased reductive dechlorination suggest that the lung may play a greater role in metabolism of lindane by young rats. Oxidative phase I reactions increased significantly, while anaerobic, reductive dechlorination of lindane to 4-chlorophenylmercapturic acid decreased significantly and glucuronide conjugation increased significantly with age. Metabolism and excretion of lindane appear to parallel development of the hepatic enzymes involved in phase I and phase II reactions.

  1. The impact of interface/connection technology on determination of risk in a subsea development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisbie, F.R.

    1995-12-31

    Subsea production is a long time player in offshore oil and gas scenarios, particularly in relatively shallow waters and in combination with uncomplicated reservoir workover requirements and simple product chemistries. The increasing emphasis on deepwater hydrocarbon potential creates significant new opportunities for utilizing subsea production systems, if some of the risk factors can be fully quantified and mitigated. This paper will address those aspects of subsea production risk associated with the interface requirements, specifically those associated with providing override and replacement capabilities for failed subsea hardware, and with the connection technology for lowlines and umbilicals. If these areas of potential failure can be shown to be manageable, then a major area of risk associated with subsea developments can be eliminated.

  2. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  3. Sterile Neutrino Fits to Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews short-baseline oscillation experiments as interpreted within the context of one, two, and three sterile neutrino models associated with additional neutrino mass states in the ~1?eV range. Appearance and ...

  4. Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation at Four Kgra's in the Imperial Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www.netl.doe.gov This page intentionally left blank Cost and Performance Baseline for Coal-to-SNG and Ammonia (Volume 2) i Table of Contents LIST OF EXHIBITS......

  6. Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  7. Accelerator-based Short-baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several experiments have reported anomalous results that could be hinting at the exciting possibility of sterile neutrino states in the $eV^{2}$ mass scale. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a particularly promising technology to explore this physics due to their fine-grained tracking and exceptional calorimetric capabilities. The MicroBooNE experiment, a 170 ton LArTPC scheduled to start taking data very soon with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), will combine LArTPC development with the main physics goal of understanding the low-energy electromagnetic anomaly seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Looking towards the future, MicroBooNE will become a part of the \\textit{short-baseline neutrino} program which expands the physics capabilities of the BNB in many important ways by adding additional LArTPC detectors to search for light sterile neutrinos and bring a definitive resolution to the set of existing experimental anomalies. This paper will give an overview of...

  8. Optimal core baseline design and observing strategy for probing the astrophysics of reionization with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greig, Bradley; Koopmans, Léon V E

    2015-01-01

    With the first phase of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1) entering into its final pre-construction phase, we investigate how best to maximise its scientific return. Specifically, we focus on the statistical measurement of the 21 cm power spectrum (PS) from the epoch of reionization (EoR) using the low frequency array, SKA1-low. To facilitate this investigation we use the recently developed MCMC based EoR analysis tool 21CMMC (Greig & Mesinger). In light of the recent 50 per cent cost reduction, we consider several different SKA core baseline designs, changing: (i) the number of antenna stations; (ii) the number of dipoles per station; and also (iii) the distribution of baseline lengths. We find that a design with a reduced number of dipoles per core station (increased field of view and total number of core stations), together with shortened baselines, maximises the recovered EoR signal. With this optimal baseline design, we investigate three observing strategies, analysing the trade-off between lowering t...

  9. Integrated Baseline System (IBS). Version 2.0, System Management Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bower, J.C. [Bower Software Services, Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This User Guide explains how to start and use the IBS program, which is designed to help civilian emergency management personnel to plan for and support their responses to a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. The intended audience for this document is all users of the IBS, especially emergency management planners and analysts.

  10. Multi-baseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar applications and error analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chua, Song Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, we deal primarily with the multi-baseline SAR configuration utilizing three satellites. Two applications of InSAR, multi-baseline height retrieval and multi-baseline compensation of CCD's slope biasing ...

  11. Way to increase the user access at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS beam is meant for a single user, but the baseline undulator is long enough to serve two users simultaneously. To this end, we propose a setup composed of two elements: an X-ray mirrors pair for X-ray beam deflection, and a 4 m-long magnetic chicane, which creates an offset for mirrors pair installation in the middle of the baseline undulator. The insertable mirrors pair can separate spatially the X-ray beams generated in the first and in the second half of the baseline undulator. Rapid switching of the FEL amplification process allows deactivating one half and activating another half of the undulator. As proposed elsewhere, using a kicker installed upstream of the LCLS baseline undulator and an already existing corrector in the first half of the undulator, it is possible to rapidly switch the X-ray beam from one user to another. We present simulation results for the LCLS baseline, and show that it is possible to generate two saturated SASE X-ray beams in the whole 0.8-8 keV photon energy range in the...

  12. ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report (November...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ABB SCADAEMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report (November 2004) ABB SCADAEMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report (November 2004) This document covers the security...

  13. Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jump, David; Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael

    2013-09-06

    This document describes procedures for testing and validating proprietary baseline energy modeling software accuracy in predicting energy use over the period of interest, such as a month or a year. The procedures are designed according to the methodology used for public domain baselining software in another LBNL report that was (like the present report) prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company: ?Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing Protocols? (referred to here as the ?Model Analysis Report?). The test procedure focuses on the quality of the software?s predictions rather than on the specific algorithms used to predict energy use. In this way the software vendor is not required to divulge or share proprietary information about how their software works, while enabling stakeholders to assess its performance.

  14. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  15. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D&D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report.

  16. Technical Evaluation Report "Baseline Design for the COS Aperture Plate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Technical Evaluation Report "Baseline Design for the COS Aperture Plate" Date: October 14, 1999 Document Number: COS-11-0009 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: SE-05 Prepared By: J. Morse, COS Project Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist

  17. THE FIRST VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRIC SETI EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.

    2012-08-15

    The first Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) conducted with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is presented. By consideration of the basic principles of interferometry, we show that VLBI is efficient at discriminating between SETI signals and human generated radio frequency interference (RFI). The target for this study was the star Gliese 581, thought to have two planets within its habitable zone. On 2007 June 19, Gliese 581 was observed for 8 hr at 1230-1544 MHz with the Australian Long Baseline Array. The data set was searched for signals appearing on all interferometer baselines above five times the noise limit. A total of 222 potential SETI signals were detected and by using automated data analysis techniques were ruled out as originating from the Gliese 581 system. From our results we place an upper limit of 7 MW Hz{sup -1} on the power output of any isotropic emitter located in the Gliese 581 system within this frequency range. This study shows that VLBI is ideal for targeted SETI including follow-up observations. The techniques presented are equally applicable to next-generation interferometers, such as the long baselines of the Square Kilometre Array.

  18. New baseline for the magnet cooling system Yury Ivanyushenkov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 New baseline for the magnet cooling system Yury Ivanyushenkov Engineering and Instrumentation Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory #12;2 Liquid nitrogen cooling system: Conceptual points · Magnet the magnet as a stand alone system. #12;3 Liquid nitrogen cooling system: Diagram Drawn by Peter Titus #12

  19. Overview of the North Coast MPA Baseline Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    & Socioeconomic scope 10 Ecosystem Features Traditional Ecological Knowledge · Contextual Information e new contextual information More information on RFP p. 3-6 #12;North Coast Ecosystem Features.g., fisheries information, physical oceanographic information Baseline Program funds cannot be used to collect

  20. 2004 Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculation Revision O Sandia National Laboratories Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2004 Compliance Recertification Application (2 ~"f, Date QA Review Mario Chavez Print WIPP: 1.4.1.1.:P A:QA-L:540232 lof153 #12;2004 Compliance

  1. Degree-1 Earth deformation from very long baseline interferometry measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    of the center of mass of the Earth system through satellite orbit models and the former purely on observing earth and the center of mass of the entire Earth system (Earth, oceans and atmosphere). The load momentDegree-1 Earth deformation from very long baseline interferometry measurements D. Lavalle´e and G

  2. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The SRC Process Area Design Baseline consists of six volumes. The first four were submitted to DOE on 9 September 1981. The fifth volume, summarizing the Category A Engineering Change Proposals (ECPs), was not submitted. The sixth volume, containing proprietary information on Kerr-McGee's Critical Solvent Deashing System, was forwarded to BRHG Synthetic Fuels, Inc. for custody, according to past instructions from DOE, and is available for perusal by authorized DOE representatives. DOE formally accepted the Design Baseline under ICRC Release ECP 4-1001, at the Project Configuration Control Board meeting in Oak Ridge, Tennessee on 5 November 1981. The documentation was then revised by Catalytic, Inc. to incorporate the Category B and C and Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals. Volumes I through V of the Revised Design Baseline, dated 22 October 1982, are nonproprietary and they were issued to the DOE via Engineering Change Notice (ECN) 4-1 on 23 February 1983. Volume VI again contains proprieary information on Kerr-McGee Critical Solvent Deashing System; it was issued to Burns and Roe Synthetic Fuels, Inc. Subsequently, updated process descriptions, utility summaries, and errata sheets were issued to the DOE and Burns and Roe Synthetic Fuels, Inc. on nonproprietary Engineering Change Notices 4-2 and 4-3 on 24 May 1983.

  3. Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

  4. An Alternative Baseline Methodology for the Power Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Alternative Baseline Methodology for the Power Sector - Taking a Systemic Approach Jakob Asger in August 2005 to discuss the international future strategy of climate policies. Both events put our work process from idea to final thesis. Further we would like to express our warm thanks to Senior Energy

  5. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission initial updated baseline summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swita, W.R.

    1998-01-09

    This document provides a summary of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval and Disposal Mission Initial Updated Baseline (scope, schedule, and cost), developed to demonstrate Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP) in support of the TWRS Phase 1B mission. This Updated Baseline is the proposed TWRS plan to execute and measure the mission work scope. This document and other supporting data demonstrate that the TWRS Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team is prepared to fully support Phase 1B by executing the following scope, schedule, and cost baseline activities: Deliver the specified initial low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) feed batches in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner to support private contractors` operations starting in June 2002; Deliver specified subsequent LAW and HLW feed batches during Phase 1B in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner; Provide for the interim storage of immobilized HLW (IHLW) products and the disposal of immobilized LAW (ILAW) products generated by the private contractors; Provide for disposal of byproduct wastes generated by the private contractors; and Provide the infrastructure to support construction and operations of the private contractors` facilities.

  6. Annual Report on Environmental Monitoring Activities for FY 1995 (Baseline Year) at Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes baseline contaminant release conditions for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sampling approach and data analysis methods used to establish baseline conditions were presented in ``Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (EMP).`` As outlined in the EMP, the purpose of the baseline monitoring year at WAG 6 was to determine the annual contaminant releases from the site during fiscal year 1995 (FY95) against which any potential changes in releases over time could be compared. The baseline year data set provides a comprehensive understanding of release conditions from all major waste units in the WAG through each major contaminant transport pathway. Due to a mandate to reduce all monitoring work, WAG 6 monitoring was scaled back and reporting efforts on the baseline year results are being minimized. This report presents the quantified baseline year contaminant flux conditions for the site and briefly summarizes other findings. All baseline data cited in this report will reside in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information system (OREIS) database, and will be available for use in future years as the need arises to identify potential release changes.

  7. Data Management Guide: Integrated Baseline System (IBS). Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, J.C. [Bower Software Services, Kennewick, Washington (United States)] Bower Software Services, Kennewick, Washington (United States); Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Moise, M.C.; Williams, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency (USANCA). The IBS Data Management Guide provides the background, as well as the operations and procedures needed to generate and maintain a site-specific map database. Data and system managers use this guide to manage the data files and database that support the administrative, user-environment, database management, and operational capabilities of the IBS. This document provides a description of the data files and structures necessary for running the IBS software and using the site map database.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the remote location and low population density of some the facilities. As such, the needs assessment contains equivalencies to the applicable requirements. The compliance assessment contains no such equivalencies and simply assesses the existing emergency response resources to the requirements of the BNA and can be updated as compliance changes independent of the BNA update schedule. There are numerous NFPA codes and standards and other requirements and guidance documents that address the subject of emergency response. These requirements documents are not always well coordinated and may contain duplicative or conflicting requirements or even coverage gaps. Left unaddressed, this regulatory situation results in frequent interpretation of requirements documents. Different interpretations can then lead to inconsistent implementation. This BNA addresses this situation by compiling applicable requirements from all identified sources (see Section 5) and analyzing them collectively to address conflict and overlap as applicable to the hazards presented by the LLNL and Sandia/CA sites (see Section 7). The BNA also generates requirements when needed to fill any identified gaps in regulatory coverage. Finally, the BNA produces a customized simple set of requirements, appropriate for the DOE protection goals, such as those defined in DOE O 420.1B, the hazard level, the population density, the topography, and the site layout at LLNL and Sandia/CA that will be used as the baseline requirements set - the 'baseline needs' - for emergency response at LLNL and Sandia/CA. A template approach is utilized to accomplish this evaluation for each of the nine topical areas that comprise the baseline needs for emergency response. The basis for conclusions reached in determining the baseline needs for each of the topical areas is presented in Sections 7.1 through 7.9. This BNA identifies only mandatory requirements and establishes the minimum performance criteria. The minimum performance criteria may not be the level of performance desired Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or Sandia/CA

  10. Determining the feasibility of making bamboo charcoal pencil leads in developing countries using graphite pencil lead manufacturing processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkordy, Nadia S

    2008-01-01

    Many organizations seek to alleviate poverty in the developing world. One organization in particular strives to improve the livelihood of people in poverty through the technical development of and training in bamboo and ...

  11. Vietnam-Danish Government Baseline Workstream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas:Standards JumpUSA JumpVideoconVientiane,Baseline

  12. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  13. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  14. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  15. PROSPECT - A Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment at Short Baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ashenfelter; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; G. Barclay; C. Bass; N. S. Bowden; C. D. Bryan; J. J. Cherwinka; R. Chu; T. Classen; D. Davee; D. Dean; G. Deichert; M. Diwan; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; D. A. Dwyer; Y. Efremenko; S. Fan; A. Galindo-Uribarri; K. Gilje; A. Glenn; M. Green; K. Han; S. Hans; K. M. Heeger; B. Heffron; L. Hu; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; Y. Kamyshkov; S. Kettell; C. Lane; T. J. Langford; B. R. Littlejohn; D. Martinez; R. D. McKeown; M. P. Mendenhall; S. Morrell; P. Mueller; H. P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; J. S. Nico; D. Norcini; D. Pushin; X. Qian; E. Romero; R. Rosero; B. S. Seilhan; R. Sharma; P. T. Surukuchi; S. J. Thompson; R. L. Varner; B. Viren; W. Wang; B. White; C. White; J. Wilhelmi; C. Williams; R. E. Williams; T. Wise; H. Yao; M. Yeh; N. Zaitseva; C. Zhang; X. Zhang

    2015-01-27

    Current models of antineutrino production in nuclear reactors predict detection rates and spectra at odds with the existing body of direct reactor antineutrino measurements. High-resolution antineutrino detectors operated close to compact research reactor cores can produce new precision measurements useful in testing explanations for these observed discrepancies involving underlying nuclear or new physics. Absolute measurement of the 235U-produced antineutrino spectrum can provide additional constraints for evaluating the accuracy of current and future reactor models, while relative measurements of spectral distortion between differing baselines can be used to search for oscillations arising from the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented liquid scintillator detectors. We describe here the conceptual design and physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 7-20 meters capable of addressing these and other physics and detector development goals. Current R&D status and future plans for PROSPECT detector deployment and data-taking at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed.

  16. Laser-Ranging Long Baseline Differential Atom Interferometers for Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity differential atom interferometers are promising for precision measurements in science frontiers in space, including gravity field mapping for Earth science studies and gravitational wave detection. We propose a new configuration of twin atom interferometers connected by a laser ranging interferometer (LRI-AI) to provide precise information of the displacements between the two AI reference mirrors and a means to phase-lock the two independent interferometer lasers over long distances, thereby further enhancing the feasibility of long baseline differential atom interferometers. We show that a properly implemented LRI-AI can achieve equivalent functionality to the conventional differential atom interferometer measurement system. LRI-AI isolates the laser requirements for atom interferometers and for optical phase readout between distant locations, thus enabling optimized allocation of available laser power within a limited physical size and resource budget. A unique aspect of LRI-AI also enables...

  17. Integrated Baseline Bystem (IBS) Version 1.03: Models guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System)(IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planning and analysis. This document is the models guide for the IBS and explains how to use the emergency related computer models. This document provides information for the experienced system user, and is the primary reference for the computer modeling software supplied with the system. It is designed for emergency managers and planners, and others familiar with the concepts of computer modeling. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other IBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary.

  18. Development of a sensitive and specific homologous radioimmunoassay for determination of chicken IgG secretion in vitro 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafferty, Richard Ware

    1990-01-01

    serum albumin antigen. The sensitivity (190 ng/ml to 3850 ug/ml) at the time of Ph' th ' fo ll * th tf1 f ~Plt ~h development was considerably higher than other serologically quantitative methods. The development of a sensitive and specific RIA... from IgM secretion to IgG and IgA secretion in response to antigenic stimulation. B-Cells and Alloantigens There are two chicken B-cell surface alloantigens currently recognized, BU-la and BU-lb, as well as a chicken class II major...

  19. Usage of videomosaic for computed aided analysis of North Sea hard bottom underwater video for baseline study of offshore windmill park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    on such extreme high-energy coast. To determine possible environmental impact of this project, baseline study/Joint Hydrographic Center, University of New Hampshire, USA * Corresponding author e-mail: aleks@corpi.ku.lt Windmill park on the open North Sea coast at Hävsul area in Norway is one of the first in the world to be build

  20. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2014-01-02

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodology calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal system in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. The overall project area is 2500km2 with the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) being about 170km2. The project was subdivided into five tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data; (2) design and populate a GIS database; (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area at 0.5km intervals to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km; (4) collect new geophysical and geochemical data, and (5) repeat Task 3 for the enhanced (baseline + new ) data. Favorability maps were based on the integrated assessment of the three critical EGS exploration parameters of interest: rock type, temperature and stress. A complimentary trust map was generated to compliment the favorability maps to graphically illustrate the cumulative confidence in the data used in the favorability mapping. The Final Scientific Report (FSR) is submitted in two parts with Part I describing the results of project Tasks 1 through 3 and Part II covering the results of project Tasks 4 through 5 plus answering nine questions posed in the proposal for the overall project. FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory’s Greenhouse Gas FY08 Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2011-06-01

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic attempt to account for the production and release of certain gasses generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gasses of interest are those which have become identified by climate science as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2008 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. Concern about the environmental impact of GHGs has grown in recent years. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of a baseline estimate of total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions in the future, and such documentation will require knowledge of a baseline against which reductions can be measured. INL's FY08 GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three Scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL's organizational boundaries but are a consequence of INL's activities). This inventory found that INL generated a total of 113,049 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during FY08. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL's baseline GHG inventory: (1) Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL's GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions; (2) Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion (facility fuels), waste disposal (including fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill and contracted disposal), mobile combustion (fleet fuels), employee commuting, and business air travel; and (3) Sources with low emissions were wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted), fugitive emissions from refrigerants, and business ground travel (in personal and rental vehicles). This report details the methods behind quantifying INL's GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory’s Greenhouse Gas FY08 Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-09-01

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic attempt to account for the production and release of certain gasses generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gasses of interest are those which have become identified by climate science as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2008 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. Concern about the environmental impact of GHGs has grown in recent years. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of a baseline estimate of total GHGs generated at the INL. Additionally, the INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE-sponsored national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federally-sponsored agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions in the future, and such documentation will require knowledge of a baseline against which reductions can be measured. INL’s FY08 GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in Federal recommendations and an as-yet-unpublished Technical and Support Document (TSD) using operational control boundary. It measures emissions generated in three Scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL’s organizational boundaries but are a consequence of INL’s activities). This inventory found that INL generated a total of 114,256 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during fiscal year 2008 (FY08). The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL’s baseline GHG inventory: • Electricity is the largest contributor to INL’s GHG inventory, with over 50% of the net anthropogenic CO2e emissions • Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion, fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill, mobile combustion (fleet fuels) and the employee commute • Sources with low emissions were contracted waste disposal, wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted) and fugitive emissions from refrigerants. This report details the methods behind quantifying INL’s GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to stress that the methodology behind this inventory followed guidelines that have not yet been formally adopted. Thus, some modification of the conclusions may be necessary as additional guidance is received. Further, because this report differentiates between those portions of the INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Performance Baseline Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-09-23

    This guide identifies key PB elements, development processes, and practices; describes the context in which DOE PB development occurs; and suggests ways of addressing the critical elements in PB development. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-5.

  4. Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Development of model evaluation criteria. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the usefulness and effectiveness of currently existing models that simulate the release of uranium hexafluoride from UF{sub 6}-handling facilities, subsequent reactions of UF{sub 6} with atmospheric moisture, and the dispersion of UF{sub 6} and reaction products in the atmosphere. The study evaluates screening-level and detailed public-domain models that were specifically developed for UF{sub 6} and models that were originally developed for the treatment of dense gases but are applicable to UF{sub 6} release, reaction, and dispersion. The model evaluation process is divided into three specific tasks: model-component evaluation; applicability evaluation; and user interface and quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) evaluation. Within the model-component evaluation process, a model`s treatment of source term, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion are considered and model predictions are compared with actual observations. Within the applicability evaluation process, a model`s applicability to Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis, and to site-specific considerations are assessed. Finally, within the user interface and QA/QC evaluation process, a model`s user-friendliness, presence and clarity of documentation, ease of use, etc. are assessed, along with its handling of QA/QC. This document presents the complete methodology used in the evaluation process.

