National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination temporal characterization

  1. Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics ... the northern GOM (http:www.boem.govOil-and-Gas-Energy-ProgramMapping- and-Data...

  2. Characterization of dynamic microgyroscopes by use of temporal digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Fujun; He Xiaoyuan; Quan Chenggen

    2006-10-20

    The advanced mechanical testing of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is necessary to provide feedback of measurements that can help the designer optimize MEMS structures and improve the reliability and stability of MEMS. We describe a digital image correlation (DIC) method for dynamic characterization of MEMS using an optical microscope with a high-speed complementary metal oxide semiconductor-based camera. The mechanical performance of a series of microgyroscopesis tested. The DIC method is employed to measure the microgyroscope in-plane displacement with subpixel accuracy. Use of the DIC method is less restrictive on the surface quality of the specimen and simplifies the measurement system. On the basis of a series of temporal digital images grabbed by a high-speed camera, the stability characteristic of the microgyroscopes is analyzed. In addition, the quality factors of the microgyroscopes are determined and agree well with other experimental methods.

  3. Characterization and Simulation of Transient Vibrations Using Band Limited Temporal Moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, David O.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described to characterize shocks (transient time histories) in terms of the Fourier energy spectrum and the temporal moments of the shock passed through a contiguous set of band pass filters. The product model is then used to generate of a random process as simulations that in the mean will have the same energy and moments as the characterization of the transient event.

  4. Single-shot high-resolution characterization of optical pulses by temporal phase diversity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dorrer, C.; Waxer, L. J.; Kalb, A.; Hill, E. M.; Bromage, J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of temporal phase diversity is proposed and applied to the temporal characterization of optical pulses. The experimental trace is composed of the measured power of a plurality of ancillary optical pulses derived from the pulse under test by adding known amounts of chromatic dispersion. The spectral phase of the pulse under test is retrieved by minimizing the error between the experimental trace and a trace calculated from the optical spectrum using the known diagnostic parameters. An assembly composed of splitters and dispersive delay fibers has been used to generate 64 ancillary pulses whose instantaneous power can be detectedmore »in a single shot with a high-bandwidth photodiode and oscilloscope. Pulse-shape reconstruction for pulses shorter than the photodetection impulse response has been demonstrated.The diagnostic is experimentally shown to accurately characterize pulses from a chirped-pulse–amplification system when its stretcher is detuned from the position for optimal recompression. Various investigations of the performance with respect to the number of ancillary pulses and the range of chromatic dispersion generated in the diagnostic are presented.« less

  5. Listed waste determination report. Environmental characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    On September 23, 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice clarifying interim status requirements for the management of radioactive mixed waste thereby subjecting the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and other applicable Department of Energy (DOE) sites to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Therefore, the DOE was required to submit a Part A Permit application for each treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) unit within the INEL, defining the waste codes and processes to be regulated under RCRA. The September 1990 revised Part A Permit application, that was approved by the State of Idaho identified 101 potential acute and toxic hazardous waste codes (F-, P-, and U- listed wastes according to 40 CFR 261.31 and 40 CFR 261.33) for some TSD units at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Most of these waste were assumed to have been introduced into the High-level Liquid Waste TSD units via laboratory drains connected to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) evaporator (PEW system). At that time, a detailed and systematic evaluation of hazardous chemical use and disposal practices had not been conducted to determine if F-, P-, or Unlisted waste had been disposed to the PEW system. The purpose of this investigation was to perform a systematic and detailed evaluation of the use and disposal of the 101 F-, P-, and Unlisted chemicals found in the approved September 1990 Part A Permit application. This investigation was aimed at determining which listed wastes, as defined in 40 CFR 261.31 (F-listed) and 261.33 (P & Unlisted) were discharged to the PEW system. Results of this investigation will be used to support revisions to the RCRA Part A Permit application.

