Sample records for determinations environmental assessments

  1. Determining Vulnerability Importance in Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toro, Javier, E-mail: jjtoroca@unal.edu.co [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Duarte, Oscar, E-mail: ogduartev@unal.edu.co [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, National University of Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Requena, Ignacio, E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain); Zamorano, Montserrat, E-mail: zamorano@ugr.es [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada (Spain)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of vulnerability has been used to describe the susceptibility of physical, biotic, and social systems to harm or hazard. In this sense, it is a tool that reduces the uncertainties of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) since it does not depend exclusively on the value assessments of the evaluator, but rather is based on the environmental state indicators of the site where the projects or activities are being carried out. The concept of vulnerability thus reduces the possibility that evaluators will subjectively interpret results, and be influenced by outside interests and pressures during projects. However, up until now, EIA has been hindered by a lack of effective methods. This research study analyzes the concept of vulnerability, defines Vulnerability Importance and proposes its inclusion in qualitative EIA methodology. The method used to quantify Vulnerability Importance is based on a set of environmental factors and indicators that provide a comprehensive overview of the environmental state. The results obtained in Colombia highlight the usefulness and objectivity of this method since there is a direct relation between this value and the environmental state of the departments analyzed. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concept of vulnerability could be considered defining Vulnerability Importance included in qualitative EIA methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of the concept of environmental vulnerability could reduce the subjectivity of qualitative methods of EIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method to quantify the Vulnerability Importance proposed provides a comprehensive overview of the environmental state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results in Colombia highlight the usefulness and objectivity of this method.

  2. Strategic Plan Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan Environmental Assessment 2009 Clinical Center National Institutes of Health U Institutes of Health Strategic Plan ­ Environmental Assessment 2009 Contents Executive Summary environmental assessment to determine Clinical Center strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats

  3. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface and the lower part of the atmosphere; this phenomenon is called the greenhouse effect. U.S. Department of Energy DOEEA-1728D Draft Environmental Assessment 32 June...

  4. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental Assessment

  5. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental Assessment 728D

  6. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental Assessment

  7. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1998). The BLM lands in southern Nevada are managed under the Las Vegas RMP and Final Environmental Impact Statement (BLM 1998). This RMP provides management objectives and...

  8. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the...

  9. The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements A writing guide...

  10. Toward an Environmental Assessment of Social Determinants of Health: Direct Observations of Latino Neighborhoods in Kansas City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Cara

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with a sign designating it as a fire station Guard Dogs Signs or other markers posted that indicate the presence of dogs (e.g., "beware of dog") Trash Any waste accumulated; must be at least 5 pieces of 2 inches by 2 inches Hazardous Materials Harmful... environmental features - exposures related to social determinants - can be assessed by direct observation. A checklist and measurement protocol was created for this purpose. This two-page environmental assessment was used to document the occurrence or non...

  11. Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATION, AND OPERATION OF THREE OF THE CONSTELLATION PROGRAM, JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLORIDA Abstract This Environmental Assessment addresses AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM OFFICE KENNEDY SPACE

  12. DOEEA-1203 Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eve1 m i xed waste low-level waste National Environmental Policy Act o f 1969 performance assessment Resource Conservation and Recovery Act o f 1976 roentgen equi valent man...

  13. Comparative vs. Absolute Performance Assessment with Environmental Sustainability Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High, Karen

    Comparative vs. Absolute Performance Assessment with Environmental Sustainability Metrics Xun Jin Different goals and potential audiences determine that two types of environmental performance assessments metrics can be partitioned into two camps. One suite of metrics aim to assess the environmental

  14. Environmental epidemiology: risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, R.L.; Whittemore, A.S. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the symposium are in the disciplines of biometry, environmental medicine, epidemiology, mathematics, and statistics. Attention is given to assessing risk due to environmental agents, particularly those known to be carcinogenic; both the complex medical issues involved and the mathematical and statistical methodologies used in analysis are presented. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  15. Environmental Health and Safety Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Environmental Health and Safety Assessment Program Manual 7/15/2013 #12;Environmental Health/26/2013. The most recent version of this document is available electronically at: http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/general-environmental-management/environmental.........................................................................................................................4 #12;Environmental Health and Safety Assessment Program Manual Approved by: (Barb English) Last

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Area and Regulatory Amendments for Bering Sea Habitat Conservation May 2008 Lead Agency: National Juneau, AK 99802 (907) 586-7228 Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review

  17. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  18. Environmental Assessment (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nova Scotia Environment conducts environmental assessments on projects and developments to ensure they adhere to the laws and regulations of the province. Developments required to undergo an...

  19. Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Health Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Health Laboratory Assessment PI or environmental concerns were identified. B. Items of safety or environmental concerns were identified. C. Uncorrected repeated safety or environmental items were identified. Signs and Labels # Compliance Items

  20. DOEEA-1177 Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of metric units Source: Engineering Unit Conversions, M. R. Lindeburg, PE., Second Ed., 1990. Professional Pub1 i cati ons, Inc. , Belmont , Cal i forni a. Environmental...

  1. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  2. Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 12, 2015 EA-1976D: Draft Environmental Assessment Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida February 10, 2015 EA-2002: Final Environmental Assessment...

  3. Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process through which the environmental impacts potentially resulting from a proposed project are identified and assessed early in the planning process....

  4. Rutgers University Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    information and generated an environmental footprint for the organization. Due to the progressive green dioxide equivalents: Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies (GHG) Calculator converts GHG reductions into scenarios2) GHG Conversion Tool which convert standard metrics for electricity, green energy, fuel use

  5. Risk assessment in environmental management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asante-Duah, D.K.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a straightforward exposition of US EPA-based procedures for the risk assessment and risk management of contaminated land, interwoven with discussions on some of the key fundamentals on the fate and transport of chemicals in the environment and the toxic action of environmental chemicals. The book is logically structured, commencing with a general overview of the principles of risk assessment and the interface with environmental legislation. There follows an introduction to environmental fate and transport, modeling, toxicology and uncertainty analysis, and a discussion of the elements of a risk assessment (site characterization, exposure analysis, toxic action and risk characterization), intake of a chemical with its environmental concentration and activity-related parameters such as inhalation rate and exposure time. The book concludes with a discussion on the derivation of risk-based action levels and remediation goals.

  6. Environmental Assessment - Proposed Actions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental

  7. Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R&D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. Selecting environmental indicator for use in strategic environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Alison [School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland) and Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland)]. E-mail: Alison.Donnelly@tcd.ie; Jones, Mike [School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); O'Mahony, Tadhg [Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland); Byrne, Gerry [Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary aim of carrying out Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is to provide for a high level of environmental protection and to integrate environmental considerations into the planning process. The SEA Directive (2001/42/EC) recommends monitoring to determine the environmental impact of the implementation of plans and programmes. Environmental indicators are a useful tool by which this impact may be measured. However, careful consideration must be given to developing a set of indicators in order to isolate, plan or programme specific impacts. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a workshop-based approach to develop appropriate criteria for selecting environmental indicator for use in SEA. A multi-disciplinary team was used in the approach which consisted of representatives from each of four environmental fields i.e. biodiversity, water, air and climatic factors, together with SEA experts, planning experts, academics and consultants. The team reviewed various sets of criteria, already in existence, for environmental indicator development but not specifically for SEA indicators. The results of this review together with original criteria were applied to the final list agreed upon. Some of the criteria recommended includes, relevance to plan, ability to prioritise, and ability to identify conflict with other plan or SEA objectives.

  10. Environmental impact assessment of the Dulang oilfield development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, M.N. (U. Kebangsaan Malaysia (MY)); (Ismail, M.Y. (Petronas Cangali Sdn. Bhd. (MY)))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss an environmental impact assessment (EIA) of the Dulang Oilfield Development Project, conducted to determine whether the project could proceed in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner. This is the first EIA for an offshore oilfield in Malaysian waters, and was conducted in anticipation of the Environmental Quality (Prescribed Activities) (Environmental Impact Assessment Order(1987)) which requires an EIA to be conducted for major oil and gas field development projects.

  11. Final Environmental Assessment, Burleigh County Wind Energy Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Burleigh County Wind Energy Center Burleigh County, North Dakota Final Burleigh County Wind, LLC BASIN...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    described by the Forest Service in the Buffalo Fork Vegetation Management Project Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) published June 15,...

  13. Environmental assessment of electricity scenarios with Life Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    been assessed with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies [1], [2], [3] and [4]. However environmentalEnvironmental assessment of electricity scenarios with Life Cycle Assessment Touria Larbi1 impacts assessment of scenarios is very rarely evaluated through a life cycle perspective partly because

  14. EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment BP Solar Array Project Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment (EA)...

  15. EA-1822: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1822: Final Environmental Assessment Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment (SOX) Range The objective of this environmental assessment...

  16. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  17. The efficiency of environmental impact assessments relating to noise issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The efficiency of environmental impact assessments relating to noise issues Z. Krukle University of environmental impact assessments (EIA) relating to noise issues. The goal is attained through evaluation, effectiveness, environmental impact assessment, noise 1 Introduction Environmental impact assessment (EIA

  18. EA-1836: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1836: Final Environmental Assessment Norwich Cogeneration Initiative, Norwich, Connecticut The DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)...

  19. EA-1705: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1705: Draft Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    excluded waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment actions or facilities; ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    excluded waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment actions or facilities; 1 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with its foundation well above a sole-source aquifer or upland surface soil 1 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

  3. Environmental Site Assessment Vermillion Highlands Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Vermillion Highlands Property Dakota County, Minnesota\\WorkFiles\\Vermillion Highlands\\Phase I ESA\\Report\\Final\\PHIESA_ Report_V2.0.doc i Phase I Environmental Site Assessment #12;BARR ENGINEERING CO. P:\\Mpls\\23 MN\\19\\2319B05 UMore park environmental

  4. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report.

  5. Environmental Assessment (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Protection Act states that the purpose of environmental assessment is to "protect the environment and quality of life of the people of the province; and facilitate the wise...

  6. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    issues such as life cycle assessment (LCA) fosters the needlife-cycle impact assessment (LCIA) process within in LCA is

  7. Ann Williamson, Deputy Director, Office of Environmental Assessment Mike Cox, Manager, Risk Assessment Unit, Office of Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ann Williamson, Deputy Director, Office of Environmental Assessment Mike Cox, Manager, Risk Assessment Unit, Office of Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ­ Region 10 Greg, WA Ann Williamson and Mike Cox, EPA Region 10 Office of Environmental Assessment, will be presenting

  8. EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and...

  9. EA-1178: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    178: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1178: Final Environmental Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates the environmental...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR EIGHT TYPES OF CONSUMER PRODUCTS: ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS, WATER HEATERS, DIRECT HEATING EQUI?MENT, MOBILE...

  11. DOE/EA-0845 Environmental Assessment Expansion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    45 Environmental Assessment Expansion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Research Center March 1994 U.S. Department of Energy MASTER DOE Idaho Operations Office Idaho...

  12. Independent Oversight Assessment, DOE Office of Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Safety Culture at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Headquarters This report provides the results of an independent assessment of the safety culture...

  13. Proponent's Environmental Assessment (PEA) Checklist for Transmission...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Proponent's Environmental Assessment (PEA) Checklist for Transmission Line and Substation Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  14. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy DOI (U.S.) Department of the Interior DQF Detonator Qualification Facility DU depleted uranium DX Dynamic Experimentation (Division) EA environmental assessment EDE...

  15. Environmental assessment and social justice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, B.M.; Sorensen, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hardee, H. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe an approach to assessing environmental justice issues at the start of proposed project. It is a structural approach to screening using readily available census data and commercial products that emphasizes the ability to replicate results and provide systematic data that can be used to identify spatial inequities. While our discussion of the methodology addresses only public health and safety issues related to certain minority and cohort sub-groups, systematic use of methodology could provide a valuable screening tool for identifying impacts particular to low-income groups. While the assumptions can be questioned as to applicability, they are based both on theory and practical knowledge.

  16. Environmental Site Assessments Courses An Idea Developed, A Vision Realized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    Environmental Site Assessments Courses An Idea Developed, A Vision Realized June 2012 - City College of New York ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENTS COURSES AN IDEA DEVELOPED, A VISION REALIZED City course on environmental site assessments geared toward entry- level environmental professionals

  17. Environmental impact assessment: Retrospect and prospect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, Stephen [Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.a.jay@shu.ac.uk; Jones, Carys [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: carys.jones@manchester.ac.uk; Slinn, Paul [Sefton Borough Council, Southport, Merseyside (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paul.slinn@eas.sefton.gov.uk; Wood, Christopher [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: chris.wood@manchester.ac.uk

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread experience of environmental impact assessment (EIA) as an anticipatory environmental management tool has generated a considerable debate over the extent to which it is achieving its purposes. This has been measured in terms of EIA 'effectiveness', especially as discussion has moved away from issues of procedural implementation, to the more substantive goals of EIA and its place within broader decision-making contexts. Empirical studies have revealed the relatively weak degree of influence on planning decisions that is being exerted by EIA, which is increasingly being attributed to its rationalist beginnings. This article seeks to direct this debate towards the founding political purposes of EIA which, it is argued, provide a neglected, yet strong, basis for EIA reform. A number of illustrative suggestions are made as a result of this redirection, to enable EIA to adopt a more determinative role in decision making and to contribute to more sustainable patterns of development planning.

  18. EA-1083: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

  19. Grizzly Substation Fiber Optics : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This notice announces BPA`s decision to construct, operate, and maintain the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project (Project). This Project is part of a continuing effort by BPA to complete a regionwide upgrade of its existing telecommunications system. The US Forest Service and BPA jointly prepared the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1241) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action, the Underground Installation Alternative, and the No Action Alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, the US Forest Service and BPA have determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI. The US Forest Service has separately issued a FONSI and Decision Notice authorizing BPA to construct, operate, and maintain the Project within the Crooked River National Grassland (Grassland).

  20. BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles are urgently needed to support risk assessments and regulatory policy decisions regarding materials containing · Environmental Protection Agency · DuPont · BASF · Evonik · Cabot · General Electric Approach The quartz crystal

  1. Environmental Impact Assessment Biologist Biologist R24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Environmental Impact Assessment Biologist Biologist R24 Annual Salary: $58,332.28 - $66,652.94 Please note: While the current vacancy exists in Prince George or Smithers*, Environmental Impact, but at a lower classification. A great opportunity to make an impact on the province's environmental protection

  2. EA-1736: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  3. EA-1310: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

  4. THE INTERFACE BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY: THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE INTERFACE BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY: THE VICTOR DIAMOND Report No: 436 Title of Research Project: The Interface Between Environmental Assessment and Corporate: ___________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT The environmental assessment and sustainable development literature recognizes

  5. ENCS 307: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES AND METHODS SECOND (WINTER) TERM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    -1- ENCS 307: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES AND METHODS SECOND (WINTER) TERM Instructor Dr. Grading Assignments 50% Exams 50% Course Description Environmental assessments are becoming more common as increasing regulatory requirements are developed. Information collected for environmental assessments must

  6. National Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) Notice of Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) Notice of Participation This document identifies the agency/program and personnel participating in the National Voluntary Environmental Assessment all foodborne illness outbreak environmental assessment data into the NVEAIS. Information collected

  7. DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOEEA-1310 Environmental Assessment for...

  8. EA-1631: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, New York The environmental assessment examines the potential environmental impacts associated...

  9. Environmental Impact Assessment (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Province of PEI has established an environmental impact assessment process for projects that could have an impact on the environment. The Province and the Federal Government cooperate in the...

  10. Special Resource Study/Environmental Assessment for Manhattan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Special Resource StudyEnvironmental Assessment for Manhattan Project Sites, DOEEA-1868 (September 2010) Special Resource StudyEnvironmental Assessment for Manhattan Project...

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Assessment OTEC Pilot Plant. Prepared forDraft Environmental Assessment Mini-OTEC Second Deployment.matic EA are within the OTEC technology and include the

  12. Policy Flash 2014-19 Electronic Products Environmental Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    19 Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) Policy Flash 2014-19 Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) Questions concerning this policy flash...

  13. EA-1542: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment EA-1542: Final Environmental Assessment Burleigh County Wind Energy Center The Burleigh County Wind Energy Center is a wind generation project proposed...

  14. EA-1698: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1698: Final Environmental Assessment Baldwin Wind Energy Center The Baldwin Wind Energy Center (Project or Proposed Action) is a wind generation...

  15. EA-1833: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment EA-1833: Final Environmental Assessment City of El Dorado Wind Energy Project, El Dorado, Butler County, Kansas DOE has provided an Energy Efficiency and...

  16. EA-1465: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    65: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1465: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Energy Center EdgeleyKulm Project, North Dakota The proposed EdgeleyKulm Project is a 21-megawatt...

  17. EA-1785: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1785: Final Environmental Assessment Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Phase III Anthropogenic Test Project DOE prepared this EA...

  18. EA-1839: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1839: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan...

  19. Final Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain Complex (DOEEA 1440) Final Environmental Assessment of the National...

  20. assessing environmental risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Zoology 411 Environmental Risk Assessment Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Syllabus Zoology 411 Environmental Risk Assessment Professor: Michael Lydy Office: LSII, Room...

  1. Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of...

  2. EA-1407: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment EA-1407: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and Consolidation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los...

  3. EA-1832: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1832: Final Environmental Assessment Rainier Biogas LLC Community Anaerobic Manure Digester, Enumclaw, Washington This project is located...

  4. EA-1061: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    61: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1061: Final Environmental Assessment The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From the Savannah River Site This EA...

  5. EA-1665: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1665: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kV...

  6. EA-1113: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1113: Final Environmental Assessment Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Economic Council This EA evaluates...

  7. EA-1117: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment EA-1117: Final Environmental Assessment Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee This EA evaluates the...

  8. EA-1866: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact EA-1866: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Argonne National Laboratory Modernization Planning This environmental assessment (EA) has...

  9. EA-1616: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Final Environmental Assessment EA-1616: Final Environmental Assessment National Carbon Research Center Project at Southern Company Services' Power Systems Development Facility...

  10. EA-1489: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    89: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1489: Final Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of the Howard T. Ricketts Laboratory The National Institutes of Health (NIH)...

  11. EA-1692: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1692: Final Environmental Assessment Construction and Start-Up of an Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility in Red River Parish, Louisiana The...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

  13. Setting boundaries of participation in environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salomons, Geoffrey H., E-mail: gsalomon@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Political Science, 10-16 Henry Marshall Tory Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H4 (Canada); Hoberg, George, E-mail: george.hoberg@ubc.ca [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Sciences Centre 2045, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)] [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Sciences Centre 2045, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Public participation processes are touted as an effective way to increase the capacity and legitimacy of environmental assessment and the regulatory process that rely on them. Recent changes to the Canadian environmental assessment process narrowed the criteria for who can participate in environmental assessments from any who were interested to those who were most directly affected. This article examines the potential consequences of this change by exploring other areas of Canadian regulatory law where a similar directed affected test has been applied. This new standard risks institutionalizing the long-understood representational bias confronted by more diffuse interest like environmental protection. Restricting participation to the “directly affected” is far too narrow a test for processes like environmental assessment that are designed to determine the public interest. -- Highlights: • Public participation can improve the legitimacy of environmental assessments. • New Canadian rules narrow the range of eligible participants. • Similar rules in Alberta have excluded environmental representation. • The new rules may institutionalize bias against more diffuse interests. • Restricting participation to the “directly affected” is far too narrow.

  14. Environmental Assessment Lakeview Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treis, Tania

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Town of Lakeview is proposing to construct and operate a geothermal direct use district heating system in Lakeview, Oregon. The proposed project would be in Lake County, Oregon, within the Lakeview Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA). The proposed project includes the following elements: � Drilling, testing, and completion of a new production well and geothermal water injection well � Construction and operation of a geothermal production fluid pipeline from the well pad to various Town buildings (i.e., local schools, hospital, and Lake County Industrial Park) and back to a geothermal water injection well This EA describes the proposed project, the alternatives considered, and presents the environmental analysis pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. The project would not result in adverse effects to the environment with the implementation of environmental protection measures.

  15. Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment on Water Quality #12;Prepared with a planned 150 MW offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, an assessment was made of the effects the wind farm would for the preparation of EIA studies for offshore wind farms." Horns Rev is situated off Blåvands Huk, which is Denmark

  16. Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment PI or environmental concerns were identified. B. Items of safety or environmental concerns were identified. C. Uncorrected repeated safety or environmental items were identified. Safety Equipment # Compliance Items

  17. Evalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Environmental Life cycle assessment (LCA) to understand impacts of forest productsEvalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment Hosted in the industrial sphere, with addiKonal effects 6 #12;Life Cycle Assessment Method

  18. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Instrument (Version 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Assessment Instrument, 1/7/2010 Page 3 Essential Service #1: Monitor environmental and health status health assessment been completed? 1.1B Is the community environmental health assessment updated at least

  19. NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs and Benefits Comments of the NW Energy Coalition October 31, 2014 Introduction: Applying (Council) to include a methodology for determining quantifiable environmental costs and benefits in its

  20. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Results of the environmental health activities and needs assessment of the South Carolina statewide family practice system for the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: EHAP Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musham, C.; Hainer, B.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An activities and needs assessment was conducted to determine what each of the seven family practice residency programs in South Carolina is providing in environmental health education. In addition, this study was designed to determine: what are the barriers to greater emphasis on environmental health in family practice residency programs and, what the basic environmental health educational goals for family practice residency programs should be.