  5. JLab High Efficiency Klystron Baseline Design for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovater, J.; Delayen, Jean; Harwood, Leigh; Nelson, Richard; Wang, Haipeng

    2003-05-01

    A computer design of a 13.5 kW, 1497 MHz, CW type, 55% efficiency, 0.8 microPv beam perveance, ~40 dB gain, 5-cavity klystron has been developed for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade project.The design uses TRICOMP codes to simulate the gun, mod-anode section, solenoid focus channel and beam dump. The klystron tube was designed by JPNDISK (1D) code initially and then optimized by MASK (2D) code for the baseline parameters. All of these codes have been bunch marked by JLab 5 kW operational klystrons. The details of design parameters and the simulations by MAFIA (3D) for the cavity couplings tuners, and window are also going to be presented.

  6. Quality Assurance Baseline Assessment Report to Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, R. A.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes observations that were made during a Quality Assurance (QA) Baseline Assessment of the Nuclear Materials Technology Analytical Chemistry Group (NMT-1). The Quality and Planning personnel, for NMT-1, are spending a significant amount of time transitioning out of their roles of environmental oversight into production oversight. A team from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Defense Program Environmental Surety Program performed an assessment of the current status of the QA Program. Several Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry procedures were reviewed, as well as Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP) QA documents. Checklists were developed and the assessment was performed according to an Implementation Work Plan, INEEL/EXT-98-00740.

  7. Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

  8. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  9. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure. These were dust and noise. The dust exposure was found to be minimal, which would be expected due to the wet environment inherent in the technology, but noise exposure was at a significant level. Further testing for noise is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, fall hazards, slipping hazards, hazards associated with the high pressure water, and hazards associated with air pressure systems.

  10. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE, SQUIRREL-I, and SQUIRREL-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation conducted during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended. Because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place, results may be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  11. LTC vacuum blasting machine (metal) baseline report: Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The LTC coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC coating removal system consisted of several hand tools, a Roto Peen scaler, and a needlegun. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. These hand tools are used with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. The dust exposure was minimal but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  12. LTC vacuum blasting maching (concrete): Baseline report: Greenbook (Chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjuction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

  13. A multiple baseline investigation of Conjoint Behavioral Consultation (CBC) facilitated by a pediatric mental health consultant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellinger, Skylar Ayn

    2011-07-28

    . Overview of Procedures 49 2. Timeline for Families Participating in Multiple Baseline Design 60 3. Dependent Variables and Corresponding Measures 61 4. CR Pre and Post Intervention BASC-2 Scores 113 5. DW Pre and Post Intervention BASC-2 Scores... Figure Page Figure 1. Baseline and intervention home routine compliance for all 3 participants. 89 Figure 2. Baseline and intervention school routine compliance for all 3 participants. 95 Figure 3. CR parent GAS ratings. 102 Figure 4. CR teacher GAS...

  14. DOE Announces Webinars on the Mid-Atlantic Baseline Study, EPA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Baseline Studies (MABS), a project intended to help inform the siting and permitting of offshore wind facilities, and will also present some of the key findings, including the...

  15. Statistical Analysis of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2012-01-01

    M. Potter, The Demand Response Baseline, v.1.75, EnerNOC OPSand Techniques for Demand Response, Lawrence BerkeleyS. Kilicotte, Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  16. U.S. Baseline Briefing Book Projections for Agricultural and Biofuel Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    U.S. Baseline Briefing Book Projections for Agricultural and Biofuel, biofuel, government cost and farm income projections in this report were prepared by the team at FAPRIMU

  17. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified...

  18. 4 ESS switch electromagnetic pulse assessment. Volume 1. Test-bed design installation, and baselining. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-19

    The content of this report is defined by paragraph 3/1 of the Statement of Work for contract DCA100-88-C-0027. This report documents Task 1 and 2, Test-Bed Design, Installation, and Baselining of the 4 ESS Switch Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Assessment Program. ATT has engineered an operational digital 4 ESS switch for the purpose of testing the susceptibility of 4 ESS switch systems to high-altitude EMP. The switch is installed in two specially designed trailers that are transparent to electro-magnetic radiation and is located in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where current-injection testing and further performance baselining is presently underway. Batteries, air conditioning, and spare parts are housed in two additional trailers. ATT Bell Laboratories has developed and implemented a test system for generating current pulses, monitoring the pulses, generating calls, and measuring switch performance. Digital traffic has been successfully generated and switched for three signaling systems: Multifrequency (MF); Common Channel Signaling System 7 (CCS7); and Q.931 (used on direct Integrated Services Digital Network connections). Due to problems in acquiring properly engineered signaling-translation software, however, the CCS7 and Q.931 signaling systems have not yet been implemented with a full complement of trunk assignments. Subsequent tasks will entail further baselining, provisioning of backup methods for the operating software, and current-injection testing of the switch.

  19. Description of the global petroleum supply and demand outlook. Updated for the 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of the U. S. energy supply and demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreyfus, D.A.

    1990-12-01

    GRI developed a world oil projection for the 1991 Baseline Projection based on publicly available data. GRI's 1991 projection of the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil is described. The potential impact of the Middle East crisis is discussed along with two alternative world oil price tracks and their impacts on the global petroleum supply and demand outlook.

  20. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

  1. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment: Exploring Fundamental Symmetries of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNE Collaboration; Corey Adams; David Adams; Tarek Akiri; Tyler Alion; Kris Anderson; Costas Andreopoulos; Mike Andrews; Ioana Anghel; João Carlos Costa dos Anjos; Maddalena Antonello; Enrique Arrieta-Diaz; Marina Artuso; Jonathan Asaadi; Xinhua Bai; Bagdat Baibussinov; Michael Baird; Baha Balantekin; Bruce Baller; Brian Baptista; D'Ann Barker; Gary Barker; William A. Barletta; Giles Barr; Larry Bartoszek; Amit Bashyal; Matt Bass; Vincenzo Bellini; Pietro Angelo Benetti; Bruce E. Berger; Marc Bergevin; Eileen Berman; Hans-Gerd Berns; Adam Bernstein; Robert Bernstein; Babu Bhandari; Vipin Bhatnagar; Bipul Bhuyan; Jianming Bian; Mary Bishai; Andrew Blake; Flor Blaszczyk; Erik Blaufuss; Bruce Bleakley; Edward Blucher; Steve Blusk; Virgil Bocean; F. Boffelli; Jan Boissevain; Timothy Bolton; Maurizio Bonesini; Steve Boyd; Andrew Brandt; Richard Breedon; Carl Bromberg; Ralph Brown; Giullia Brunetti; Norman Buchanan; Bill Bugg; Jerome Busenitz; E. Calligarich; Leslie Camilleri; Giada Carminati; Rachel Carr; Cesar Castromonte; Flavio Cavanna; Sandro Centro; Alex Chen; Hucheng Chen; Kai Chen; Daniel Cherdack; Cheng-Yi Chi; Sam Childress; Brajesh Chandra Choudhary; Georgios Christodoulou; Cabot-Ann Christofferson; Eric Church; David Cline; Thomas Coan; Alfredo Cocco; Joao Coelho; Stephen Coleman; Janet M. Conrad; Mark Convery; Robert Corey; Luke Corwin; Jack Cranshaw; Daniel Cronin-Hennessy; A. Curioni; Helio da Motta; Tristan Davenne; Gavin S. Davies; Steven Dazeley; Kaushik De; Andre de Gouvea; Jeffrey K. de Jong; David Demuth; Chris Densham; Milind Diwan; Zelimir Djurcic; R. Dolfini; Jeffrey Dolph; Gary Drake; Stephen Dye; Hongue Dyuang; Daniel Edmunds; Steven Elliott; Muhammad Elnimr; Sarah Eno; Sanshiro Enomoto; Carlos O. Escobar; Justin Evans; A. Falcone; Lisa Falk; Amir Farbin; Christian Farnese; Angela Fava; John Felde; S. Fernandes; Fernando Ferroni; Farshid Feyzi; Laura Fields; Alex Finch; Mike Fitton; Bonnie Fleming; Jack Fowler; Walt Fox; Alex Friedland; Stu Fuess; Brian Fujikawa; Hugh Gallagher; Raj Gandhi; Gerald Garvey; Victor M. Gehman; Gianluigi de Geronimo; Daniele Gibin; Ronald Gill; Ricardo A. Gomes; Maury C. Goodman; Jason Goon; Nicholas Graf; Mathew Graham; Rik Gran; Christopher Grant; Nick Grant; Herbert Greenlee; Leland Greenler; Sean Grullon; Elena Guardincerri; Victor Guarino; Evan Guarnaccia; Germano Guedes; Roxanne Guenette; Alberto Guglielmi; Marcelo M. Guzzo; Alec T. Habig; Robert W. Hackenburg; Haleh Hadavand; Alan Hahn; Martin Haigh; Todd Haines; Thomas Handler; Sunej Hans; Jeff Hartnell; John Harton; Robert Hatcher; Athans Hatzikoutelis; Steven Hays; Eric Hazen; Mike Headley; Anne Heavey; Karsten Heeger; Jaret Heise; Robert Hellauer; Jeremy Hewes; Alexander Himmel; Matthew Hogan; Pedro Holanda; Anna Holin; Glenn Horton-Smith; Joe Howell; Patrick Hurh; Joey Huston; James Hylen; Richard Imlay; Jonathan Insler; G. Introzzi; Zeynep Isvan; Chris Jackson; John Jacobsen; David E. Jaffe; Cat James; Chun-Min Jen; Marvin Johnson; Randy Johnson; Robert Johnson; Scott Johnson; William Johnston; John Johnstone; Ben J. P. Jones; H. Jostlein; Thomas Junk; Richard Kadel; Karl Kaess; Georgia Karagiorgi; Jarek Kaspar; Teppei Katori; Boris Kayser; Edward Kearns; Paul Keener; Ernesto Kemp; Steve H. Kettell; Mike Kirby; Joshua Klein; Gordon Koizumi; Sacha Kopp; Laura Kormos; William Kropp; Vitaly A. Kudryavtsev; Ashok Kumar; Jason Kumar; Thomas Kutter; Franco La Zia; Kenneth Lande; Charles Lane; Karol Lang; Francesco Lanni; Richard Lanza; Tony Latorre; John Learned; David Lee; Kevin Lee; Qizhong Li; Shaorui Li; Yichen Li; Zepeng Li; Jiang Libo; Steve Linden; Jiajie Ling; Jonathan Link; Laurence Littenberg; Hu Liu; Qiuguang Liu; Tiankuan Liu; John Losecco; William Louis; Byron Lundberg; Tracy Lundin; Jay Lundy; Ana Amelia Machado; Cara Maesano; Steve Magill; George Mahler; David Malon; Stephen Malys; Francesco Mammoliti; Samit Kumar Mandal; Anthony Mann; Paul Mantsch; Alberto Marchionni; William Marciano; Camillo Mariani; Jelena Maricic; Alysia Marino; Marvin Marshak; John Marshall; Shiegenobu Matsuno; Christopher Mauger; Konstantinos Mavrokoridis; Nate Mayer; Neil McCauley; Elaine McCluskey; Kirk McDonald; Kevin McFarland; David McKee; Robert McKeown; Robert McTaggart; Rashid Mehdiyev; Dongming Mei; A. Menegolli; Guang Meng; Yixiong Meng; David Mertins; Mark Messier; William Metcalf; Radovan Milincic; William Miller; Geoff Mills; Sanjib R. Mishra; Nikolai Mokhov; Claudio Montanari; David Montanari; Craig Moore; Jorge Morfin; Ben Morgan; William Morse; Zander Moss; Célio A. Moura; Stuart Mufson; David Muller; Jim Musser; Donna Naples; Jim Napolitano; Mitch Newcomer; Ryan Nichol; Tim Nicholls; Evan Niner; Barry Norris

    2014-04-22

    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early Universe, the dynamics of the supernova bursts that produced the heavy elements necessary for life and whether protons eventually decay --- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our Universe, its current state and its eventual fate. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) represents an extensively developed plan for a world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions. LBNE is conceived around three central components: (1) a new, high-intensity neutrino source generated from a megawatt-class proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, (2) a near neutrino detector just downstream of the source, and (3) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber deployed as a far detector deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. This facility, located at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, is approximately 1,300 km from the neutrino source at Fermilab -- a distance (baseline) that delivers optimal sensitivity to neutrino charge-parity symmetry violation and mass ordering effects. This ambitious yet cost-effective design incorporates scalability and flexibility and can accommodate a variety of upgrades and contributions. With its exceptional combination of experimental configuration, technical capabilities, and potential for transformative discoveries, LBNE promises to be a vital facility for the field of particle physics worldwide, providing physicists from around the globe with opportunities to collaborate in a twenty to thirty year program of exciting science. In this document we provide a comprehensive overview of LBNE's scientific objectives, its place in the landscape of neutrino physics worldwide, the technologies it will incorporate and the capabilities it will possess.

  2. Determination of 1,3-butadiene in workplace air: reevaluation of NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Method S91 and development of NIOSH Method 1024

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, R.A.; Gagnon, Y.T.

    1988-08-24

    NIOSH Method S91 for the determination of 1,3-butadiene in air was reevaluated, and a new method was developed. Limitations to Method S91 included the fact that the lower quantitation limit appeared to be about 3.4 parts per million (ppm) and the packed-column gas-chromatographic analysis was subject to interference. The new method developed, Method 1024, employed collection on tandem coconut-shell charcoal tubes, desorption with methylene chloride, and high-resolution gas-chromatographic analysis. Evaluation of Method 1024 indicated that it should be useful for determining full-shift time-weighted average exposures in humid air at concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 10 ppm. The sampler's capacity should permit quantitation of levels up to 100 ppm if desorbed samples are diluted so that they fall in the calibration range. In the chromatographic process, the combination of backflushable precolumn and aluminum oxide fused-silica capillary analytical columns offered the advantages of enhanced sensitivity enabling detection down to 0.005 ppm in 25 liters, and enhanced selectivity, limiting the need for confirmatory techniques.

  3. U.S. Biofuels Baseline and Impact of E-15 Expansion on Biofuel Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    May 2012 U.S. Biofuels Baseline and Impact of E-15 Expansion on Biofuel Markets FAPRI-MU Report #02 for agricultural and biofuel markets.1 That baseline assumes current biofuel policy, including provisions credit expired, as scheduled, at the end of 2011. The additional tax credit for cellulosic biofuel

  4. FAPRI-MU Biofuel Baseline FAPRI-MU Report #02-13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    FAPRI-MU Biofuel Baseline March 2013 FAPRI-MU Report #02-13 Providing objective analysis for more of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Executive Summary This report takes a closer look at the biofuels portion of the U.S. Agricultural and Biofuels Baseline released by the Food and Agricultural Policy

  5. Multi-Project Baselines for Evaluation of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    Africa compared to the sector-wide baseline Best Plant 10th Percentile Project #5 - off-grid solar Project #Africa compared to the all-fossil baseline Best Plant 10th Percentile 25th Percentile Project #5 - off-grid solar Weighted Average Project #

  6. Biodiversity Research Institute Mid-Atlantic Baseline Study Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    predictive models and maps to regulators, developers, and other stakeholders for offshore wind energy. This knowledge on wildlife distributions, movements, and habitat use...

  7. Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baseline Scenarios...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strategy with a view to withstanding the adverse effects of climate change, while building a green economy. The CRGE Strategy, developed in 2010, was constructed as an offshoot...

  8. Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy security. A broad portfolio of technologies is being developed within the Clean Coal Program to accomplish this objective. Ever increasing technological enhancements...

  9. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2008-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No Further Investigation (NFI) determination made on land that adjoins ED-4 to the east (DOE 1997a) and to the south (DOE 1997b).

  10. Assessment of Current Process Modeling Approaches to Determine Their Limitations, Applicability and Developments Needed for Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2006-11-30

    This report describes the status of the current process modeling approaches to predict the behavior and flow of fiber-filled thermoplastics under injection molding conditions. Previously, models have been developed to simulate the injection molding of short-fiber thermoplastics, and an as-formed composite part or component can then be predicted that contains a microstructure resulting from the constituents’ material properties and characteristics as well as the processing parameters. Our objective is to assess these models in order to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). First, the concentration regimes are summarized to facilitate the understanding of different types of fiber-fiber interaction that can occur for a given fiber volume fraction. After the formulation of the fiber suspension flow problem and the simplification leading to the Hele-Shaw approach, the interaction mechanisms are discussed. Next, the establishment of the rheological constitutive equation is presented that reflects the coupled flow/orientation nature. The decoupled flow/orientation approach is also discussed which constitutes a good simplification for many applications involving flows in thin cavities. Finally, before outlining the necessary developments for LFTs, some applications of the current orientation model and the so-called modified Folgar-Tucker model are illustrated through the fiber orientation predictions for selected LFT samples.

  11. Baseline information development for energy smart schools -- applied research, field testing and technology integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Piette, Mary Ann

    2004-01-01

    metric is the energy used per square foot of total schoolelectricity energy use per square foot of school buildingNatural gas energy use per square foot of school building

  12. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A Dominant Agro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    plantations of Eucalyptus and Acacia auriculiformis.plantations of either Eucalyptus or Acacia auriculiformis.the plantations are of Eucalyptus species and have not been

  13. Development and Use of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Eight Army Installations Around the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared for the United States Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) located in Champaign, IL by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) of Texas A&M University. The first phase of ...

  14. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlstrom, R.R.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1993-12-01

    The US Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption by the station. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Cape Canaveral AFS. It is A companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profiles to be used to improve the current energy system on the station. The characteristics of electricity, diesel fuel, No. 2 fuel oil, and motor vehicle gasoline (MOGAS) are analyzed for on-base facilities. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Cape Canaveral AFS facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985--1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the North, South, and Titan Substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

  15. Optimization of neutrino fluxes for future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Calviani; S. Di Luise; V. Galymov; P. Velten

    2014-11-10

    One of the main goals of the Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation experiment (LBNO) experiment is to study the L/E behaviour of the electron neutrino appearance probability in order to determine the unknown phase $\\delta_{CP}$. In the standard neutrino 3-flavour mixing paradigm, this parameter encapsulates a possibility of a CP violation in the lepton sector that in turn could help explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. In LBNO, the measurement of $\\delta_{CP}$ would rely on the observation of the electron appearance probability in a broad energy range covering the 1$^{st}$ and 2$^{nd}$ maxima of the oscillation probability. An optimization of the energy spectrum of the neutrino beam is necessary to find the best coverage of the neutrino energies of interest. This in general is a complex task that requires exploring a large parameter space describing hadron target and beamline focusing elements. In this paper we will present a numerical approach of finding a solution to this difficult optimization problem often encountered in design of modern neutrino beamlines and we will show the improved LBNO sensitivity to the presence of the leptonic CP violation attained after the neutrino beam optimization.

  16. 2008 CHP Baseline Assessment and Action Plan for the Hawaii Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report providing an updated baseline assessment and action plan for combined heat and power (CHP) in Hawaii and to identify the hurdles that prevent the expanded use of CHP systems.

  17. RELATIVE ASTROMETRY OF COMPACT FLARING STRUCTURES IN Sgr A* WITH POLARIMETRIC VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael D.

    We demonstrate that polarimetric interferometry can be used to extract precise spatial information about compact polarized flares of Sgr A*. We show that, for a faint dynamical component, a single interferometric baseline ...

  18. 2008 CHP Baseline Assessment and Action Plan for the California Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Report providing an updated baseline assessment and action plan for combined heat and power (CHP) in California and to identify the hurdles that prevent the expanded use of CHP system

  19. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining candidates, those of glass-ceramics (devitrified matrices) represent the best compromise for meeting the probable stricter disposal requirements in the future.

  20. Integrated Baseline System (IBS), Version 1.03. User guide: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, B.M.; Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planing and analysis. This document is the user guide for the IBS and explains how to operate the IBS system. The fundamental function of the IBS is to provide tools that civilian emergency management personnel can use in developing emergency plans and in supporting emergency management activities to cope with a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. Emergency management planners can evaluate concepts and ideas using the IBS system. The results of that experience can then be factored into refining requirements and plans. This document provides information for the general system user, and is the primary reference for the system features of the IBS. It is designed for persons who are familiar with general emergency management concepts, operations, and vocabulary. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other LBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary. IBS is a dynamic system. Its capabilities are in a state of continuing expansion and enhancement.