  6. Characterizing temporal repetition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cukierman, D.; Delgrande, J.

    1996-12-31

    We are investigating the representation and reasoning about schedulable, repeated activities, specified using calendars. Examples of such activities include meeting every Tuesday and Thursday during a semester and attending a seminar every first day of a month. This research provides for a valuable framework for scheduling systems, financial systems and, in general, date-based systems. Very recently work has been done related to reasoning about repetition in the Artificial Intelligence community and others. A partial reference list is provided here. However, to our knowledge no extensive taxonomy of repetition has been proposed in the literature. We believe that reasoning about repeated activities calls for a study and precise definition of the topological characteristics in a repetitive series. In this abstract we summarize a proposal to classify types of repetition according to parameters. The combination of all possible values of these parameters provides a complete taxonomy of repetitive classes with respect to the proposed parameters. Several notions of repetition are considered, some are extremely general, some are very specific.

  7. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-30

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska�s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska�s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009

  8. Temporal characterization of a time-compensated monochromator for high-efficiency selection of extreme-ultraviolet pulses generated by high-order harmonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poletto, L.; Villoresi, P.; Benedetti, E.; Ferrari, F.; Stagira, S.; Sansone, G.; Nisoli, M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast extreme-ultraviolet pulses are spectrally selected by a time-delay-compensated grating monochromator. The intrinsic very short duration of the pulses is obtained by exploiting the high-order harmonic generation process. The temporal characterization of the harmonic pulses is obtained using a cross-correlation method: pulses as short as 8 fs are measured at the output of the monochromator in the case of the 23rd harmonic. This value is in agreement with the expected duration of such pulses, indicating that the influence of the monochromator is negligible. The photon flux has been measured with a calibrated photodiode, pointing out the good efficiency of the monochromator, derived by the exploitation for the two gratings of the conical diffraction mounting.

  9. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol; Macelloni, Leonardo; D'Emidio, Marco; Dunbar, John; Higley, Paul

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  10. Characterizing the three-orbital Hubbard model with determinant quantum Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kung, Y. F.; Chen, C. -C.; Wang, Yao; Huang, E. W.; Nowadnick, E. A.; Moritz, B.; Scalettar, R. T.; Johnston, S.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2016-04-29

    Here, we characterize the three-orbital Hubbard model using state-of-the-art determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) simulations with parameters relevant to the cuprate high-temperature superconductors. The simulations find that doped holes preferentially reside on oxygen orbitals and that the (π,π) antiferromagnetic ordering vector dominates in the vicinity of the undoped system, as known from experiments. The orbitally-resolved spectral functions agree well with photoemission spectroscopy studies and enable identification of orbital content in the bands. A comparison of DQMC results with exact diagonalization and cluster perturbation theory studies elucidates how these different numerical techniques complement one another to produce a more complete understandingmore » of the model and the cuprates. Interestingly, our DQMC simulations predict a charge-transfer gap that is significantly smaller than the direct (optical) gap measured in experiment. Most likely, it corresponds to the indirect gap that has recently been suggested to be on the order of 0.8 eV, and demonstrates the subtlety in identifying charge gaps.« less

  11. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determinants of Household Use of Selected Energy Star Appliances May 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Determinants of Household Use of Selected Energy Star Appliances i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

  12. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zweiacker, K.; McKeown, J. T.; Liu, C.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.

    2016-08-04

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of themore » metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ~1.3 m s–1 to ~2.5 m s–1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s–1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. As a result, using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.« less

  13. Determination of Elastic Properties and Characterization of Thermal Barrier Coatings using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical properties of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are extremely important to engine design. However, the determination of these properties is often difficult because of the unique and complicated microstructure of the coatings. In this presentation the determination of the elastic constants of plasma sprayed Yttria stabilized Zirconia thermal barrier coatings using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy will be described along with an analysis that enables the determination of the elastic constants as a function of temperature and coating direction. In this work, results on the following issues will be discussed: 1) the elastic anisotropy of thermal barrier coatings, which is associated with coating failure modes; 2) sintering effects on coating compliance comparing with thermal behavior, which is important to coating performance on engineering structures, such as turbine engines; 3) coating elastic modulus at high temperatures close to the service condition, which provides insights of coating mechanical behavior in both fundamental and practical studies.

  14. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

  15. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. Throughout the project, however, we learned that this strategy was impractical because the different data and model are complementary instead of competitive. For the complex Coalinga field, we found that a thorough understanding of the reservoir evolution through geologic times provides the necessary framework which ultimately allows integration of the different data and techniques.