  1. Environmental Site Assessments Courses An Idea Developed, A Vision Realized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    Environmental Site Assessments Courses An Idea Developed, A Vision Realized June 2012 - City College of New York ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENTS COURSES AN IDEA DEVELOPED, A VISION REALIZED June 2012 course on environmental site assessments geared toward entry-level environmental professionals

  2. Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1636E Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual Prepared by: Environment Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University

  3. Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance.

  4. Performance Assessment for Environmental Decision Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.R.; Fewell, M.E.; Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Swift, P.N.; Trauth, K.M.; Vaughn, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacKinnon, R.J. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Performance Assessment Departments at Sandia National Laboratories have, over the last twenty (20) years, developed unique, internationally-recognized performance and risk assessment methods to assess options for the safe disposal and remediation of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous waste/contamination in geohydrologic systems. While these methods were originally developed for the disposal of nuclear waste, ongoing improvements and extensions make them equally applicable to a variety of environmental problems such as those associated with the remediation of EPA designated Superfund sites and the more generic Brownfield sites (industrial sites whose future use is restricted because of real or perceived contamination).

  5. EA-1108: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment The National Spherical Tokamah Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to...

  6. EA-1156: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-1156: Final Environmental Assessment Effluent Reduction Los Alamos National Laboratory This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to eliminate industrial...

  7. EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent...

  8. Table of Contents for the Site-Wide Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration FTLB Field Test Laboratory Building EA Environmental Assessment EIS Environmental Impact Statement FY Fiscal Year (Oct. 1 to Sept. 30) GDP General Development...

  9. Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology R. A. Efroymson, efroymsonra.S. Department of Energy Dec-05 Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology R. A. Efroymson environmental assessment methodologies such as risk assessment, by explicitly considering benefits (not just

  10. MODULE DESCRIPTION FORM CL959 Strategic Environmental Assessment in Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    MODULE DESCRIPTION FORM CL959 Strategic Environmental Assessment in Action Module Registrar: Dr Assessment (SEA) is a process for identifying and assessing the environmental impacts of policies, plans was implemented in the EU member countries on July 2004. In Scotland, the Environmental Assessment (Scotland) Act

  11. Environmental Assessments | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Safety

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Environmental and Resource Studies ERST 311H Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Environmental and Resource Studies ERST 311H ­ Winter 2009 TRENT is by email. Course Summary Description Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process by which is a process by which a balance among these three primary environmental aspects is assessed and the optimal

  13. EA-1363: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment EA-1363: Final Environmental Assessment California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program The purpose of the "Proposed Action" is to control...

  14. EA-1819: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment EA-1819: Final Environmental Assessment Kilowatts for Kenston Wind Energy Project, Chagrin Falls, Geauga County The Department of Energy has provided Federal...

  15. EA-1807: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment EA-1807: Final Environmental Assessment Heartland Community College Wind Energy Project, Normal, McLean County, Illinois DOE has provided a State Energy Program...

  16. EA-1756: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment EA-1756: Final Environmental Assessment Battelle Memorial Institute's Smart Grid Project At The City Of Ellensburg's Renewable Energy Park, Kittitas County,...

  17. assessment environmental health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOI 10.3310hta18690 and economic evaluation. Health Technol Assess 2014;18(69). Health Technology Assessment is indexed 298 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTREGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW...

  18. EA-1800: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment EA-1800: Draft Environmental Assessment Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project, Lenox Township, Warren County, Illinois The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  19. Project 198740100 Assessment of Smolt Condition: Biological and Environmental Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Project 198740100 Assessment of Smolt Condition: Biological and Environmental Interactions detailed investigations of environmental and biological factors that influence smolt development environmental factors influence fish development, condition, and long-term survival. The proposed tasks describe

  20. Constraints on implementing environmental impact assessments in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakonge, J.O. (UNDP, Maseru (South Africa)); Imevbore, A.M. (Univ. of Ile-ife (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Africa can benefit from the experience of other areas in implementing environmental impact assessments (EIAs), but African countries face a greater challenge in achieving this goal due to such problems as inadequate environmental legislation; inappropriate institutional framework for coordination and monitoring government activities; a shortage of qualified manpower, inadequate financial resources; absence of public awareness of the need for EIAs; and lack of suitable screening procedures to determine which development projects require an EIA. Despite these difficulties, African countries can realize short- and long-term benefits from the incorporation of the EIA into their decision-making process.

  1. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  2. Depleted Uranium in Kosovo Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unep Scientific; Mission Kosovo

    2.1 UNEP’s role in post-conflict environmental assessment................................................9 2.2 Depleted uranium............................................................10

  3. Final Environmental assessment for the Uranium Lease Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a programmatic environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue leasing withdrawn lands and DOE-owned patented claims for the exploration and production of uranium and vanadium ores. The Domestic Uranium Program regulation, codified at Title 10, Part 760.1, of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), gives DOE the flexibility to continue leasing these lands under the Uranium Lease Management Program (ULMP) if the agency determines that it is in its best interest to do so. A key element in determining what is in DOE`s ``best interest`` is the assessment of the environmental impacts that may be attributable to lease tract operations and associated activities. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA for the ULMP, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.), as amended.Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for the ULMP,and DOE is issuing this Finding, of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  4. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department The Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES) will undertake a continuing assessment

  5. e-Learning on Environmental Assessment of Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS246346-A e-Learning on Environmental Assessment of Foodborne Illness Outbreaks Register Today outbreak environmental assessments. Participants acquire in-depth skills and knowledge to · Investigate the pretest, you can start the course on foodborne illness outbreak environmental assessment, which includes

  6. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure of Federal Regulations, Part 230, the Tulsa District has assessed the environmental impacts of modifications

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Being Applied: Memorandum from EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY May 12 1 h. 2010. SUBJECT: Emergencies and the National Environmental...

  8. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment of Environmental Estrogens in Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenk, D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Orange County,CA. Environmental Toxicology and ChemistryCalifornia Flatfish. Society of Environmental Toxicology andOcean. Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (

  9. Is environmental impact assessment regulation a 'burden' to private firms?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annandale, David; Taplin, Ross

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of environmental regulation on macroeconomic performance has been studied in some depth over the last 15 years. Similarly, impact on profit performance, investment intention and location decisions of firms has also been studied, although in less depth. There has been less academic interest, however, in the impact that environmental regulation has on the strategic objectives of companies. This article reports on a research project that focused on the impact that environmental approvals regulation (predominantly environmental impact assessment, EIA) has on proposed new development in the international mining sector. Based on a large and externally valid survey of senior mining company executives in Australia and Canada in the late 1990s, the research indicated that a significant majority of firms consider the environmental approvals process to be an important determinant of investment strategy. An initial reaction to these figures might suggest that the majority of respondents believe the environmental approvals process to be a negative influence. However, further questioning indicated that only a small proportion of companies in both countries thought of the environmental approvals process as an impediment to development. Instead, it is clear that most firms see EIA as a catalyst for integrating environmental design into the early planning of a project, thereby alleviating the need to spend money on overcoming environmental problems once a poorly designed project has been commissioned. The somewhat surprising conclusion that companies see environmental approvals regulation as important, but as an encouragement to development rather than as an impediment, goes against much previous industry and academic comment and, at least in relation to the mining sector, refutes the idea that EIA is ''burdensome''.

  10. Protocols for conducting Environmental Management Assessments of DOE organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess the effectiveness of DOE`s environmental programs, the Office of Environmental Audit conducts Environmental Management Assessments of DOE programs and facilities. These assessments take a broad programmatic view of environmental systems which may cover multiple sites. The focus of the assessment is on the infrastructure, systems, programs, and tools to manage environmental issues, not on the compliance issues themselves. Protocols have been developed to assist in the conduct of Environmental Management Assessments. The protocols are, based on and serve as implementing guidelines for the Environmental Management Section of ``Performance Objectives and Criteria for Conducting DOE Environmental Audits`` (DOE/EH-022). They are intended to provide guidance to the Assessment Team in conducting these reviews.

  11. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

  12. Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  14. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium (indoor air, food, tap water, etc.) and to an exposed individual. Exposure scenarios are used to define plausible pathways for human contact. Recognition of the multiple pathways possible for exposure highlights the importance of a multimedia, multipathway exposure framework.

  15. Environmental Management Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the environmental management assessment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from September 14 through September 27, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The environmental management assessment of NREL focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems and assessed the formality of programs employing an approach that recognizes the level of formality implementing environmental programs may vary commensurate with non-nuclear research and development operations. The Assessment Team evaluated environmental monitoring, waste management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities at NREL, from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section of this report. The scope of the NREL Environmental Management Assessment was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management. At the same time, environmental monitoring, waste management, and NEPA activities were evaluated to develop a programmatic understanding of these environmental disciplines, building upon the results of previous appraisals, audits, and reviews performed at the NREL.

  16. Environmental Assessment Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -RailroadEnvironmentalAssessment Low

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

  18. Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang,, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment

  19. Listed waste determination report. Environmental characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 23, 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice clarifying interim status requirements for the management of radioactive mixed waste thereby subjecting the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and other applicable Department of Energy (DOE) sites to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Therefore, the DOE was required to submit a Part A Permit application for each treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) unit within the INEL, defining the waste codes and processes to be regulated under RCRA. The September 1990 revised Part A Permit application, that was approved by the State of Idaho identified 101 potential acute and toxic hazardous waste codes (F-, P-, and U- listed wastes according to 40 CFR 261.31 and 40 CFR 261.33) for some TSD units at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Most of these waste were assumed to have been introduced into the High-level Liquid Waste TSD units via laboratory drains connected to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) evaporator (PEW system). At that time, a detailed and systematic evaluation of hazardous chemical use and disposal practices had not been conducted to determine if F-, P-, or Unlisted waste had been disposed to the PEW system. The purpose of this investigation was to perform a systematic and detailed evaluation of the use and disposal of the 101 F-, P-, and Unlisted chemicals found in the approved September 1990 Part A Permit application. This investigation was aimed at determining which listed wastes, as defined in 40 CFR 261.31 (F-listed) and 261.33 (P & Unlisted) were discharged to the PEW system. Results of this investigation will be used to support revisions to the RCRA Part A Permit application.

  20. Environmental Impact Assessment Determination Enquiry Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    need consent, from the Forestry Commission (under the EIA Regulations 1999), to carry out your proposed that is covered by any of the following designations: Sensitive Area as listed in "Schedule 2" of the 1999 EIA

  1. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2010 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources Department Head: Tracy M. Sterling Assessment Coordinator: Cathy Zabinski Degrees/Majors/Options Offered

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas, and other water sources that are vital in a region); and (vii) Tundra, coral reefs, or rain forests; or x 5 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION...

  3. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 4: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s (MUSC) vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. The significant growth in the number of environmental/health information systems that has occurred over the past few years has made data access challenging. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: immunological consequences of beryllium exposure; assessment of genetic risks to environmental diseases; low dose-rate radiation health effects; environmental risk perception in defined populations; information support and access systems; and environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine.

  4. Strategic environmental assessment can help solve environmental impact assessment failures in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshuwaikhat, Habib M. [Department of City and Regional Planning, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, PO Box 1632, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: habibms@kfupm.edu.sa

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current trend of industrialization and urbanization in developing nations has a huge impact on anthropogenic and natural ecosystems. Pollution sources increase with the expansion of cities and cause contamination of water, air and soil. The absence of urban environmental planning and management strategies has resulted in greater concern for future urban development. This paper advocates the adoption of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) as a means to achieve sustainable development in developing countries. It investigates project-level environmental impact assessment (EIA) and its limitations. The exploration of SEA and its features are addressed. The effective implementation of SEA can create a roadmap for sustainable development. In many developing countries, the lack of transparency and accountability and ineffective public participation in the development of the policy, plan and program (PPP) would be mitigated by the SEA process. Moreover, the proactive and broadly based characteristics of SEA would benefit the institutional development of the PPP process, which is rarely experienced in many developing countries. The paper also explores the prospects for SEA and its guiding principles in developing countries. Finally, the paper calls for a coordinated effort between all government, nongovernment and international organizations involved with PPPs to enable developing countries to pursue a path of sustainable development through the development and application of strategic environmental assessment.

  5. DOE/EA-0820 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact. COPIES OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ARE AVAILABLE FROM: Information Resource Center U.S. Department of Energy 105...

  6. EA-1815: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-1815: Final Environmental Assessment Cuyahoga County Agricultural Society Wind Energy Project, Berea, Cuyahoga County, Ohio The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has...

  7. EA-1782: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-1782: Final Environmental Assessment University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project The University of Delaware has constructed a wind turbine adjacent to its...

  8. assessing environmental mobility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  9. assess environmental performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  10. arizona environmental assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  11. assessing environmental social: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  12. assessing environmentally friendly: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  13. assess environmental degradation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  14. Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for U.S. Geothermal's Neal Hot...

  15. EA-1532: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    processes that reside at Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) and Los Alamos National Laboratory need to be consolidated. Final Environmental Assessment for the...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (the 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  17. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule 10 CFR Parts 433 and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    environmental assessment for Proposed Rule 10 CFR Part 433, Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential...

  18. EA-1976D: Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announces...

  19. EA-1900: Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOENaval Nuclear Propulsion Laboratory announces the availability of the Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1900-NOA-FEA-2012 More Documents &...

  20. EA-1545: DOE Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Within and Around the Caliente Rail Corridor, Nevada This notice announces the availability, and opportunity for public review and comment, of the environmental assessment...

  1. Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologie...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment March 2003 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION In 1999, the United States government announced the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI)...

  2. EA-1638: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Solyndra, Inc. for Construction of A Photovoltaic Manufacturing Facility and Leasing of an Existing Commercial Facility in Fremont,...

  3. DOE/EA-0965 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    65 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE PREPARED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY, CHICAGO FIELD OFFICE PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES...

  4. Environmental and economic assessment of microalgae-derived jet fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Nicholas Aaron

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant efforts must be undertaken to quantitatively assess various alternative jet fuel pathways when working towards achieving environmental and economic United States commercial and military alternative aviation ...

  5. EA-1642: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1642: Final Environmental Assessment Design and Construction of an Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research...

  6. EA-1792: DOE Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-1792-DOENOAFEA-20110.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1792: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1792: Finding of No Significant Impact...

  7. Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT, TENNESSEE AND HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  8. Title Page for the Site-Wide Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1440 FINAL Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex July 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE...

  9. Cover Page for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1440 FINAL Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex July 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE...

  10. Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas Emissions In the most comprehensive environmental assessment of electric transportation to date, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Natural Resources...

  11. EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment SalvageDemolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (Plan (EDP) 1978. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. Dept.the 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  13. EA-1880: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment with Scoping (EA) to meet its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and 7 CFR part 1794 in connection with potential impacts...

  14. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  15. The paradox of strategic environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bidstrup, Morten, E-mail: bidstrup@plan.aau.dk; Hansen, Anne Merrild, E-mail: merrild@plan.aau.dk

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a tool that can facilitate sustainable development and improve decision-making by introducing environmental concern early in planning processes. However, various international studies conclude that current planning practice is not taking full advantage of the tool, and we therefore define the paradox of SEA as the methodological ambiguity of non-strategic SEA. This article explores causality through at three-step case study on aggregates extraction planning in Denmark, which consists of a document analysis; a questionnaire survey and follow-up communication with key planners. Though the environmental reports on one hand largely lack strategic considerations, practitioners express an inherent will for strategy and reveal that their SEAs in fact have been an integrated part of the planning process. Institutional context is found to be the most significant barrier for a strategy and this suggests that non-strategic planning setups can prove more important than non-strategic planning in SEA practice. Planners may try to execute strategy within the confinements of SEA-restricted planning contexts; however, such efforts can be overlooked if evaluated by a narrow criterion for strategy formation. Consequently, the paradox may also spark from challenged documentation. These findings contribute to the common understanding of SEA quality; however, further research is needed on how to communicate and influence the strategic options which arguably remain inside non-strategic planning realities. - Highlights: • International studies conclude that SEAs are not strategic. = The paradox of SEA. • Even on the highest managerial level, some contexts do not leave room for strategy. • Non-strategic SEA can derive from challenged documentation. • Descriptive and emergent strategy formation can, in practice, be deemed non-strategic.

  16. Transmission line environmental assessment guidance document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.; Pentecost, E.; Muzzarelli, J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1939, U.S. utility companies have been required to obtain a Presidential Permit to construct electric transmission lines that cross a U.S. border and connect with a foreign utility. The purpose of this document is to provide Presidential Permit applicants with two types of guidance: (1) on the type of environmental and project descriptive information needed to assess the potential impacts of the proposed and alternative actions and (2) on compliance with applicable federal and state regulations. The main three chapters present information on the purpose and content of this document (Chapter 1); legislative, regulatory, and consultation requirements for transmission line interconnect projects (Chapter 2); and identification of basic transmission system design parameters and environmental data requirements for analysis of potential impacts of the proposed action (Chapter 3). Chapter 3 also includes information on possible techniques or measures to mitigate impacts. Appendix A presents an overview of NEPA requirements and DOE`s implementing procedures. Appendix B summarizes information on legislation that may be applicable to transmission line projects proposed in Presidential Permit applications.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas, and other water sources that are vital in a region); and (vii) Tundra, coral reefs, or rain forests; or 5 x x x x x x x ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL...

  18. Logic-Based Decision Support for Strategic Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavanelli, Marco; Milano, Michela; Cagnoli, Paolo; 10.1017/S1471068410000335

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic Environmental Assessment is a procedure aimed at introducing systematic assessment of the environmental effects of plans and programs. This procedure is based on the so-called coaxial matrices that define dependencies between plan activities (infrastructures, plants, resource extractions, buildings, etc.) and positive and negative environmental impacts, and dependencies between these impacts and environmental receptors. Up to now, this procedure is manually implemented by environmental experts for checking the environmental effects of a given plan or program, but it is never applied during the plan/program construction. A decision support system, based on a clear logic semantics, would be an invaluable tool not only in assessing a single, already defined plan, but also during the planning process in order to produce an optimized, environmentally assessed plan and to study possible alternative scenarios. We propose two logic-based approaches to the problem, one based on Constraint Logic Programming a...

  19. Environmental Assessment: geothermal direct heat project, Marlin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal action addressed by this Environmental Assessment (EA) is joint funding the retrofitting of a heating and hot water system in a hospital at Marlin, Texas, with a geothermal preheat system. The project will be located within the existing hospital boiler room. One supply well was drilled in an existing adjacent parking lot. It was necessary to drill the well prior to completion of this environmental assessment in order to confirm the reservoir and to obtain fluids for analysis in order to assess the environmental effects of fluid disposal. Fluid from operation will be disposed of by discharging it directly into existing street drains, which will carry the fluid to Park Lake and eventually the Brazos River. Fluid disposal activities are regulated by the Texas Railroad Commission. The local geology is determined by past displacements in the East Texas Basin. Boundaries are marked by the Balcones and the Mexia-Talco fault systems. All important water-bearing formations are in the cretaceous sedimentary rocks and are slightly to highly saline. Geothermal fluids are produced from the Trinity Group; they range from approximately 3600 to 4000 ppM TDS. Temperatures are expected to be above 64/sup 0/C (147/sup 0/F). Surface water flows southeastward as a part of the Brazos River Basin. The nearest perennial stream is the Brazos River 5.6 km (3.5 miles) away, to which surface fluids will eventually discharge. Environmental impacts of construction were small because of the existing structures and paved areas. Construction run-off and geothermal flow-test fluid passed through a small pond in the city park, lowering its water quality, at least temporarily. Construction noise was not out of character with existing noises around the hospital.

  20. Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Biological Assessment mitigation measures or will be chipped and spread on site. B. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusion Being Applied: (See text in 10 CFR Part...

  2. Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGOIUCAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CATEGOIUCAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area Power Administration Ogallala Substation Drainage Control Keith County, Nebraska A. Brief Description of...

  4. UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan UR Undergraduate BS Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan UR Undergraduate BS Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan Students will as their physical, chemical, and biological characteristics. #12;UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

  5. Student Learning Assessment: Towards an Environmental Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Student Learning Assessment: Towards an Environmental Model for Academic and Student Services in the classroom. · And, implicitly, design assessment methods that lead to documentation and improvement. #12;MSCHE and Student Learning Assessment #12;The NJIT Academic Affairs Institutional Level Learning Goals 1

  6. Environmental assessment: Kotzebue Wind Installation Project, Kotzebue, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE is proposing to provide financial assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska. Like many rural Alaska towns, Kotzebue uses diesel-powered generators to produce its electricity, the high cost of which is currently subsidized by the Alaska State government. In an effort to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce dependence on diesel fuel, and reduce air pollutants, the DOE is proposing to fund an experimental wind installation to test commercially available wind turbines under Arctic conditions. The results would provide valuable information to other Alaska communities experiencing similar dependence on diesel-powered generators. The environmental assessment for the proposed wind installation assessed impacts to biological resources, land use, electromagnetic interference, coastal zone, air quality, cultural resources, and noise. It was determined that the project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  7. Environmental impact assessment in the Fijian state sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnbull, Jane

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 20 years, the South Pacific state of Fiji has required developers to conduct more than 70 environmental impact assessments (EIA), without specifying the environmental quality or impacts it considers (in)appropriate. It has ignored aspects of EIA to which agencies funding development have paid little attention--assessing alternatives, monitoring outcomes and enforcing consent conditions. This infers the Fijian state is not serious about using EIA to control environmental quality. Factors other than technical shortcomings are shaping the way the state constrains EIA practice. Unless these factors change, the comprehensive EIA system proposed in Sustainable Development legislation will not prevent environmental degradation.