  1. Integrated Baseline System (IBS), Version 1. 03. [Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, B.M.; Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planing and analysis. This document is the user guide for the IBS and explains how to operate the IBS system. The fundamental function of the IBS is to provide tools that civilian emergency management personnel can use in developing emergency plans and in supporting emergency management activities to cope with a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. Emergency management planners can evaluate concepts and ideas using the IBS system. The results of that experience can then be factored into refining requirements and plans. This document provides information for the general system user, and is the primary reference for the system features of the IBS. It is designed for persons who are familiar with general emergency management concepts, operations, and vocabulary. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other LBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary. IBS is a dynamic system. Its capabilities are in a state of continuing expansion and enhancement.

  2. Annual Technology Baseline (Including Supporting Data); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, Nate; Cory, Karlynn; Hand, Maureen; Parkhill, Linda; Speer, Bethany; Stehly, Tyler; Feldman, David; Lantz, Eric; Augusting, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O'Connor, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  3. Mexico-Danish Government Baseline Workstream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO is developed by

  4. Mixed waste focus area technical baseline report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    As part of its overall program, the MWFA uses a national mixed waste data set to develop approaches for treating mixed waste that cannot be treated using existing capabilities at DOE or commercial facilities. The current data set was originally compiled under the auspices of the 1995 Mixed Waste Inventory Report. The data set has been updated over the past two years based on Site Treatment Plan revisions and clarifications provided by individual sites. The current data set is maintained by the MWFA staff and is known as MWFA97. In 1996, the MWFA developed waste groupings, process flow diagrams, and treatment train diagrams to systematically model the treatment of all mixed waste in the DOE complex. The purpose of the modeling process was to identify treatment gaps and corresponding technology development needs for the DOE complex. Each diagram provides the general steps needed to treat a specific type of waste. The NWFA categorized each MWFA97 waste stream by waste group, treatment train, and process flow. Appendices B through F provide the complete listing of waste streams by waste group, treatment train, and process flow. The MWFA97 waste strewn information provided in the appendices is defined in Table A-1.

  5. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot-blast machine that removes layer of concrete of varying depths. Hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is reused until it is pulverized to dust, which is deposited in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  6. The Science and Strategy for Phasing of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwan, Milind V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2012-05-22

    This note is about the principles behind a phased plan for realizing a Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment(LBNE) in the U.S.. The most important issue that must be resolved is the direction of the first phase of the experiment. Based on both scientific and programmatic considerations, the U.S. should pursue the best option for accelerator neutrino physics, which is the longer baseline towards Homestake with an optimizedbroadband intense beam.

  7. Results & Conclusions SPECInt 2000. 4 way. 32 IQ entries. 128 ROB. 64 LSQ. Baseline: 2-cycle Scheduling Loop latency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morancho, Enric

    -cycle Scheduling Loop latency Ideal (1 cycle) Our Proposal Our proposal & fusion Speculative Wakeup-mcf Speed-up over Baseline Baseline with Double IQ size (64 IQ entries) Baseline & fusion We have proposed two previously proposed speculative schedulers Conclusions References [Star00] J. Stark et al

  8. DiFX: A software correlator for very long baseline interferometry using multi-processor computing environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Deller; S. J. Tingay; M. Bailes; C. West

    2007-02-06

    We describe the development of an FX style correlator for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), implemented in software and intended to run in multi-processor computing environments, such as large clusters of commodity machines (Beowulf clusters) or computers specifically designed for high performance computing, such as multi-processor shared-memory machines. We outline the scientific and practical benefits for VLBI correlation, these chiefly being due to the inherent flexibility of software and the fact that the highly parallel and scalable nature of the correlation task is well suited to a multi-processor computing environment. We suggest scientific applications where such an approach to VLBI correlation is most suited and will give the best returns. We report detailed results from the Distributed FX (DiFX) software correlator, running on the Swinburne supercomputer (a Beowulf cluster of approximately 300 commodity processors), including measures of the performance of the system. For example, to correlate all Stokes products for a 10 antenna array, with an aggregate bandwidth of 64 MHz per station and using typical time and frequency resolution presently requires of order 100 desktop-class compute nodes. Due to the effect of Moore's Law on commodity computing performance, the total number and cost of compute nodes required to meet a given correlation task continues to decrease rapidly with time. We show detailed comparisons between DiFX and two existing hardware-based correlators: the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) S2 correlator, and the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) correlator. In both cases, excellent agreement was found between the correlators. Finally, we describe plans for the future operation of DiFX on the Swinburne supercomputer, for both astrophysical and geodetic science.

  9. GTA (ground test accelerator) Phase 1: Baseline design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program has two objectives: to provide the necessary basis for a discriminator/weapon decision by 1992, and to develop the technology in stages that lead ultimately to a neutral particle beam weapon. The ground test accelerator (GTA) is the test bed that permits the advancement of the state-of-the-art under experimental conditions in an integrated automated system mode. An intermediate goal of the GTA program is to support the Integrated Space Experiments, while the ultimate goal is to support the 1992 decision. The GTA system and each of its major subsystems are described, and project schedules and resource requirements are provided. (LEW)

  10. Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO is developed by EMDPowerMexican

  11. Thailand-Danish Government Baseline Workstream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberITerraPowerDeveloping Countries

  12. Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe,T.

    2008-06-23

    NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.

  13. Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi

  14. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

  15. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gougar, Hans D.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

  16. Development Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

  17. Baseline Evaluations to Support Control Room Modernization at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-02-01

    For any major control room modernization activity at a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the U.S., a utility should carefully follow the four phases prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG-0711, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model. These four phases include Planning and Analysis, Design, Verification and Validation, and Implementation and Operation. While NUREG-0711 is a useful guideline, it is written primarily from the perspective of regulatory review, and it therefore does not provide a nuanced account of many of the steps the utility might undertake as part of control room modernization. The guideline is largely summative—intended to catalog final products—rather than formative—intended to guide the overall modernization process. In this paper, we highlight two crucial formative sub-elements of the Planning and Analysis phase specific to control room modernization that are not covered in NUREG-0711. These two sub-elements are the usability and ergonomics baseline evaluations. A baseline evaluation entails evaluating the system as-built and currently in use. The usability baseline evaluation provides key insights into operator performance using the control system currently in place. The ergonomics baseline evaluation identifies possible deficiencies in the physical configuration of the control system. Both baseline evaluations feed into the design of the replacement system and subsequent summative benchmarking activities that help ensure that control room modernization represents a successful evolution of the control system.

  18. SU-E-T-106: Development of a Collision Prediction Algorithm for Determining Problematic Geometry for SBRT Treatments Using a Stereotactic Body Frame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagar, M; Friesen, S; Mannarino, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Collision between the gantry and the couch or patient during Radiotherapy is not a common concern for conventional RT (static fields or arc). With the increase in the application of stereotactic planning techniques to the body, collisions have become a greater concern. Non-coplanar beam geometry is desirable in stereotatic treatments in order to achieve sharp gradients and a high conformality. Non-coplanar geometry is less intuitive in the body and often requires an iterative process of planning and dry runs to guarantee deliverability. Methods: Purpose written software was developed in order to predict the likelihood of collision between the head of the gantry and the couch, patient or stereotatic body frame. Using the DICOM plan and structures set, exported by the treatment planning system, this software is able to predict the possibility of a collision. Given the plan's isocenter, treatment geometry and exterior contours, the software is able to determine if a particular beam/arc is clinically deliverable or if collision is imminent. Results: The software was tested on real world treatment plans with untreatable beam geometry. Both static non-coplanar and VMAT plans were tested. Of these, the collision prediction software could identify all as having potentially problematic geometry. Re-plans of the same cases were also tested and validated as deliverable. Conclusion: This software is capable of giving good initial indication of deliverability for treatment plans that utilize complex geometry (SBRT) or have lateral isocenters. This software is not intended to replace the standard pre-treatment QA dry run. The effectiveness is limited to those portions of the patient and immobilization devices that have been included in the simulation CT and contoured in the planning system. It will however aid the planner in reducing the iterations required to create complex treatment geometries necessary to achieve ideal conformality and organ sparing.

  19. Borehole temperatures and a baseline for 20th-century global warming estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.N.; Chapman, D.S.

    1997-03-14

    Lack of a 19th-century baseline temperature against which 20th-century warming can be referenced constitutes a deficiency in understanding recent climate change. Combination of borehole temperature profiles, which contain a memory of surface temperature changes in previous centuries, with the meteorologicl archive of surface air temperatures can provide a 19th-century baseline temperature tied to the current observational record. A test case in Utah, where boreholes are interspersed with meteorological stations belonging to the Historical Climatological network, Yields a noise reduction in estimates of 20th-century warming and a baseline temperature that is 0.6{degrees} {+-} 0.1{degrees}C below the 1951 to 1970 mean temperature for the region. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower sl...

  1. The impact of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction on student self-determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Williams-Diehm, Kendra; Little, Todd D.; Boulton, Aaron Jacob

    2012-01-01

    possible, attrition of teachers/students at control campuses. After obtaining consent and assent to partici- pate, we collected baseline data, including demo- graphic information and two measures of self-determination. We also collected self-determi- nation... data at the end of Year 1 and of Year 2. As expected, there was attrition in the sample over time. At the end of Year 1, 103 control-group stu- dents had completed baseline and Year 1 posttest scores from the SDS (Wehmeyer & Kelchner, 1995) and 94...

  2. 08/04/2000 Optimization of a Baseline H.263 Encoder on the TMS320C6000 1 08/04/2000 Optimization of a Baseline H.263 Encoder on the TMS320C6000 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Brian L.

    08/04/2000 Optimization of a Baseline H.263 Encoder on the TMS320C6000 1 #12;08/04/2000 redundancy in the prediction error. I P P I Frame ... #12;08/04/2000 Optimization of a Baseline H.263 Encoder ME: Motion Estimation #12;08/04/2000 Optimization of a Baseline H.263 Encoder on the TMS320C6000 4

  3. Baseline Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura BeaneCardwell,Production

  4. Functional connectivity in a baseline resting-state network in autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Functional connectivity in a baseline resting-state network in autism Vladimir L. Cherkassky@cmu.edu Acknowledgements:This research was supported by the Collaborative Program of Excellence in Autism (CPEA) Grant HD 28 July 2006 Brain activity in people with high-functioning autism has been shown to be atypical

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

  6. LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 Robert J. Wilson 8/11/2010Page 2 Wednesday August 11th Session 6 PWG C520 14:00 Solar, Geo, and Reactor Neutrinos N. Tolich (Washington) 14:30 Q&A Guests/PWG Session 8

  7. Experimental Parameters for a Cerium 144 Based Intense Electron Antineutrino Generator Experiment at Very Short Baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gaffiot; T. Lasserre; G. Mention; M. Vivier; M. Cribier; M. Durero; V. Fischer; A. Letourneau; E. Dumonteil; I. S. Saldikov; G. V. Tikhomirov

    2015-02-09

    The standard three-neutrino oscillation paradigm, associated with small squared mass splittings $\\ll 0.1\\ \\mathrm{eV^2}$, has been successfully built up over the last 15 years using solar, atmospheric, long baseline accelerator and reactor neutrino experiments. However, this well-established picture might suffer from anomalous results reported at very short baselines in some of these experiments. If not experimental artifacts, such results could possibly be interpreted as the existence of at least an additional fourth sterile neutrino species, mixing with the known active flavors with an associated mass splitting $\\ll 0.1\\ \\mathrm{eV^2}$, and being insensitive to standard weak interactions. Precision measurements at very short baselines (5 to 15 m) with intense MeV electronic antineutrino emitters can be used to probe these anomalies. In this article, the expected antineutrino signal and backgrounds of a generic experiment which consists of deploying an intense beta minus radioactive source inside or in the vicinity of a large liquid scintillator detector are studied. The technical challenges to perform such an experiment are identified, along with quantifying the possible source and detector induced systematics, and their impact on the sensitivity to the observation of neutrino oscillations at short baselines.

  8. WIDE-BASELINE IMAGE CHANGE DETECTION Ziggy Jones Mike Brookes Pier Luigi Dragotti David Benton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    the problem of wide-baseline image change detection and presents a method for identifying areas that have such as leaves rustling in the wind. The appearance of any planar region of the scene in two different images to pro- duce fewer matches and require a larger computational effort. This paper utilises a novel

  9. Baseline Risk Assessment for the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits and Rubble Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    This document provides an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a description of the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (BRPs) and Rubble Pit (RP) unit. It also describes the objectives and scope of the baseline risk assessment (BRA).

  10. Numerical Modeling of CIGS Solar Cells: Definition of the Baseline and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Thesis Numerical Modeling of CIGS Solar Cells: Definition of the Baseline and Explanation our supervision by Markus Gloeckler entitled "Numerical Modeling of CIGS Solar Cells: Definition. A three-layer structure, simulating a Cu(InGa)Se2 (CIGS) heterojunction solar cell, was set up using

  11. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CIGS AND CdTe SOLAR CELLS: SETTING THE BASELINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    NUMERICAL MODELING OF CIGS AND CdTe SOLAR CELLS: SETTING THE BASELINE M. Gloeckler, A important complications that are often found in experimental CIGS and CdTe solar cells. 1. INTRODUCTION Numerical modeling of polycrystalline thin-film solar cells is an important strategy to test the viability

  12. Energy Analysis, Baselining and Modeling of Prairie View A&M University 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Eggebrecht, J.; Carlson, K. A.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the available data found that electricity savings in the J.B. Coleman Library for June - September, 1998 were 298 MWh, or 38% of the baseline consumption during these months. Extrapolation of these savings to a full year leads would...

  13. A Methodology for Establishing Information Quality Baselines for Complex, Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    to occur in the future. Key Words: Data Quality, Information Quality, Baselines, Alert Management System, investigating, and ameliorating the information quality of event based data. Here is a motivating example and information quality problems. 3. Each party that processes the data usually employs several different systems

  14. Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding-globulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    Effects of corticosterone pellets on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and corticosteroid-degradable corticosterone pellets (implanted under the skin) in elevating plasma corticosterone levels. We monitored to handling in Eurasian kestrel Falco tinnunculus and barn owl Tyto alba nestlings. Corticosterone pellets

  15. WIPP Project Plan Descriptions Waste Characterization (LANL, SRS, Oak Ridge) Baseline Inspections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WIPP Project Plan Descriptions · Waste Characterization (LANL, SRS, Oak Ridge) Baseline Inspections Change Request As part of EPA's WIPP Certification Decision in 1998, EPA required that the disposal of Energy (DOE) submitted a planned change request reducing to the amount of MgO emplaced in the WIPP

  16. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Baseline update--Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This report provides a baseline update to provide the background information necessary for personnel to prepare clear and consise NEPA documentation. The environment of the Sandia National Laboratories is described in this document, including the ecology, meteorology, climatology, seismology, emissions, cultural resources and land use, visual resources, noise pollution, transportation, and socioeconomics.

  17. DRAFT VERSION September 6, 2009 1 1990 GHG Baseline for Building Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    DRAFT VERSION ­ September 6, 2009 1 1990 GHG Baseline for Building Energy Use in the Oregon of 1990 building energy use and the associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for Oregon University System's stated intent. Specifically, there is a focus on building energy use, the single largest source of direct

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with the Baseline Risk Assessment for the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-25

    This document describes the RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment of the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin.

  19. Precision measurement of solar neutrino oscillation parameters by a long-baseline reactor neutrino experiment in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Petcov; T. Schwetz

    2006-07-13

    We consider the determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and $\\theta_{12}$ by studying oscillations of reactor anti-neutrinos emitted by nuclear power plants (located mainly in France) with a detector installed in the Frejus underground laboratory. The performances of a water Cerenkov detector of 147 kt fiducial mass doped with 0.1% of Gadolinium (MEMPHYS-Gd) and of a 50 kt scale liquid scintillator detector (LENA) are compared. In both cases 3$\\sigma$ uncertainties below 3% on $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and of about 20% on $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$ can be obtained after one year of data taking. The Gadolinium doped Super-Kamiokande detector (SK-Gd) in Japan can reach a similar precision if the SK/MEMPHYS fiducial mass ratio of 1 to 7 is compensated by a longer SK-Gd data taking time. Several years of reactor neutrino data collected by MEMPHYS-Gd or LENA would allow a determination of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$ with uncertainties of approximately 1% and 10% at 3$\\sigma$, respectively. These accuracies are comparable to those that can be reached in the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters $\\Delta m^2_{31}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$ in long-baseline superbeam experiments.

  20. Development of equations to determine the increase in pavement condition due to treatment and the rate of decrease in condition after treatment for a local agency pavement network. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Maithilee Mukund.

    2010-07-14

    OF EQUATIONS TO DETERMINE THE INCREASE IN PAVEMENT CONDITION DUE TO TREATMENT AND THE RATE OF DECREASE IN CONDITION AFTER TREATMENT FOR A LOCAL AGENCY PAVEMENT NETWORK A Thesis by MAITHILEE MUKUND DESHMUKH Submitted to the Office of Graduate... TO TREATMENT AND THE RATE OF DECREASE IN CONDITION AFTER TREATMENT FOR A LOCAL AGENCY PAVEMENT NETWORK A Thesis by MAITHILEE MUKUND DESHMUKH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  1. The 2010 Interim Report of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment Collaboration Physics Working Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LBNE Collaboration; T. Akiri; D. Allspach; M. Andrews; K. Arisaka; E. Arrieta-Diaz; M. Artuso; X. Bai; B. Balantekin; B. Baller; W. Barletta; G. Barr; M. Bass; A. Beck; B. Becker; V. Bellini; O. Benhar; B. Berger; M. Bergevin; E. Berman; H. Berns; A. Bernstein; F. Beroz; V. Bhatnagar; B. Bhuyan; R. Bionta; M. Bishai; A. Blake; E. Blaufuss; B. Bleakley; E. Blucher; S. Blusk; D. Boehnlein; T. Bolton; J. Brack; R. Bradford; R. Breedon; C. Bromberg; R. Brown; N. Buchanan; L. Camilleri; M. Campbell; R. Carr; G. Carminati; A. Chen; H. Chen; D. Cherdack; C. Chi; S. Childress; B. Choudhary; E. Church; D. Cline; S. Coleman; R. Corey; M. D'Agostino; G. Davies; S. Dazeley; J. De Jong; B. DeMaat; D. Demuth; A. Dighe; Z. Djurcic; J. Dolph; G. Drake; A. Drozhdin; H. Duan; H. Duyang; S. Dye; T. Dykhuis; D. Edmunds; S. Elliott; S. Enomoto; C. Escobar; J. Felde; F. Feyzi; B. Fleming; J. Fowler; W. Fox; A. Friedland; B. Fujikawa; H. Gallagher; G. Garilli; G. Garvey; V. Gehman; G. Geronimo; R. Gill; M. Goodman; J. Goon; D. Gorbunov; R. Gran; V. Guarino; E. Guarnaccia; R. Guenette; P. Gupta; A. Habig; R. Hackenberg; A. Hahn; R. Hahn; T. Haines; S. Hans; J. Harton; S. Hays; E. Hazen; Q. He; A. Heavey; K. Heeger; R. Hellauer; A. Himmel; G. Horton-Smith; J. Howell; P. Huber; P. Hurh; J. Huston; J. Hylen; J. Insler; D. Jaffe; C. James; C. Johnson; M. Johnson; R. Johnson; W. Johnson; W. Johnston; J. Johnstone; B. Jones; H. Jostlein; T. Junk; S. Junnarkar; R. Kadel; T. Kafka; D. Kaminski; G. Karagiorgi; A. Karle; J. Kaspar; T. Katori; B. Kayser; E. Kearns; S. Kettell; F. Khanam; J. Klein; J. Kneller; G. Koizumi; J. Kopp; S. Kopp; W. Kropp; V. Kudryavtsev; A. Kumar; J. Kumar; T. Kutter; T. Lackowski; K. Lande; C. Lane; K. Lang; F. Lanni; R. Lanza; T. Latorre; J. Learned; D. Lee; K. Lee; Y. Li; S. Linden; J. Ling; J. Link; L. Littenberg; L. Loiacono; T. Liu; J. Losecco; W. Louis; P. Lucas; C. Lunardini; B. Lundberg; T. Lundin; D. Makowiecki; S. Malys; S. Mandal; A. Mann; A. Mann; P. Mantsch; W. Marciano; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; A. Marino; M. Marshak; R. Maruyama; J. Mathews; S. Matsuno; C. Mauger; E. McCluskey; K. McDonald; K. McFarland; R. McKeown; R. McTaggart; R. Mehdiyev; W. Melnitchouk; Y. Meng; B. Mercurio; M. Messier; W. Metcalf; R. Milincic; W. Miller; G. Mills; S. Mishra; S. MoedSher; D. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; C. Moore; J. Morfin; W. Morse; A. Moss; S. Mufson; J. Musser; D. Naples; J. Napolitano; M. Newcomer; B. Norris; S. Ouedraogo; B. Page; S. Pakvasa; J. Paley; V. Paolone; V. Papadimitriou; Z. Parsa; K. Partyka; Z. Pavlovic; C. Pearson; S. Perasso; R. Petti; R. Plunkett; C. Polly; S. Pordes; R. Potenza; A. Prakash; O. Prokofiev; X. Qian; J. Raaf; V. Radeka; R. Raghavan; R. Rameika; B. Rebel; S. Rescia; D. Reitzner; M. Richardson; K. Riesselman; M. Robinson; M. Rosen; C. Rosenfeld; R. Rucinski; T. Russo; S. Sahijpal; S. Salon; N. Samios; M. Sanchez; R. Schmitt; D. Schmitz; J. Schneps; K. Scholberg; S. Seibert; F. Sergiampietri; M. Shaevitz; P. Shanahan; M. Shaposhnikov; R. Sharma; N. Simos; V. Singh; G. Sinnis; W. Sippach; T. Skwarnicki; M. Smy; H. Sobel; M. Soderberg; J. Sondericker; W. Sondheim; J. Spitz; N. Spooner; M. Stancari; I. Stancu; J. Stewart; P. Stoler; J. Stone; S. Stone; J. Strait; T. Straszheim; S. Striganov; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; B. Szczerbinska; A. Szelc; R. Talaga; H. Tanaka; R. Tayloe; D. Taylor; J. Thomas; L. Thompson; M. Thomson; C. Thorn; X. Tian; W. Toki; N. Tolich; M. Tripathi; M. Trovato; H. Tseung; M. Tzanov; J. Urheim; S. Usman; M. Vagins; R. Van Berg; R. Van de Water; G. Varner; K. Vaziri; G. Velev; B. Viren; T. Wachala; C. Walter; H. Wang; Z. Wang; D. Warner; D. Webber; A. Weber; R. Wendell; C. Wendt; M. Wetstein; H. White; S. White; L. Whitehead; W. Willis; R. J. Wilson; L. Winslow; J. Ye; M. Yeh; B. Yu; G. Zeller; C. Zhang; E. Zimmerman; R. Zwaska

    2011-10-27

    In early 2010, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) science collaboration initiated a study to investigate the physics potential of the experiment with a broad set of different beam, near- and far-detector configurations. Nine initial topics were identified as scientific areas that motivate construction of a long-baseline neutrino experiment with a very large far detector. We summarize the scientific justification for each topic and the estimated performance for a set of far detector reference configurations. We report also on a study of optimized beam parameters and the physics capability of proposed Near Detector configurations. This document was presented to the collaboration in fall 2010 and updated with minor modifications in early 2011.