  16. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walls, Joel; Taner, M. Turhan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2006-08-08

    A method for seismic characterization of subsurface Earth formations includes determining at least one of compressional velocity and shear velocity, and determining reservoir parameters of subsurface Earth formations, at least including density, from data obtained from a wellbore penetrating the formations. A quality factor for the subsurface formations is calculated from the velocity, the density and the water saturation. A synthetic seismogram is calculated from the calculated quality factor and from the velocity and density. The synthetic seismogram is compared to a seismic survey made in the vicinity of the wellbore. At least one parameter is adjusted. The synthetic seismogram is recalculated using the adjusted parameter, and the adjusting, recalculating and comparing are repeated until a difference between the synthetic seismogram and the seismic survey falls below a selected threshold.

  17. An experimental comparison of laboratory techniques in determining bulk properties of tuffaceous rocks; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J. III; Price, R.H.

    1994-04-01

    Samples of tuffaceous rock were studied as part of the site characterization for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. These efforts were scoping in nature, and their results, along with those of other investigations, are being used to develop suitable procedures for determining bulk properties of tuffaceous rock in support of thermal and mechanical properties evaluations. Comparisons were made between various sample preparation, handling, and measurement techniques for both zeolitized and nonzeolitized tuff in order to assess their effects on bulk property determinations. Laboratory tests included extensive drying regimes to evaluate dehydration behavior, the acquisition of data derived from both gas and water pycnometers to compare their suitability in determining grain densities, a comparison of particle size effects, and a set of experiments to evaluate whole core saturation methods. The results affirm the added complexity of these types of measurements where there is a zeolite component in the sample mineralogy. Absolute values for the bulk properties of zeolitized tuff are immeasurable due to the complex nature of their dehydration behavior. However, the results of the techniques that were investigated provide a basis for the development of preferred, consistent methods for determining the grain density, dry and saturated bulk densities, and porosity of tuffaceous rock, including zeolitic tuff in support of thermal and mechanical properties evaluations.

  18. Novel Imaging Techniques, Integrated with Mineralogical, Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization to Determine the Biogeochemical Controls....

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2005-06-01

    conditions on the stability/solubility of Fe(II) and Tc(IV), found 80 % resolubilization of the Tc. Column experiments exploring this behavior are being planned. HYPOTHESIS 4 The mobility of 99mTc in the sediment columns can be modeled using a coupled speciation and transport code. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of the column experiments is ongoing and transport and geochemical modeling experiments are being planned.

  19. Kinetic Characterization of Strongly Coupled Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapek, C. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.; Samsonov, D.

    2007-01-05

    We propose a simple method to determine the local coupling strength {gamma} experimentally, by linking the individual particle dynamics with the local density and crystal structure of a 2D plasma crystal. By measuring particle trajectories with high spatial and temporal resolution we obtain the first maps of {gamma} and temperature at individual particle resolution. We employ numerical simulations to test this new method, and discuss the implications to characterize strongly coupled systems.

  20. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  1. Program development to identify and characterize potential emergency situations at a petroleum refinery and determination of industrial hygiene emergency responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oransky, J.J.; Delp, S.N.; Deppen, E.A.; Barrett, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the modern world the field of industrial hygiene continues to grow beyond the traditional definition of the profession. This case study documents the problem solving approach used to identify potential exposures and evaluate industrial hygiene preparedness to handle emergencies due to fire or major spill at a complex multi-process petroleum refinery. In the recent past an environmental engineer and industrial hygiene consulting firm was retained by a mature, multi-process petroleum refinery to assist in the program development to identify and characterize potential emergency situations due to a fire, major release, or spill. This study would assist the refinery in compliance with the process safety and emergency response standards and to protect refinery operations and fire fighting personnel by minimizing potential exposures and risk when responding to such a major incident.