  8. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR OTEC PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Preoperational Test Platform,Thermal EnergyConversion (OTEC), Preoperational Ocean Test1979. Sands, M.D. , Draft OTEC Programmatic Environmental

  10. Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition This second edition of the "Green Book" was issued by DOE to assist preparers and reviewers of NEPA documents, with the...

  11. Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmental to modify an assessment checklist that best addresses specific safety and environmental compliance needs

  12. National Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) State Notice and Acknowledgment of Local Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) State Notice and Acknowledgment of Local/program) _______________________________ in the National Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) of the National Center all foodborne illness outbreak environmental assessment data to the system. Information collected

  13. Accepted Manuscript Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco-Environmental assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accepted Manuscript Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco- Environmental assessment Corre O, Feidt M, Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco- Environmental assessment of cleaner ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 CARBON FOOTPRINT AND EMERGY COMBINATION FOR ECO- ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF CLEANER

  14. Environmental Assessment for the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) needs to collect engineering and technical information on (1) the physical response and behavior of a Phase I grout fill in an actual tank, (2) field deployment of grout production equipment and (3) the conduct of component closure activities for single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106 (C-106). Activities associated with this Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration (ATCD) project include placement of grout in C-106 following retrieval, and associated component closure activities. The activities will provide information that will be used in determining future closure actions for the remaining SSTs and tank farms at the Hanford Site. This information may also support preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposal of Tank Waste and Closure of Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Tank Closure EIS). Information will be obtained from the various activities associated with the component closure activities for C-106 located in the 241-C tank farm (C tank farm) under the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989). The impacts of retrieving waste from C-106 are bounded by the analysis in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS (DOE/EIS-0189), hereinafter referred to as the TWRS EIS. DOE has conducted and continues to conduct retrieval activities at C-106 in preparation for the ATCD Project. For major federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, the ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires that federal agencies evaluate the environmental effects of their proposed and alternative actions before making decisions to take action. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has developed regulations for implementing NEPA. These regulations are found in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 1500-1508. They require the preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) that includes an evaluation of alternative means of addressing the problem and a discussion of the potential environmental impacts of a proposed federal action. An EA provides analysis to determine whether an EIS or a finding of no significant impact should be prepared.

  15. 2004 Environmental risk assessment report for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................................12 6.1 Water 12 6.2 Waste 14 6.3 Other impact areas 16 6.4 Buildings ­ Phenomics 17 7 - Current..................... 7 Figure 5.2 ­ Per cent residual environmental risk at the Australian National University ... 7 ..................................................... 8 Figure 5.4 - Per cent residual environmental risk by impact area

  16. Assessing potential future environmental legal events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Petrich, C. [The Ernst and Yound Center for Business Innovation, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the topic of environmental citizenship in the United States. The term refers to responsibilities each of us have with respect to helping our communities and nation make sound environmental decisions. This research centers on the citizens and what we ought to be doing, as opposed to what the government ought to be doing for us, to improve environmental citizenship. This report examines four central questions: What are the requirements (i.e., responsibilities) of citizenship vis-a-vis environmental decision- making processes; what constraints limit people`s ability to meet these requirements; what does our form of governance do to help or hinder in meeting these requirements; and what recommendations can be put forth to improve public participation in environmental decision making?

  17. Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks. This support is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact

  18. Scoping the Environmental Assessment Process for a MRS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tribe and preparing of the environmental assessment (EA) required by Section 404 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended (NWPAA), are the first steps in a process intended to...

  19. Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

  20. Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

  1. EA-1816: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Assessment Town of Hempstead Wind-to-Hydrogen Project, Point Lookout, New York The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided a grant to the Town of Hempstead, New...

  2. The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG. 2010. Human and environmental impact assessment ofof the overall environmental impacts and benefits of theand reducing environmental impacts of CCS Roger Sathre and

  3. Environmental life cycle assessment as a decision making tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    2011 Environmental impact categories Global warming (99 %) Acidification Ozone depletion Photo oxidant · Environmental Life Cycle Assessment · Operation of the Argentinean Electricity Network · Conclusions #12;PASI minimization 2 1 2 1 2 1 CC)(1Z ** Global criteria method p *** * p *** * C-C CC - Z

  4. An environmental assessment of Bermuda's caves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Darcy Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The current environmental status of the majority of Bermuda?s one hundred sixty-six known caves was investigated. This survey replicated a historical cave study performed in 1983, wherein each was analyzed for positive ...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR OTEC PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) at approxi- mately theOperational o INITIATE EA/EIS FOR SITE/REGION Based on theof the appropriate ErA/EIS. o DESIGN LONG-TERM MONITORING/

  6. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  7. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  8. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|July 14, 2014July 7,July2014, 2015Environmental|

  9. Retrospective examination of geothermal environmental assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J.W.; Eddlemon, G.K.; Reed, A.W.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1976, the Department of Energy (DOE) has supported a variety of programs and projects dealing with the exploration, development, and utilization of geothermal energy. This report presents an overview of the environmental impacts associated with these efforts. Impacts that were predicted in the environmental analyses prepared for the programs and projects are reviewed and summarized, along with measures that were recommended to mitigate these impacts. Also, for those projects that have gone forward, actual impacts and implemented mitigation measures are reported, based on telephone interviews with DOE and project personnel. An accident involving spills of geothermal fluids was the major environmental concern associated with geothermal development. Other important considerations included noise from drilling and production, emissions of H/sub 2/S and cooling tower drift, disposal of solid waste (e.g., from H/sub 2/S control), and the cumulative effects of geothermal development on land use and ecosystems. Mitigation measures were frequently recommended and implemented in conjunction with noise reduction; drift elimination; reduction of fugitive dust, erosion, and sedimentation; blowout prevention; and retention of wastes and spills. Monitoring to resolve uncertainties was often implemented to detect induced seismicity and subsidence, noise, drift deposition, concentrations of air and water pollutants, and effects on groundwater. The document contains an appendix, based on these findings, which outlines major environmental concerns, mitigation measures, and monitoring requirements associated with geothermal energy. Sources of information on various potential impacts are also listed.

  10. Variability of building environmental assessment tools on evaluating carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, S. Thomas, E-mail: tstng@hkucc.hku.hk; Chen Yuan, E-mail: chenyuan4@gmail.com; Wong, James M.W., E-mail: jmwwong@hku.hk

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing importance of sustainability in construction, more and more clients and designers employ building environmental assessment (BEA) tools to evaluate the environmental friendliness of their building facilities, and one important aspect of evaluation in the BEA models is the assessment of carbon emissions. However, in the absence of any agreed framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking, the results generated by the BEA tools might vary significantly which could lead to confusion or misinterpretation on the carbon performance of a building. This study thus aims to unveil the properties of and the standard imposed by the current BEA models on evaluating the life cycle carbon emissions. The analyses cover the (i) weighting of energy efficiency and emission levels among various environmental performance indicators; (ii) building life cycle stages in which carbon is taken into consideration; (iii) objectiveness of assessment; (iv) baseline set for carbon assessment; (v) mechanism for benchmarking the emission level; and (v) limitations of the carbon assessment approaches. Results indicate that the current BEA schemes focus primarily on operational carbon instead of the emissions generated throughout the entire building life cycle. Besides, the baseline and benchmark for carbon evaluation vary significantly among the BEA tools based on the analytical results of a hypothetical building. The findings point to the needs for a more transparent framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking in BEA modeling. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon emission evaluation in building environmental assessment schemes are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulative carbon emission is modeled for building environmental assessment schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon assessments focus primarily on operational stage instead of entire lifecycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baseline and benchmark of carbon assessment vary greatly among BEA schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more transparent and comprehensive framework for carbon assessment is required.

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    l l,eve l Ventil.u:ion ( el OTEC H . . ard Level (f) Type ofW.E. and R.N. Manley, 1979. OTEC Commercialization Analysis.Assessment for Operational OTEC Platforms A Progress Report.

  12. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, G.

    2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL's public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  13. Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maheras, Anastasia Francis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

  14. An environmental impact assessment of quantum dot photovoltaics (QDPV) from raw material acquisition through use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    An environmental impact assessment of quantum dot photovoltaics (QDPV) from raw material of Environmental Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara, Turkey b Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, University: Life cycle assessment Quantum dots Nanophotovoltaics Quantum dot photovoltaic modules Solar energy

  15. Rate of environmental change determines stress response specificity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elowitz, Michael

    as to salt (13), calcium (14), heat, and other stresses (15). Bacteria also contain general stress responseRate of environmental change determines stress response specificity Jonathan W. Younga,1 , James C (received for review August 2, 2012) Cells use general stress response pathways to activate diverse tar- get

  16. A Holistic Framework for Environmental Flows Determination in Hydropower Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the ecological science community, the consensus view is that the natural flow regime sustains the ecological integrity of river systems. This prevailing viewpoint by many environmental stakeholders has progressively led to increased pressure on hydropower dam owners to change plant operations to affect downstream river flows with the intention of providing better conditions for aquatic biological communities. Identifying the neccessary magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, or rate of change of stream flows to meet ecological needs in a hydropower context is challenging because the ecological responses to changes in flows may not be fully known, there are usually a multitude of competing users of flow, and implementing environmental flows usually comes at a price to energy production. Realistically, hydropower managers must develop a reduced set of goals that provide the most benefit to the identified ecological needs. As a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program, the Instream Flow Project (IFP) was carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argon National Laboratory (ANL) as an attempt to develop tools aimed at defining environmental flow needs for hydropower operations. The application of these tools ranges from national to site-specific scales; thus, the utility of each tool will depend on various phases of the environmental flow process. Given the complexity and sheer volume of applications used to determine environmentally acceptable flows for hydropower, a framework is needed to organize efforts into a staged process dependent upon spatial, temporal, and functional attributes. By far, the predominant domain for determining environmental flows related to hydropower is within the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing process. This process can take multiple years and can be very expensive depending on the scale of each hydropower project. The utility of such a framework is that it can expedite the environmental flow process by 1) organizing data and applications to identify predictable relationships between flows and ecology, and 2) suggesting when and where tools should be used in the environmental flow process. In addition to regulatory procedures, a framework should also provide the coordination for a comprehensive research agenda to guide the science of environmental flows. This research program has further reaching benefits than just environmental flow determination by providing modeling applications, data, and geospatial layers to inform potential hydropower development. We address several objectives within this document that highlight the limitations of existing environmental flow paradigms and their applications to hydropower while presenting a new framework catered towards hydropower needs. Herein, we address the following objectives: 1) Provide a brief overview of the Natural Flow Regime paradigm and existing environmental flow frameworks that have been used to determine ecologically sensitive stream flows for hydropower operations. 2) Describe a new conceptual framework to aid in determining flows needed to meet ecological objectives with regard to hydropower operations. The framework is centralized around determining predictable relationships between flow and ecological responses. 3) Provide evidence of how efforts from ORNL, PNNL, and ANL have filled some of the gaps in this broader framework, and suggest how the framework can be used to set the stage for a research agenda for environmental flow.

  17. Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H. (ed.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  18. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C W [ed.] [ed.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  19. Environmental Assessment of Remedial Action at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0254) on the proposed remedial action at the inactive uranium milling site near Riverton, Wyoming. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required.

  20. Environmental Assessment : Happy Valley [Substation Project].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Happy Valley project consists of construction of a new BPA customer service 69-kV substation south of Sequim in Clallam County, Washington. A tie line, to be constructed by the customer as part of this project, will link the new BPA facility to the existing customer's transmission system in the area. This project responds to rapid load growth in the Olympic Peninsula, and will strengthen the existing BPA system and interconnected utility systems. It will reduce transmission losses presently incurred, especially on the BPA system supplying power to the Olympic Peninsula. This report describes the potential environmental impact of the proposed actions. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Environmental Assessment Checklist | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -RailroadEnvironmental

  2. Environmental Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof1-SCORECARD-09-21-11 Page 1 of 1Independent|Environmental Risk

  3. Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1405

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental405

  4. Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental405Astrophysics

  5. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Process of V1 NPP Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matejovic, Igor [DECOM A.S., Jana Bottu, 2. SK-91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Polak, Vincent [STM POWER, a.s., Jana Bottu 2, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the adoption of Governmental Resolution No. 801/99 the Slovak Republic undertook a commitment to shutdown units 1 and 2 of Jaslovske Bohunice V 1 NPP (WWER 230 reactor type) in 2006 and 2008 respectively. Therefore the more intensive preparation of a decommissioning documentation has been commenced. Namely, the VI NPP Conceptual Decommissioning Plan and subsequently the Environmental Impact Assessment Report of VI NPP Decommissioning were developed. Thus, the standard environmental impact assessment process was performed and the most suitable alternative of V1 NPP decommissioning was selected as a basis for development of further decommissioning documents. The status and main results of the environmental impact assessment process and EIA report are discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  6. A new paradigm for Environmental Assessment (EA) in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Young-Il [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Glasson, John, E-mail: jglasson@brookes.ac.u [Oxford Brookes University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 30 years, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in Korea has played an important role in decision-making processes particularly for environmentally sensitive projects. However, the EIA system alone has sometimes not been effective enough to ensure the successful resolution of environmental concerns. In order to compensate for the limitations of the EIA system, a new assessment system called Prior Environmental Review System (PERS), which is relevant to Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in some aspects, was introduced in 1993. PERS aims to balance development and preservation by identifying possible environmental impacts of some administrative plans mainly related to development projects in the early stages of planning. However, PERS still appeared to have some weak points such as a limited range of subjects to be assessed, and weakness of tiering (or vertical integration) from PERS to EIA. Therefore, the necessity for reform of the Korean Environmental Assessment (EA) system, including PERS, was raised. In response, the Korean government sought to establish its policy direction for implementing SEA by enhancing the objectivity and expertise of PERS. The policy was approved by the National Assembly in May 2005, and went into effect in June 2006. The introduction of SEA, by enhancing PERS, provides a framework for a system of EA from the strategic level, including PPPs, to the project level. Yet, despite such improvements, some managerial and technical problems associated with subsequent EA implementation remain. This paper critically reviews the evolution of the EA system in Korea and suggests essential improvements for the current EA system based on experiences of implementation of both EIA and SEA since June 2006, in the context of international good practice.

  7. A qualitative method proposal to improve environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toro, Javier, E-mail: jjtoroca@unal.edu.co [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia at Bogotá (Colombia)] [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia at Bogotá (Colombia); Requena, Ignacio, E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain)] [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain); Duarte, Oscar, E-mail: ogduartev@unal.edu.co [National University of Colombia at Bogotá, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics (Colombia)] [National University of Colombia at Bogotá, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics (Colombia); Zamorano, Montserrat, E-mail: zamorano@ugr.es [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada (Spain)] [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada (Spain)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In environmental impact assessment, qualitative methods are used because they are versatile and easy to apply. This methodology is based on the evaluation of the strength of the impact by grading a series of qualitative attributes that can be manipulated by the evaluator. The results thus obtained are not objective, and all too often impacts are eliminated that should be mitigated with corrective measures. However, qualitative methodology can be improved if the calculation of Impact Importance is based on the characteristics of environmental factors and project activities instead on indicators assessed by evaluators. In this sense, this paper proposes the inclusion of the vulnerability of environmental factors and the potential environmental impact of project activities. For this purpose, the study described in this paper defined Total Impact Importance and specified a quantification procedure. The results obtained in the case study of oil drilling in Colombia reflect greater objectivity in the evaluation of impacts as well as a positive correlation between impact values, the environmental characteristics at and near the project location, and the technical characteristics of project activities. -- Highlights: • Concept of vulnerability has been used to calculate the importance impact assessment. • This paper defined Total Impact Importance and specified a quantification procedure. • The method includes the characteristics of environmental and project activities. • The application has shown greater objectivity in the evaluation of impacts. • Better correlation between impact values, environment and the project has been shown.

  8. Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

  9. UGP Environmental Review (NEPA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transparency and openness. Some actions may have environmental impacts that require an environmental assessment and a detailed analysis to determine the extent and severity of...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HYDROPOWER PILOT PROJECT LICENSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM STAR Certified Homes,|ASSESSMENT FOR

  11. Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-' CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

  12. Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-` CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

  13. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  14. CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for...

  15. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  16. Assessing the influence of environmental impact assessments on science and policy: An analysis of the Three Gorges Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Assessing the influence of environmental impact assessments on science and policy: An analysis Keywords: Environmental impact assessment Dams Three Gorges Project Uncertainty Prioritization a b s t r exist between the scientific interest (via number of publications) in environmental impacts and (a

  17. Perera Lam: An environmental justice assessment of the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor in Louisiana, U.S. APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 11(4): 681-697.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera ­ Lam: An environmental justice assessment of the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor to assess the status of environmental justice concerns in the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor injustice in the study area. The study approach allows preliminary assessment of environmental justice

  18. SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from disadvantaging non for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007, the Council began developing options

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Amendment and Need The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from paper of all GOA sideboards for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007

  20. REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned offshore wind farm, Horns Rev 1 (160 MW with 80 turbines of 2 MW), became operational in 2002. The aver- age capacity of turbines and size of offshore wind farms have been increasing since then

  1. August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data prompted ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology to be re-considered for use in Hawaii for OTEC development. Keywords- Ocean thermal energy conversion, OTEC, renewable energy, Hawaii

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  3. Environmental implications of accelerated gasohol production: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of increasing US production of fuel ethanol by 330 million gallons per year in the 1980 to 1981 time frame in order to substitute gasohol for 10% of the unleaded gasoline consumed in the United States. Alternate biomass feedstocks are examined and corn is selected as the most logical feedstock, based on its availability and cost. Three corn conversion processes that could be used to attain the desired 1980 to 1981 production are identified; fermentation plants that use a feedstock of starch and wastes from an adjacent corn refining plants are found to have environmental and economic advantages. No insurmountable environmental problems can be achieved using current technology; the capital and operating costs of this control are estimated. If ethanol production is increased substantially after 1981, the environmentally acceptable use or disposal of stillage, a liquid by-product of fermentation, could become a serious problem.

  4. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  5. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  6. DOE/EA-1635: Environmental Assessment for Pre-approval Review...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy DOT Department of Transportation EA Environmental Assessment EFH essential fish habitat EIS Environmental Impact Statement EMF electric and magnetic fields EO...

  7. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Project: ECM assessment guidance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a summary of the basic tools that will be used in conducting assessments under the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) Project assessment program. ECM can cover a wide range of issues including: finding safer alternatives to toxic materials; changing processes to become more efficient; environmental costs and regulatory compliance; waste reduction; energy conservation; product packaging; and product reuse/recycling. The assessments performed as part of this program will try to identify opportunities to implement technologies/actions that will promote the types of results listed above. The general methodology, or sequence of events, that will be used in conducting assessments is as follows: 1. Form an Assessment Team; 2. Map Process by flow diagrams and materials accounting; 3. Identify opportunities for ECM by activity based accounting and pareto analysis; 4. Identify and evaluate ECM/pollution prevention alternatives; 5. Implement alternatives; 6. Monitor progress. All of the assessment steps listed above are addressed in this document except forming the assessment team. The tools discussed in this document are well known, widely used process analysis or quality improvement tools which have been adapted for use in evaluating opportunities for ECM/Pollution prevention.

  8. A Protocol for Lifetime Energy and Environmental Impact Assessment of Building Insulation Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors, and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist that provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines.

  9. A protocol for lifetime energy and environmental impact assessment of building insulation materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S., E-mail: shresthass@ornl.gov; Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre O.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist, which provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different building insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines. - Highlights: • We proposed a protocol to evaluate the environmental impacts of insulation materials. • The protocol considers all life cycle stages of an insulation material. • Both the direct environmental impacts and the indirect impacts are defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided operational energy’ is defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided environmental impact’ is defined.

  10. RAPID DETERMINATION OF RA-226 IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for emergency response or routine sample analyses. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device or Improvised Nuclear Device event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. {sup 226}Ra (T1/2 = 1,620 years) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha-emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The new method to determine {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method for solid samples, calcium carbonate precipitation to preconcentrate Ra, and rapid column separation steps to remove interferences. The column separation process uses cation exchange resin to remove large amounts of calcium, Sr Resin to remove barium and Ln Resin as a final purification step to remove {sup 225}Ac and potential interferences. The purified {sup 226}Ra sample test sources are prepared using barium sulfate microprecipitation in the presence of isopropanol for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed good chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The determination of {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples can be performed in less than 16 h for vegetation, concrete, brick, soil, and air filter samples with excellent quality for emergency or routine analyses. The sample preparation work takes less than 6 h. {sup 225}Ra (T1/2 = 14.9 day) tracer is used and the {sup 225}Ra progeny {sup 217}At is used to determine chemical yield via alpha spectrometry. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory radium particles are effectively digested. The preconcentration and column separation steps can also be applied to aqueous samples with good results.

  11. Environmental life-cycle assessment of highway construction projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopalan, Neethi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An LCI report for environmental releases should be considered as some form of impact assessment. The listing of releases implies that the emissions have a detrimental effect on the environment but no attempt has been made to analyze the nature... inventory of the environmental emissions to air from the construction of 3.2 miles (four lanes of highway) of a road in Texas. A process-based approach, which is basically a material and energy balance approach, was used and compared with the economic...