  2. Improving the nonlinear performance of the HEPS baseline design with genetic algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The baseline design for the High Energy Photon Source has been proposed, with an emittance of 60 pm.rad within a circumference of 1.3 kilometers. Nevertheless, the nonlinear performance of the design needs further improvements to enlarge both the dynamic aperture and the momentum acceptance. In this study, genetic optimization of the linear optics is performed, so as to find all the possible solutions with weaker sextupoles and hence weaker nonlinearities, while keeping the emittance at the same level as the baseline design. These obtained solutions enable us to explore the dependence of nonlinear dynamics on the working point. The result indicates that with the same layout, it is feasible to obtain much better nonlinear performance with a delicate tuning of the magnetic field strengths and a wise choice of the working point.

  3. Results from baseline tests of the SPRE I and comparison with code model predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairelli, J.E.; Geng, S.M.; Skupinski, R.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. This paper presents results of base-line engine tests at design and off-design operating conditions. The test results are compared with code model predictions.

  4. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-16

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  5. Estimating matter induced CPT violation in Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Randhawa; Mandip Singh; Manmohan Gupta

    2014-12-16

    We examine matter induced CPT violation effects in long baseline electron neutrino appearance experiments in a low energy neutrino factory setup. Assuming CPT invariance in vacuum, the magnitude of CPT violating asymmetry in matter has been estimated using the exact expressions for the transition probabilities. The dependence of the asymmetry on the oscillation parameters like mixing angles, mass squared differences as well as on the Dirac CP violating phase has been investigated.

  6. Circular polarization control for the LCLS baseline in the soft X-ray regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS baseline includes a planar undulator system, producing linearly polarized light in the range 0.15-1.5 nm. Polarization control in the soft X-ray region from linear to circular is highly desirable. Several schemes using helical undulators have been discussed for the LCLS. One consists in replacing three of the last planar undulator segments by APPLE III. A second proposal, the 2nd harmonic helical afterburner, uses short, crossed undulators tuned to the second harmonic. This last scheme is expected to be the better one. Its advantages are a high and stable degree of circular polarization and a low cost. Its disadvantage is a small output power and a narrow wavelength range. We propose a novel method to generate 10 GW level power at the fundamental harmonic with 99% degree of circular polarization from the LCLS baseline. Its merits are low cost, simplicity and easy implementation. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is sent through a 40 m long straight section, and subsequently passes throu...

  7. Ash Determinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Germination of Ashe juniper seed were compared in a controlled environment at different levels of fruit maturation, lengths of storage, and seed stratification to determine potential germination. Annual mean germination varied by an order...

  8. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernández, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Ovsiannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pérez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be establis...

  9. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyper-Kamiokande Proto-Collaboraion; :; K. Abe; H. Aihara; C. Andreopoulos; I. Anghel; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; R. Asfandiyarov; M. Askins; J. J. Back; P. Ballett; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; F. Bay; P. Beltrame; V. Berardi; M. Bergevin; S. Berkman; T. Berry; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; F. S. Cafagna; G. Carminati; S. L. Cartwright; M. G. Catanesi; K. Choi; J. H. Choi; G. Collazuol; G. Cowan; L. Cremonesi; G. Davies; G. De Rosa; C. Densham; J. Detwiler; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; S. Emery; A. Ereditato; P. Fernández; T. Feusels; A. Finch; M. Fitton; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; D. Fukuda; V. Galymov; K. Ganezer; M. Gonin; P. Gumplinger; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; Y. Haga; B. Hartfiel; M. Hartz; Y. Hayato; M. Hierholzer; J. Hill; A. Himmel; S. Hirota; S. Horiuchi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; T. Iijima; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; K. Inoue; J. Insler; R. A. Intonti; T. Irvine; T. Ishida; H. Ishino; M. Ishitsuka; Y. Itow; A. Izmaylov; B. Jamieson; H. I. Jang; M. Jiang; K. K. Joo; C. K. Jung; A. Kaboth; T. Kajita; J. Kameda; Y. Karadhzov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; J. Y. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. Kishimoto; T. Kobayashi; M. Koga; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. R. Kropp; Y. Kudenko; T. Kutter; M. Kuze; L. Labarga; J. Lagoda; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; J. G. Learned; I. T. Lim; T. Lindner; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; W. Ma; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; C. Mariani; L. Marti; J. F. Martin; C. Martin; P. P. J. Martins; E. Mazzucato; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; M. Mezzetto; H. Minakata; A. Minamino; S. Mine; O. Mineev; M. Miura; J. Monroe; T. Mori; S. Moriyama; T. Mueller; F. Muheim; M. Nakahata; K. Nakamura; T. Nakaya; S. Nakayama; M. Needham; T. Nicholls; M. Nirkko; Y. Nishimura; E. Noah; J. Nowak; H. Nunokawa; H. M. O'Keeffe; Y. Okajima; K. Okumura; S. M. Oser; E. O'Sullivan; T. Ovsiannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; J. Pérez; M. Y. Pac; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; C. Pistillo; S. Playfer; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; B. Quilain; M. Quinto; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. Rayner; A. Redij; F. Retiere; C. Riccio; E. Richard; E. Rondio; H. J. Rose; M. Ross-Lonergan; C. Rott; S. D. Rountree; A. Rubbia; R. Sacco; M. Sakuda; M. C. Sanchez; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; A. Shaikhiev; I. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; G. Sinnis; M. B. Smy; J. Sobczyk; H. W. Sobel; T. Stewart; J. L. Stone; Y. Suda; Y. Suzuki; A. T. Suzuki; R. Svoboda; R. Tacik; A. Takeda; A. Taketa; Y. Takeuchi; H. A. Tanaka; H. K. M. Tanaka; H. Tanaka; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; M. Thorpe; S. Tobayama; N. Tolich; T. Tomura; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; M. R. Vagins; G. Vasseur; R. B. Vogelaar; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; J. R. Wilson; T. Xin; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; M. Zito

    2015-03-31

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than $3\\,\\sigma$ ($5\\,\\sigma$) for $76\\%$ ($58\\%$) of the $\\delta_{CP}$ parameter space. Using both $\

  10. Development of a portable mass spectrometric system for determination of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples using fluorine volatilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loge, G.

    1994-09-30

    Using hardware and materials supplied by LANL, a prototype quadrupole mass spectrometer system designed for portable field analysis of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples was assembled and tested. The system contained the capability for fluorine volatilization of solid uranium samples with gas introduction, which was successfully tested and demonstrated using 100 mg samples of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Determination of precision and accuracy for measuring isotopic composition was performed using isotopic standards. Use with soil samples containing uranium were also attempted. Silicates in the soil forming SiF{sub 4} were found to be a kinetic bottleneck to the formation of UF{sub 6}. This could be avoided by performing some sort of chemical separation as a pre-treatment step, which was demonstrated using nitric acid.

  11. A long baseline RICH with a 27-kiloton water target and radiator for detection of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ypsilantis, T.; Seguinot, J.; Zichichi, A.

    1997-01-01

    A 27 kt water volume is investigated as a target for a long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso. Charged secondaries from the neutrino interactions produce Cherenkov photons in water which are imaged as rings by a spherical mirror. The photon detector elements are 14 400 photomultipliers (PM`s) of 127 mm diameter or 3600 HPD`s of 250 mm diameter with single photon sensitivity. A coincidence signal of about 300 pixel elements in time with the SPS beam starts readout in bins of 1 ns over a period of 128 ns. Momentum, direction, and velocity of hadrons and mucons are determined from the width, center, and radius of the rings, respectively. Momentum is measured if multiple scattering dominates the ring width, as is the case for most of the particles of interest. Momentum, direction, and velocity of hadrons and muons are determined from the width, center, and radius of the rings, respectively. Momentum is measured if multiple scattering dominates the ring width, as is the case for most of the particles of interest. Momentum resolutions of 1-10%, mass resolutions of 5-50 MeV, and direction resolutions of < 1 mrad are achievable. Thresholds in water for muons, pions, kaons, and protons are 0.12, 0.16, 0.55, and 1.05 GeV/c, respectively. Electrons and gammas can be measured with energy resolution {sigma}{sub E}/E{approx}8.5%/{radical}E(GeV) and with direction resolution {approx} 1 mrad. The detector can be sited either inside a Gran Sasso tunnel or above ground because it is directional and the SPS beam is pulsed; thus the rejection of cosmic ray background is excellent.

  12. The mixed waste management facility. Project baseline revision 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streit, R.D.; Throop, A.L.

    1995-04-01

    Revision 1.2 to the Project Baseline (PB) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is in response to DOE directives and verbal guidance to (1) Collocate the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and MWMF into a single complex, integrate certain and overlapping functions as a cost-saving measure; (2) Meet certain fiscal year (FY) new-BA funding objectives ($15.3M in FY95) with lower and roughly balanced funding for out years; (3) Reduce Total Project Cost (TPC) for the MWMF Project; (4) Include costs for all appropriate permitting activities in the project TPC. This baseline revision also incorporates revisions in the technical baseline design for Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO). Changes in the WBS dictionary that are necessary as a result of this rebaseline, as well as minor title changes, at WBS Level 3 or above (DOE control level) are approved as a separate document. For completeness, the WBS dictionary that reflects these changes is contained in Appendix B. The PB, with revisions as described in this document, were also the basis for the FY97 Validation Process, presented to DOE and their reviewers on March 21-22, 1995. Appendix C lists information related to prior revisions to the PB. Several key changes relate to the integration of functions and sharing of facilities between the portion of the DWTF that will house the MWMF and those portions that are used by the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) Division at LLNL. This collocation has been directed by DOE as a cost-saving measure and has been implemented in a manner that maintains separate operational elements from a safety and permitting viewpoint. Appendix D provides background information on the decision and implications of collocating the two facilities.

  13. CX-004351: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4351: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004351: Categorical Exclusion Determination Center for Development of Math, Science and Technology CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 1029...

  14. CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Catalyst-Assisted Manufacture of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

  15. Formation and Sustainment of ITPs in ITER with the Baseline Heating Mix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesca M. Poli and Charles Kessel

    2012-12-03

    Plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) are a potential and attractive route to steady-state operation in ITER. These plasmas exhibit radially localized regions of improved con nement with steep pressure gradients in the plasma core, which drive large bootstrap current and generate hollow current pro les and negative shear. This work examines the formation and sustainment of ITBs in ITER with electron cyclotron heating and current drive. It is shown that, with a trade-o of the power delivered to the equatorial and to the upper launcher, the sustainment of steady-state ITBs can be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating con guration.

  16. SRC-I Project Baseline. [SRC-I demonstration project near Owensboro, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-03-01

    The Process Design Criteria Specification forms the basis for process design for the 6000-TPSD SRC-I Demonstration Plant. It sets forth: basic engineering data, e.g., type and size of plant, feedstocks, product specifications, and atmospheric emission and waste disposal limits; utility conditions; equipment design criteria and sparing philosophy; and estimating criteria for economic considerations. Previously the formal ICRC Document No. 0001-01-002 has been submitted to DOE and revised, as necessary, to be consistent with the SRC-I Project Baseline. Revision 6, dated 19 March 1982, 51 pages, was forwarded to DOE on 19 March 1982.

  17. A comparison of baseline aerodynamic performance of optimally-twisted versus non-twisted HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, D.A.; Robinson, M.C.; Hand, M.M.; Fingersh, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    NREL has completed the initial twisted blade field tests of the ``Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.`` This test series continues systematic measurements of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent in stall-controlled horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The blade twist distribution optimizes power production at a single angle of attack along the span. Abrupt transitions into and out of stall are created due to rapid changes in inflow. Data from earlier experiments have been analyzed extensively to characterize the steady and unsteady response of untwisted blades. In this report, a characterization and comparison of the baseline aerodynamic performance of the twisted versus non-twisted blade sets will be presented for steady flow conditions.

  18. CONSTRAINING THE STRUCTURE OF SAGITTARIUS A*'s ACCRETION FLOW WITH MILLIMETER VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY CLOSURE PHASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broderick, Avery E.

    Millimeter wave very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) provides access to the emission region surrounding Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, on sub-horizon scales. ...

  19. GLOBAL VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY OBSERVATIONS OF THE 6.0 GHz HYDROXYL MASERS IN ONSALA 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Vincent L.

    We present global very long baseline interferometry observations of the first excited-state hydroxyl (OH) masers in the massive star-forming region Onsala 1 (ON 1). The 29 masers detected are nearly all from the 6035 MHz ...

  20. A contractor report to the Department of Energy on environmental management baseline programs and integration opportunities (discussion draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) chartered a government contractor led effort to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives which meet the EM mission. The contractor team was challenged to ``think outside-the-box`` for solutions that cross traditional site boundaries and enable the programs to get the job done at an earlier date and at a lower cost. This report documents baseline programs current plans for material disposition and presents the opportunities for additional acceleration of cleanup and cost savings. A graphical depiction of the disposition of EM-owned waste and material from current state to final disposition is shown as disposition maps in Attachments 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. These disposition maps detail the material disposition at eleven major DOE sites as planned in the current discussion draft plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Maps reflecting material disposition at additional sites will be added in the future. Opportunities to further accelerate the cleanup of DOE-EM sites and reduce the overall cost of cleanup are depicted in the alternative disposition maps shown in Attachments 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. These integration opportunities bring nation-wide resources to bear on common problems facing the DOE sites.

  1. Fiscal year 1996 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Site summary baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johndro-Collins, A.

    1995-10-01

    The technical baseline is a hierarchical description of the Hanford Site cleanup mission. This technical baseline does not address the science, technology, or economic transition missions. It begins with a definition of the existing conditions at the Hanford Site, provides a description of the end product or mission accomplishments at completion, presents a statement of the major requirements and constraints that must be observed during the performance of the mission, and provides a statement of the top-level strategic approach to accomplish the mission. Mission-level interfaces are also described. This information is further defined hierarchically in increasing levels of detail. This definition is composed of the following major elements: functions that are key task descriptions; requirements that are the measurable standards to which the functions must be performed; architectures which are specific engineering solutions or systems that perform the functions described earlier; and verification ensuring the system satisfies the requirements and fulfills the functions. The above information is supplemented with the following: interface data; risk analyses and watch lists; assumptions; and required analyses.

  2. Comprehensive baseline environmental audit of former underground test areas in Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of Former Underground Test Areas (FUTAS) in the States of Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico. DOE and contractor systems for management of environmental protection activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were not within the scope of the audit. The audit was conducted May 16-May 26, 1994, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program{close_quotes}, establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is to enhance environmental protection and minimize risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations and supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. These evaluations function as a vehicle through which the Secretary and program managers are apprised of the status and vulnerabilities of Departmental environmental activities and environmental management systems. Several types of evaluations are conducted, including: (1) comprehensive baseline environmental audits; (2) routine environmental audits; (3) environmental management assessments; and (4) special issue reviews.

  3. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

  4. Development and Testing of an Acoustic Based Underwater Positioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and inaccurate coordinates compound the difficulty of this task. The work contained in this thesis develops to absolute GPS coordinates. A surface buoy uses super-short baseline navigation and positioning technology Table of Contents List of Figures

  5. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    in: Innovations in Portland Cement Manufacturing, Skokie,IL, Portland Cement Association. Worrell, E. , Price, L. ,emissions from the global cement industry’, Ann. Rev. Energy

  6. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    energy projects (small hydro and bagasse co-generators) andPCF) in Guatemala for a small hydro project assumes that the

  7. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    generators entered into power purchase agreements (PPAs)take-orpay clause in its power purchase agreement. While thereceived generous power purchase agreements, but information

  8. Development of a Monitoring and Verification (M&V) Plan and Baseline for the Fort Hood ESPC Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Lynn, B.; Underwood, D.

    2004-01-01

    (kWh,kW) 6,439 0 0 $0.01 $0.01 87014 CO HQ Building 14,162 87000 Block STEAM WBE(kWh,kW) 32,892 96 0 $0.16 $0.16 87015 Enlisted UPH 42,306 87000 Block STEAM WBE(kWh,kW) 6,502 3 0 $0.01 $0.01 87016 CO HQ Building 25,168 87000 Block STEAM WBE(kWh,kW) 50,197....1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rpt No. LBL-8689 Rev. 2; DOE-2 User Coordination Office, LBL, Berkeley, CA. LBL. 1981. DOE-2 Engineers Manual, Ver. 2.1A, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  9. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    cogeneration (bagasse and heavy fuel oil), and reciprocatingwhen it is available and heavy fuel oil for supplying powerengines burning heavy fuel oil, whereas prior to that, the

  10. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    projects. Several bagasse cogeneration and hydro projects,In addition, existing cogeneration facilities in the sugardelivered to the grid by cogeneration facilities were

  11. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    de?ne as all heavy and distillate fuel oil plants. Theirengines burning heavy fuel oil, whereas prior to that, theit is available and heavy fuel oil for supplying power to

  12. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    plants constituting the baseload reference set are a diverse mix of coal, hydro, geothermal, cogeneration (plants in the dry season when dispatch data were analyzed. Similarly, the cogenerationplants with low capital costs and short construction lead times. In addition, existing cogeneration

  13. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  14. Dual baseline search for muon antineutrino disappearance at 0.1 eV²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.; Huelsnitz, W.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; et al

    2012-09-25

    The MiniBooNE and SciBooNE collaborations report the results of a joint search for short baseline disappearance of ?¯? at Fermilab’s Booster Neutrino Beamline. The MiniBooNE Cherenkov detector and the SciBooNE tracking detector observe antineutrinos from the same beam, therefore the combined analysis of their data sets serves to partially constrain some of the flux and cross section uncertainties. Uncertainties in the ?? background were constrained by neutrino flux and cross section measurements performed in both detectors. A likelihood ratio method was used to set a 90% confidence level upper limit on ?¯? disappearance that dramatically improves upon prior limits inmore »the ?m²=0.1–100 eV² region.« less

  15. Concurrent 43 and 86 GHz Very Long Baseline Polarimetry of 3C273

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joanne M. Attridge; John F. C. Wardle; Daniel C. Homan

    2005-06-10

    We present sub-milliarcsecond resolution total intensity and linear polarization VLBI images of 3C273, using concurrent 43 and 86 GHz data taken with the Very Long Baseline Array in May 2002. The structure seen in the innermost jet suggest that we have fortuitously caught the jet in the act of changing direction. The polarization images confirm that the core is unpolarized (fractional polarization m 5.2 x 10^{4} rad m^{-2} must be present in or in front of that region. These are among the highest rotation measures reported so far in the nucleus of any active galaxy or quasar, and must occur outside (but probably close to) the radio emitting region. The transverse rotation measure gradient is in the same sense as that observed by Asada et al and by Zavala and Taylor at greater core distances. The magnitude of the transverse gradient decreases rapidly with distance down the jet, and appears to be variable.