  2. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  3. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  4. Temporal Scattering And Response

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-12-15

    TSAR2.3 (Temporal Scattering and Response) is a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics code suite. TSAR2.3 is a software package for simulating the interactions of electromagnetic waves with linear materials through the use of the finite-difference time-domain method. The code suite contains grid generation, grid verification, input-file creation and post-processing utilities. The physics package, written in Fortran 77, can be pre-processed to run on many different architectures including Cray, Vax and many Unix workstations. Tools are provided tomore » easily port the code to new computers. The physics package is an efficient, flexible electromagnetic simulator. A body under study can be represented as a three-dimensional grid of materials with arbitrary linear properties. This grid can be simulated in a number of ways including incident plane waves, dipoles, and arbitrary incident fields. The grid can be terminated with numerous boundary conditions including free-space radiation, electric conductor, or magnetic conductor. Projection to the far-field in both the time and frequency domains is possible. This distribution includes make files for installing and maintaining the entire code suite.« less

  5. CX-001436: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane SeepageCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.8Date: 04/06/2010Location(s): AlaskaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. The detection and characterization of natural fractures using P-wave reflection data, multicomponent VSP, borehole image logs and the in-situ stress field determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured tight gas reservoir, using surface seismic methods, borehole imaging logs, and in-situ stress field data. Further, the project aims to evaluate the various seismic methods as to their effectiveness in characterizing the fractures, and to formulate the optimum employment of the seismic methods as regards fracture characterization.

  7. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half

  8. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Energy and Environment Tool (STREET) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spatially and Temporally Resolved Energy and Environment Tool (STREET) Model (University of California-Irvine) Objectives Determine the number of strategically located hydrogen fueling stations needed within a geographic area to enable the introduction of commercial volumes of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs), and determine the geographic distribution of the required stations while also assessing the environmental impacts. Key Attributes & Strengths Optimized hydrogen fueling station

  9. Uranium in soils integrated demonstration site characterization at Fernald, Ohio. Report of uranium concentrations in soil determined by in situ LA-ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.; Zamzow, D.; Bajic, S.J.

    1993-02-02

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry was used for in situ determination of uranium and thorium concentrations in soil at 80 sampling sites in the Sewage Treatment Plant area. This work was performed by the Environmental Technology Development Program of the Ames Laboratory using a completely self-contained mobile laboratory. This laboratory, the mobile demonstration laboratory for environmental screening technologies and the robotic sampling accessory, were designed and constructed by the Ames Laboratory during FY 1992. The instrumentation is capable of analyzing each sample for twenty operator-defined elements simultaneously. Using the MDLEST/RSA, the uranium concentrations in the soil at the 80 sampling sites were found to range from <20 parts-per-million (ppM)(<13.5 pCi/g) to 303 ppM (205 pCi/g). The 95% confidence interval for these field determined values range from 80 to 110 ppM. Bore hole samples from two sites were analyzed. No measurable uranium concentration was detected below the one foot depth. Seven samples taken from sites within an area currently under remediation were analyzed and found to contain uranium concentrations ranging from 101 ppM (68.3 pCi/g) to 788 ppM (532 pCi/g). Soil samples were taken from twelve of the 80 sampling sites in the field, using conventional sampling techniques. These samples were prepared by microwave digestion, using the wet chemistry capability in the MDLEST, and field analyzed using solution nebulization ICP-AES. The laboratory procedure followed for microwave digestion required the samples to be diluted by a factor of 100. This dilution resulted in uranium intensities too low to be accurately quantitated in the field. Optimization of the instrumentation and sample preparation will make this field capability useful in determining near real-time the soil matrix, and enable the performance of this quality assurance process in the field with greater sensitivity and accuracy.

  10. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  11. SWiFT site atmospheric characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee; Ennis, Brandon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Historical meteorological tall tower data are analyzed from the Texas Tech University 200 m tower to characterize the atmospheric trends of the Scaled Wind Farm Technologies (SWiFT) site. In this report the data are analyzed to reveal bulk atmospheric trends, temporal trends and correlations of atmospheric variables. Through this analysis for the SWiFT turbines the site International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) classification is determined to be class III-C. Averages and distributions of atmospheric variables are shown, revealing large fluctuations and the importance of understanding the actual site trends as opposed to simply using averages. The site is significantly directional with the average wind speed from the south, and particularly so in summer and fall. Site temporal trends are analyzed from both seasonal (time of the year) to daily (hour of the day) perspectives. Atmospheric stability is seen to vary most with time of day and less with time of year. Turbulence intensity is highly correlated with stability, and typical daytime unstable conditions see double the level of turbulence intensity versus that experienced during the average stable night. Shear, veer and atmospheric stability correlations are shown, where shear and veer are both highest for stable atmospheric conditions. An analysis of the Texas Tech University tower anemometer measurements is performed which reveals the extent of the tower shadow effects and sonic tilt misalignment.