  12. EA-1983: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1972: Final Environmental8: Sand

  13. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate...

  14. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate...

  15. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy and Environmental Engineering Civil Systems Program mchester@cal.berkeley.edu Project Director: Arpad Horvath, Associate Professor University of California, Berkeley Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  16. Tritium Determination at Trace Level: Which Strategy to Determine Accurately HTO and OBT in Environmental Samples?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglan, N.; Alanic, G.; Pointurier, F. [CEA (France)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing on environmental tritium levels, measurements have been made for several natural water and leaf samples from an area where no tritium industrial discharge was known to occur. Therefore, to obtain sufficiently accurate data tritium was determined from large samples. Moreover, tritium measurement at environmental level requires appropriate methodology to avoid any contamination. Both tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) were determined for biological samples and compared to preliminary or literature data. In this paper, the authors describe both: a mobile extraction water device allowing therefore to realise the extraction step under the sampling site conditions to get rid of any contamination; a sensitive method for low level non-exchangeable OBT determination by a combination of a suitable sample treatment, a large capacity combustion apparatus and low background liquid scintillation spectrometry. Then, owing to validate this approach the authors give an application of this methodology to the determination of both fractions determined on tree leaves originating from the lower Rhone valley. The results demonstrate both the suitability of the procedure as tritium concentration in leaves and natural waters exhibit environmental level concentration and also that the OBT background in the studied area is very close to the one measured in the south west of France.

  17. Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment of Sea Bottom and Marine Biology #12 Design ApS 01.03.2000 #12;Bio/consult A/S Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1........................................................................................................................................................... 36 #12;Bio/consult A/S ELSAM Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1 Page 4

  18. A proposed tool to integrate environmental and economical assessments of products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthil, Kumaran D.; Ong, S.K.; Nee, A.Y.C.; Tan, Reginald B.H

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt has been made to interpret the outcomes of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in terms of environmental costs. This attempt ensures the environmental accountability of the products while LCA ensures their eco-friendly nature. Keeping this as an objective, a Life Cycle Environmental Cost Analysis (LCECA) model was developed. This new tool incorporates costing into the LCA practice. This model prescribes a life cycle environmental cost model to estimate and correlate the effects of these costs in all the life cycle stages of the product. The newly developed categories of eco-costs are: costs of effluent treatment/control/disposal, environmental management systems, eco-taxes, rehabilitation, energy and savings of recycling and reuse strategies. The mathematical model of LCECA determines quantitative expressions between the total cost of products and the various eco-costs. The eco-costs of the alternatives are compared with the computational LCECA model. This method enables the environmental as well as the economic assessment of products, which leads to cost-effective, eco-friendly design of products.

  19. A viewpoint on the approval context of strategic environmental assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontic, Branko; Kontic, Davor, E-mail: davor.kontic@ijs.si

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection on the last report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the application and effectiveness of the Directive on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is provided. It covers the inadequacies of the approval/permitting context of SEA, which appears to be increasingly applied by a significant number of Member States in recent years. A viewpoint is provided on the main deficiencies of such praxis. As a practical defence of the planning context of SEA, the authors propose that the EC should consider a clear recommendation to Member States to cease performing SEA in the approval/permitting context until proper amendments to the SEA Directive are made and implemented. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Administrative and permitting context of SEA, has ousted the primary environmental impact assessment goal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approval context moves from the environmental protection to the area of political power and economy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA and EIA are misused. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental evaluations should be used for improving the projects/plans/programmes and not for permitting them.

  20. Environmental assessment in The Netherlands: Effectively governing environmental protection? A discourse analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runhaar, Hens, E-mail: h.a.c.runhaar@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, P.O. Box 80,115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands); Laerhoven, Frank van, E-mail: vanLaerhoven@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, P.O. Box 80,115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter, E-mail: p.driessen@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, P.O. Box 80,115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands); Arts, Jos, E-mail: e.j.m.m.arts@rug.nl [University of Groningen, Faculty of Planning, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessment (EA) aims to enhance environmental awareness and to ensure that environmental values are fully considered in decision-making. In the EA arena, different discourses exist on what EA should aim for and how it functions. We hypothesise that these discourses influence its application in practice as well as its effectiveness in terms of achieving the above goals. For instance, actors who consider EA as a hindrance to fast implementation of their projects will probably apply it as a mandatory checklist, whereas actors who believe that EA can help to develop more environmentally sound decisions will use EIA as a tool to design their initiatives. In this paper we explore discourses on EA in The Netherlands and elaborate on their implications for EA effectiveness. Based on an innovative research design comprising an online survey with 443 respondents and 20 supplementary semi-structured interviews we conclude that the dominant discourse is that EA is mainly a legal requirement; EAs are conducted because they have to be conducted, not because actors choose to do so. EA effectiveness however seems reasonably high, as a majority of respondents perceive that it enhances environmental awareness and contributes to environmental protection. However, the 'legal requirement' discourse also results in decision-makers seldom going beyond what is prescribed by EA and environmental law. Despite its mandatory character, the predominant attitude towards EA is quite positive. For most respondents, EA is instrumental in providing transparency of decision-making and in minimising the legal risks of not complying with environmental laws. Differences in discourses seldom reflect extreme opposites. The 'common ground' regarding EA provides a good basis for working with EA in terms of meeting legal requirements but at the same time does not stimulate creativity in decision-making or optimisation of environmental values. In countries characterised by less consensual political cultures we may expect more extreme discourses on EA, the consequences of which are reflected upon in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effectiveness of environmental assessment (EA) depends in part on meanings associated with EA (i.e., discourse). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results suggest that the general discourse in The Netherlands is that EA is a legal requirement, nothing more. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This discourse makes EA effective in protecting the environment, but not in the optimisation of environmental values. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EA has a limited contribution to the development of policy alternatives or innovative solutions to environmental problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a high consensus among EA professionals, providing a common ground for working with EA.

  1. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 294313 Environmental impact assessment of different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 294­313 Environmental impact assessment environmental impacts. Therefore, it is vital to evaluate the environmental impacts of the symbiosis in order is proposed. In this paper, an LCA-type environmental impact assessment of different design schemes

  2. Life-Cycle Assessment of Highway Pavement Alternatives in Aspects of Economic, Environmental, and Social Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Zhuting

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments EIO-LCA Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment EIS Environmental Impact Statements EO Executive Order EPA Environmental Protection Agency ESAL Equivalent Single Axle Loads FHWA Federal Highway Administration GWP... Transaction Cost ............................................. 48 Figure 11. Environmental Impact: Global Warming Potential ........................................ 50 Figure 12. Environmental Impact: CO2 Emissions...

  3. Acoustic Rapid Environmental Assessment: the AOB concept S. M. Jesus, C. Soares and N. Martins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Acoustic Rapid Environmental Assessment: the AOB concept S. M. Jesus, C. Soares and N. Martins Si}@ualg.pt. Abstract Rapidly assessing the environmental conditions of a given coastal area with the capability) as a promising tool for operational environmental assessment of small coastal areas. This work was supported

  4. MNE 697k Introduction to Social and Environmental Assessment Spring Semester 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    MNE 697k Introduction to Social and Environmental Assessment Spring Semester 2010 Instructors the receiving environment and the local communities in the region. Social and environmental assessments fundamentals. This course introduces students to the basics of the social and environmental assessment process

  5. Assessment of environmental correlates with the distribution of fish stocks using a spatially explicit model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Allan R.

    Assessment of environmental correlates with the distribution of fish stocks using a spatially-mail: msundermeyer@umassd.edu phone: (508) 999-8812 fax: (508) 910-6371 Running title: Assessing environmental;INTRODUCTION We present here a method for assessing the explanatory skill of environmental correlates

  6. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR NATURAL PRODUCTS RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR NATURAL PRODUCTS RESEARCH PHASE II BLANK #12;ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR NATURAL PRODUCTS RESEARCH PHASE II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared in accordance with the National

  7. Evaluation of environmental impact assessment system in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeem, Obaidullah [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: obaidnadeem@yahoo.com; Hameed, Rizwan [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: d_rizwan@hotmail.com

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was first introduced in Pakistan based on the Environmental Protection Ordinance 1983. The EIA process was further strengthened under the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997, which became operational under EIA Regulations 2000. Despite a sound legal basis and comprehensive guidelines, evidence suggests that EIA has not yet evolved satisfactorily in Pakistan. An evaluation of the EIA system against systematic evaluation criteria, based on interviews with EIA approval authorities, consulting firms and experts, reveals various shortcomings of the EIA system. These mainly include; inadequate capacity of EIA approval authorities, deficiencies in screening and scoping, poor EIA quality, inadequate public participation and weak monitoring. Overall, EIA is used presently as a project justification tool rather than as a project planning tool to contribute to achieving sustainable development. Whilst shortcomings are challenging, central government has recently shown a high degree of commitment to the environmental protection by making EIA compulsory for all the public sector projects likely to have adverse environmental impacts. The paper identifies opportunities for taking advantage of the current environment for strengthening the EIA process.

  8. The mediation of environmental assessment's influence: What role for power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashmore, Matthew, E-mail: cashmore@plan.aau.dk [Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vaenge 15, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV (Denmark); Axelsson, Anna [Naturskyddsforeningen, Box 4625, 116 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable empirical research has been conducted on why policy tools such as environmental assessment (EA) often appear to have 'little effect' (after Weiss) on policy decisions. This article revisits this debate but looks at a mediating factor that has received limited attention to-date in the context of EA - political power. Using a tripartite analytical framework, a comparative analysis of the influence and significance of power in mediating environmental policy integration is undertaken. Power is analysed, albeit partially, through an exploration of institutions that underpin social order. Empirically, the research examines the case of a new approach to policy-level EA (essentially a form of Strategic Environmental Assessment) developed by the World Bank and its trial application to urban environmental governance and planning in Dhaka mega-city, Bangladesh. The research results demonstrate that power was intimately involved in mediating the influence of the policy EA approach, in both positive (enabling) and negative (constraining) ways. It is suggested that the policy EA approach was ultimately a manifestation of a corporate strategy to maintain the powerful position of the World Bank as a leading authority on international development which focuses on knowledge generation. Furthermore, as constitutive of an institution and reflecting the worldviews of its proponents, the development of a new approach to EA also represents a significant power play. This leads us to, firstly, emphasise the concepts of strategy and intentionality in theorising how and why EA tools are employed, succeed and fail; and secondly, reflect on the reasons why power has received such limited attention to-date in EA scholarship. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conducts empirical research on the neglected issue of power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Employs an interpretation of power in which it is viewed as a productive phenomenon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses the influence of power in the trial application of a new approach to policy environmental assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrates the importance of power dynamics in understanding the successes and failures of environmental assessment.

  9. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, John S

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  10. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment - April 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, J.S.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  11. The screening and scoping of Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment of Carbon Capture and Storage in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koornneef, J.; Faaij, A.; Turkenburg, W. [University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) are procedural tools which have as goal to assess and evaluate possible environmental effects of, respectively, a proposed project or policy plan. The goal of this article is to explore possible bottlenecks in applying both the EIA and SEA procedures on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) activities in the Netherlands, as experience is currently minimal or lacking. In this study we focus mainly on the institutional and procedural aspects of the screening and scoping phases of both procedures. This is achieved by reviewing EIA and SEA procedures for analogue projects for the three distinctive process steps of a CCS project, namely the power plant with capture, the transport and finally the underground storage of the CO{sub 2}. Additionally, EIA and SEA or similar procedures on CCS in other countries are reviewed and the legal framework for the Dutch EIA and SEA is studied. This article shows a concise overview of the EIA and SEA procedure in the Netherlands and the relation between both procedures. Based on our findings we have constructed a conceptual taxonomy for the scope of both procedures for CCS in the Netherlands. This taxonomy conceptualizes the possible integration of assessing the environmental impacts for tiered levels of decision making. This integration might be needed for first CCS projects as decisions on the strategic (spatial planning) level are currently absent for CCS in the Netherlands. Perpendicular to such integration is the integration of linked activities in the CCS chain and their alternatives, into one procedure. We argue that it would be beneficial to combine the separate EIA procedures for CCS activities into one procedure or at least provide close linkage between them.

  12. Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

  13. Environmental Assessment for Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared pursuant to the implementing regulations to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which require federal agencies to assess the environmental impacts of a proposed action to determine whether that action requires the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or if a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) can be issued. The Pantex Plant does not possess permanent containerized waste staging facilities with integral secondary containment or freeze protection. Additional deficiencies associated with some existing staging facilities include: no protection from precipitation running across the staging pads; lack of protection against weathering; and facility foundations not capable of containing leaks, spills or accumulated precipitation. These shortcomings have raised concerns with respect to requirements under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Deficiencies for these waste staging areas were also cited by a government audit team (Tiger Team) as Action Items. The provision for the staging of hazardous, mixed, and low level waste is part of the no-action altemative in the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the integrated ER/WM program. Construction of this proposed project will not prejudice whether or not this integration will occur, or how.

  14. Ecological compensation and Environmental Impact Assessment in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villarroya, Ana, E-mail: avillarroya@alumni.unav.e [Department of Zoology and Ecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Navarra) (Spain); Puig, Jordi, E-mail: jpbaguer@unav.e [Department of Zoology and Ecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Navarra) (Spain)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve meaningful sustainable development, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) should avoid the net losses in the environment resource base. But EIA practice does not always avoid the losses caused by the implementation of the projects under EIA regulation. Some environmental impacts are, simply, admitted, even without enforcing any form of compensation. When applied, compensation is sometimes just a monetary payment to offset the environmental loss. This paper looks for evidence on the role that compensation is given at present in EIA practice in Spain, and for some of its conceptual and regulatory roots. Specifically, it explores how compensation is addressed in 1302 records of decision (RODs) on those projects subject to the Spanish EIA regulation published during the years 2006 and 2007, to know how far Spain is from preserving the environmental resource base managed through this particular aspect of EIA practice. As a result, it is concluded that the practice of ecological compensation in EIA in Spain is much lower than it could be expected in a theoretical sustainability context committed to avoid net losses in the environment resource base, mainly due to an EIA practice focused on on-site mitigation that allows these net losses.

  15. Effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessment system in Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinma, Kaupo, E-mail: kaupo@environment.e [Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Tallinn University, 25 Narva Road, 10120 Tallinn (Estonia); Poder, Tonis, E-mail: tonisp@tlu.e [Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Tallinn University, 25 Narva Road, 10120 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To be effective, an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) system, first, has to minimize the probability that projects with significant environmental effects are implemented without EIA, and second, minimize the number of EIAs, which do not provide decision makers with essential information, so that the decision is improved as a result of EIA. The objective of this study was to find out how frequently in Estonia the projects implemented without EIA have caused significant environmental effects, and to measure the relative frequency of EIAs that have no influence on decision. An extensive survey with e-mail distributed questionnaires was carried out to reveal information from governmental agencies, local self-governments, and developers. There was no evidence that projects authorized without EIA have had environmental impacts, which could have been mitigated as a result of EIA. In contrast, about half of EIAs did not alter the decision of relevant authorities. This proportion was valid to both mandatory EIAs and those initiated on judgement basis. In our view, the proportion of no-influence EIAs was excessive and indicated the need to reconsider the provisions applying to the projects with a mandatory EIA requirement as well as judgements practice.

  16. Environmental assessment, expanded Ponnequin wind energy project, Weld County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE`s deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

  17. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  18. Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program, a small-scale production initiative designed to increase numbers of a weak but potentially recoverable population of spring chinook salmon in the Tucannon River in the State of Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-l326) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation; Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund research for 2 to 3 years on the feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon into mid-Columbia River basin tributaries. The research would take place in the Methow and Wenatchee river basins in Chelan and Okanogan Counties, Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1282) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  20. Environmental Assessment for the Warren Station externally fired combined cycle demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Penelec project is one of 5 projects for potential funding under the fifth solicitation under the Clean Coal Technology program. In Penelec, two existing boilers would be replaced at Warren Station, PA; the new unit would produce 73 MW(e) in a combined cycle mode (using both gas-fired and steam turbines). The project would fill the need for a full utility-size demonstration of externally fire combined cycle (EFCC) technology as the next step toward commercialization. This environmental assessment was prepared for compliance with NEPA; its purpose is to provide sufficient basis for determining whether to prepare an environmental impact statement or to issue a finding of no significant impact. It is divided into the sections: purpose and need for proposed action; alternatives; brief description of affected environment; environmental consequences, including discussion of commercial operation beyond the demonstration period.

  1. Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described.

  2. ORISE: Resources for environmental assessments and health physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurseResources Environmental assessments and health

  3. EA-1772: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E TDrewFinding of NoFinal Environmental Assessment

  4. EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-Wide Environmental AssessmentCorpCitizensUranium

  5. DOE Environmental Assessment EA-1391 for Presidential Permit Applications for Baja California Power Inc and Sempra Energy Resources PP-234 and PP-235: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has determined in its Environmental Assessment EA-1391 for Presidential Permit Applications for Baja California Power Inc and Sempra Energy Resources PP-234 and PP-235 a...

  6. Assessment of Environmentally Friendly Refrigerants for Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Pradeep [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents technical assessment of environmentally friendly refrigerants for window air conditioners that currently use refrigerant R410A for residential and commercial applications. The alternative refrigerants that are studied for its replacement include R32, R600a, R290, R1234yf, R1234ze and a mixture of R32 (90% molar concentration) and R125 (10% molar concentration). Baseline experiments were performed on a window unit charged with R410A. The ORNL Heat Pump Design Model was calibrated with the baseline data and was used to assess the comparative performance of the WAC with alternative refrigerants. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each refrigerants and their suitability for window air conditioners.

  7. POLICY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH USING SIMULATION TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchitel, Kirsten; Tanana, Heather

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the relationship between simulation-based science and judicial assessments of simulations or models supporting evaluations of environmental harms or risks, considering both how it exists currently and how it might be shaped in the future. This report considers the legal standards relevant to judicial assessments of simulation-based science and provides examples of the judicial application of those legal standards. Next, this report discusses the factors that inform whether there is a correlation between the sophistication of a challenged simulation and judicial support for that simulation. Finally, this report examines legal analysis of the broader issues that must be addressed for simulation-based science to be better understood and utilized in the context of judicial challenge and evaluation. !

  8. Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA the environmental impacts of PV systems are small during their operating phase, they are more significant during the use of LCA to assess the environmental impacts of one electricity-production technology. To address

  9. IEA-SHC Task 27: Environmental Performance Assessment of glazing and windows: context, overview, main concerns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEA-SHC Task 27: Environmental Performance Assessment of glazing and windows: context, overview, environmental quality criteria will just widen the actual scope of the technical assessment of building products. The first question is a double one : Who will use environmental criteria related to the building products

  10. HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Spring Semester, 2009) Dr. Jonathan Patz, course director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Spring Semester, 2009) Dr. Jonathan Patz) ============================================================= Course Outline Section I. Assessment Frameworks & Intro to Environmental/Occupational Health Faculty (UW (& proj. mapping tool) Jonathan Patz 2. 1/26/09 Intro. to Environmental Health: Local to Global Scales

  11. Development of agro-environmental scenarios to support pesticide risk assessment in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    Development of agro-environmental scenarios to support pesticide risk assessment in Europe T reserved. Keywords: Pesticides Risk assessment Agro-environmental scenarios FOOTPRINT Agricultural Kingdom b Pesticide Environmental Fate, 58, St. Annes Rd., London Colney, St. Albans AL2 1LJ, United

  12. Re-conceptualising strategic environmental assessment: theoretical overview and case study from Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bina, Olivia Claudia

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , Chile (Comision Nacional del Medio Ambiente) Regional Environmental Commission, Chile (Comision Regional del Medio Ambiente) DepaJ1ment for International Development (UK) Direccion General de Aguas Declaracion de Impacto Ambiental Direccion de... Impact Assessment (in Chilean literature: Evaluacion de Impacto Ambiental) Environmental Sustainability Assurance European Union Global Environmental Facility Geographical Information Systems Impact Assessment (generic for all categories of 'impacts...

  13. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  14. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.P.; Farrar, D.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Epidemiology Unit, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (England))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the animal data showed trichloroethylene (TRI) to be of low acute toxicity. Repeated exposure showed that the target organs were the liver, and to a lesser extent, the kidney. TRI is not mutagenic or only marginally mutagenic. There is no evidence of fetotoxicity or teratogenicity. TRI is judged not to exhibit chronic neurotoxicity. Lifetime bioassays resulted in tumors in both the mouse and the rat. However, because of qualitative and quantitative metabolic differences between rodent and human, no one suitable tumor site can be chosen for human health risk assessment. In addition, of the several epidemiology studies, none has demonstrated a positive association for increased tumor incidence. A review of the health effects in humans shows TRI to be of low acute toxicity and, following chronic high doses, to be hepatotoxic. Environmental exposure to TRI is mainly via the atmosphere, while the contribution from exposure to drinking water and foodstuffs is negligible. The total body burden was calculated as 22 micrograms/day. The safety margin approach based on human health effects showed that TRI levels are well within the safety margin for the human no-observable-effect level (10,000 times lower). The total body burden represents a risk of 1.4 X 10(-5) by linearized multistage modeling. Therefore, by either methodological approach to risk assessment, the environmental occurrence of TRI does not represent a significant health risk to the general population or to the population in areas close to industrial activities. 66 references.