  16. Baseline LHC machine parameters and configuration of the 2015 proton run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bruce; G. Arduini; S. Fartoukh; M. Giovannozzi; M. Lamont; E. Metral; T. Pieloni; S. Redaelli; J. Wenninger

    2014-10-22

    This paper shows the baseline LHC machine parameters for the 2015 start-up. Many systems have been upgraded during LS1 and in 2015 the LHC will operate at a higher energy than before and with a tighter filling scheme. Therefore, the 2015 commissioning phase risks to be less smooth than in 2012. The proposed starting configuration puts the focus on feasibility rather than peak performance and includes margins for operational uncertainties. Instead, once beam experience and a better machine knowledge has been obtained, a push in $\\beta^*$ and performance can be envisaged. In this paper, the focus is on collimation settings and reach in $\\beta^*$---other parameters are covered in greater depth by other papers in these proceedings.

  17. A Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyper-Kamiokande Working Group; :; K. Abe; H. Aihara; C. Andreopoulos; I. Anghel; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; R. Asfandiyarov; M. Askins; J. J. Back; P. Ballett; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; F. Bay; P. Beltrame; V. Berardi; M. Bergevin; S. Berkman; T. Berry; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; F. S. Cafagna; G. Carminati; S. L. Cartwright; M. G. Catanesi; K. Choi; J. H. Choi; G. Collazuol; G. Cowan; L. Cremonesi; G. Davies; G. De Rosa; C. Densham; J. Detwiler; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; S. Emery; A. Ereditato; P. Fernandez; T. Feusels; A. Finch; M. Fitton; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; D. Fukuda; V. Galymov; K. Ganezer; M. Gonin; P. Gumplinger; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; Y. Haga; B. Hartfiel; M. Hartz; Y. Hayato; M. Hierholzer; J. Hill; A. Himmel; S. Hirota; S. Horiuchi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; T. Iijima; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; K. Inoue; J. Insler; R. A. Intonti; T. Irvine; T. Ishida; H. Ishino; M. Ishitsuka; Y. Itow; A. Izmaylov; B. Jamieson; H. I. Jang; M. Jiang; K. K. Joo; C. K. Jung; A. Kaboth; T. Kajita; J. Kameda; Y. Karadhzov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; J. Y. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. Kishimoto; T. Kobayashi; M. Koga; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. R. Kropp; Y. Kudenko; T. Kutter; M. Kuze; L. Labarga; J. Lagoda; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; J. G. Learned; I. T. Lim; T. Lindner; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; W. Ma; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; C. Mariani; L. Marti; J. F. Martin; C. Martin; P. P. J. Martins; E. Mazzucato; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; M. Mezzetto; H. Minakata; A. Minamino; S. Mine; O. Mineev; M. Miura; J. Monroe; T. Mori; S. Moriyama; T. Mueller; F. Muheim; M. Nakahata; K. Nakamura; T. Nakaya; S. Nakayama; M. Needham; T. Nicholls; M. Nirkko; Y. Nishimura; E. Noah; J. Nowak; H. Nunokawa; H. M. O'Keeffe; Y. Okajima; K. Okumura; S. M. Oser; E. O'Sullivan; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; J. Perez; M. Y. Pac; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; C. Pistillo; S. Playfer; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; B. Quilain; M. Quinto; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; A. Redij; F. Retiere; C. Riccio; E. Richard; E. Rondio; H. J. Rose; M. Ross-Lonergan; C. Rott; S. D. Rountree; A. Rubbia; R. Sacco; M. Sakuda; M. C. Sanchez; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; A. Shaikhiev; I. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; G. Sinnis; M. B. Smy; J. Sobczyk; H. W. Sobel; T. Stewart; J. L. Stone; Y. Suda; Y. Suzuki; A. T. Suzuki; R. Svoboda; R. Tacik; A. Takeda; A. Taketa; Y. Takeuchi; H. A. Tanaka; H. K. M. Tanaka; H. Tanaka; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; M. Thorpe; S. Tobayama; N. Tolich; T. Tomura; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; M. R. Vagins; G. Vasseur; R. B. Vogelaar; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; J. R. Wilson; T. Xin; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; M. Zito

    2015-01-18

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this document, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis has been updated from the previous Letter of Intent [K. Abe et al., arXiv:1109.3262 [hep-ex

  18. Comparison of the 1984 DOE/EIA annual energy outlook and the 1984 GRI baseline projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, A.; Holtberg, P.; Woods, T.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand with the DOE/EIA 1984 Annual Energy Outlook shows many similar assumptions, but many cases of widening differences between the projections of primary energy consumption and sector-specific energy consumption. The DOE/EIA expects a faster and more significant decline in the electricity to natural gas price ratio, lower sector-specific end-use prices of refined petroleum products, and a faster growth in industrial raw material energy demand. In contrast to the GRI report, it also omits an estimate of industrial cogeneration and does not retire any exisiting generating capacity. The report examines the basic assumptions and results of both projections using five scenarios. 17 tables.

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  20. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  1. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  2. Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurakis, Eugene G

    2010-10-01

    Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten people’s awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

  3. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2014-01-02

    FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  4. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  5. Baseline tests for arc melter vitrification of INEL buried wastes. Volume 1: Facility description and summary data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.; Soelberg, N.R.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-11-19

    This report presents field results and raw data from the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Arc Melter Vitrification Project Phase 1 baseline test series conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). The baseline test series was conducted using the electric arc melter facility at the USBM Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. Five different surrogate waste feed mixtures were tested that simulated thermally-oxidized, buried, TRU-contaminated, mixed wastes and soils present at the INEL. The USBM Arc Furnace Integrated Waste Processing Test Facility includes a continuous feed system, the arc melting furnace, an offgas control system, and utilities. The melter is a sealed, 3-phase alternating current (ac) furnace approximately 2 m high and 1.3 m wide. The furnace has a capacity of 1 metric ton of steel and can process as much as 1,500 lb/h of soil-type waste materials. The surrogate feed materials included five mixtures designed to simulate incinerated TRU-contaminated buried waste materials mixed with INEL soil. Process samples, melter system operations data and offgas composition data were obtained during the baseline tests to evaluate the melter performance and meet test objectives. Samples and data gathered during this program included (a) automatically and manually logged melter systems operations data, (b) process samples of slag, metal and fume solids, and (c) offgas composition, temperature, velocity, flowrate, moisture content, particulate loading and metals content. This report consists of 2 volumes: Volume I summarizes the baseline test operations. It includes an executive summary, system and facility description, review of the surrogate waste mixtures, and a description of the baseline test activities, measurements, and sample collection. Volume II contains the raw test data and sample analyses from samples collected during the baseline tests.

  6. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 1. Volume 1 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  7. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 2. Volume 2 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  8. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 1. Volume 2 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  9. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 2. Volume 1 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  10. Systems engineering identification and control of mixed waste technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. Waste treatment includes all necessary steps from generation through disposal. Systems engineering was employed to reduce programmatic risk, that is, risk of failure to meet technical commitments within cost and schedule. Customer needs (technology deficiencies) are identified from Site Treatment Plans, Consent Orders, ten year plans, Site Technical Coordinating Groups, Stakeholders, and Site Visits. The Technical Baseline, a prioritized list of technology deficiencies, forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. Technology Development Requirements Documents are prepared for each technology selected for development. After technologies have been successfully developed and demonstrated, they are documented in a Technology Performance Report. The Technology Performance Reports are available to any of the customers or potential users of the technology, thus closing the loop between problem identification and product development. This systematic approach to technology development and its effectiveness after 3 years is discussed in this paper.

  11. LTC America`s, Inc. PTC-6 vacuum system (metal): Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The LTC coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC coating removal system consisted of several hand tools, a Roto Peen scaler, and a needlegun. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. These hand tools are used with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. The dust exposure was minimal but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  13. Cost-effective way to enhance the capabilities of the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential for enhancing the LCLS hard X-ray FEL capabilities. In the hard X-ray regime, a high longitudinal coherence will be the key to such performance upgrade. The method considered here to obtain high longitudinal coherence is based on a novel single-bunch self-seeding scheme exploiting a single crystal monochromator, which is extremely compact and can be straightforwardly installed in the LCLS baseline undulator. We present simulation results dealing with the LCLS hard X-ray FEL, and show that this method can produce fully-coherent X-ray pulses at 100 GW power level. With the radiation beam monochromatized down to the Fourier transform limit, a variety of very different techniques leading to further improvements of the LCLS performance become feasible. In particular, we describe an efficient way for obtaining full polarization control at the LCLS hard X-ray FEL. We also propose to exploit crystals in the Bragg reflection geometry as movable deflectors for the LCLS X-ray transport...

  14. NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    1981-07-15

    The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

  15. NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

  16. Report to Estates and Buildings, University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Baseline Review of the King's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biodiversity and attaining BREEAM certification on building development. This could be supported by more direct

  17. Report to Estates and Buildings, University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Baseline Review and Preliminary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and enhancing biodiversity and attaining BREEAM certification on building development. This could be supported

  18. Description of Model Data for SNL100-00: The Sandia 100-meter All-glass Baseline Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Todd Griffith, Brian R. Resor Sandia National Laboratories Wind and Water Power TechnologiesDescription of Model Data for SNL100-00: The Sandia 100-meter All-glass Baseline Wind Turbine Blade version and date, description, etc). A summary of the blade model data is also provided from the design

  19. Year ahead prediction of US landfalling hurricane numbers: the optimal combination of long and short baselines for intense hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewson, S; Casey, C; Jewson, Stephen; Penzer, Jeremy; Casey, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    In previous work, we have shown how to combine long and short historical baselines to make predictions of future hurricane numbers. We now ask: how should such combinations change if we are interested in predicting the future number of intense hurricanes?

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision.

  1. Towards Baseline Operation Integrating ITER-Relevant Core and Edge Plasma within the Constraint of the ITER-Like Wall at JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards Baseline Operation Integrating ITER-Relevant Core and Edge Plasma within the Constraint of the ITER-Like Wall at JET

  2. Hidden photon measurements using the long-baseline cavity of laser interferometric gravitational-wave detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Inoue; Koji Ishidoshiro

    2015-09-28

    We suggest a new application for the long-baseline and high powered cavities in a laser-interferometric gravitational-wave~(GW) detector to search for WISPs (weakly interacting sub-eV particles), such as a hidden U(1) gauge boson, called the hidden-sector photon. It is based on the principle of a light shining through the wall experiment, adapted to the laser with a wavelength of 1064 or 532 nm. The transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer is assumed as a detector, which the dark rate and efficiency are assumed as $0.000001~\\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and 0.75, respectively. The TES bolometer is sufficiently sensitive to search for the low-mass hidden-sector photons. We assume that the reconversion cavity is mounted on the reconversion region of hidden-sector photons, which number of reflection and length are assumed as 1000 and 10, 100, and 1000m. We found that the second-point-five and the second generation GW experiments, such as KAGRA and Advanced LIGO with a regeneration cavity and TES bolometers. The expected lower bounds with these experiments wit the reconverted mirror are set on the coupling constant $\\chi = 2 \\times 10^{-9}$ for hidden-sector photon with a mass of $2 \\times 10^{-5}$ eV within 95% confidence level. The third generation detector, Einstein Telescope, will reach $\\chi = 1 \\times 10^{-9}$ at a mass of $1 \\times 10^{-5}$ eV within 95% confidence level. Although the operation and construction of the RC will demand dedicated optical configurations, the cavities used in GW detection are expected to measure the strong potential for finding the hidden-sector photons.

  3. Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

    1993-06-01

    The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  4. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume II. Environmental baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company, Inc. (AECI) have recently formed the Breckinridge Project and are currently conducting a process and economic feasibility study of a commercial scale facility to produce synthetic liquid fuels from coal. The coal conversion process to be used is the H-COAL process, which is in the pilot plant testing stage under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at the H-COAL Pilot Plant Project near Catlettsburg, Kentucky. The preliminary plans for the commercial plant are for a 18,140 metric ton/day (24,000 ton/day) nominal coal assumption capacity utilizing the abundant high sulfur Western Kentucky coals. The Western Kentucky area offers a source of the coal along with adequate water, power, labor, transportation and other factors critical to the successful siting of a plant. Various studies by federal and state governments, as well as private industry, have reached similar conclusions regarding the suitability of such plant sites in western Kentucky. Of the many individual sites evaluated, a site in Breckinridge County, Kentucky, approximately 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) west of the town of Stephensport, has been identified as the plant location. Actions have been taken to obtain options to insure that this site will be available when needed. This report contains an overview of the regional setting and results of the baseline environmental studies. These studies include collection of data on ambient air and water quality, sound, aquatic and terrestrial biology and geology. This report contains the following chapters; introduction, review of significant findings, ambient air quality monitoring, sound, aquatic ecology, vegetation, wildlife, geology, soils, surface water, and ground water.

  5. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  6. Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

    2013-08-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  7. Baseline biological risk assessment for aquatic populations occurring near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.; Brandt, C.; Lewis, R.; Smith, R.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska was listed as a Superfund site in November 1989 with 64 potential source areas of contamination. As part of a sitewide remedial investigation, baseline risk assessments were conducted in 1993 and 1994 to evaluate hazards posed to biological receptors and to human health. Fish tissue, aquatic invertebrates, aquatic vegetation, sediment, and surface water data were collected from several on-site and off-site surface water bodies. An initial screening risk assessment indicated that several surface water sites along two major tributary creeks flowing through the base had unacceptable risks to both aquatic receptors and to human health because of DDTs. Other contaminants of concern (i.e., PCBs and PAHs) were below screening risk levels for aquatic organisms, but contributed to an unacceptable risk to human health. Additional samples was taken in 1994 to characterize the site-wide distribution of PAHs, DDTs, and PCBs in aquatic biota and sediments. Concentrations of PAHs were invertebrates > aquatic vegetation > fish, but concentrations were sufficiently low that they posed no significant risk to biological receptors. Pesticides were detected in all fish tissue samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were also detected in most fish from Garrison Slough. The pattern of PCB concentrations in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was related to their proximity to a sediment source in lower Garrison Slough. Ingestion of PCB-contaminated fish is the primary human-health risk driver for surface water bodies on Eielson AFB, resulting in carcinogenic risks > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for future recreational land-use at some sites. Principal considerations affecting uncertainty in the risk assessment process included spatial and temporal variability in media contaminant concentrations and inconsistencies between modelled and measured body burdens.

  8. ESRDC ship notional baseline Medium Voltage Direct Current (MVDC) architecture thermal simulation and visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a fast visualization and thermal simulation tool developed as part of the Electric Ship Research and Development Consortium (ESRDC) funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) that is capable of providing ...

  9. LBNO-DEMO: Large-scale neutrino detector demonstrators for phased performance assessment in view of a long-baseline oscillation experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Agostino; B. Andrieu; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; F. Bay; R. Bayes; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; S. Bordoni; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; F. Cadoux; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; N. Colino; P. Crivelli; I. De Bonis; Y. Déclais; J. Dawson; C. De La Taille; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; F. Dulucq; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; T. Esanu; D. Franco; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; I. Gil-Botella; M. C Gomoiu; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; M. Ieva; A. Jipa; Y. Karadzhov; I. Karpikov; A. Khotjantsev; A. Korzenev; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; T. Lux; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin; G. Martin-Chassard; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; M. Nessi; K. Nikolics; L. Nita; E. Noah; P. Novella; G. A. Nuijten; T. Ovsiannikova; C. Palomares; T. Patzak; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; C. Regenfus; C. Ristea; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez; R. Santorelli; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; M. Slupecki; F. J. P. Soler; D. L. Stanca; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; A. Verdugo; T. Viant; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

    2014-09-14

    In June 2012, an Expression of Interest for a long-baseline experiment (LBNO) has been submitted to the CERN SPSC. LBNO considers three types of neutrino detector technologies: a double-phase liquid argon (LAr) TPC and a magnetised iron detector as far detectors. For the near detector, a high-pressure gas TPC embedded in a calorimeter and a magnet is the baseline design. A mandatory milestone is a concrete prototyping effort towards the envisioned large-scale detectors, and an accompanying campaign of measurements aimed at assessing the detector associated systematic errors. The proposed $6\\times 6\\times 6$m$^3$ DLAr is an industrial prototype of the design discussed in the EoI and scalable to 20 kton or 50~kton. It is to be constructed and operated in a controlled laboratory and surface environment with test beam access, such as the CERN North Area (NA). Its successful operation and full characterisation will be a fundamental milestone, likely opening the path to an underground deployment of larger detectors. The response of the DLAr demonstrator will be measured and understood with an unprecedented precision in a charged particle test beam (0.5-20 GeV/c). The exposure will certify the assumptions and calibrate the response of the detector, and allow to develop and to benchmark sophisticated reconstruction algorithms, such as those of 3-dimensional tracking, particle ID and energy flow in liquid argon. All these steps are fundamental for validating the correctness of the physics performance described in the LBNO EoI.

  10. Estimation of Energy Baseline by Simulation for On-going Commissioning and Energy Saving Retrofit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Asada, M.; Iwata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2006-01-01

    ,rq : Rated chilled capacity of R-1 [kW] 2,rq : Rated chilled capacity of R-2 [kW] [1] IPMVP New Costruction Subcommittee: Concepts and Options for Determining Energy and Water Savings Volume I, International Performance Measerment...

  11. Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models, Stabilization of Data Logging Environment and Development of Metering Plan and Shopping List for Fort Hood, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N. F.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    This report has been prepared for the United States Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (CERL) located at Champaign, IL. The report describes the work performed by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) of Texas A&M University System...

  12. Work Domain Analysis of a Predecessor Sodium-cooled Reactor as Baseline for AdvSMR Operational Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Farris; David Gertman; Jacques Hugo

    2014-03-01

    This report presents the results of the Work Domain Analysis for the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). This is part of the phase of the research designed to incorporate Cognitive Work Analysis in the development of a framework for the formalization of an Operational Concept (OpsCon) for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs). For a new AdvSMR design, information obtained through Cognitive Work Analysis, combined with human performance criteria, can and should be used in during the operational phase of a plant to assess the crew performance aspects associated with identified AdvSMR operational concepts. The main objective of this phase was to develop an analytical and descriptive framework that will help systems and human factors engineers to understand the design and operational requirements of the emerging generation of small, advanced, multi-modular reactors. Using EBR-II as a predecessor to emerging sodium-cooled reactor designs required the application of a method suitable to the structured and systematic analysis of the plant to assist in identifying key features of the work associated with it and to clarify the operational and other constraints. The analysis included the identification and description of operating scenarios that were considered characteristic of this type of nuclear power plant. This is an invaluable aspect of Operational Concept development since it typically reveals aspects of future plant configurations that will have an impact on operations. These include, for example, the effect of core design, different coolants, reactor-to-power conversion unit ratios, modular plant layout, modular versus central control rooms, plant siting, and many more. Multi-modular plants in particular are expected to have a significant impact on overall OpsCon in general, and human performance in particular. To support unconventional modes of operation, the modern control room of a multi-module plant would typically require advanced HSIs that would provide sophisticated operational information visualization, coupled with adaptive automation schemes and operator support systems to reduce complexity. These all have to be mapped at some point to human performance requirements. The EBR-II results will be used as a baseline that will be extrapolated in the extended Cognitive Work Analysis phase to the analysis of a selected advanced sodium-cooled SMR design as a way to establish non-conventional operational concepts. The Work Domain Analysis results achieved during this phase have not only established an organizing and analytical framework for describing existing sociotechnical systems, but have also indicated that the method is particularly suited to the analysis of prospective and immature designs. The results of the EBR-II Work Domain Analysis have indicated that the methodology is scientifically sound and generalizable to any operating environment.

  13. Short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance, tritium beta decay, and neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Galilei, Universita di Padova, and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    We consider the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly and the gallium radioactive source experiments anomaly in terms of short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the framework of 3+1 four-neutrino mixing schemes. The separate fits of MiniBooNE and gallium data are highly compatible, with close best-fit values of the effective oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}. The combined fit gives {Delta}m{sup 2}(greater-or-similar sign)0.1 eV{sup 2} and 0.11(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.48 at 2{sigma}. We consider also the data of the Bugey and Chooz reactor antineutrino oscillation experiments and the limits on the effective electron antineutrino mass in {beta} decay obtained in the Mainz and Troitsk tritium experiments. The fit of the data of these experiments limits the value of sin{sup 2}2{theta} below 0.10 at 2{sigma}. Considering the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data as a statistical fluctuation, we perform a combined fit which gives {Delta}m{sup 2}{approx_equal}2 eV and 0.01(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.13 at 2{sigma}. Assuming a hierarchy of masses m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, m{sub 3}<

  14. INITIAL COMPARISON OF BASELINE PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR THE VHTR CANDIDATE GRAPHITE GRADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Mark C

    2014-09-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration that is capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered “candidate” grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding process. An analysis of the comparison between each of these grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear-grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  15. SRC-I: revised baseline supplement. [Cash flows associated with Phase IIIC extended operation of SRC-I Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The recently submitted Revised SRC-I Project Baseline included 30 months of plant operations. This period is divided into two sub-phases: IIIA and IIIB. Phase IIIA is six months in duration and is defined as Startup and Shakedown of the Demonstration Plant. Phase IIIB is two years in duration and encompasses two years of test operations. The Prime Contract allowed for the possibility of up to three additional years of test operations. This extension, Phase IIIC, was subject to mutual agreement by ICRC and DOE. It was also dependent upon a formal Notice of Buyout and plan for expansion of the Demonstration Plant. Pursuant to DOE instructions, the cash flows associated with Phase IIIC have been prepared consistent with the Revised SRC-I Project Baseline and are herewith included.