  15. Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

  16. Terrestrial perturbation experiments as an environmental assessment tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters.

  17. Safety Training Self-Assessment The UC Irvine Safety Training Self-Assessment (STSA) is provided by Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Safety Training Self-Assessment The UC Irvine Safety Training Self-Assessment (STSA) is provided by Environmental Health Safety (EH&S). The Safety Training Self-Assessment is required for: · All UC employees the Safety Training Self-Assessment: 1. Log into the UC Learning Center at http://www.uclc.uci.edu. 2

  18. Imnaha Subbasin Assessment May 2004259 1.2.10.3 Key Environmental Correlates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imnaha Subbasin Assessment May 2004259 1.2.10.3 Key Environmental Correlates Key environmental conditions. Key environmental correlates are the finest scale features that help to define wildlife habitat the environmental correlates exert of the realized fitness of a species (Johnson and O'Neil 2001). They include

  19. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bascietto, J.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US). RCRA/CERCLA Div.; Dunford, R.W. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (US); Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

  20. Environmental assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment on the proposed decontamination and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania. Based on the environmental assessment, which is available to the public on request, the Department has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, no environmental impact statement is required. The proposed action is to decontaminate and decommission the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division fuel fabrication facilities (the Plutonium Laboratory - Building 7, and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory - Building 8). Decontamination and decommissioning of the facilities would require removal of all process equipment, the associated service lines, and decontamination of the interior surfaces of the buildings so that the empty buildings could be released for unrestricted use. Radioactive waste generated during these activities would be transported in licensed containers by truck for disposal at the Department's facility at Hanford, Washington. Useable non-radioactive materials would be sold as excess material, and non-radioactive waste would be disposed of by burial as sanitary landfill at an approved site.

  1. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  2. Framework for a comparative environmental assessment of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the drilling of an oil or gas well, drilling fluid (or mud) is used to maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. In response to effluent limitation guidelines promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for discharge of drilling wastes offshore, alternatives to water and oil-based muds have been developed. These synthetic-based muds (SBMs) are more efficient than water-based muds (WBMs) for drilling difficult and complex formation intervals and have lower toxicity and smaller environmental impacts than diesel or conventional mineral oil-based muds (OBMs). A third category of drilling fluids, derived from petroleum and called enhanced mineral oils (EMOs), also have these advantages over the traditionally used OBMs and WBMs. EPA recognizes that SBMs and EMOs are new classes of drilling fluids, but their regulatory status is unclear. To address this uncertainty, EPA is following an innovative presumptive rulemaking process that will develop final regulations for SBM discharges offshore in less than three years. This report develops a framework for a comparative risk assessment for the discharge of SBMs and EMOs, to help support a risk-based, integrated approach to regulatory decision making. The framework will help identify potential impacts and benefits associated with the use of SBMs, EMOs, WBMs, and OBMs; identify areas where additional data are needed; and support early decision-making in the absence of complete data. As additional data becomes available, the framework can support a full quantitative comparative assessment. Detailed data are provided to support a comparative assessment in the areas of occupational and public health impacts.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opsomer, Jean

    Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results by J Association June 11, 2001 Iowa State University Ames, Iowa #12;2 Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake health assessment, are briefly described in the article. All the selected plots and stream locations were

  4. THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument of acquiring information relevant to HEDS, the WCL will assess the chemical composition and properties

  5. Assessment of transboundary environmental effects in the Pearl River Delta Region: Is there a role for strategic environmental assessment?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, Simon, E-mail: simon.marsden@flinders.edu.au

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    China's EIA Law does not require transboundary proposals to be assessed, despite recognition of this globally, for example in the Espoo Convention and Kiev Protocol, and in the European EIA and SEA Directives. In a transboundary context assessment within a state is unusual, as regulating these effects is primarily about the relationship between states. However where a state has more than one legal system such as in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of southern China, transboundary effects should also be addressed. Yet despite the geographical connections between Guangdong Province in mainland China (where the EIA Law applies) and the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions (which have their own provisions, neither of which requires transboundary assessments), EIA and SEA are carried out separately. Coordinated or joint approaches to transboundary assessment are generally absent, with the legal autonomy of Hong Kong and Macau a major constraint. As a result institutional responses at the policy level have developed. The article considers global experiences with regulating transboundary EIA and SEA, and analyses potential application to land use, transport and air and water planning in the PRD Region. If applied, benefits may include prevention or mitigation of cumulative effects, broader public participation, and improvements to environmental governance. The PRD Region experience may encourage China to conduct and coordinate EIA and SEA processes with neighbouring states, which has been non-existent or extremely limited to date.

  6. When Waste Becomes Intelligent: Assessing the Environmental Impact of Microchip Tagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Waste Becomes Intelligent: Assessing the Environmental Impact of Microchip Tagging Claudia Binder1 , Svetlana Domnitcheva2 1 Natural and Social Science Interface Department of Environmental recognition of several tags. Many shops are already successfully using such systems as prevention

  7. Environmental Assessment and Metrics for Solar: Case Study of SolFocus Solar Concentrator Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Assessment and Metrics for Solar: Case StudyEnvironmental Installation impacts of PV electricity generation - a critical comparison of energy supply options,” in 21st European Photovoltaic Solar

  8. Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

  9. Multi-jurisdictional environmental impact assessment: Canadian experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, Patricia, E-mail: p.fitzpatrick@uwinnipeg.c [Department of Geography, The University of Winnipeg 515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Sinclair, A. John, E-mail: Jsincla@ms.umanitoba.c [Natural Resources Institute, Sinnott Building, 70 Dysart Rd., University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines complexities surrounding environmental impact assessment (EIA) in a multi-jurisdictional environment, with a specific focus on opportunities for public participation. With almost universal adoption of EIA, projects are increasingly subject to more than one assessment process. Thus there is demand to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination of EIAs. Canada has growing expertise with multijuristictional EIA that serves to illustrate the costs and opportunities associated with three different approaches to coordination: standardization, harmonization and substitution. Findings suggest that, although fraught with issues, harmonization is the most realistic approach for coordinating efforts. Harmonization has the potential to minimize duplication, avoid process uncertainty and increase efficiency and effectiveness in EIA. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrates that a bilateral agreement between jurisdictions is the best approach to harmonization, so long as negotiation of the agreement includes opportunities for meaningful participation, and implementation includes activities designed to communicate the assessment responsibilities of each jurisdiction, activities and schedules to the public. The experience of participants of different coordinated EIAs in Canada serves as counsel for on-going and future efforts to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination.

  10. Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

  11. Integrating life-cycle impact assessment with environmental assessment techniques to satisfy the needs of ISO 14000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, S.P.; Brown, L. [Scientific Certification Systems, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After three years of negotiations, the ISO 14000 standards on Environmental Management Tools are now making rapid progress toward completion and international adoption. At the outset of this standardization effort, one methodological tool--life-cycle assessment (LCA)--was singled out for standardization, while the remaining standards were focused on management frameworks and applications--environmental management systems, environmental performance evaluation, environmental labeling and environmental auditing. The reason for singling out LCA was the belief that it could serve as a tool for evaluating the environmental impacts associated with competing production technologies, alternative materials, product options and packaging choices, and for supporting environmental claims in the marketplace. Of particular importance was LCA`s system-wide, cradle-to-grave, scope, which was considered essential for accurate and fair assessments and comparisons. This presentation examines the evolution of LCA standardization within the ISO-14000 process, describes the LCSEA framework and methodology, and explores the role of environmental professionals in this context.

  12. Environmental Assessment Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. DOE completed an environmental assessment of the original proposed project in August 1997. Since then, the geographic scope and the design of the project changed, necessitating additional review of the project under the National Environmental Policy Act. The project now calls for the possible construction of up to 48 wind turbines on State and private lands. PSCo and its partners have initiated construction of the project on private land in Weld County, Colorado. A substation, access road and some wind turbines have been installed. However, to date, DOE has not provided any funding for these activities. DOE, through its Commercialization Ventures Program, has solicited applications for financial assistance from state energy offices, in a teaming arrangement with private-sector organizations, for projects that will accelerate the commercialization of emerging renewable energy technologies. The Commercialization Ventures Program was established by the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (P.L. 101-218) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486). The Program seeks to assist entry into the marketplace of newly emerging renewable energy technologies, or of innovative applications of existing technologies. In short, an emerging renewable energy technology is one which has already proven viable but which has had little or no operational experience. The Program is managed by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Federal action triggering the preparation of this EA is the need for DOE to decide whether to release the requested funding to support the construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE's deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

  13. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  14. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Pond B Dam Repair Project at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1285) for the proposed repair of the Pond B dam at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  15. Market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use through 2020. It was prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratories for the Fossil Energy R&D Program. It is based on interviews of representatives of 8 coal, coal technology, electricity and environmental groups concerned with the future of energy and the environment. Interviewees generally agreed that the U.S. and other countries would continue to need to use coal into the middle of the next century. The size of the market for coal would be determined by the ability of coal and coal technologies to meet environmental requirements at costs that would compete with natural gas. Outside the U.S., three interviewees suggested that there is a market for low cost coal technologies that will reduce the environmental impact of coal use, particularly in developing countries that have few alternative sources of energy. The principal environmental concerns mentioned in these interviews were: efficiency and carbon, air toxics, and NO{sub x}. Several also mentioned potential modifications to the SO{sub x} standards, a fine particulate standard, bottom and fly ash, and methane from coalbeds.

  16. Human health and wellbeing in environmental impact assessment in New South Wales, Australia: Auditing health impacts within environmental assessments of major projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Patrick J., E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Thompson, Susan, E-mail: s.thompson@unsw.edu.a [Faculty of the Built Environment, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Kemp, Lynn, E-mail: l.kemp@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally the inclusion of health within environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been shown to be limited. While Australian EIA documentation has not been studied empirically to date, deficiencies in practice have been documented. This research developed an audit tool to undertake a qualitative descriptive analysis of 22 Major Project EAs in New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that health and wellbeing impacts were not considered explicitly. They were, however, included indirectly in the identification of traditional public health exposures associated with the physical environment and to a lesser extent the inclusion of social and economic impacts. However, no health data was used to inform any of the assessments, there was no reference to causal pathways between exposures or determinants and physical or mental health effects, and there was no inclusion of the differential distribution of exposures or health impacts on different populations. The results add conceptually and practically to the long standing integration debate, showing that health is in a position to add value to the EIA process as an explicit part of standard environmental, social and economic considerations. However, to overcome the consistently documented barriers to integrating health in EIA, capacity must be developed amongst EIA professionals, led by the health sector, to progress health related knowledge and tools.

  17. Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products" webcast, held March 28, 2013.

  18. EA-1968: Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the U.S. Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    68: Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) Campus, Golden, Colorado EA-1968:...

  19. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

  20. National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

  1. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, [June 1992--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, the Environment Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) Annual Report, is the second of three reports that document activities under the EHAP grant and details progress made during the first year of the grant. The first year was devoted to the development of a working program implementation plan. During the developmental process some key objectives were achieved such as developing a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Environmental Studies at MUSC (Medical University of South Carolina) and conducting the first Crossroads of Humanity series Round Table Forum. The PIP (Program Implementation Program) details the objectives, management and budgetary basis for the overall management and control of the grant over the next four years, the yearly program plans provide the monthly and day-to-day programmatic and budgetary control by which the PIP was developed.

  2. Avoiding climate change uncertainties in Strategic Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Sanne Vammen, E-mail: sannevl@plan.aau.dk [The Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Aalborg University-Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark); Kørnøv, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk [The Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Aalborg University, Skibbrogade 5, 1. Sal, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark)] [The Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Aalborg University, Skibbrogade 5, 1. Sal, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Driscoll, Patrick, E-mail: patrick@plan.aau.dk [The Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Aalborg University-Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark)] [The Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Aalborg University-Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is concerned with how Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) practice handles climate change uncertainties within the Danish planning system. First, a hypothetical model is set up for how uncertainty is handled and not handled in decision-making. The model incorporates the strategies ‘reduction’ and ‘resilience’, ‘denying’, ‘ignoring’ and ‘postponing’. Second, 151 Danish SEAs are analysed with a focus on the extent to which climate change uncertainties are acknowledged and presented, and the empirical findings are discussed in relation to the model. The findings indicate that despite incentives to do so, climate change uncertainties were systematically avoided or downplayed in all but 5 of the 151 SEAs that were reviewed. Finally, two possible explanatory mechanisms are proposed to explain this: conflict avoidance and a need to quantify uncertainty.

  3. Wild Horse 69-kV transmission line environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc. (Hill County) proposes to construct and operate a 69-kV transmission line from its North Gildford Substation in Montana north to the Canadian border. A vicinity project area map is enclosed as a figure. TransCanada Power Corporation (TCP), a Canadian power-marketing company, will own and construct the connecting 69-kV line from the international border to Express Pipeline`s pump station at Wild Horse, Alberta. This Environmental Assessment is prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) as lead federal agency to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as part of DOE`s review and approval process of the applications filed by Hill County for a DOE Presidential Permit and License to Export Electricity to a foreign country. The purpose of the proposed line is to supply electric energy to a crude oil pump station in Canada, owned by Express Pipeline Ltd. (Express). The pipeline would transport Canadian-produced oil from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Caster, Wyoming. The Express Pipeline is scheduled to be constructed in 1996--97 and will supply crude oil to refineries in Wyoming and the midwest.

  4. Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal program objective and principal part of the proposed action is to improve the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors by providing the technical means (through technical development, design, and testing) for reducing the uranium enrichment requirements of these fuels to substantially less than the 90 to 93% enrichment currently used. Operator acceptance of the reduced-enrichment-uranium (REU) fuel alternative will require minimizing of reactor performance reduction, fuel cycle cost increases, the number of new safety and licensing issues raised, and reactor and facility modifications. The other part of the proposed action is to assure the capability for commercial production and supply of REU fuel for use both in the US and abroad. The RERTR Program scope is limited to generic design studies, technical support to reactor operating organizations in preparing for conversions to REU fuels, fuel development, fuel demonstrations, and technical support for commercialization of REU fuels. This environmental assessment addresses the environmental consequences of RERTR Program activities and of specific conversions of typical reactors (the Ford Nuclear Reactor and one or two other to-be-designated demonstrations) to REU-fuel cycles, including domestic and international shipments of enriched uranium pertinent to the conduct of RERTR Program activities.

  5. Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) sensitivity analysis of computer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, P.G.; Miley, T.B.; Cowan, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a computer-based methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate health impacts from the release of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials. The health impacts are estimated from the environmental inventory and release or emission rate, constituent transport, constituent uptake and toxicity, and exposure route parameters. As part of MEPAS development and evaluation, PNL performed a formal parametric sensitivity analysis to determine the sensitivity of the model output to the input parameters, and to provide a systematic and objective method for determining the relative importance of the input parameters. The sensitivity analysis determined the sensitivity of the Hazard Potential Index (HPI) values to combinations of transport pathway and exposure routes important to evaluating environmental problems at DOE sites. Two combinations of transport pathways and exposure routes were evaluated. The sensitivity analysis focused on evaluating the effect of variation in user-specified parameters, such as constituent inventory, release and emission rates, and parameters describing the transport and exposure routes. The constituents used were strontium-90, yttrium-90, tritium, arsenic, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, toluene, and perchloroethylene. 28 refs., 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  6. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; LLoyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the analysis details and summary of analyses conducted to evaluate the environmental impacts for the Resumption of Transient Fuel and Materials Testing Program. It provides an assessment of the impacts for the two action alternatives being evaluated in the environmental assessment. These alternatives are (1) resumption of transient testing using the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and (2) conducting transient testing using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL/NM). Analyses are provided for radiologic emissions, other air emissions, soil contamination, and groundwater contamination that could occur (1) during normal operations, (2) as a result of accidents in one of the facilities, and (3) during transport. It does not include an assessment of the biotic, cultural resources, waste generation, or other impacts that could result from the resumption of transient testing. Analyses were conducted by technical professionals at INL and SNL/NM as noted throughout this report. The analyses are based on bounding radionuclide inventories, with the same inventories used for test materials by both alternatives and different inventories for the TREAT Reactor and ACRR. An upper value on the number of tests was assumed, with a test frequency determined by the realistic turn-around times required between experiments. The estimates provided for impacts during normal operations are based on historical emission rates and projected usage rates; therefore, they are bounding. Estimated doses for members of the public, collocated workers, and facility workers that could be incurred as a result of an accident are very conservative. They do not credit safety systems or administrative procedures (such as evacuation plans or use of personal protective equipment) that could be used to limit worker doses. Doses estimated for transportation are conservative and are based on transport of the bounding radiologic inventory that will be contained in any given test. The transportation analysis assumes all transports will contain the bounding inventory.

  7. An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailamaki, Anastassia

    . Small Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University ms35@andrew.cmu.edu Jeanne VanBriesen Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering CarnegieAn environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security Anastassia

  8. Assessment of doses and and environmental contamination from decommissioning of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of doses and and environmental contamination from decommissioning of the nuclear contamination from decommissioning of thecontamination from decommissioning of the nuclear facilities - 6 December 2002 #12;PresentationPresentation · Assessment of activity inventory in the nuclear

  9. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA).

  10. The environmental assessment of nuclear materials disposition options: A transportation perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.K.; Clauss, D.B.; Moyer, J.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy has undertaken a program to evaluate and select options for the long-term storage and disposition of fissile materials declared surplus to defense needs as a result of the end of the Cold War. The transport of surplus fissile material will be an important and highly visible aspect of the environmental impact studies and other planning documents required for implementation of the disposition options. This report defines the roles and requirements for transportation of fissile materials in the program, and discusses an existing methodology for determining the environmental impact in terms of risk. While it will be some time before specific alternatives are chosen that will permit the completion of detailed risk calculations, the analytical models for performing the probabilistic risk assessments already exist with much of the supporting data related to the transportation system. This report summarizes the various types of data required and identifies sources for that data.

  11. Public participation in environmental impact assessment: why, who and how?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glucker, Anne N., E-mail: anne.glucker@gmx.de [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands); Kolhoff, Arend, E-mail: akolhoff@eia.nl [Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, P.O. Box 2345, 3500 GH Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, P.O. Box 2345, 3500 GH Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Hens A.C., E-mail: h.a.c.runhaar@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a cursory glance at the literature on environmental impact assessment (EIA) reveals that public participation is being considered as an integral part of the assessment procedure. Public participation in EIA is commonly deemed to foster democratic policy-making and to render EIA more effective. Yet a closer look at the literature unveils that, beyond this general assertion, opinions of the precise meaning, objectives and adequate representation of public participation in EIA considerably diverge. Against this background, in this article we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the academic debate on public participation in EIA concerning its meaning, objectives and adequate level of inclusiveness. In so doing, we hope to stimulate a more focused debate on the subject, which is key to advancing the research agenda. Furthermore, this paper may serve as a starting point for practitioners involved in defining the role of public participation in EIA practice. -- Highlights: • There is little reflection on the meaning, objectives and adequate level of inclusiveness of public participation in EIA. • We provide a comprehensive overview of the academic debate on public participation in EIA concerning the meaning, objectives and adequate level of inclusiveness. • Theoretical claims put forth by scholars are contrasted with empirical evidence. • Overview shall stimulate a more focused debate on the subject. • This paper may serve as a starting point for practitioners involved in defining the role of public participation in EIA.

  12. Legal and institutional framework of environmental impact assessment in Nigeria: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olokesusi, F. [Nigerian Inst. of Social and Economic Research, Ibadan, Oyo (Nigeria)] [Nigerian Inst. of Social and Economic Research, Ibadan, Oyo (Nigeria)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, has high rates of urbanization and industrialization. Until recently, decisions on most large-scale projects such as expressways, harbors, industries, dams, and irrigation were considered with an emphasis on traditional technical and cost-benefit analysis. Spurred by massive environmental degradation and persistent community agitation in oil producing areas, environmental impact assessment (EIA) legislation was passed in late 1992. The main purpose of this article is to review and assess the content of this legislation and the guidelines produced by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), the institution responsible for EIA administration. Some EIA reports have been prepared and reviewed by FEPA since 1994. There are some positive outcomes and expectations, but some problems have been identified as well, including: deliberate restriction of public involvement and participation by proponents and/or their consultants, interagency conflict leading to high cost and project delays especially in the oil industry, and restriction of public access to final EIA reports. These are discussed, and recommendations for improving the process are made.

  13. EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal NuclearofCommunication |DoesFinding of NoFinding of35:

  14. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  15. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  16. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  17. Research Summary Sustainability impact assessment: tools for environmental, social and economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Sustainability impact assessment: tools for environmental, social and economic to produce Sustainability Impact Assessment Tools (SIATs) that will be used to predict the impacts) and will be used as part of the Impact Assessment (IA) process, as set out in the Impact Assessment Guidelines

  18. Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

  19. The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

  20. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  1. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified as the potential habitability of its regolith. INDEX TERMS: 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars; 6297

  2. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives . . . . . 15 2.2 Whale watching activity in Alaska

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands assessment (Assessment 2) are included as part of this EA. The following sections and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  4. Transportation of radionuclides in urban environs: draft environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, N.C.; Aldrich, D.C.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M.; Henning-Sachs, C.; Kaestner, P.C.; Ortiz, N.R.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials in densely populated urban areas, including estimates of the radiological, nonradiological, and social impacts arising from this process. The chapters of the report and the appendices which follow detail the methodology and results for each of four causative event categories: incident free transport, vehicular accidents, human errors or deviations from accepted quality assurance practices, and sabotage or malevolent acts. The numerical results are expressed in terms of the expected radiological and economic impacts from each. Following these discussions, alternatives to the current transport practice are considered. Then, the detailed analysis is extended from a limited area of New York city to other urban areas. The appendices contain the data bases and specific models used to evaluate these impacts, as well as discussions of chemical toxicity and the social impacts of radioactive material transport in urban areas. The latter are evaluated for each causative event category in terms of psychological, sociological, political, legal, and organizational impacts. The report is followed by an extensive bibliography covering the many fields of study which were required in performing the analysis.

  5. Power and environmental assessment: Introduction to the special issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashmore, Matthew, E-mail: cashmore@plan.aau.dk [Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vaenge 15, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV (Denmark); Richardson, Tim [Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Skibbrogade 5, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of politics and power dynamics has long been recognised in environmental assessment (EA) research, but there has not been sustained attention to power, either theoretically or empirically. The aim of this special issue is to encourage the EA community to engage more consistently with the issue of power. The introduction represents a ground-clearing exercise intended to clarify the terms of the debate about power in the EA field, and to contribute to the development of a research agenda. Research trends in the field are outlined, and potential analytic and normative lines of inquiry are identified. The contributions to this special issue represent contrasting conceptual and methodological approaches that navigate the analytical and normative terrain of power dynamics in EA. Together, they demonstrate that power cannot be removed from EA policy or practices, and is a necessary research focus for the development of the field. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduces the themed section on power Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides an overview of the papers in the themed section Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifies research trends and directions for future research.

  6. Implementing Strategic Environmental Assessment of spatial planning tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Montis, Andrea, E-mail: andreadm@uniss.it

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After more than a decade from the publication of the European Directive 2001/42/CE (Directive) on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), the design and construction of the interested spatial planning instruments has gone through a variety of changes and integrations in European and in world states. This inhomogeneous panorama can be explained with a pattern of institutional structures that have so far affected the implementation of the Directive. The aim of this paper is to investigate the level of implementation of the Directive in Italy by developing a comparative analysis of the quality of integration of SEA within the design of the spatial coordination plan of a set of Italian provinces. Italian practice is analyzed in the framework of a comparative study of worldwide SEA implementation within spatial and land use planning. The results reveal strengths and weaknesses in SEA implementation at the provincial level and, in particular, the emergence of critical areas of research concerning institutional context, public participation, monitoring, and observatory of the spatial transformations. -- Highlights: • This is a comparative analysis of SEA in strategic spatial planning in Italy. • The adhesion of Provinces to the study is remarkable. • SEA implementation and integration into spatial planning is still moderate. • Participation via consultations should be more widespread. • Monitoring and institution of observatories are still in an infancy stage.

  7. Environmental analysis and data report prepared for the environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information and data gathered in support of the preparation of the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lowman, Idaho. The Lowman EA was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the effects of their actions on the environment. It examines the short-term and the long-term effects of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) proposed remedial action for the Lowman site as well as the no action alternative. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented in the EA to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE may issue a Finding of No Significant Impact and implement the proposed action. The information and data presented in this environmental analyses and data report are for background purposes only and are not required as part of the NEPA decision-making process.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Groundwater Characterization Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to conduct a program to characterize groundwater at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, in accordance with a 1987 DOE memorandum stating that all past, present, and future nuclear test sites would be treated as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites (Memorandum from Bruce Green, Weapons Design and Testing Division, June 6, 1987). DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0532) to evaluate the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action, referred to as the Groundwater Characterization Project (GCP). This proposed action includes constructing access roads and drill pads, drilling and testing wells, and monitoring these wells for the purpose of characterizing groundwater at the NTS. Long-term monitoring and possible use of these wells in support of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, is also proposed. The GCP includes measures to mitigate potential impacts on sensitive biological, cultural and historical resources, and to protect workers and the environment from exposure to any radioactive or mixed waste materials that may be encountered. DOE considers those mitigation measures related to sensitive biological, cultural and historic resources as essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, and DOE has prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) that explains how such mitigations will be planned and implemented. Based on the analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

  9. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  10. The potential use of Chernobyl fallout data to test and evaluate the predictions of environmental radiological assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, C.R.; Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Lesslie, P.A.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.; Till, J.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Model Validation Committee were to collaborate with US and foreign scientists to collect, manage, and evaluate data for identifying critical research issues and data needs to support an integrated assessment of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; test environmental transport, human dosimetric, and health effects models against measured data to determine their efficacy in guiding decisions on protective actions and in estimating exposures to populations and individuals following a nuclear accident; and apply Chernobyl data to quantifications of key processes governing the environmental transport, fate and effects of radionuclides and other trace substances. 55 refs.

  11. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  12. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  13. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian, E-mail: cumt_chenlongqian@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: • A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). • Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. • The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. • The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. • The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  14. Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including of water sanitation systems may be done using the LCA approach (Life Cycle Assessment). Indeed

  15. Canby Area Service Project substation and associated transmission line. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp`s substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC`s Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC`s substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA`s proposed action is intended to meet SVEC`s increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC`s increasing energy load by tapping into BPA`s existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC`s Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no ``environmental impact statement`` is not required.

  16. Canby Area Service Project : Substation and Associated Transmission Line : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp's substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC's Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC's substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA's proposed action is intended to meet SVEC's increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC's increasing energy load by tapping into BPA's existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC's Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no environmental impact statement'' is not required.

  17. Environmental Restoration Program waste minimization and pollution prevention self-assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. is currently developing a more active waste minimization and pollution prevention program. To determine areas of programmatic improvements within the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program, the ER Program required an evaluation of the program across the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site, and the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site. This document presents the status of the overall program as of fourth quarter FY 1994, presents pollution prevention cost avoidance data associated with FY 1994 activities, and identifies areas for improvement. Results of this assessment indicate that the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program is firmly established and is developing rapidly. Several procedural goals were met in FY 1994 and many of the sites implemented ER waste minimization options. Additional growth is needed, however, for the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program.

  18. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  19. Int. J. Sustainable Society, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2011, p. 133-150 1 Environmental sustainability assessments: toward a new framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for an accurate and transparent environmental sustainability assessment. Environmental impacts involved in defining indicators are considered. This analysis is based on research on environmental impacts, local applications) on sustainable development presents most of the environmental impact assessments

  20. Assessment of cold-climate environmental research priorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    States, J.B.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has consistently recognized that cold regions pose unique environmental problems. This report sets forth the conceptual framework and research plans for several high priority research areas. It provides the fundamental basis for implementation of the EPA Cold-Climate Environmental Research Program. This three- to five-year program encompasses both short- and long-term research of high relevance to the EPA and to the cold regions that it serves.

  1. How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes and Different Coastal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes Program, 1926 Victoria Avenue, Fort Myers, Florida 33901 ABSTRACT: The most recent spate of hurricanes characteristics of hurricanes interact with human land use to lead to various types and degrees of environmental

  2. 44 Journal of Student Research in Environmental Science at Appalachian Determining the viability of the practical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    of the practical application of solar electric systems in Boone, North Carolina April Lail Environmental Sciences44 Journal of Student Research in Environmental Science at Appalachian Determining the viability. Solar electric systems are a common renewable energy technology in households throughout the United

  3. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental of the Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. ,of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference. Sponsored by the

  5. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. , and M.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF No REMEDIAL ACTION AT THE INACTIVE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Health and Consolidated Laboratories Division of Environmental Engineering Air Pollution Control Program Bismarck, North Dakota Steve Weber 0 North Dakota State...

  7. EA-1239: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Property" at the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. EA-1239-FEA-1999.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1239: Finding of No...

  8. EA-1829: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE completed its Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Phycal Algae Pilot Project,Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, HI (DOEEA-1829). Based on the analyses in the...

  9. EA-1092: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Decontamination and Dismantlement This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Pinellas Plant's proposal to clean up facilities, structures, and...

  10. EA-1131: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Neutron Tube Target Loading Operation, Los Alamos Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Neutron...

  11. Exploring Personal and Environmental Characteristics that Predict Self-Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shogren, Karrie A.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Palmer, Susan B.; Paek, Youngshil

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    with age-peers, attendance at the most recent individualized education plan [IEP] meeting, transition goal for the future on the IEP, and experience with setting goals for the future) predicted student's relative level of self-determination. Age, disability...

  12. Walking the sustainability assessment talk - Progressing the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa); School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally there is a growing demand for environmental impact assessment (EIA) to move away from its traditional focus towards delivering more sustainable outcomes. South Africa is an example of a country where the EIA system seems to have embraced the concept of sustainability. In this paper we test the existing objectives for EIA in South Africa against sustainability principles and then critique the effectiveness of EIA practice in delivering these objectives. The outcome of the research suggests that notwithstanding a strong and explicit sustainability mandate through policy and legislation, the effectiveness of EIA practice falls far short of what is mandated. This shows that further legislative reform is not required to improve effectiveness but rather a focus on changing the behaviour of individual professionals. We conclude by inviting further debate on what exactly practitioners can do to give effect to sustainability in EIA practice.

  13. Environmental management assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Assessment was conducted by EH-24 from July 19 through July 30, 1993 to advise the Secretary of Energy of the adequacy of management systems established at WIPP to ensure the protection of the environment and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. The mission of WIPP is to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the management and operating contractors. This assessment revealed that WIPP`s environmental safety and health programs are satisfactory, and that all levels of the Waste Isolation Division (WID) management and staff consistently exhibit a high level of commitment to achieve environmental excellence.

  14. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management quality assessment program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the soil inorganic analysis of the 45th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLV) that were received on or before December 2, 1996.

  15. Environmental Decision Making and Information Technology: Issues Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barg, S.; Fletcher, T.; Mechling, J.; Tonn, B.; Turner, R.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the Information Technology and Environmental Decision Making Workshop that was held at Harvard University, October 1-3, 1998. Over sixty participants from across the US took part in discussions that focused on the current practice of using information technology to support environmental decision making and on future considerations of information technology development, information policies, and data quality issues in this area. Current practice is focusing on geographic information systems and visualization tools, Internet applications, and data warehousing. In addition, numerous organizations are developing environmental enterprise systems to integrate environmental information resources. Plaguing these efforts are issues of data quality (and public trust), system design, and organizational change. In the future, much effort needs to focus on building community-based environmental decision-making systems and processes, which will be a challenge given that exactly what needs to be developed is largely unknown and that environmental decision making in this arena has been characterized by a high level of conflict. Experimentation and evaluation are needed to contribute to efficient and effective learning about how best to use information technology to improve environmental decision making.

  16. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

  17. Application of a fusion strain to assess Salmonella Typhimurium virulence potential to environmental sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutt, Jeffrey David

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATION OF A FUSION STRAIN TO ASSESS SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM VIRULENCE POTENTIAL TO ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES A Thesis by JEFFREY DAVID NUTT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology APPLICATION OF A FUSION STRAIN TO ASSESS SALJWONELL4 TYPHIMURIUM VIRULENCE POTENTIAL TO ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES A Thesis by JEFFREY DAVID NUTT...

  18. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 44th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIV) that were received on or before June 3, 1996. The QAP is designed to test the quality of environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by it`s contractors. Since 1976, samples have been prepared and analyzed by the Environmental measurements Laboratory.

  19. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Widening Trench 36 of the 218-E-12B Low-Level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment was prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action to widen and operate unused Trench 36 in the 218-E-12B Low-Level Burial Ground for disposal of low-level waste. Information contained herein will be used by the Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, to determine if the Proposed Action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the Proposed Action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the Proposed Action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact will be issued and the action may proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations 1508.27. This environmental assessment was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act of1969'', as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for ''National Environmental Polio Act'' (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations 1021). The following is a description of each section of this environmental assessment. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This section provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S, Department of Energy is addressing with the Proposed Action. Background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. This section provides a description of the Proposed Action with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. This section describes reasonable,alternative actions to the Proposed Action, which addresses the Purpose and Need. A No Action Alternative, as required by Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This section provides a brief description of the locale in which the Proposed Action would take place. (5) Environmental Impacts. This section describes the range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, of the Proposed Action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. This section provides a brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the Proposed Action. (7) Organizations Consulted. This section lists any outside groups, agencies, or individuals contacted as part of the environmental assessment preparation and/or review. (8) References. This section provides a list of documents used to contribute information or data in preparation of this environmental assessment.

  20. DOE Signs Notice to Prepare Environmental Assessment on Proposed Project with Germany

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Energy Department recently signed a notice of intent to prepare an environmental assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts from a proposed project to accept used nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition.

  1. Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU- sponsored EnerGEO project, aiming, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms

  2. Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Environmental Sensibility of Oil and Gas (O&G) developments for a given study area. A Risk index associated with the development of O&G operation activities based on the spatial environmental sensibility was also mapped. To facilitate the Risk assessment...

  3. NSF/SRC Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing Integrated ESH Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    NSF/SRC Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing 1 Integrated ESH Assessment: Cu CVD and ALD Unit Process Optimization (Thrust C, Task C-5) Wei Lei, Soon Cho for System Research University of Maryland, College Park Department of Chemical and Environmental

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL BENZENE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR PARENT-CHILD PAIRS IN ROUEN, FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ENVIRONMENTAL BENZENE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR PARENT-CHILD PAIRS IN ROUEN, FRANCE Amin KOUNIALIa environmental benzene exposure. In this study we compared personal benzene exposure and inhalation uptake in a group of children to those of their parents. We also compared levels of urinary benzene metabolites

  5. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

  7. Assessing the environmental impact of energy generating clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie, A.C.D.; McMillen, M. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Pell, J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a partnership between government and industry designed for cleaner and more efficient use of coal, both for electric power generation and industrial applications. Approximately seven billion dollars have been committed to the CCT program (two and half-billion dollars from DOE and the rest by industry). The potential environmental effects of CCT projects are subject to review because a proposal by DOE to cost-share a CCT project constitutes a {open_quotes}major federal action{close_quotes} under section 102(2)(c) of NEPA. Consequently, by virtue of numerous NEPA impact evaluations of CCT projects, a great deal has been learned about environmental impact analyses for coal combustion sources. In the course of NEPA review of CCT projects, air quality is often a significant environmental issue. This paper focuses on CCT air quality issues from a NEPA perspective, including Prevention of Significant Deterioration, New Source Review, atmospheric visibility, global climate change, and acidic deposition. The analyses of the impacts of the proposed action, alternative actions, and cumulative effects will be examined. (It is a {open_quotes}given{close_quotes} that any action must comply with Federal and State requirements and the provision of the Clean Air Act and other regulatory statues.) NEPA is not a permitting process, but rather it is a process to provide decision makers with the information they require make an informed decision about the potential environmental consequences of undertaking an action. The NEPA review of environmental effects has been instrumental in effectuating beneficial changes in some past CCT projects-changes that have mitigated potentially adverse environmental impacts. Accordingly, NEPA has served as a constructive analytical tool, with similar implications for other actions related to the electric power generation industry that are subject to environmental review.

  8. assessment environmental impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to HIA Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan HIA Lessons learned 12;Health Impact Assessment Screening Scoping Bertini, Robert L. 209 VTAC:...

  9. assessing environmental impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to HIA Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan HIA Lessons learned 12;Health Impact Assessment Screening Scoping Bertini, Robert L. 209 VTAC:...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programthe 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programprojected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants canmonitoring at Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites

  12. EA-1457: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico, Sandia Site Office, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico In 1999, the...

  13. EA-1409: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos...

  14. Environmental screening tools for assessment of infrastructure plans based on biodiversity preservation and global warming (PEIT, Spain)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Montero, Luis G., E-mail: luisgonzaga.garcia@upm.e [Dept. Forest Engineering, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Montes, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Lopez, Elena, E-mail: elopez@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Monzon, Andres, E-mail: amonzon@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Otero Pastor, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.otero@upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research has been concerned with SEA as a procedure, and there have been relatively few developments and tests of analytical methodologies. The first stage of the SEA is the 'screening', which is the process whereby a decision is taken on whether or not SEA is required for a particular programme or plan. The effectiveness of screening and SEA procedures will depend on how well the assessment fits into the planning from the early stages of the decision-making process. However, it is difficult to prepare the environmental screening for an infrastructure plan involving a whole country. To be useful, such methodologies must be fast and simple. We have developed two screening tools which would make it possible to estimate promptly the overall impact an infrastructure plan might have on biodiversity and global warming for a whole country, in order to generate planning alternatives, and to determine whether or not SEA is required for a particular infrastructure plan.

  15. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Waste Disposition Activities at the Paducah Site Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1339), which is incorporated herein by reference, for proposed disposition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site (Paducah Site) in Paducah, Kentucky. All of the wastes would be transported for disposal at various locations in the United States. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment with in the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  17. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

  18. Environmental impact assessment practices in the sub-Saharan Africa: cases from Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngunjiri, P.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim for this research is to review environmental impact assessment (EIA) practices in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing upon appropriate theoretical and methodological work on EIA. This study uses a comparative evaluation method to examine the extent of environmental impact assessment (EIA) in project analysis. It uses site and services low cost housing projects from Kenya. The research has three major components: (1) review of environmental practice in Sub-Saharan Africa through literature review and case studies; (2) review of general literature on EIA as practiced by international agencies and developed countries; and (3) formulation of more suitable guidelines for EIA procedures in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  19. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

  20. Environmental assessment for the salvage/demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the US Department of Energy`s proposed action: the salvage/demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants and steam distribution piping. Impact information will be used by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. The proposed action involves the salvage and demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Are, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping, equipment, and ancillary facilities. Activities include the salvaging and recycling of all materials, wastes, and equipment where feasible, with waste minimization efforts utilized.

  1. Revision of three-stakeholder signaling game for environmental impact assessment in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pu Xiao [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Cheng Hongguang, E-mail: chg@bnu.edu.c [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Gong Li; Hao Fanghua [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Qi Ye [School of Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University No. 1, Qinghuayuan Street, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since environmental impact assessment (EIA) regulations were adopted in China 30 years ago, the implementation rate of EIA policies for development projects has been steadily increasing while national environmental quality keeps deteriorating. This contradiction prevents achievement of the goals that the regulations were originally created for, raising concerns regarding the EIA implementation process. One of the objectives of EIA is the evaluation of socio-economic costs introduced by various commercial activities. However, independent economic entities are inclined to break away from these cost related responsibilities, making it necessary for government agencies and EIA organizations to participate in the evaluation process. The practice of avoiding costs may also bring forth other issues, such as rent-seeking behavior and conspiracies. Reducing private costs and the tendency of the three EIA stakeholders to evade social responsibility are intertwined in every EIA process. Their activities are as follows: The government is the lawmaker whose attitude toward the EIA organization determines how business owners react in the EIA process. The government inclination can be interpreted as a signal from which enterprises can determine the nature of the government, which helps the enterprise owners formulate their future actions. A similar relationship also exists among the government, EIA organizations, and enterprise entities. Fundamentally, the correlations between the EIA stakeholders are determined by their socio-economic situation, namely, the economic costs and benefits they encounter. In this article, signaling game theory derived from the classic game theory is applied to describe the EIA process in China by analyzing the activities of the stakeholders and searching for game equilibrium solutions. The optimal reaction schema for stakeholders was obtained by transforming the equilibrium.

  2. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  3. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2010 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2010 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 DRAFT The radiological dose assessment assures stakeholders that BNL facilities and operations are in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations and the public is protected. The potential radiological dose to members of the public

  4. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 BNL's annual radiological dose assessment assures stakeholders that on-site facilities and BNL operations are in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, and that the public is protected. The potential radiological dose

  5. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 BNL's annual radiological dose assessment assures stakeholders that on-site facilities and BNL operations are in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, and that the public is protected. The potential radiological dose

  6. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2011 Site environmental report8-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2011 Site environmental report8-1 BNL's annual radiological dose assessment assures stakeholders that on-site facilities and operations are in compliance with federal, state and local regulations, and that the public is protected. The potential radiological dose to members

  7. Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size of the local living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size on the quantification of the exposure level in a surface defined as the subject's exposure area. For residential residential buildings. Twelve noise exposure indicators have been used to assess inhabitants' exposure

  8. Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of the DP Road Tract to the County of Los Alamos. Predecisional Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide the DOE with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether or not to transfer its ownership of the subject land tract by deed. This type of action does not in and of itself result in environmental effects; however, the DOE has considered the planned use of the land and the ensuing potential environmental effects subsequent to the transfer of ownership in its decision making process. Therefore, DOE is evaluating its decision in light of the contemplated land use as outlined by County officials that could only occur if the DOE decides to transfer its ownership of the subject land tract. The objectives of this EA are (1) to describe the baseline environmental conditions at the tract location involved in the Proposed Action, (2) to analyze potential generic effects to the baseline environment from land development activities and future occupants' operations occurring at the tract location, and (3) to identify and characterize cumulative effects of future anticipated uses of the tract involved in the Proposed Action together with those of surrounding properties. In addition, the EA provides DOE with environmental information that would be used in preparing appropriate notices which would serve to preserve the integrity of the human environment and natural ecosystems should the DOE decide to proceed with the Proposed Action.