  16. How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine invasion success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Nick

    149 How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine for limited resources is considered a key factor controlling invasion success. Resource availability can be viewed in either the long or short-term. Long-term availability depends on the baseline nutrient

  17. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  18. CX-001717: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-001717: Categorical Exclusion Determination Application of 2-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) Imaging to the Targeting of Exploration and Development Wells in a...

  19. CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a High-Concentration Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation CX(s)...

  20. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of River Protection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 CX-012329: Categorical Exclusion Determination PNNL Projects Involving Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects in the 300 Area CX(s)...

  1. CX-002327: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Determination Central Facility Area and Advanced Test Reactor-Complex Analytical and Research and Development Laboratory Operation (Overarching) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05...

  2. Appendix A: GPRA08 benefits estimates: NEMS and MARKAL Model Baseline Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  3. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Shaffer, Jenny L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

  4. Developing a Marketing Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-03-02

    Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

  5. Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

  6. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and CP violation in NoVA with a second off-axis detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; /Vanderbilt U.; Pascoli, Silvia; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP

    2005-10-01

    We consider a Super-NOVA-like experimental configuration based on the use of two detectors in a long-baseline experiment as NOVA. We take the far detector as in the present NOVA proposal and add a second detector at a shorter baseline. The location of the second off-axis detector is chosen such that the ratio L/E is the same for both detectors, being L the baseline and E the neutrino energy. We consider liquid argon and water- Cerenkov techniques for the second off-axis detector and study, for different experimental setups, the detector mass required for the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy, for different values of {theta}{sub 13}. We also study the capabilities of such an experimental setup for determining CP-violation in the neutrino sector. Our results show that by adding a second off-axis detector a remarkable enhancement on the capabilities of the current NOVA experiment could be achieved.

  7. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  9. Low No{sub x}/SO{sub x} burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Baseline test report: Issue A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, K.; Martin, L.; Smith, J.

    1991-05-01

    The Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} (LNS) Burner Retrofit for Utility Cyclone Boilers program consists of the retrofit and subsequent demonstration of the technology at Southern Illinois Power Cooperative`s (SIPC`s) 33-MW unit 1 cyclone boiler located near Marion, Illinois. The LNS Burner employs a simple innovative combustion process burning high-sulfur Illinois coal to provide substantial SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control within the burner. A complete series of boiler performance and characterization tests, called the baseline tests, was conducted in October 1990 on unit 1 of SIPC`s Marion Station. The primary objective of the baseline test was to collect data from the existing plant that could provide a comparison of performance after the LNS Burner retrofit. These data could confirm the LNS Burner`s SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions control and any effect on boiler operation. Further, these tests would provide to the project experience with the operating characteristics of the host unit as well as engineering design information to minimize technical uncertainties in the application of the LNS Burner technology.

  10. Scheme for generating and transporting THz radiation to the X-ray experimental floor at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel scheme for integrating a coherent THz source in the baseline of the LCLS facility. Any method relying on the spent electron beam downstream of the baseline undulator should provide a way of transporting the radiation up to the experimental floor. Here we propose to use the dump area access maze. In this way the THz output must propagate with limited size at least for one hundred meters in a maze, following many turns, to reach the near experimental hall. The use of a standard, discrete, open beam-waveguide formed by periodic reflectors, that is a mirror guide, would lead to unacceptable size of the system. To avoid these problems, in this paper we propose an alternative approach based on periodically spaced metallic screens with holes. This quasi-optical transmission line is referred to as an iris line. We present complete calculations for the iris line using both analytical and numerical methods, which we find in good agreement. We present a design of a THz edge radiation source ...

  11. On the Use of an ER-213 Detonator to Establish a Baseline for the ER-486

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Keith A.; Liechty, Gary H.; Jaramillo, Dennis C.; Munger, Alan C.; McHugh, Douglas C.; Kennedy, James E.

    2014-08-19

    This report documents a series of tests using a TSD-115 fireset coupled with an ER-213, a gold exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. These tests were designed to fire this EBW with a smaller fireset to obtain current and voltage data as well as timing information at voltage levels below, above, and throughout the threshold firing region. This study could then create a database for comparison to our current ER-486 EBW development, which is designed to be a lower voltage (<500V) device.

  12. Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

    2014-09-05

    Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

  13. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  15. Environmental settings for selected US Department of Energy installations - support information for the programmatic environmental impact statement and the baseline environmental management report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdren, G.R.; Glantz, C.S.; Berg, L.K.; Delinger, K.; Fosmire, C.J.; Goodwin, S.M.; Rustad, J.R.; Schalla, R.; Schramke, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report contains the environmental setting information developed for 25 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) installations in support of the DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) and the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The common objective of the PEIS and the BEMR is to provide the public with information about the environmental contamination problems associated with major DOE facilities across the country, and to assess the relative risks that radiological and hazardous contaminants pose to the public, onsite workers, and the environment. Environmental setting information consists of the site-specific data required to model (using the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System) the atmospheric, groundwater, and surface water transport of contaminants within and near the boundaries of the installations. The environmental settings data describes the climate, atmospheric dispersion, hydrogeology, and surface water characteristics of the installations. The number of discrete environmental settings established for each installation was governed by two competing requirements: (1) the risks posed by contaminants released from numerous waste sites were to be modeled as accurately as possible, and (2) the modeling required for numerous release sites and a large number of contaminants had to be completed within the limits imposed by the PEIS and BEMR schedule. The final product is the result of attempts to balance these competing concerns in a way that minimizes the number of settings per installation in order to meet the project schedule while at the same, time providing adequate, if sometimes highly simplified, representations of the different areas within an installation. Environmental settings were developed in conjunction with installation experts in the fields of meteorology, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry.

  16. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan

    2013-02-22

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  17. Decoherence, determinism and chaos revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1994-11-15

    We suggest that the derivation of the free space Maxwell Equations for classical electromagnetism, using a discrete ordered calculus developed by L.H. Kauffman and T. Etter, necessarily pushes the discussion of determinism in natural science down to the level of relativistic quantum mechanics and hence renders the mathematical phenomena studied in deterministic chaos research irrelevant to the question of whether the world investigated by physics is deterministic. We believe that this argument reinforces Suppes` contention that the issue of determinism versus indeterminism should be viewed as a Kantian antinomy incapable of investigation using currently available scientific tools.

  18. 86 GHz Very Long Baseline Polarimetry of 3C273 and 3C279 with the Coordinated Millimeter VLBI Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joanne M. Attridge

    2001-04-18

    86 GHz Very Long Baseline Polarimetry probes magnetic field structures within the cores of Active Galactic Nuclei at higher angular resolutions and a spectral octave higher than previously achievable. Observations of 3C273 and 3C279 taken in April 2000 with the Coordinated Millimeter VLBI Array have resulted in the first total intensity (Stokes I) and linear polarization VLBI images reported of any source at 86 GHz. These results reveal the 86 GHz electric vector position angles within the jets of 3C273 and 3C279 to be orthogonal to each other, and the core of 3C273 to be unpolarized. If this lack of polarization is due to Faraday depolarization alone, the dispersion in rotation measure is >=90000 rad/m^2 for the core of 3C273.

  19. DETECTION OF FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS WITH MULTIPLE STATIONS: A CASE STUDY USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2011-07-10

    Recent investigations reveal an important new class of transient radio phenomena that occur on submillisecond timescales. Often, transient surveys' data volumes are too large to archive exhaustively. Instead, an online automatic system must excise impulsive interference and detect candidate events in real time. This work presents a case study using data from multiple geographically distributed stations to perform simultaneous interference excision and transient detection. We present several algorithms that incorporate dedispersed data from multiple sites, and report experiments with a commensal real-time transient detection system on the Very Long Baseline Array. We test the system using observations of pulsar B0329+54. The multiple-station algorithms enhanced sensitivity for detection of individual pulses. These strategies could improve detection performance for a future generation of geographically distributed arrays such as the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the Square Kilometre Array.

  20. Application of ECH to the study of transport in ITER baseline scenario-like discharges in DIII-D

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Austin, M. E.; Ernst, D. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Luce, T. C.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Perkins, R. J.; et al

    2015-03-12

    Recent DIII-D experiments in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) have shown strong increases in fluctuations and correlated reduction of confinement associated with entering the electron-heating-dominated regime with strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The addition of 3.2 MW of 110 GHz EC power deposited at ?~0.42 to IBS discharges with ~3 MW of neutral beam injection causes large increases in low-k and medium-k turbulent density fluctuations observed with Doppler backscatter (DBS), beam emission spectroscopy (BES) and phase-contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostics, correlated with decreases in the energy, particle, and momentum confinement times. Power balance calculations show the electron heat diffusivity ?e more »increases significantly in the mid-radius region 0.4« less

  1. Dual baseline search for muon antineutrino disappearance at 0.1 eV²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.; Huelsnitz, W.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Franke, A. J.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Giganti, C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Grange, J.; Guzowski, P.; Hanson, A.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jover-Manas, G.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobayashi, Y. K.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kubo, H.; Kurimoto, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Masuike, S.; Matsuoka, K.; McGary, V. T.; Metcalf, W.; Mills, G. B.; Mirabal, J.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyachi, Y.; Mizugashira, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Nakaya, T.; Napora, R.; Nienaber, P.; Orme, D.; Osmanov, B.; Otani, M.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Sanchez, F.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sorel, M.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R. J.; Takei, H.; Tanaka, H.-K.; Tanaka, M.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, I. J.; Tesarek, R. J.; Uchida, Y.; Van de Water, R. G.; Walding, J. J.; Wascko, M. O.; White, D. H.; White, H. B.; Wickremasinghe, D. A.; Yokoyama, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2012-09-01

    The MiniBooNE and SciBooNE collaborations report the results of a joint search for short baseline disappearance of ?¯? at Fermilab’s Booster Neutrino Beamline. The MiniBooNE Cherenkov detector and the SciBooNE tracking detector observe antineutrinos from the same beam, therefore the combined analysis of their data sets serves to partially constrain some of the flux and cross section uncertainties. Uncertainties in the ?? background were constrained by neutrino flux and cross section measurements performed in both detectors. A likelihood ratio method was used to set a 90% confidence level upper limit on ?¯? disappearance that dramatically improves upon prior limits in the ?m²=0.1–100 eV² region.

  2. Two experiments for the price of one? -- The role of the second oscillation maximum in long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Huber; Joachim Kopp

    2011-05-09

    We investigate the quantitative impact that data from the second oscillation maximum has on the performance of wide band beam neutrino oscillation experiments. We present results for the physics sensitivities to standard three flavor oscillation, as well as results for the sensitivity to non-standard interactions. The quantitative study is performed using an experimental setup similar to the Fermilab to DUSEL Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). We find that, with the single exception of sensitivity to the mass hierarchy, the second maximum plays only a marginal role due to the experimental difficulties to obtain a statistically significant and sufficiently background-free event sample at low energies. This conclusion is valid for both water Cherenkov and liquid argon detectors. Moreover, we confirm that non-standard neutrino interactions are very hard to distinguish experimentally from standard three-flavor effects and can lead to a considerable loss of sensitivity to \\theta_{13}, the mass hierarchy and CP violation.

  3. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  4. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa (Albuquerque, NM); Sackos, John Theodore (Albuquerque, NM); Bradley, Bart Davis (Albuquerque, NM); Nellums, Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  5. CX-008995: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-008995: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Development of Integrated Die Casting Process For Large Thin-Wall Magnesium Applications CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08...

  6. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  7. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  8. Determination of Longitudinal Stress in Rails 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djayaputra, Ferdinand

    2012-02-14

    The objective of this research is to determine the longitudinal stress in rails by using the polarization of Rayleigh waves. Analytical models are developed to describe the effect of applied stress on wave speed and on the polarization of Rayleigh...

  9. Youth Employment in Ghana: Conditions and Determinants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Zachary; Berrios, Andrea; He, Yukuai; Larsen, Sean; Novoa, Miguel; Twumasi-Ankrah, Kwame; Vega, Camille

    2015-06-11

    Youth employment, and its limitations, is a pertinent problem that most developing nations face. “Youth Employment in Ghana: Conditions and Determinants” is a student-led research project that summarizes and analyzes the conditions of youth...

  10. Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, Economic Development Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options,...

  11. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A.

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site operations, specifically as associated with lead in surface soil at the abandoned water tank and nickel in surface soils over the northern portion of the parcel from former Bldg. K-1037 smelting operations. Low level detections of organics are also reported in some surface soils including Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) near Blair Road and common laboratory contaminants at randomly distributed locations. However, human health risk from site-related contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are acceptable?though maximum concentrations of lead and nickel and the screening-level ecological risk assessment (SLERA) demonstrate no further ecological evaluation is warranted. The weight of evidence leads to the conclusion Parcel 21d does not require any actions per the FFA.

  12. 100%Baseline is conventional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    installation of the PureComfortTM 240 took place during July 2004 at a new 57,000-square-foot A&P supermarket% ­100% CHP Efficiency Fuel Energy CO2 NOx Each PureComfortTM system produces about 40% less carbon dioxide and 85% less NOx per megawatt-hour than the average fossil-fuel-fired utility power plant. U

  13. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  14. Short Baseline Neutrino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift End Shift End A shift ends

  15. HIGH VELOCITY PRECESSING JETS FROM THE WATER FOUNTAIN IRAS 18286-0959 REVEALED BY VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Rd., Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Imai, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Deguchi, Shuji [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Diamond, Philip J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-10

    We report the results of multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array observations of the 22.2 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission associated with the 'water fountain' IRAS 18286-0959. We suggest that this object is the second example of a highly collimated bipolar precessing outflow traced by H{sub 2}O maser emission, the other is W 43A. The detected H{sub 2}O emission peaks are distributed over a velocity range from -50 km s{sup -1} to 150 km s{sup -1}. The spatial distribution of over 70% of the identified maser features is found to be highly collimated along a spiral jet (jet 1) extended southeast to northwest; the remaining features appear to trace another spiral jet (jet 2) with a different orientation. The two jets form a 'double-helix' pattern which lies across {approx}200 mas. The maser distribution is reasonably fit by a model consisting of two bipolar precessing jets. The three-dimensional velocities of jet 1 and jet 2 are derived to be 138 km s{sup -1} and 99 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The precession period of jet 1 is about 56 years. For jet 2, three possible models are tested and they give different values for the kinematic parameters. We propose that the appearance of two jets is the result of a single driving source with significant proper motion.

  16. Testing the universality of free fall with rubidium and ytterbium in a very large baseline atom interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas Hartwig; Sven Abend; Christian Schubert; Dennis Schlippert; Holger Ahlers; Katerine Posso-Trujillo; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

    2015-03-04

    We propose a very long baseline atom interferometer test of Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) with ytterbium and rubidium extending over 10m of free fall. In view of existing parametrizations of EEP violations, this choice of test masses significantly broadens the scope of atom interferometric EEP tests with respect to other performed or proposed tests by comparing two elements with high atomic numbers. In a first step, our experimental scheme will allow reaching an accuracy in the E\\"otv\\"os ratio of $7\\times 10^{-13}$. This achievement will constrain violation scenarios beyond our present knowledge and will represent an important milestone for exploring a variety of schemes for further improvements of the tests as outlined in the paper. We will discuss the technical realisation in the new infrastructure of the Hanover Institute of Technology (HITec) and give a short overview of the requirements to reach this accuracy. The experiment will demonstrate a variety of techniques which will be employed in future tests of EEP, high accuracy gravimetry and gravity-gradiometry. It includes operation of a force sensitive atom interferometer with an alkaline earth like element in free fall, beam splitting over macroscopic distances and novel source concepts.

  17. A Proposal for a Three Detector Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Program in the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Acciarri; C. Adams; R. An; C. Andreopoulos; A. M. Ankowski; M. Antonello; J. Asaadi; W. Badgett; L. Bagby; B. Baibussinov; B. Baller; G. Barr; N. Barros; M. Bass; V. Bellini; P. Benetti; S. Bertolucci; K. Biery; H. Bilokon; M. Bishai; A. Bitadze; A. Blake; F. Boffelli; T. Bolton; M. Bonesini; J. Bremer; S. J. Brice; C. Bromberg; L. Bugel; E. Calligarich; L. Camilleri; D. Caratelli; B. Carls; F. Cavanna; S. Centro; H. Chen; C. Chi; E. Church; D. Cianci; A. G. Cocco; G. H. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. Convery; G. De Geronimo; A. Dermenev; R. Dharmapalan; S. Dixon; Z. Djurcic; S. Dytmam; B. Eberly; A. Ereditato; J. Esquivel; J. Evans; A. Falcone; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; B. T. Fleming; W. M. Foreman; J. Freestone; T. Gamble; G. Garvey; V. Genty; M. Geynisman; D. Gibin; S. Gninenko; D. Göldi; S. Gollapinni; N. Golubev; M. Graham; E. Gramellini; H. Greenlee; R. Grosso; R. Guenette; A. Guglielmi; A. Hackenburg; R. Hänni; O. Hen; J. Hewes; J. Ho; G. Horton-Smith; J. Howell; A. Ivashkin; C. James; C. M. Jen; R. A. Johnson; B. J. P. Jones; J. Joshi; H. Jostlein; D. Kaleko; L. N. Kalousis; G. Karagiorgi; W. Ketchum; B. Kirby; M. Kirby; M. Kirsanov; J. Kisiel; J. Klein; J. Klinger; T. Kobilarcik; U. Kose; I. Kreslo; V. A. Kudryavtsev; Y. Li; B. Littlejohn; D. Lissauer; P. Livesly; S. Lockwitz; W. C. Louis; M. Lüthi; B. Lundberg; F. Mammoliti; G. Mannocchi; A. Marchionni; C. Mariani; J. Marshall; K. Mavrokoridis; N. McCauley; N. McConkey; K. McDonald; V. Meddage; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; I. Mercer; T. Miao; T. Miceli; G. B. Mills; D. Mladenov; C. Montanari; D. Montanari; J. Moon; M. Mooney; C. Moore; Z. Moss; M. H. Moulai; S. Mufson; R. Murrells; D. Naples; M. Nessi; M. Nicoletto; P. Nienaber; B. Norris; F. Noto; J. Nowak; S. Pal; O. Palamara; V. Paolone; V. Papavassiliou; S. Pate; J. Pater; Z. Pavlovic; J. Perkin; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; P. P?o?ski; S. Pordes; R. Potenza; G. Pulliam; X. Qian; L. Qiuguang; J. L. Raaf; V. Radeka; R. Rameika; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; P. N. Ratoff; B. Rebel; M. Richardson; L. Rochester; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; C. Rudolf von Rohr; B. Russell; P. Sala; A. Scaramelli; D. W. Schmitz; A. Schukraft; W. Seligman; M. H. Shaevitz; B. Sippach; E. Snider; J. Sobczyk; M. Soderberg; S. Söldner-Rembold; M. Spanu; J. Spitz; N. Spooner; D. Stefan; J. St. John; T. Strauss; R. Sulej; C. M. Sutera; A. M. Szelc; N. Tagg; C. E. Taylor; K. Terao; M. Thiesse; L. Thompson; M. Thomson; C. Thorn; M. Torti; F. Tortorici; M. Toups; C. Touramanis; Y. Tsai; T. Usher; R. Van de Water; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli; T. Wachala; M. Weber; D. Whittington; P. Wilson; S. Wolbers; T. Wongjirad; K. Woodruff; M. Xu; T. Yang; B. Yu; A. Zani; G. P. Zeller; J. Zennamo; C. Zhang

    2015-03-05

    A Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program of three LAr-TPC detectors located along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab is presented. This new SBN Program will deliver a rich and compelling physics opportunity, including the ability to resolve a class of experimental anomalies in neutrino physics and to perform the most sensitive search to date for sterile neutrinos at the eV mass-scale through both appearance and disappearance oscillation channels. Using data sets of 6.6e20 protons on target (P.O.T.) in the LAr1-ND and ICARUS T600 detectors plus 13.2e20 P.O.T. in the MicroBooNE detector, we estimate that a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino appearance can be performed with ~5 sigma sensitivity for the LSND allowed (99% C.L.) parameter region. In this proposal for the SBN Program, we describe the physics analysis, the conceptual design of the LAr1-ND detector, the design and refurbishment of the T600 detector, the necessary infrastructure required to execute the program, and a possible reconfiguration of the BNB target and horn system to improve its performance for oscillation searches.

  18. Limb-brightened jet of 3C 84 revealed by the 43 GHz very-long-baseline-array observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, H.; Hada, K.; Haga, T.; Giovannini, G.; Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Giroletti, M.; Doi, A.; Kino, M.; Nakamura, M.; Asada, K.