  9. Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to determine the adequate level of power plant controls or adequate levels of ambient air pollution and strives only to determine the specific impacts of large-scale PHEV...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical conditions of the site must be determined. An engineering test plan for evaluation of plant design

  11. Environmental value assessment in a multidisciplinary EIA setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikstad, Lars [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: lars.erikstad@nina.no; Lindblom, Inge [Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU), Box 736, Sentrum NO-0105 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: inge.lindblom@niku.no; Jerpasen, Gro [Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU), Box 736, Sentrum NO-0105 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: gro.jerpasen@niku.no; Hanssen, Martin A. [Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research (NIBR), Box 44 Blindern, NO-0313 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: martin.hanssen@nibr.no; Bekkby, Trine [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: trine.bekkby@niva.no; Stabbetorp, Odd [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: odd.stabbetorp@nina.no; Bakkestuen, Vegar [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway); Department of Botany, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo P.O. Box 1172 Blindern, NO-0318 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: vegar.bakkestuen@nina.no

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Value assessment is a central element in an EIA for the understanding of the impacts of specified projects. The value assessment contains subjective elements and this may cause errors and difficulties in numeric value assessment methods. There is a need for transparent common criteria to promote discussion and understanding. A common criteria base already exists, but lack of communication between different management systems and different disciplines, all with different traditions in value assessment, makes the situation complex. In this article we have looked into the basic understanding of value linked to the investigation themes of natural environment, cultural heritage and society. The investigation themes linked to social science is difficult to incorporate into a common system, basically because they have less focus on land use and contain different value types. Much of the relevant literature about value assessment is linked to the assessment of sites of special interest as candidates for legal protection or conservation. In an EIA a much broader range of areas is introduced, including the 'every day landscape' with a lower and more general level of value. Together with a focus on mitigation and adjustments of plans, this results in a need for a more detailed value assessment scale than is normally in use today. We have suggested a new scale to ease communication between different disciplines and management systems. How we understand value is not constant over time, nor is the level of knowledge. This makes it necessary to sustain an ongoing debate on value assessment. The need for a dynamic value assessment system increases with the increasing use of database modelling, digital analysis of map data (GIS) etc. Lack of a ongoing value debate will rapidly lead to misleading and biased results.

  12. Assessing environmental benefits and economic costs of aviation environmental policy measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the recent global economic downturn, longer term growth is anticipated for aviation with an increasing environmental impact, specifically in the areas of noise, air quality, and climate change. To ensure sustainable ...

  13. Analytical strategic environmental assessment (ANSEA) developing a new approach to SEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalkmann, Holger; Herrera, Rodrigo Jiliberto; Bongardt, Daniel

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of analytical strategic environmental assessment (ANSEA) is to provide a decision-centred approach to the SEA process. The ANSEA project evolved from the realisation that, in many cases, SEA, as currently practised, is not able to ensure an appropriate integration of environmental values. The focus of SEA is on predicting impacts, but the tool takes no account of the decision-making processes it is trying to influence. At strategic decision-making levels, in turn, it is often difficult to predict impacts with the necessary exactitude. The decision-making sciences could teach some valuable lessons here. Instead of focusing on the quantitative prediction of environmental consequences, the ANSEA approach concentrates on the integration of environmental objectives into decision-making processes. Thus, the ANSEA approach provides a framework for analysing and assessing the decision-making processes of policies, plans and programmes (PPP). To enhance environmental integration into the decision-making process, decision windows (DW) can be identified. The approach is designed to be objective and transparent to ensure that environmental considerations are taken into account, or--from an ex-post perspective--to allow an evaluation of how far environmental considerations have been integrated into the decision-making process under assessment. The paper describes the concepts and the framework of the ANSEA approach and discusses its relation to SEA and the EC Directive.

  14. EA-1570: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy activities associated with constructing and operating facilities for a new neutrino physics research program called NOvA. DOE has determined that the proposed action...

  15. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. Environmental compliance assessment protocol - federal aviation administration (ECAP-FAA). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, D.K.; Schell, D.J.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the growing number of environmental laws and regulations worldwide, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has adopted an environmental compliance program that identifies compliance problems before they are cited as violations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). In 1992, the FAA developed a program to maintain compliance with all Federal, state, and local environmental regulations. The goal is to protect human health/safety and the environment. The Southern Region of the FAA, which includes eight states and the Caribbean, developed and implemented a specific environmental assessment and management program tailored to the type and size of their facilities and operations. The resulting system combines Federal environmental regulations, along with good management practices and risk management information, into a series of checklists that show (1) legal requirements and (2) which specific items or operations to review. In 1994, the program was implemented nationwide. The Environmental Compliance Assessment Protocol - Federal Aviation Administration (ECAP-FAA) incorporates existing checklists from USEPA and private industry. The system has been tested at several FAA facilities. The manual is updated continually to address new environmental compliance laws and regulations.

  17. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  18. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.; Pan, V.

    1995-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 42st set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLII) that were received on or before June 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  19. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

  20. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 43rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIII) that were received on or before December 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  1. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

  2. Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  3. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

  4. Draft Environmental Assessment for NorthStar | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office ofDepartment of EnergyAdministration Environmental

  5. Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Dark Matter, Wimps and Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovationEnvironment,682 Environmental405Astrophysics

  6. EA-1709: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E TDrew Bittner56:1:4:Final EnvironmentalFinding7:8:Final

  7. EA-0821: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy5-FEB. 15, 2007 REVISED CONTINUING21: Final Environmental

  8. EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy5-FEB. 15, 2007 REVISED69: Final Environmental0:10:2:

  9. EA-1356: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy5-FEB. 15, 2007 REVISED69: Final5: Final Environmental56:

  10. EA-1929: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy5-FEB. 15,5: Mitigation AttachmentDraft EnvironmentalFinal

  11. Assessment of Environmental Impacts of Shell GTL Fuel | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |AquionMr.August 4,Energy Environmental

  12. EA-1573: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 219Does3-E6: Finding73: Final Environmental

  13. The application of strategic environmental assessment in a non-mandatory context: Regional transport planning in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGimpsey, Paul, E-mail: paul.mcgimpsey@urs.com [URS, St. George's House, 5 St. George's Road, London SW19 4DR (United Kingdom)] [URS, St. George's House, 5 St. George's Road, London SW19 4DR (United Kingdom); Morgan, Richard K., E-mail: rkm@geography.otago.ac.nz [Department of Geography, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is no legal mandate for strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in New Zealand. However, a requirement to consider environmental and sustainability issues is a key feature of many statutes, including that relating to regional transport planning. Given this, the research sought to determine whether SEA could be used to improve the incorporation of environmental and sustainability aspects into the regional transport planning process in New Zealand. Existing practice was evaluated, examining what factors currently limiting the consideration of environmental and sustainability issues and to what extent elements of SEA are currently being used. The research culminated in the development of a conceptual model where SEA elements could be incorporated into the existing framework to promote improved consideration of environmental and sustainability issues. The results provide some reassurance about the value of SEA even where its application is not legally mandated. However, it also highlighted some ongoing issues around the integration of SEA in existing frameworks and around the scope of SEA as a decision-aiding tool. -- Highlights: • The research examined whether SEA can provide benefits even where it is not mandated. • The research examined the extent to which SEA elements are currently being used. • A conceptual model was developed to incorporate necessary SEA elements into an existing framework.

  14. assess environmental contamination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to determine potential effects associated with the proposed Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leaks during OTEC operations -Survey existing literature tosurvey of international law of the sea applicable to OTEC operations;operations -Conduct laboratory tests to determine the effects of varying levels of biocide use on marine ecosystems -Survey

  16. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  17. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment and a floodplain/wetlands assessment are included as part of this EA. This report and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

  18. Environmental Management Assessment of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the CEBAF Site Office; the CEBAF management and operating contractor (M&O), Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA); the Oak Ridge Field Office (OR); and the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Office, the Office of Energy Research (ER). The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 8 through March 19, 1993, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` and Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN)-6E-92, ``Departmental Organizational and Management Arrangements,`` establish the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities which serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  19. Disappearing rivers — The limits of environmental assessment for hydropower in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erlewein, Alexander, E-mail: erlewein@sai.uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mountain rivers of the Indian Himalaya possess a vast potential for hydropower generation. After decades of comparatively modest development recent years have seen a major intensification in the construction of new hydropower dams. Although increasingly portrayed as a form of renewable energy generation, hydropower development may lead to extensive alterations of fluvial systems and conflicts with resource use patterns of local communities. To appraise and reduce adverse effects is the purpose of statutory Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) and corresponding mitigation plans. However, in the light of ambitious policies for hydropower expansion conventional approaches of environmental assessment are increasingly challenged to keep up with the intensity and pace of development. This paper aims to explore the systemic limitations of environmental assessment for hydropower development in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. Based on a qualitative methodology involving interviews with environmental experts, document reviews and field observations the study suggests that the current practice of constraining EIAs to the project level fails to address the larger effects of extensive hydropower development. Furthermore, it is critically discussed as to what extent the concept of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) might have the potential to overcome existing shortcomings.

  20. Environmental determinants of unscheduled residential outages in the electrical power distribution of Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    service. The reliability of electrical power is important because many other infrastructures are directly of the electric power distribution infrastructure. There are many studies on the vulnerability of infrastructuresEnvironmental determinants of unscheduled residential outages in the electrical power distribution

  1. Environmental assessment for presidential permit applications for Baja California Power Inc and Sempra Energy Resources PP-234 and PP-235

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental assessment for presidential permit applications for Baja California Power Inc and Sempra Energy Resources. December 2001 PP-234 and PP-235

  2. A method for the assessment of changes in environmental perception during an EIA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterlin, Monika [Institute for Water of the Republic of Slovenia, Hajdrihova 28c, Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: monika.peterlin@guest.arnes.si; Kross, Burton C. [Management Resources Network Inc., 6933 Sedgwick, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Kontic, Branko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in environmental perception during an EIA process among the general population (the public) and employees of the Port of Koper were measured. The method of measurement addresses the statistical significance of the influence of the content, form, mode, providers of environmental information, institutional constraint and other factors. Opinions about environmental issues were collected in both groups prior to and after the provision of information in the EIA process. The difference formed the basis for an assessment of how environmental information provided during an EIA process contributes to environmental perception. The results show that difference in opinions about the impact of the Port between the two groups became smaller when comparing the first and second survey. In relation to the opinions of the employees, institutional constraint was recognised.

  3. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

  4. Geopressured geothermal resource of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast: a technology characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usibelli, A.; Deibler, P.; Sathaye, J.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two aspects of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal resource: (1) the technological requirements for well drilling, completion, and energy conversion, and, (2) the environmental impacts of resource exploitation are examined. The information comes from the literature on geopressured geothermal research and from interviews and discussions with experts. The technology characterization section emphasizes those areas in which uncertainty exists and in which further research and development is needed. The environmental assessment section discusses all anticipated environmental impacts and focuses on the two largest potential problems: (a) subsidence and (b) brine disposal.

  5. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  6. Environmental impact assessment by means of a procedure based on fuzzy logic: A practical application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peche, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.peche@ehu.es; Rodriguez, Esther, E-mail: esther.rodriguez@ehu.e

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study shows the practical application of the EIA method based on fuzzy logic proposed by the authors (Peche and Rodriguez, 2009) to a simplified case of study-the activity of a petrol station throughout its exploitation. The intensity (p{sub 1}), the extent (p{sub 2}) and the persistence (p{sub 3}) were the properties selected to describe the impacts and their respective assessment functions v-bar{sub i}=f(p-bar{sub i}) were determined. The main actions (A) and potentially affected environmental factors (F) were selected. Every impact was identified by a pair A-F and the values of the three impact properties were estimated for each of them by means of triangular fuzzy numbers. Subsequently, the fuzzy estimation of every impact was carried out, the estimation of the impact A{sub 1}-F{sub 2} (V-bar{sub 1}) being explained in detail. Every impact was simultaneously represented by its corresponding generalised confidence interval and membership function. Since the membership functions of all impacts were similar to triangular fuzzy numbers, a triangular approach (TA) was used to describe every impact. A triangular approach coefficient (TAC) was introduced to quantify the similarity of each fuzzy number and its corresponding triangular approach, where TAC (V-bar) element of (0, 1] and TAC being 1 when the fuzzy number is triangular. The TACs-ranging from 0.96 to 0.99-proved that TAs were valid in all cases. Next, the total positive and negative impacts-TV-bar{sup +} and TV-bar{sup -} were calculated and later, the fuzzy value of the total environmental impact TV-bar was determined from them. Finally, the defuzzification of TV-bar led to the punctual impact estimator TV{sup (1)} = -88.50 and its corresponding uncertainty interval [{delta}{sub l}(TV-bar),{delta}{sub r}(TV-bar)]=[6.52,6.96], which represent the total value of the EI. In conclusion, the EIA method enabled the integration of heterogeneous impacts, which exerted influence on environmental factors of a very diverse nature in very different ways, into a global impact indicator.

  7. EA-1941: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinal EA to assess the

  8. EA-1942: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinal EA to assess

  9. EA-1942: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinal EA to assessCove

  10. EA-1973: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPA issued aSunflowerfinal EA that assesses

  11. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eunyoung, E-mail: eykim@kei.re.kr [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wonkyong, E-mail: wksong79@gmail.com [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongkun, E-mail: dklee7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should consider the distances at which impacts occur in the vicinity of the forest ecosystem, and these considerations should include the impacts on forest vegetation and bird species. Impacts can be mitigated by considering the distances at which these influences occur. In particular, this paper presents an integrated environmental impact assessment system to be applied in the SEIA process. The integrated assessment system permits the assessment of the cumulative impacts of land development on multiple scales. -- Highlights: • The model is to assess the impact of forest fragmentation across multiple scales. • The paper suggests the type of forest fragmentation on a regional scale. • The type can be used to evaluate the location and size of a land development. • The paper shows the influence distance of land development on a local scale. • The distance can be used to mitigate the impact at an EIA process.

  12. Sitewide Environmental Assessment for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1974 authorized a federal program to develop solar energy as a viable source of the nation`s future energy needs. Under this authority, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was created as a laboratory of the Department of Energy (DOE) to research a number of renewable energy possibilities. The laboratory conducts its operations both in government-owned facilities on the NREL South Table Mountain (STM) Site near Golden, Colorado, and in a number of leased facilities, particularly the Denver West Office Park. NREL operations include research in energy technologies, and other areas of national environmental and energy technology interest. Examples of these technologies include electricity from sunlight with solar cells (photovoltaics); energy from wind (windmills or wind turbines); conversion of plants and plant products (biomass) into liquid fuels (ethanol and methanol); heat from the sun (solar thermal) in place of wood, oil, gas, coal and other forms of heating; and solar buildings. NREL proposes to continue and expand the present R&D efforts in C&R energy by making infrastructure improvements and constructing facilities to eventually consolidate the R&D and associated support activities at its STM Site. In addition, it is proposed that operations continue in current leased space at the present levels of activity until site development is complete. The construction schedule proposed is designed to develop the site as rapidly as possible, dependent on Congressional funding, to accommodate not only the existing R&D that is being conducted in leased facilities off-site but to also allow for the 20-year projected growth. Impacts from operations currently conducted off-site are quantified and added to the cumulative impacts of the STM site. This environmental assessment provides information to determine the severity of impacts on the environment from the proposed action.

  13. Evaluation of the environmental impact assessment system in Syria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haydar, F., E-mail: firashaydar@yahoo.co [Rural Development Division, National Agricultural Policy Center, Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, Airport Highway, 5th Bridge, Damascus, 4251 (Syrian Arab Republic); Pediaditi, K., E-mail: kalliapediaditi@hotmail.co [Department of Environmental Management, Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Chania, Alsylion Agrokepion, Chania, P.O. Box 185, 73100, Crete (Greece)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Syria is a country experiencing rapid change, undergoing a process of political and governance decentralisation, opening its markets to the private sector, and experiencing a rise in infrastructure development. In light of these economic growth targeted changes, knowledge of the status and capacity of the Syrian EIA system to ensure environmental protection becomes of paramount importance. Syria first introduced EIA as a Draft Decree in 1995, which was not formally adopted until 2008. To date, no structured evaluation of Syria's EIA system has been conducted, a knowledge gap addressed through this paper. The research presented herein comprises a review and comparative evaluation of Syrian legislation and procedures, to the EU EIA Directive and World Bank Operational Directive, as well as a series of interviews with Syrian stakeholders involved in EIA implementation. The investigation concluded that the new EIA provisions provide a sound legal basis. From interviews however, it was ascertained that EIA implementation faces a number of barriers such as, a lack of EIA integration into existing decision making and licensing processes and persistent exclusion of public projects from EIA. A number of recommendations are proposed, perceived necessary for the enhancement of EIA implementation in Syria.

  14. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor development. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) is a unique and innovative coal-fueled technology that has the potential to meet these conditions and provide heat and/or process steam to small industrial, commercial, institutional and residential complexes. The potential of Pulse Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (PAFBC) technology has been amply demonstrated under the sponsorship of a previous DOE/METC contract (DE-AC21-88MC25069). The environmental performance of a coal-fired laboratory-scale system (1.5 million British Thermal Units per hour) (MMBtu/hr) significantly surpassed that of conventional bubbling and circulating fluidized-bed combustion units (see Table 1 for performance comparison). Prompted by these encouraging results in combustion, sulfur capture, emissions control, and enhanced heat transfer, Island Creek Coal Company (ICC) and Baltimore Thermal Energy Corporation expressed interest in the technology and offered to participate by providing host sites for field testing. EA`s have been submitted independently for each of these field test sites. This submission addresses the preliminary testing of the PAFBC unit at Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International`s (MTCI) Baltimore, MD facility.

  15. Integration of Life Cycle Assessment into Environmental Process Engineering Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Benko

    I would like to thank my supervisor Prof. Dr. Peter Mizsey for his guidance and support during the course of this research. I am grateful for his encouragement and for giving me an opportunity to use all the facilities available at the Department of Chemical and Environmental Process Engineering. I would like to thank Dr. Daniela Jacob and the colleagues at the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology for their help and support in the field of atmospheric simulations and modelling during my visit at the Institute in Hamburg, Germany. I also would like to thank Professor Sandor Kemeny for his help with statistical problems. Moreover, I would like to thank all the colleagues at the department, especially to Mrs. Gabriella Ling-Mihalovics, for helping me even with technical, scientific, and intellectual questions, and for maintaining a friendly and family atmosphere at the department. I am forever indebted to my parents, my brother Peter, and Viola for encouraging and supporting my studies and helping me get through the difficulties I encountered.

  16. Environmental assessment of advanced thin film manufacturing process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, D.W.; Mopas, E.; Skinner, D. [BP Solar, Inc., Fairfield, CA (United States); McGuire, L.; Strehlow, M. [Radian International, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed by BP Solar, Inc., to provide an extensive preproduction analysis of waste-stream abatement at its plant in Fairfield, California. During the study, numerous technologies were thoroughly evaluated, which allowed BP Solar to select systems that outperformed the stringent federal and state regulations. The main issues were originally perceived to be controlling cadmium compound releases to both air and wastewater to acceptable levels and adopting technologies for air and water waste streams in an efficient, cost-effective manner. BP Solar proposed high-efficiency, reliable control equipment that would reduce air-contaminant emission levels below levels of concern. Cadmium telluride dust is successfully controlled with high-efficiency (>99.9%) bag-in/bag-out filters. For air abatement, carbon canisters provide efficient VOC reduction, and wastewater pretreatment is required per federal pretreatment standards. BP Solar installed a cadmium-scavenging ion exchange system and electrowinning system capable of removing cadmium to <10 ppb (local publicly-owned-treatment-works limits for cadmium is 30 ppb). BP Solar plans to maximize potential reuse of rinse waters by phasing in additional wastewater treatment technologies. Finally, the work to date has identified the areas that need to be revisited as production scales up to ensure that all health, safety, and environmental goals are met.

  17. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  18. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

  19. Efficiency, Economic and Environmental Assessment of Ground-Source Heat Pumps in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumsack, Seth

    the potential for significant energy savings [1]. The performance of ground-source heat pumps for residential1 Efficiency, Economic and Environmental Assessment of Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Central, the efficiency gain for the ground-source heat pump compared to electricity is 43% for cooling and 81

  20. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a ground water compliance strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Durango, Colorado. DOE has prepared this environmental assessment to provide the public with information concerning the potential effects of this proposed strategy.

  1. Probabilistic risk assessment course documentation. Volume 7. Environmental transport and consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Alpert, D.J.; Burke, R.P.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Kaiser, G.D.; Runkle, G.E.; Woodard, K.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consequence models have been designed to assess health and economic risks from potential accidents at nuclear power plants. These models have been applied to an ever increasing variety of problems with ever increasing demands to improve modeling capabilities and provide greater realism. This course discusses the environmental transport of postulated radiological releases and the elements and purpose of accident consequence evaluation.