    2014-04-10

    We present a study of the sub-parsec scale radio structure of the radio galaxy 3C 84/NGC 1275 based on the Very Long Baseline Array data at 43 GHz. We discover a limb brightening in the 'restarted' jet that is associated with the 2005 radio outburst. In the 1990s, the jet structure was ridge brightening rather than limb brightening, despite the observations being done with similar angular resolutions. This indicates that the transverse jet structure has recently changed. This change in the morphology reveals an interesting agreement with the ?-ray flux increase, i.e., the ?-ray flux in the 1990s was at least seven times lower than the current one. One plausible explanation for the limb brightening is that the velocity structure of the jet is in the context of the stratified jet, which is a successful scenario that explains the ?-ray emission in some active galactic nuclei. If this is the case, then the change in apparent transverse structure might be caused by the change in the transverse velocity structure. We argue that the transition from ridge brightening to limb brightening is related to the ?-ray time variability on the timescale of decades. We also discuss the collimation profile of the jet.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  20. Development and validation of instantaneous risk model in nuclear power plant's risk monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, J.; Hu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The instantaneous risk model is the fundament of calculation and analysis in a risk monitor. This study focused on the development and validation of an instantaneous risk model. Therefore the principles converting from the baseline risk model to the instantaneous risk model were studied and separated trains' failure modes modeling method was developed. The development and validation process in an operating nuclear power plant's risk monitor were also introduced. Correctness of instantaneous risk model and rationality of converting method were demonstrated by comparison with the result of baseline risk model. (authors)

  1. Horizontal well construction/completion process in a Gulf of Mexico unconsolidated sand: development of baseline correlations for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, Jason Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    -planning by lignite personnel for handling, weather problems, storage/mixing requirements and fluid property maintenance are very important for successful operations using DIF. Proper maintenance of solids control systems is essential for quality control of DIF...

  2. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  3. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  4. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  5. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  6. PSR B0329+54: Substructure in the scatter-broadened image discovered with RadioAstron on baselines of up to 235,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, M V; Bartel, N; Gwinn, C R; Johnson, M D; Joshi, B C; Kardashev, N S; Karuppusamy, R; Kovalev, Y Y; Kramer, M; Rudnitskii, A G; Safutdinov, E R; Shishov, V I; Smirnova, T V; Soglasnov, V A; Zensus, J A; Zhuravlev, V I

    2015-01-01

    We studied scattering properties of the pulsar PSR B0329+54 with a ground-space radio interferometer RadioAstron which included the 10-m Space Radio Telescope, the 110-m Green Bank Telescope, the 14x25-m Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and the 64-m Kalyazin Radio Telescope. The observations were performed at 324 MHz on baselines of up to 235,000 km in November 2012 and January 2014. At short ground-space baselines of less than about 20,000 km, the visibility amplitude decreases with the projected baseline length, providing a direct measurement of the diameter of the scattering disk of 4.7$\\pm$0.9 mas. The size of the diffraction spot near Earth is 15,000$\\pm$3,000 km. At longer baselines of up to 235,000 km, where no interferometric detection of the scattering disk would be expected, significant visibilities were observed with amplitudes scattered around a constant value. These detections result in a discovery of a substructure in the completely resolved scatter-broadened image of the pointlike source, ...

  7. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2009-12-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-792 Switchyard Complex, which includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-79 1-B building, the K-796-A building, and the K-792 Northern Expansion Area located in the northwestern portion of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The total area of the property is approximately 19.91 acres. DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land area and buildings to the Heritage Center, LLC (Heritage Center), a subsidiary corporation of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned facility at ETTP to a non-federal entity. The area proposed for title transfer includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-792 Northern Expansion Area, Bldg. K-791-B, Bldg. K-796-A, and the underlying property known as the underlying fee. Located within the K-792 Switchyard footprint but not included in the transfer are Bldg. K-131 0-MP and Bldg. K- 131 0-MQ, two buildings owned by a private company that leases space in the northern portion of the Switchyard. The transfer footprint is bounded by Perimeter Road to the north and west, the parking area for Portal 8 to the south, and primarily the former K-792 Powerhouse Complex and Avenue 'U' North to the east; however, the eastern boundary along the Northern Expansion area has no physical features associated with it. Zone 2 remedial action objectives were developed by the DVS to support the future use of ETTP as a mixed-use commercial and industrial park. Therefore, remediation criteria were designed for the protection of the future industrial worker under the assumption the worker normally would not have the potential for exposure to soils at depths below 10 ft below ground surface (bgs). Accordingly, land use controls (LUCs) have been established to restrict disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to limit future land use to industriallcornmercial activities. Where the need for LUCs below 10 ft bgs is not warranted, this is so stated and explained. Once all actions associated with the DVS for Zone 1 and Zone 2 are completed and the data support it, there will be a re-evaluation with EPA and TDEC for the restriction on excavation below 10 ft. The DVS process and the preparation of this report included visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, a detailed records search, sampling and analysis of soils, radiological walkover surveys, and a risk evaluation. Resources evaluated as part of the records search included Federal Government records, title documents, aerial photographs that may reflect prior uses, and interviews with current and former employees 1 involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed of. In addition, radiological surveys of Bldgs. K-791-B and K-796-A were conducted to assess the buildings radiological condition. Soil vapor sampling and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) swipe sampling also were conducted within the buildings. Based on the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the existing information, including discussions and interviews referenced herein, and evaluation of the data gathered in preparation of the environmental baseline survey (EBS) for the K-792 Switchyard Complex, DOE recommends the following: Due to the uncertainty associated with the nature of the on-site groundwater and the need to evaluate and possibly address groundwater in the future, DOE recommends that the transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex be achieved by a covenant deferral per the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Sect. 120(h)(3)(c). Land use restrictions associated with the covenant deferral are described.

  8. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  9. Baseline Environmental Analysis Report for the K-1251 Barge Facility at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Winkle J.E.

    2007-08-24

    This report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-1251 Barge Facility, which is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to lease the facility to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the use, by a potential lessee, of government-owned facilities at ETTP. This report is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The lease footprint is slightly over 1 acre. The majority of the lease footprint is defined by a perimeter fence that surrounds a gravel-covered area with a small concrete pad within it. Also included is a gravel drive with locked gates at each end that extends on the east side to South First Avenue, providing access to the facility. The facility is located along the Clinch River and an inlet of the river that forms its southern boundary. To the east, west, and north, the lease footprint is surrounded by DOE property. Preparation of this report included the review of government records, title documents, historic aerial photos, visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, and interviews with current and former employees involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products or their derivatives and acutely hazardous wastes were known to have been released or disposed. Radiological surveys were conducted and chemical samples were collected to assess the facility's condition.

  10. VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY MEASURED PROPER MOTION AND PARALLAX OF THE ?-RAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0218+4232

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yuanjie; Chen, Ding; Yang, Jun; Campbell, Robert M.; Janssen, Gemma; Stappers, Ben

    2014-02-20

    PSR J0218+4232 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) with a flux density ?0.9 mJy at 1.4 GHz. It is very bright in the high-energy X-ray and ?-ray domains. We conducted an astrometric program using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.6 GHz to measure its proper motion and parallax. A model-independent distance would also help constrain its ?-ray luminosity. We achieved a detection of signal-to-noise ratio S/N >37 for the weak pulsar in all five epochs. Using an extragalactic radio source lying 20 arcmin away from the pulsar, we estimate the pulsar's proper motion to be ?{sub ?}cos ? = 5.35 ± 0.05 mas yr{sup –1} and ?{sub ?} = –3.74 ± 0.12 mas yr{sup –1}, and a parallax of ? = 0.16 ± 0.09 mas. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) proper motion has significantly improved upon the estimates from long-term pulsar timing observations. The VLBI parallax provides the first model-independent distance constraints: d=6.3{sub ?2.3}{sup +8.0} kpc, with a corresponding 3? lower-limit of d = 2.3 kpc. This is the first pulsar trigonometric parallax measurement based solely on EVN observations. Using the derived distance, we believe that PSR J0218+4232 is the most energetic ?-ray MSP known to date. The luminosity based on even our 3? lower-limit distance is high enough to pose challenges to the conventional outer gap and slot gap models.

  11. NEPA Determination Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has determined that this proposed project is a major Federal action that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment. To comply with the National Environmental Policy Act ...

  12. Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Methods, applications and developments of ground-penetrating radar for determination of reservoir geometries in near-surface settings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMechan, G.A.; Soegaard, K.

    1998-05-25

    An integrated sedimentologic and GPR investigation has been carried out on a fluvial channel sandstone in the mid-Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone at Coyote Basin along the southwestern flank of the San Rafael Uplift in east-central Utah. This near-surface study, which covers a area of 40 {times} 16.5 meters to a depth of 15 meters, integrates detailed stratigraphic data from outcrop sections and facies maps with multi-frequency 3-D GPR surveys. The objectives of this investigation are two-fold: (1) to develop new ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology for imaging shallow subsurface sandstone bodies, and (2) to construct an empirical three-dimensional sandstone reservoir model suitable for hydrocarbon flow-simulation by imaging near-surface sandstone reservoir analogs with the use of GPR. The sedimentological data base consists of a geologic map of the survey area and a detailed facies map of the cliff face immediately adjacent to the survey area. Five vertical sections were measured along the cliff face adjacent to the survey area. In addition, four wells were cored within the survey area from which logs were recorded. In the sections and well logs primary sedimentary structures were documented along with textural information and permeability data. Gamma-ray profiles were also obtained for all sections and core logs. The sedimentologic and stratigraphic information serves as the basis from which much of the processing and interpretation of the GPR data was made. Three 3-D GPR data sets were collected over the survey area at frequencies of 50 MHZ, 100 MHZ, and 200 MHZ.

  13. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  14. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  15. Development and Testing of an Integrated Sandia Cooler Thermoelectric Device (SCTD).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry A.; Staats, Wayne Lawrence,; Leick, Michael Thomas; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Radermacher, Reinhard; Martin, Cara; Nasuta, Dennis; Kalinowski, Paul; Hoffman, William

    2014-12-01

    This report describes a FY14 effort to develop an integrated Sandia Cooler T hermoelectric D evice (SCTD) . The project included a review of feasible thermoelectric (TE) cooling applications, baseline performance testing of an existing TE device, analysis and design development of an integrated SCTD assembly, and performance measurement and validation of the integrated SCTD prototype.

  16. ACEEE Summer Study on Energy in Industry, West Point, NY, July 19-22. 1 Benchmarking Approaches: An Alternate Method to Determine Best

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    : An Alternate Method to Determine Best Practice by Examining Plant-Wide Energy Signatures Yogesh Patil and JohnACEEE Summer Study on Energy in Industry, West Point, NY, July 19-22. 1 Benchmarking Approaches Seryak, Energy & Resource Solutions, Inc. Kelly Kissock, University of Dayton ABSTRACT Baselining

  17. Solid waste management challenges for cities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abarca Guerrero, Lilliana; Maas, Ger; Hogland, William

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stakeholders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factors affecting performance waste management systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Questionnaire as Annex for waste management baseline assessment. - Abstract: Solid waste management is a challenge for the cities' authorities in developing countries mainly due to the increasing generation of waste, the burden posed on the municipal budget as a result of the high costs associated to its management, the lack of understanding over a diversity of factors that affect the different stages of waste management and linkages necessary to enable the entire handling system functioning. An analysis of literature on the work done and reported mainly in publications from 2005 to 2011, related to waste management in developing countries, showed that few articles give quantitative information. The analysis was conducted in two of the major scientific journals, Waste Management Journal and Waste Management and Research. The objective of this research was to determine the stakeholders' action/behavior that have a role in the waste management process and to analyze influential factors on the system, in more than thirty urban areas in 22 developing countries in 4 continents. A combination of methods was used in this study in order to assess the stakeholders and the factors influencing the performance of waste management in the cities. Data was collected from scientific literature, existing data bases, observations made during visits to urban areas, structured interviews with relevant professionals, exercises provided to participants in workshops and a questionnaire applied to stakeholders. Descriptive and inferential statistic methods were used to draw conclusions. The outcomes of the research are a comprehensive list of stakeholders that are relevant in the waste management systems and a set of factors that reveal the most important causes for the systems' failure. The information provided is very useful when planning, changing or implementing waste management systems in cities.

  18. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  19. CX-010389: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Second Site Investigation CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 01172013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office The purpose of this project is...

  20. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    150 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Degree options BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA degree; if you are most interested

  1. White Paper: Airborne Observations in Western North Dakota to Obtain Baseline Measurements for Qualification of Important Atmospheric Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    and aerosols. The production, transportation and storage of crude oil and natural gas can result in methane atoms) vapors from crude oil production form aerosols within the atmosphere. The research objective determine the magnitude of emission rates from the region's oil and gas production (Karion et al. 2013

  2. Mayan Telegraphese: Intonational Determinants of Inflectional Development in Quiché Mayan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pye, Clifton

    1983-09-01

    -tional structure of the language they are learning. 1. I collected longitudinal records from four Quiche Mayan children (aged 2;0 to 3;0 when I began) living in the highland village of Zunil, Guatemala. I visited the children in their homes over a nine... in prefabricated routines. (c) 'If [morpheme] x has low frequency and low perceptual salience, and is verbally con-ditioned [sic] and expressive of a semantic modulation, then it will be completely absent from Stage I.' The next step is to apply these predictions...

  3. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    ) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences enquiries Dr Emilia Ferraro, Department of Geography & Sustainable Development E: gg. Resources Very few universities currently offer undergraduate degrees in Sustainable Development. Uniquely

  4. Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L.

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  5. Career Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The career development objective is to produce better employees and maximizing employee potential. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs can help provide employees with the skills and...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR NETWORK TEST BED FOR ISD MATERIALS AND STRUCUTRAL CONDITION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeigler, K.; Ferguson, B.; Karapatakis, D.; Herbst, C.; Stripling, C.

    2011-07-06

    The P Reactor at the Savannah River Site is one of the first reactor facilities in the US DOE complex that has been placed in its end state through in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of remote sensors to provide verification of ISD system conditions and performance characteristics, an ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The test bed addresses the DOE-EM Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of: (1) Groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring; (2) Strain gauges for crack growth monitoring; (3) Tiltmeters for settlement monitoring; and (4) A communication system for data collection. Preliminary baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  8. Development of a rotary valve for pulse-combustion applications. Annual report, June 1986-June 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, P.E.; Corliss, J.M.

    1987-10-05

    Development of a rotary-valve air inlet for pulse-combustor systems in a variety of industrial applications is reviewed. The work focuses on development of a rotary-valve pulse combustor that will operate at input rates of up to 100,000 Btu/hr with computer control capable of synchronizing a motor-driven valve to combustor pressure oscillations. Activities included integrating the valve and combustor, conducting baseline experiments, developing computer control, integrating components, and performing laboratory evaluation.

  9. On coaxial minors of determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babcock, Wealthy Consuelo

    1922-01-01

    . Approved by: ROOlOb SlSb^ Contents Page I. Introduction 1 II. Independence of Coaxial Minors of Special Determinants 9 A. Symmetric Determinant 9 B. Skew-symmetric Determinant ...14 C. Circulant 17 D. Hankel's Determinant 19 III... Introduction The work on coaxial minors of a deter­ minant has centered about the problems of deter­ mining the number of independent coaxial minors, of finding independent sets, and of expressing the determinant in terms of the minors of an independent set...

  10. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Wray, William O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  12. Determining Pregnancy in Cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly, John R.; Sprott, L. R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2008-12-16

    . The cervix may also act as a sperm sieve, trapping some abnormal sperm cells and allowing normal sperm cells to travel into the uterus and oviducts. The uterus is Y-shaped with a right and left horn. The horns share a connecting region known as the body..., the placental membranes are well developed and extend into both horns of the uterus. About 38 days into gestation, these membranes begin at- taching to the uterine wall at special, raised areas known as caruncles. Located throughout the uterus...

  13. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2010-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Parcel ED-9 consists of about 13 acres that DOE proposes to transfer to Heritage Center, LLC (hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center'), a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The 13 acres include two tracts of land, referred to as ED-9A (7.06 acres) and ED-9B (5.02 acres), and a third tract consisting of about 900 linear feet of paved road and adjacent right-of-way, referred to as ED-9C (0.98 acres). Transfer of the title to ED-9 will be by deed under a Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides a summary of information to support the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity.

  14. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE RADIO EMISSIONS IN NEARBY RADIO-QUIET NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2013-03-01

    We conducted Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of seven nearby narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) with milliarcsecond resolution. This is the first systematic very long baseline interferometry study focusing on the central parsec-scale regions of radio-quiet NLS1s. Five of the seven were detected at a brightness temperature of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and contain radio cores with high brightness temperatures of >6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, indicating a nonthermal process driven by jet-producing central engines as in radio-loud NLS1s and other active galactic nucleus classes. VLBA images of MRK 1239, MRK 705, and MRK 766 exhibit parsec-scale jets with clear linear structures. A large portion of the radio power comes from diffuse emission components that are distributed within the nuclear regions ({approx}< 300 pc), which is a common characteristic throughout the observed NLS1s. Jet kinetic powers limited by the Eddington limit may be insufficient to allow the jets to escape to kiloparsec scales for these radio-quiet NLS1s with low-mass black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }.

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  16. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2013-03-27

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: • Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. • Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. • Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. • Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. • Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

  17. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  20. Climate change: comparative impact on developing and developed countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change: comparative impact on developing and developed countries PAUL CHINOWSKY1 , CAROLYN. In these projections, climate change is a global issue with potential impacts for every country. However, the relative levels to determine the relative impact of climate change in the context of a single infrastructure

  1. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine...

  2. Background Study on nu_e Appearance from a nu_mu Beam in Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments with a Large Water Cherenkov Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Yanagisawa; Chang Kee Jung; Trung Le; Brett Viren

    2011-02-23

    There is a growing interest in very long baseline neutrino oscillation experimentation using accelerator produced neutrino beam as a machinery to probe the last three unmeasured neutrino oscillation parameters: the mixing angle theta_13, the possible CP violating phase delta_CP and the mass hierarchy, namely, the sign of delta-m^2_32. Water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have shown to be very successful at detecting neutrino interactions. Scaling up this technology may continue to provide the required performance for the next generation of experiments. This report presents the latest effort to demonstrate that a next generation (> 100 kton) water Cherenkov detector can be used effectively for the rather difficult task of detecting nu_e events from the neutrino oscillation nu_mu -> nu_e despite the large expected potential background resulting from pi^0 events produced via neutral current interactions.

  3. First Parallax Measurements Towards a 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser with the Australian Long Baseline Array - Distance to G339.884-1.259

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, V; Reid, M J; Brunthaler, A; Sanna, A; McCallum, J; Reynolds, C; Bignall, H E; Phillips, C J; Dodson, R; Rioja, M; Caswell, J L; Chen, X; Dawson, J R; Fujisawa, K; Goedhart, S; Green, J A; Hachisuka, K; Honma, M; Menten, K; Shen, Z Q; Voronkov, M A; Walsh, A J; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Zheng, X W

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted the first parallax and proper motion measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission using the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA). The parallax of G339.884$-$1.259 measured from five epochs of observations is 0.48$\\pm $0.08 mas, corresponding to a distance of $2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ kpc, placing it in the Scutum spiral arm. This is consistent (within the combined uncertainty) with the kinematic distance estimate for this source at 2.5$\\pm $0.5 kpc using the latest Solar and Galactic rotation parameters. We find from the Lyman continuum photon flux that the embedded core of the young star is of spectral type B1, demonstrating that luminous 6.7 GHz methanol masers can be associated with high-mass stars towards the lower end of the mass range.

  4. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  5. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE JET STRUCTURES IN RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2011-09-10

    We conducted very long baseline interferometry observations of five radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies in milliarcsecond resolutions at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) using the Very Long Baseline Array. Significant parsec (pc) scale structures were revealed for three out of the five sources with high brightness temperature by direct imaging; this is convincing evidence for nonthermal jets. FBQS J1644+2619 with an inverted spectrum showed a prominent one-sided linear structure, indicating Doppler beaming with an intrinsic jet speed of >0.74c. FBQS J1629+4007, also with an inverted spectrum, showed rapid flux variability, indicating Doppler beaming with an intrinsic jet speed of >0.88c. Thus, we found convincing evidence that these two NLS1s can generate at least mildly or highly relativistic jets, which may make them apparently radio loud even if they are intrinsically radio quiet. On the other hand, the other three NLS1s had steep spectra and two of them showed significantly diffuse pc-scale structures, which were unlikely to be strongly beamed. Thus, some NLS1s have the ability to generate jets strong enough to make them intrinsically radio loud without Doppler beaming. NLS1s as a class show a number of extreme properties and radio-loud ones are very rare. We build on these radio results to understand that the central engines of radio-loud NLS1s are essentially the same as that of other radio-loud active galactic nuclei in terms of the formation of nonthermal jets.

  6. TEEX tackles toxins: TEEX develops ECLOX protocols to detect toxins in drinking water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    by Leslie Jordan tx H2O | pg. 8 Thanks to the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX), utilities personnel across Texas can monitor water safety and quality using a highly effective machine? ECLOX?that was once shelved and forgotten because... completing the joint project with TCEQ in which TEEX developed the specific ECLOX protocols, TEEX is now known for its expertise in ECLOX baseline data develop- ment, protocols, and training. McLeroy conducted a custom- ized, one-day ECLOX training...