  2. Environmental assessment of a BOF steel slag used in road construction: The ECLAIR research program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Abstract Steel production generates great amounts of by-products as steel slag. Unlike blast furnace slag silicates. No real toxicity effect of seepage waters has been revealed from eco-toxicological tests carried, environmental assessment. Introduction Steelmaking slag includes blast furnace iron slag, and electric arc

  3. Environmental Assessment of Pavement Alternatives: Decision-Making in Light of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    = Energy W = Waste P = Pollution = Transport Recycle 9 #12;The Pavement Life Cycle Materials EndEnvironmental Assessment of Pavement Alternatives: Decision-Making in Light of Current Knowledge · Measures inputs and outputs of a product or system ­ Example inputs: energy, water, materials ­ Example

  4. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  5. Public participation and environmental impact assessment: Purposes, implications, and lessons for public policy making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran, E-mail: Ciaran.Ofaircheallaigh@griffith.edu.a [Department of Politics and Public Policy, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years the need to enhance public participation in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and the efficacy of alternative mechanisms in achieving this goal, have been central themes in the EIA literature. The benefits of public participation are often taken for granted, and partly for this reason the underlying rationale for greater public participation is sometimes poorly articulated, making it more difficult to determine how to pursue it effectively. The reasons for seeking public participation are also highly diverse and not always mutually consistent. There has been limited analysis of the implications of different forms and degrees of public participation for public decision making based on EIA, and little discussion of how experience with public participation in EIA relates to debates about participation in policy making generally. This paper distinguishes various purposes for public participation in EIA, and discusses their implications for decision making. It then draws on some general models of public participation in policy making to consider how approaches to participation in EIA can be interpreted and valued, and asks what EIA experience reveals about the utility of these models. It argues that the models pay insufficient attention to the interaction that can occur between different forms of public participation; and to the fact that public participation raises issues regarding control over decision making that are not subject to resolution, but must be managed through ongoing processes of negotiation.

  6. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.

  7. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  8. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

  9. Integrated farm sustainability assessment for the environmental management of rural activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stachetii Rodrigues, Geraldo, E-mail: stacheti@cnpma.embrapa.b [Embrapa Labex Europe, Agropolis International, Avenue Agropolis, 34394, Montpellier (France); Aparecida Rodrigues, Izilda, E-mail: isis@cnpma.embrapa.b [Environmental Management Laboratory, Embrapa Environment, Rodovia SP340, km 127.5, Jaguariuna (SP), CEP 13820-000 (Brazil); Almeida Buschinelli, Claudio Cesar de, E-mail: buschi@cnpma.embrapa.b [Environmental Management Laboratory, Embrapa Environment, Rodovia SP340, km 127.5, Jaguariuna (SP), CEP 13820-000 (Brazil); Barros, Inacio de, E-mail: indebarros@antilles.inra.f [INRA, Unite de Recherche Agropedoclimatique da la Zone Caraibe, Domaine Duclos, 97170 Petit-Bourg (France)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Farmers have been increasingly called upon to respond to an ongoing redefinition in consumers' demands, having as a converging theme the search for sustainable production practices. In order to satisfy this objective, instruments for the environmental management of agricultural activities have been sought out. Environmental impact assessment methods are appropriate tools to address the choice of technologies and management practices to minimize negative effects of agricultural development, while maximizing productive efficiency, sound usage of natural resources, conservation of ecological assets and equitable access to wealth generation means. The 'system for weighted environmental impact assessment of rural activities' (APOIA-NovoRural) presented in this paper is organized to provide integrated farm sustainability assessment according to quantitative environmental standards and defined socio-economic benchmarks. The system integrates sixty-two objective indicators in five sustainability dimensions - (i) Landscape ecology, (ii) Environmental quality (atmosphere, water and soil), (iii) Sociocultural values, (iv) Economic values, and (v) Management and administration. Impact indices are expressed in three integration levels: (i) specific indicators, that offer a diagnostic and managerial tool for farmers and rural administrators, by pointing out particular attributes of the rural activities that may be failing to comply with defined environmental performance objectives; (ii) integrated sustainability dimensions, that show decision-makers the major contributions of the rural activities toward local sustainable development, facilitating the definition of control actions and promotion measures; and (iii) aggregated sustainability index, that can be considered a yardstick for eco-certification purposes. Nine fully documented case studies carried out with the APOIA-NovoRural system, focusing on different scales, diverse rural activities/farming systems, and contrasting spatial/territorial contexts, attest to the malleability of the method and its applicability as an integrated farm environmental management tool.

  10. Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 2. Environmental control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, W.; Hill, J. (eds.)

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental control technologies are essential elements to be included in the overall design of Imperial Valley geothermal power systems. Environmental controls applicable to abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions, cooling tower drift, noise, liquid and solid wastes, and induced subsidence and seismicity are assessed here. For optimum abatement of H{sub 2}S under a variety of plant operating conditions, removal of H{sub 2}S upstream of the steam turbine is recommended. The environmental impact of cooling tower drift will be closely tied to the quality of cooling water supplies. Conventional noise abatement procedures can be applied and no special research and development are needed. Injection technology constitutes the primary and most essential environmental control and liquid waste disposal technology for Imperial Velley geothermal operations. Subsurface injection of fluids is the primary control for managing induced subsidence. Careful maintenance of injection pressure is expected to control induced seismicity. (MHR)

  11. Environmental assessment for the A-01 outfall constructed wetlands project at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed A-01 outfall constructed wetlands project at the Savannah River site (SRS), located near aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include the construction and operation of an artificial wetland to treat effluent from the A-01 outfall located in A Area at SRS. The proposed action would reduce the outfall effluent concentrations in order to meet future outfall limits before these go into effect on October 1, 1999. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021).

  12. Environmental Modeling and Assessment (2005) 10:6379 DOI 10.1007/s10666-004-4267-z Springer 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risbey, James S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Modeling and Assessment (2005) 10:63­79 DOI 10.1007/s10666-004-4267-z Springer 2005 Application of a checklist for quality assistance in environmental modelling to an energy model James Risbey a present considerable challenges to develop and test. Uncertainty assessments of such models provide only

  13. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessmentUse of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research SUSAN K. MAXWELLa , JAYMIE R. MELIKERb AND PIERRE GOOVAERTSc a U.S. Geological

  14. Environmental assessment for proposed energy conservation standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) on the candidate energy conservation standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1500 through 1508. The proposed energy conservation standard (Level 1) and the alternative standards are being reviewed in an energy-efficiency standards rulemaking that the Department has undertaken pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act. The EA presents the associated environmental impacts from four energy conservation standards for this type of household appliance. For purposes of this EA, each standard is an alternative action and is compared to what is expected to happen if no new standards for this type of product were finalized, i.e., the no action alternative. Of the four energy conservation standard levels considered, standard level 4 has the highest level of energy efficiency and the largest environmental impact. The proposed action implementing Standard Level 1 would have the least environmental impacts, through emission reductions, of the four alternatives. The description of the standards results from the appliance energy-efficiency analyses conducted for the rulemaking. The presentation of environmental impacts for each of the alternatives appears at Section 3 of the EA.

  15. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

  16. Mid-Columbia Coho Salmon Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State) Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) decides whether to fund a program to reintroduce coho salmon to mid-Columbia River basin tributaries, research is needed to determine the ecological risks and biological feasibility of such an effort. Since the early 1900s, the native stock of coho has been decimated in the tributaries of the middle reach of the Columbia River. The four Columbia River Treaty Tribes identified coho reintroduction in the mid-Columbia as a priority in the Tribal Restoration Plan. It is a comprehensive plan put forward by the Tribes to restore the Columbia River fisheries. In 1996, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) recommended the tribal mid-Columbia reintroduction project for funding by BPA. It was identified as one of fifteen high-priority supplementation projects for the Columbia River basin, and was incorporated into the NPPC`s Fish and Wildlife Program. The release of coho from lower Columbia hatcheries into mid-Columbia tributaries is also recognized in the Columbia River Fish Management Plan.

  17. Applying an improved rapid impact assessment matrix method to strategic environmental assessment of urban planning in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei, E-mail: weili@bnu.edu.cn; Xie, Yuanbo, E-mail: former_007@163.com; Hao, Fanghua, E-mail: fanghua@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has become an increasingly important decision-support tool for providing information on the environmental implications of a policy, plan, or program. The goal is to safeguard the environment and promote sustainable development at the strategic level. Despite major progress in implementing SEA practices internationally, developing countries, such as China, often lag behind in applying SEA methodology. Lack of available data and time constraints arising from tight schedules create problems. The rapid impact assessment matrix (RIAM) is a potential resource for breaking through such difficulties. Our analysis of RIAM applications suggested that it could become a tool for evaluating strategic alternatives because of its applicability in interdisciplinary settings, its transparency, and its short implementation timeframe. To make it more suitable for the SEA context, we have developed two major improvements to the conventional RIAM process: assignment of weights to assessment indicators and the development of an integrated environmental assessment score (IES). The improved RIAM process was employed in an SEA of the development plan for the Nansha District in Guangzhou, the capital city of Guangdong Province in China. It was used to assess five alternatives for development in Wanqingsha (WQS), a subunit of Nansha, where important ecological resources are located and where industrial development could impact the air quality in the neighboring Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). The evaluation identified WQS-A04 as the preferred alternative. This alternative involved a minimal amount of industrial development – 10% compared with the most intense development alternative – and included important wetland preservation plans. The assessment results have been incorporated into the officially approved development plan for Nansha. The improved RIAM methodology is well adapted to the technical aims of SEA and decision-making structures in China. It offers the potential for delivering timely and quality results to decision-making processes. To achieve the desired efficiency, it is recommended that an SEA procedure take into account findings acquired from an improved RIAM application at an early stage, then, at a later stage, results from more comprehensive assessments conducted using more sophisticated methods should be added, if time and data are available. - Highlights: • RIAM is a potential SEA tool due to its multidisciplinary setting and rapid process. • Weighting index and computing IES are raised for improving RIAM when applied to SEAs. • The improved RIAM boosts SEA effectiveness by timely responding to decision-making. • The improved RIAM is more suitable to an SEA bothered by tight time or data shortage. • The improved RIAM adapts to the technical aims of SEA and decision features in China.

  18. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

  19. Life cycle assessment of the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besnainou, J.; Landfield, A. [Ecobalance, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, environmental issues have become an increasing priority for both government and industry alike. In the U.S. as well as in Europe, the emphasis has gradually shifted from a site specific focus to a product specific focus. For this reason, tools are needed to scientifically assess the overall environmental performance of products and/or industrial systems. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) belongs to that category of tools, and is used to perform this study. In numerous industrial countries, LCA is now recognized, and is rapidly becoming the tool of preference, to successfully provide quantitative and scientific analyses of the environmental impacts of industrial systems. By providing an unbiased analysis of entire systems, LCA has shown that the reality behind widely held beliefs regarding {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} issues, such as reusable vs. one way products, and {open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} vs. synthetic products, were far more complex than expected, and sometimes not as {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} as assumed. This paper describes the modeling and assumptions of an LCA, commissioned by the Integrated Waste Services Association (IWSA), that summarizes the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities, and compares them to the environmental emissions generated by major combustible energy sources of the northeast part of the United States (NE). The geographical boundary for this study is, therefore, the NE US.

  20. Life cycle assessment as an analytical tool in strategic environmental assessment. Lessons learned from a case study on municipal energy planning in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjoerklund, Anna, E-mail: annab@abe.kth.se

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is explored as an analytical tool in strategic environmental assessment (SEA), illustrated by case where a previously developed SEA process was applied to municipal energy planning in Sweden. The process integrated decision-making tools for scenario planning, public participation and environmental assessment. This article describes the use of LCA for environmental assessment in this context, with focus on methodology and practical experiences. While LCA provides a systematic framework for the environmental assessment and a wider systems perspective than what is required in SEA, LCA cannot address all aspects of environmental impact required, and therefore needs to be complemented by other tools. The integration of LCA with tools for public participation and scenario planning posed certain methodological challenges, but provided an innovative approach to designing the scope of the environmental assessment and defining and assessing alternatives. - Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LCA was explored as analytical tool in an SEA process of municipal energy planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process also integrated LCA with scenario planning and public participation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Benefits of using LCA were a systematic framework and wider systems perspective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration of tools required some methodological challenges to be solved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This proved an innovative approach to define alternatives and scope of assessment.

  1. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF OKLAHOMA ABANDONED DRILLING AND PRODUCTION SITES AND ASSOCIATED PUBLIC EDUCATION/OUTREACH ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Terry

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has participated with the Oklahoma Energy Resource Board (OERB) since 1995 by providing grant funding for on-going work in both environmental assessment of abandoned oilfield exploration and production sites and associated public education/outreach activities. The OERB, a state agency created in 1993 by the Oklahoma legislature, administers programs funded by an assessment of one tenth of one percent on all oil and natural gas produced and sold in the state of Oklahoma. Approximately one half of the funds are used to assess and remediate abandoned oilfield sites and the other half are being used to educate about the importance of the oil and natural gas industry and OERB's environmental efforts. Financial participation through grant funding by the U.S. D.O.E. has been $200,000 annually which represents approximately 3 percent of OERB's private funding. Most of OERB's revenues come from an assessment of 1/10th of 1% on the sale of crude and natural gas in Oklahoma. The assessment is considered voluntary in that any interest owner may ask for a refund annually of their contributions to the fund. On average, 95% of the assessment dollars have remained with OERB, which shows tremendous support by the industry. This Final Report summarizes the progress of the three year grant. The purpose of this three-year project was to continue the progress of the OERB to accomplish its environmental and educational objectives and transfer information learned to other organizations and producing states in the industry.

  3. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of future opportunities in enhanced communications services. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the baseline environmental conditions at the proposed power line location, (2) analyze the potential effects to the existing environment from construction, operation, and maintenance of a new power line, and (3) compare the effects of the Proposed Action and the four action alternatives to the No Action Alternative. In addition, the EA provides DOE with environmental information that could be used in developing mitigative actions to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the integrity of the human environment and natural ecosystems should DOE decide to proceed with construction and operation of the new power line. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA and this EA is to aid DOE officials in making decisions based on understanding the environmental consequences of their decision.

  4. Environmental impact assessment in Colombia: Critical analysis and proposals for improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toro, Javier, E-mail: jjtoroca@unal.edu.c [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Requena, Ignacio, E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.e [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain); Zamorano, Montserrat, E-mail: zamorano@ugr.e [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Campus de Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) systems is a highly recommended strategy for enhancing their effectiveness and quality. This paper describes an evaluation of EIA in Colombia, using the model and the control mechanisms proposed and applied in other countries by Christopher Wood and Ortolano. The evaluation criteria used are based on Principles of Environmental Impact Assessment Best Practice, such as effectiveness and control features, and they were contrasted with the opinions of a panel of Colombian EIA experts as a means of validating the results of the study. The results found that EIA regulations in Colombia were ineffective because of limited scope, inadequate administrative support and the inexistence of effective control mechanisms and public participation. This analysis resulted in a series of recommendations regarding the further development of the EIA system in Colombia with a view to improving its quality and effectiveness.

  5. Scenario analysis in environmental impact assessment: Improving explorations of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duinker, Peter N. [School for Resource and Environmental Studies, Faculty of Management, Dalhousie University, 6100 University Ave., Halifax, NS, B3H 3J5 (Canada)]. E-mail: peter.duinker@dal.ca; Greig, Lorne A. [ESSA Technologies Ltd., 77 Angelica Avenue, Richmond Hill, ON, L4S 2C9 (Canada)]. E-mail: lgreig@essa.com

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenarios and scenario analysis have become popular approaches in organizational planning and participatory exercises in pursuit of sustainable development. However, they are little used, at least in any formal way, in environmental impact assessment (EIA). This is puzzling because EIA is a process specifically dedicated to exploring options for more-sustainable (i.e., less environmentally damaging) futures. In this paper, we review the state of the art associated with scenarios and scenario analysis, and describe two areas where scenario analysis could be particularly helpful in EIA: (a) in defining future developments for cumulative effects assessment; and (b) in considering the influence of contextual change - e.g. climate change - on impact forecasts for specific projects. We conclude by encouraging EIA practitioners to learn about the promise of scenario-based analysis and implement scenario-based methods so that EIA can become more effective in fostering sustainable development.

  6. Treatability studies for uranium and plutonium contaminated soils using physical separation methods. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Field Office of the Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has stated in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) Site Specific Plan for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that DOE/NV is committed to achieving compliance with all applicable environmental laws, regulations, guidelines, and agreements covering operations at the NTS. The primary DOE/NV objective identified by the Site-Specific Plan is to comply with all laws and regulations aimed at protecting human health and the environment. These include Nevada statutes and regulations which may be applicable, including federally delegated authorities. This environmental assessment discusses limited bench-scale soil treatability testing of physical processes for decontamination of plutonium- and uranium-contaminated soil. The proposed location of these studies would be the Treatability Testing Facility (TTF), Building 3124 at Test Cell ``All in Area 25 of the NTS.

  7. Submitted to Environmental and Ecological Statistics A Methodology for Assessing Departure of Current Plant Communities from Historical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Brian

    Submitted to Environmental and Ecological Statistics 1 A Methodology for Assessing Departure of this strategy is the assessment of departure of current plant communities from historical conditions across Federal lands. Assessing departure is a difficult problem because of very limited spatial coverage of data

  8. Solid-phase extraction preconcentration and radiometric determination of strontium radionuclides in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malofeeva, G.I.; Danilova, T.V.; Petrukhin, O.M.; Spivakov, B.Ya. [Vernadskii Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of strontium radionuclides in environmental samples often require preconcentration. In many cases, it is necessary to preconcentrate from large volumes of sample solutions containing predominant amounts of alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and the enrichment factors in the procedure must be high. Problems of this kind can be efficiently solved by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE). Until recently, coordinatively saturated metal chelates were the only compounds employed in the SPE method. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the possibility of using cationic metal complexes for metal preconcentration in the form of ion associates, taking the system strontium-dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6)-ion-pairing reagent as an example. The metal distribution ratio depends on many parameters, and the prescribed adsorption conditions must be strictly met to achieve complete recovery. A procedure for {sup 90} Sr preconcentration is developed and is applicable to analysis of environmental samples and certain foodstuffs.

  9. Compilation of Quality Assurance Documentation for Analyses Performed for the Resumption of Transient Testing Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a companion document to the analyses performed in support of the environmental assessment for the Resumption of Transient Fuels and Materials Testing. It is provided to allow transparency of the supporting calculations. It provides computer code input and output. The basis for the calculations is documented separately in INL (2013) and is referenced, as appropriate. Spreadsheets used to manipulate the code output are not provided.

  10. A method of assessment of environmental impacts on remote campsites at Lake Ouachita

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Jeffrey James

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Scope of Investigation This study examined recreational activity and the resulting changes in the environment (impacts) at a water based recreation area. The findings of this study are~ generalizable only to areas where conditions, both physically... (Chairman of Committee) E ward Heat (Member) De 1 ma r nke (Nembe r ) Leslie M. Reid (Head of Department) May 1983 111 ABSTRACT A Nethod of Assessment of Environmental Impacts on Remote Campsites at Lake Ouachita. (Nay 1983) Jeffrey James Kuhl, B...

  11. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  12. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    room on August 19, 2009. The following issues were discussed: 1. Removal and replacement of cattle guards and concerns with cattle crossing to the adjacent pasture. 2....

  13. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    regulated structures will be provided to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Air Pollution Control Program on the Department's form at least 10 days prior to...

  14. Environmental Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or threatened or endangered species, although lowered national water use and reduced air pollution could have a positive impact, if any at all. This action is not expected to...

  15. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed overhead power line construction project (Sand Dunes to Ochoa, in Eddy and Lea Counties, New Mexico) will supply additional electric power to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and involve construction of a new electric substation at WIPP. This would provide a redundant electrical power source to WIPP. A finding of no significant impact is made.

  16. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebbaEnvironment...Work

  17. Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

  18. Quality control and the substantive influence of environmental impact assessment in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poeloenen, Ismo [University of Joensuu, Department of Law, P.O. Box 111, 80101 Joensuu (Finland)]. E-mail: Ismo.Polonen@joensuu.fi

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the challenges concerning the quality assurance of environmental impact statements (EIS) in Finland and the European Union. Moreover, the linkage between environmental impact assessment and decision-making is examined from a legal point of view. In addition, the paper includes some comparative remarks concerning the content requirements of examination of alternatives. The study reveals that a significant problem of the Finnish EIA system is the lack of efficient access to a judicial procedure to challenge the quality and completeness of an EIS. Another pitfall is the fact that in certain permit procedures, environmental consideration is so limited that only a minor part of the EIA can be taken into account. In its current state, EIA legislation in the EU and in Finland does not guarantee that the assessment results filter into decision-making. From the national point of view, the shortcomings can be addressed by amending current legislation concerning licensing procedures so that authorities have the competence and the duty to take environmental matters widely into account in the permit consideration. At the European level, a legislative alternative could be to strengthen the substantive element of the EIA Directive (85/337/EEC). This would increase the weight of EIA related arguments in the national appellate procedures and contribute, in some cases significantly, to the substantive influence of EIA in decision-making.

  19. Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

  20. Environmental Assessment on the leasing of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, St. James Terminal, St. James Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease the Strategic Petroleum Reserve`s (SPR) St. James Terminal to private industry. The St. James Terminal consists of six storage tanks, a pumping station, two maine docks and ancillary facilities. DOE believes that the St. James Terminal presents an opportunity to establish a government- industry arrangement that could more effectively use this asset to serve the nations`s oil distribution needs, reduce the operational cost of the SPR, and provide a source of revenue for the Government. DOE solicited interest in leasing its distribution facilities in a notice published March 16, 1994. In response, industry has expressed interest in leasing the St. James Terminal, as well as several DOE pipelines, to enhance the operation of its own facilities or to avoid having to construct new ones. Under such a lease, industry use would be subordinate to DOE use in the event of a national energy emergency. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed leasing operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) OF 1969 and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).