  7. Development of quality control procedures for mass produced and released Bactrocera Philippinensis (Diptera: Tephritidae) for sterile insect technique programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resilva, S.; Obra, G.; Zamora, N.; Gaitan, E.

    2007-03-15

    Quality control procedures for Bactrocera philippinensis Drew and Hancock 1994 (Diptera: Tephritidae) used in sterile insect technique (SIT) programs were established in the mass rearing facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. Basic studies on pupal irradiation, holding/packaging systems, shipping procedures, longevity, sterility studies, and pupal eye color determination in relation to physiological development at different temperature regimes were investigated. These studies will provide baseline data for the development of quality control protocols for an expansion of B. philippinensis field programs with an SIT component in the future. (author) [Spanish] Los procedimientos de control de calidad para Bactrocera philippinensis Drew y Hancock 1994 (Diptera: Tephritidae) usados en programas de la tecnica de insecto esteril (TIE) fueron establecidos en la facilidad de cria en masa del Instituto Filipino de Investigacion Nuclear. Estudios basicos sobre la irradiacion de las pupas, sistemas de almacenaje/empaque, procedimientos del envio, longevidad, estudios de esterilidad y la determinacion del color de ojo de la pupa en relacion con el desarrollo fisiologico en regimenes diferentes de temperatura fueron investigados. Estos estudios proveeran una linea de informacion basica para el desarrollo de protocolos de control de calidad para una expansion de los programas de campo para B. philippinensis con un componente de TIS en el futuro. (author)

  8. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  9. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  10. Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

    2013-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

  11. Results of the 2004 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys for the Baseline Knowledge Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Cooper, Christy [U.S. Department of Energy

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program focuses on overcoming critical barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel cell technology. The transition to a new, hydrogen-based energy economy requires an educated human infrastructure. With this in mind, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted statistical surveys to measure and establish baselines for understanding and awareness about hydrogen, fuel cells, and a hydrogen economy. The baseline data will serve as a reference in designing an education program, and it will be used in comparisons with future survey results (2008 and 2011) to measure changes in understanding and awareness. Scientific sampling was used to survey four populations: (1) the general public, ages 18 and over; (2) students, ages 12-17; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen users. It was decided that the survey design should include about 1,000 individuals in each of the general public and student categories, about 250 state and local officials, and almost 100 large-scale end users. The survey questions were designed to accomplish specific objectives. Technical questions measured technical understanding and awareness of hydrogen technology. Opinion questions measured attitudes about safety, cost, the environment, and convenience, as well as the likelihood of future applications of hydrogen technology. For most of the questions, "I don't know" or "I have no opinion" were acceptable answers. Questions about information sources assessed how energy technology information is received. The General Public and Student Survey samples were selected by random digit dialing. Potential large-scale end users were selected by random sampling. The State and Local Government Survey was of the entire targeted population of government officials (not a random sample). All four surveys were administered by computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). For each population, the length of the survey was less than 15 minutes. Design of an education program is beyond the scope of the report, and comparisons of the baseline data with future results will not be made until the survey is fielded again. Nevertheless, a few observations about the data are salient: For every population group, average scores on the technical knowledge questions were lower for the fuel cell questions than for the other technical questions. State and local officials expressed more confidence in hydrogen safety than large-scale end users, and they were much more confident than either the general public or students. State and local officials also scored much higher on the technical questions. Technical understanding appears to influence opinions about safety. For the General Public, Student, and Large-Scale End User Surveys, respondents with above-average scores on the eleven technical questions were more likely to have an opinion about hydrogen technology safety, and for those respondents who expressed an opinion, their opinion was more likely to be positive. These differences were statistically significant. Using criteria of "Sometimes" or "Frequently" to describe usage, respondents rated media sources for obtaining energy information. The general public and students responded that television is the primary media source of energy information. State and local officials and large-scale end users indicated that their primary media sources are newspapers, the Internet, and science and technology journals. In order of importance, the general public values safety, cost, environment, and convenience. The Large-Scale End User Survey suggests that there is presently little penetration of hydrogen technology; nor is there much planning for it.

  12. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design CompetitionsFuelof

  13. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. M. Beheary, and K. M. Abdel-Moneim, "Effect of dust on the Transpar- ent Cover of Solar Collectors," Energy Conversion and Management, vol. 47, no. 18-19, pp. 3192-3203,...

  14. Determining the Gluonic Content of Isoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Close; Glennys R. Farrar; Zhenping Li

    1996-10-08

    We develop tools to determine the gluonic content of a resonance of known mass, width and $J^{PC}$ from its branching fraction in radiative quarkonium decays and production cross section in $\\gamma \\gamma$ collisions. We test the procedures by applying them to known $q\\bar{q}$ mesons, then analyze four leading glueball candidates. We identify inconsistencies in data for $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma f_0(1500)$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma f_J(1710)$ whose resolution can quantify their glueball status.When $\\Gamma(f_0(1500) \\to \\gamma \\gamma )$ and $\\Gamma(f_J(1710) \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ are known, the $n\\bar{n}, s\\bar{s},gg$ mixing angles can be determined. The enigmatic situation in 1400-1500 MeV region of the isosinglet $0^{-+}$ sector is discussed.

  15. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  16. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  17. BMC{trademark}: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    Barrier Membrane Containment (BMC){trademark} is a high-density polyethylene membrane (HOPE) groundwater barrier and pass-through system, with applications ranging from plume control and containment to groundwater manipulation coupled with in-site treatment. BMC{trademark} system can function as a permeable or impermeable reaction wall, a cut-off wall, interceptor trenches, a barrier with collection and/or monitoring system and a pass-through in a funnel and gate configuration. BMC{trademark} can be inspected with a down-hole video camera, producing a permanent VHS format tape, insuring the integrity of the wall and the interlocking joints. The joints are sealed with a ``U``-packing elastomeric gasket to prevent the flow of fluids or gases.

  18. Hanford spent fuel inventory baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1994-07-15

    This document compiles technical data on irradiated fuel stored at the Hanford Site in support of the Hanford SNF Management Environmental Impact Statement. Fuel included is from the Defense Production Reactors (N Reactor and the single-pass reactors; B, C, D, DR, F, H, KE and KW), the Hanford Fast Flux Test Facility Reactor, the Shipping port Pressurized Water Reactor, and small amounts of miscellaneous fuel from several commercial, research, and experimental reactors.

  19. Baseline Control Measures.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura BeaneCardwell,Production -BariDepartmentIndividual

  20. ARM - AMF1 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive09AzoresAMF Science

  1. ARM - AMF2 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive09AzoresAMFBaseline

  2. ARM - AMF3 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers'Organization and Contact Information

  3. ARM - Baseline Change Request Guidelines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive

  4. CX-010531: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renovation of the LSU Nuclear Science Building and Development of LSU's Nuclear Workforce Development Program CX(s) Applied: B3.14 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  5. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  6. Development Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDeSmall BusinessDeveloperDevelopingTools

  7. Gearbox Modeling and Load Simulation of a Baseline 750-kW Wind Turbine Using State-of-the-Art Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyague, F.

    2009-02-01

    This report discusses the causes for premature wind turbine gearbox failure and determining a method for revealing the missing loading conditions relevant to the gearbox design process.

  8. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (CX) Determinations By Date Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date August 25, 2015 CX-012469: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Analysis Services CX(s) Applied:...

  9. CX-004264: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phase II, Determination of Uranium in GroundwaterCX(s) Applied: B3.8Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Richland, WashingtonOffice(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  10. CX-008905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-012121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Notice of Preliminary Determination of Energy Savings for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 CX(s) Applied: A6 Date: 04/25/2014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. National Mining Association Experimental Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Mining Association Experimental Determination of Radon Fluxes over Water #12;Introduction research funded by the National Mining Association (NMA) regarding radon fluxes from water surfaces surfaces at uranium recovery operations are insignificant and approximate background soil fluxes for most

  13. Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

    2014-01-06

    the dust for explosibility based on the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E 1226 to ensure proper regulation of facilities. Dusts found in cotton gins were tested to determine if they are explosible. Safety Consulting Engineers Inc. (SCE...

  14. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  15. Software Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

  16. Gender determination of avian embryo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  17. Determining Cropland Cash Rental Arrangements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Kastens, Terry L.; Outlaw, Joe

    1999-06-23

    arrangements, using a crop share approach to determine a cash rental rate is practical. This approach determines the cash equivalent amount of an equitable crop share arrangement and then often makes a risk adjustment to that value. The reason for making... proportionally (increase of approxi- mately 10 percent in all regions). This normal- ization of returns is also consistent with the gen- eral assumption that average profits equal zero in the long run. Equitable crop share arrangements were cal- culated...

  18. Trade in waste among developed countries : evidence and origins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Andrew B.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the determinants of the international trade in waste between developed countries. Data from the 1980s suggest that while the trade in waste between developed and less developed countries has ...

  19. Development of Biomimetic Membranes for Near Zero PC Power Plant Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Trachtenberg; Robert Cowan; David Smith; Ira Sider

    2009-07-31

    The first objective of this project was to develop, evaluate and compare two different CO2 separation (capture) systems. The second was to carry the preferred solution to pre-pilot development and testing. To achieve these objectives we undertook several infrastructure enabling elements: (1) development of a preferred catalyst coupled with its immobilization onto a microporous polymer membrane, (2) design and development of a microporous membrane-based, contained liquid membrane permeator and a membrane-based absorber/desorber apparatus, (3) development of a resin-wafer electrodialytic absorber/desorber apparatus, (4) development and demonstration of a pre-treatment process to condition the feed gas stream, (5) and development of computer modeling of the components and of the integrated system. The first technology was an enzyme catalyzed, membrane supported, contained liquid membrane apparatus whose gas capture was pressure/vacuum and temperature driven. A first embodiment was as a permeator, i.e. a combined absorber/desorber in a single housing. The second embodiment was as discrete absorber and desorber units. The second technology was an enzyme catalyzed, ion exchange resin wafer electrodialytically-based separation. For each of these technologies the objective was to design, manufacture, test and demonstrate the apparatus, first in the laboratory and then at pre-pilot scale, and to run it for sufficient time at the pre-pilot scale to demonstrate stability even in the face of upset. Tests would include several ranks of coal, which had been appropriately pre-treated to remove NOx, SOx and particles, to a pre-determined acceptance level, as a basis for demonstrating efficient CO{sub 2} capture. The pre-pilot tests would be run at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in North Dakota. A larger scale test (400m{sup 2} test unit) would later be run also at EERC. An economic goal was to compare the cost of CO{sub 2} capture by each of these methods with values obtained when using MEA (monoethanolamine) as a baseline case. Other metrics included capital and operating expense, parasitic loss and cost of electricity. A final goal was to carry out an initial examination of market forces to understand what barriers to entry for installation of CO{sub 2} capture equipment might exist and their relative importance.

  20. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Liu, Bing; Winiarski, David W.; McBride, Merle F.; Suharli, L.; Walden, D.

    2006-11-30

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings (AEDG-SO), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in small office buildings over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The AEDG-SO is the first in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the New Buildings Institute (NBI), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Each of the guides in the AEDG series will provide recommendations and user-friendly design assistance to designers, developers and owners of small commercial buildings that will encourage steady progress towards net-zero energy buildings. The guides will provide prescriptive recommendation packages that are capable of reaching the energy savings target for each climate zone in order to ease the burden of the design and construction of energy-efficient small commercial buildings The AEDG-SO was developed by an ASHRAE Special Project committee (SP-102) made up of representatives of each of the partner organizations in eight months. This TSD describes the charge given to the committee in developing the office guide and outlines the schedule of the development effort. The project committee developed two prototype office buildings (5,000 ft2 frame building and 20,000 ft2 two-story mass building) to represent the class of small office buildings and performed an energy simulation scoping study to determine the preliminary levels of efficiency necessary to meet the energy savings target. The simulation approach used by the project committee is documented in this TSD along with the characteristics of the prototype buildings. The prototype buildings were simulated in the same climate zones used by the prevailing energy codes and standards to evaluate energy savings. Prescriptive packages of recommendations presented in the guide by climate zone include enhanced envelope technologies, lighting and day lighting technologies and HVAC and SWH technologies. The report also documents the modeling assumptions used in the simulations for both the baseline and advanced buildings. Final efficiency recommendations for each climate zone are included, along with the results of the energy simulations indicating an average energy savings over all buildings and climates of approximately 38%.

  1. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and CP-violation in NO{nu}A with a second off-axis detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, Olga [Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States); Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Pascoli, Silvia [Physics Department, Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IPPP, Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-01

    We consider a Super-NO{nu}A-like experimental configuration based on the use of two detectors in a long-baseline experiment as NO{nu}A. We take the far detector as in the present NO{nu}A proposal and add a second detector at a shorter baseline. The location of the second off-axis detector is chosen such that the ratio L/E is the same for both detectors, being L the baseline and E the neutrino energy. We consider liquid argon and water-Cerenkov techniques for the second off-axis detector and study, for different experimental setups, the detector mass required for the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy, for different values of {theta}{sub 13}. We also study the capabilities of such an experimental setup for determining CP-violation in the neutrino sector. Our results show that by adding a second off-axis detector a remarkable enhancement on the capabilities of the current NO{nu}A experiment could be achieved.

  2. ILC Marx Modulator Development Program Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, C.; Beukers, T.; Larsen, R.; Macken, K.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Development of a first generation prototype (P1) Marx-topology klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider is nearing completion at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is envisioned as a smaller, lower cost, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, 'Baseline Conceptual Design'. The Marx presents several advantages over conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at ILC parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. The P1-Marx employs all solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. A general overview of the modulator design and the program status are presented.

  3. CX-006210: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination CX-006210: Categorical Exclusion Determination Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Bodine Aluminum Incorporated - Thermal Oxidizer Replacement...

  4. CX-007851: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    007851: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007851: Categorical Exclusion Determination Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial...

  5. CX-006442: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    442: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006442: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research Support Facility II, Cafeteria; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking No....

  6. CX-004730: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    30: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004730: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

  7. CX-000623: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    623: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000623: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kentucky Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Small Cities and Counties...

  8. CX-005963: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    63: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005963: Categorical Exclusion Determination Missouri - Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Mallinckrodt - Plant-Wide Chiller System...

  9. CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine Algae Industrialization Consortium (MAGIC): Combining biofuel and high-value bioproducts to...

  10. Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Change Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle...

  11. CX-100144 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100144 Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar and Distributed Generation as Key Elements in Meeting Vermont's Comprehensive Energy Plan...

  12. Determining risks for hazardous material operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Dare, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is structured to manage and control work at the activity level. Fundamental to ISM is that all work will be performed safely while meeting the applicable institutional-, facility-, and activity-level expectations. High and medium initial risk activities require certain levels of independent peer and/or Environmental, Health & Safety subject matter expert reviews prior to authorization. A key responsibility of line management and chemical workers is to assign initial risk adequately, so that the proper reviews are obtained. Thus, the effectiveness of an ISM system is largely dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of this initial risk determination. In the following presentation, a Risk Determination Model (RDM) is presented for physical, health and ecological hazards associated with materials. Magnitude of exposure (Le., dose or concentration), frequency, duration, and quantity are the four factors most difficult to capture in a research and development setting. They are factored into the determination, as a function of the quantity of material. Quantity and magnitude of exposure components are simplified by using boundary criteria. This RDM will promote conformity and consistency in the assignment of risk to hazardous material activities. In conclusion, the risk assessors (line manager and chemical worker) should be capable of more accurately assessing the risk of exposure to a specific chemical with regard to the employee, public, and the environment.

  13. CX-009753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12/06/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-012482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mid-Atlantic Regional Infrastructure Development Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22Date: 41862 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. Determination and optimization of spatial samples for distributed measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Xiaoming (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tran, Hy D.; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Kim, Heeyong (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-10-01

    There are no accepted standards for determining how many measurements to take during part inspection or where to take them, or for assessing confidence in the evaluation of acceptance based on these measurements. The goal of this work was to develop a standard method for determining the number of measurements, together with the spatial distribution of measurements and the associated risks for false acceptance and false rejection. Two paths have been taken to create a standard method for selecting sampling points. A wavelet-based model has been developed to select measurement points and to determine confidence in the measurement after the points are taken. An adaptive sampling strategy has been studied to determine implementation feasibility on commercial measurement equipment. Results using both real and simulated data are presented for each of the paths.

  16. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Volkow, Nora D. [National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, Gene-Jack [National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kojori, Eshan Shokri [National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Benveniste, Helene [Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Tomasi, Dardo [National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET-¹?FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared to placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.

  17. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ? 5 M {sub ?}) < 4.9 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  18. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kojori, Eshan Shokri; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET-¹?FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared tomore »placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.« less

  19. Determining solar abundances using helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2006-02-28

    The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and analysis for determination of porous media properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uh, Jinsoo

    2007-04-25

    Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging methodologies have been developed to determine porous media properties associated with fluid flow processes. This dissertation presents the development of NMR experimental and analysis methodologies...

  1. CX-002861: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing High-Resolution Spatial Data of Migration Corridors for Avian Species of Concern in Regions of High Potential Wind DevelopmentCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 07/02/2010Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  2. CX-005390: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of High Yield Tropical Feedstock and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy Production and Economic DevelopmentCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.1Date: 03/10/2011Location(s): HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  3. CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  4. CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-002153: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of High Yield Tropical Feedstock and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy Production and Economic DevelopmentCX(s) Applied: B3.8, A9, B5.1Date: 01/21/2010Location(s): HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. CX-012693: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experimental Determination and Mechanistic Modeling of Used Fuel Drying by Vacuum and Gas Circulation for Dry Cask Storage – University of South Carolina CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41869 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  7. CX-008738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Microstructure and Chemical State Changes in Ion-Irradiated Fuels and Structural Components with a High Kinetic Energy Electron Detector – Illinois Institute of Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  8. CX-100019: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determination of Rare Earths in Geothermal Brines and Evaluation of Potential Extraction Techniques CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 08/18/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Geothermal Technologies Award Number: DE-EE0006750

  9. CX-000373: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measurements of 222 Radon, 220 Radon, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Natural Carbon Dioxide Fields in Wyoming: Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock IntegrityCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, B3.8Date: 11/20/2009Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. Nozzle development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oney, Stephen K.; Hogan, Timothy; Steinbeck, John

    2013-08-31

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

  12. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  13. CX-011559: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Safeguards in Pyroprocessing: an Integrated Model Development and Measurement Data Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/20/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  14. CX-003718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research for Developing Renewable Biofuels from AlgaeCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/10/2010Location(s): NebraskaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  15. CX-007603: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ultra-Deepwater Resources to Reserves Development and Acceleration through Appraisal CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/20/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-005923: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Sidco-DevelopmentCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/16/2011Location(s): Clairesville, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-011571: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Novel Porous Sorbents for Extraction of Uranium from Seawater CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  18. CX-011702: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Geothermal Development of Deep Sedimentary Systems in the United States CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/02/2014 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-100005: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Community Crowd Funded Solar Development Award Number: DE-EE0006700 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Solar Energy Technologies Date: 08/27/2014 Location(s): California Office(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-009061: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Methods CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/24/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-012588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Obtain Samples for Potential D-Area Borrow Sources (Revision 1: Develop Borrow Pit 6 and Haul Roads) CX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 41835 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. CX-009143: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-004716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing Railway Markets for Montana BiodieselCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 12/14/2010Location(s): Havre, MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  4. CX-003688: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mid-Atlantic Regional Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/02/2010Location(s): Hayes, VirginiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-011695: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Magnet Prototype and Research and Development CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 12/10/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  6. CX-100054 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of On-Site Tapered Spiral Welding for Large Turbine Towers Award Number: DE-EE0006736 CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/09/2014 Location(s): MA Office(s): Golden Field Office

  7. CX-004016: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Nacelle Assembly Lifting SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/14/2010Location(s): Golden, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. CX-004101: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Industrial Development - Hybrid Laser ARC Welding of Wind TowersCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 09/29/2010Location(s): MichiganOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. CX-010322: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research and Development Welding and Brazing Sample Preparation and Activities in Building 723-A CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/16/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-012249: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/29/2014 Location(s): Hawaii, Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-100171 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture - Project 14 TransitScreen Award Number: DE-FG36-08GO88146 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

  12. CX-006871: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii Renewable Energy Development VentureCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1Date: 10/06/2011Location(s): HawaiiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. CX-010506: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quenching and Partitioning Process Development to Replace Hot Stamping of High Strength Automotive Steel CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 06/14/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-010524: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Percussive Drilling Technology for Geothermal Exploration and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 06/14/2013 Location(s): Virginia, New Mexico Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-009268: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Development and Scale-Up for New and Retrofit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/11/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-011265: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building Energy Management Open Source Software Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-011705: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiochemistry Laboratory (RCL) Gloveboxes Research and Development Activities CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/11/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  18. CX-011766: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University Research Awards and Workforce Development for Hydropower CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/07/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-007857: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Endurance Testing of SLH Timing Belt Powertrain in Hydraulic Laboratory Environment CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/26/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-100140 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Local Energy Matters: Market Pathway Development in Duluth, MN Award Number: DE-EE0006808 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/12/2014 Location(s): MN Office(s): Golden Field Office