  12. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations This document was used to determine facts and conditions ...

  13. Union Temporal de Empresas UTE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal de Empresas UTE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Union Temporal de Empresas (UTE) Place: Spain Sector: Solar Product: Developer of PV solar parks. References: Union...

  14. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  15. Tank waste characterization basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.M.

    1996-08-09

    This document describes the issues requiring characterization information, the process of determining high priority tanks to obtain information, and the outcome of the prioritization process. In addition, this document provides the reasoning for establishing and revising priorities and plans.

  16. TEMPORAL SELF-ORGANIZATION IN GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a relation between the number of star formation (SF) peaks per unit time, ?{sub peak}, and the size of the temporal smoothing window function, ?t, used to define the peaks: ?{sub peak}??t {sup 1} {sup –} {sup ?} (? ? 1.618). This relation holds over the range of ?t = 10-1000 Myr that can be reliably computed here, using a large sample of galaxies obtained from a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. This means that the temporal distribution of SF peaks in galaxies as a population is fractal with a Hausdorff fractal dimension equal to ? – 1. This finding reveals, for the first time, that the superficially chaotic process of galaxy formation is underlined by temporal self-organization up to at least one gigayear. It is tempting to suggest that, given the known existence of spatial fractals (such as the power-law two-point function of galaxies), there is a joint spatio-temporal self-organization in galaxy formation. From an observational perspective, it will be urgent to devise diagnostics to probe the SF histories of galaxies with good temporal resolution to facilitate a test of this prediction. If confirmed, it would provide unambiguous evidence for a new picture of galaxy formation that is interaction driven, cooperative, and coherent in and between time and space. Unravelling its origin may hold the key to understanding galaxy formation.

  17. Electrically actuatable temporal tristimulus-color device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1992-01-01

    The electrically actuated light filter operates in a cyclical temporal mode to effect a tristimulus-color light analyzer. Construction is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of a high-speed movable mirror pair and cyclically powered electrical actuators. When combined with a single vidicon tube or a monochrome solid state image sensor, a temporally operated tristimulus-color video camera is effected. A color-generated is accomplished when constructed with a companion light source and is a flicker-free colored-light source for transmission type display systems. Advantages of low cost and small physical size result from photolithographic batch-processing manufacturability.

  18. Spatio-temporal Visualization for Environmental Decision Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Sorokine, Alexandre; Ganguly, Auroop R.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional visualization of earth surface features has been addressed through visual exploration, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of observable geospatial data. However, characterizing the changes in their observable and unobservable properties of geospatial features is critical for planning and policy formulation. Recent approaches are addressing modeling and visualization of the temporal dynamics that describe observed and/or predicted physical and socioeconomic processes using vast volumes of earth observation (imagery and other geophysical) data from remote sensor networks. This paper provides an overview of selected geospatial modeling and simulation, exploratory analysis of earth observation data, and high performance visualization research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for developing novel data driven approaches for geospatial knowledge discovery and visualization relevant to environmental decision support.

  19. A representation for efficient temporal reasoning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgrande, J.P.; Gupta, A.

    1996-12-31

    It has been observed that the temporal reasoning component in a knowledge-based system is frequently a bottleneck. We investigate here a class of graphs appropriate for an interesting class of temporal domains and for which very efficient algorithms for reasoning are obtained, that of series-parallel graphs. These graphs can be used for example to model process execution, as well as various planning or scheduling activities. Events are represented by nodes of a graph and relationships are represented by edges labeled by {le} or <. Graphs are composed using a sequence of series and parallel steps (recursively) on series-parallel graphs. We show that there is an O(n) time preprocessing algorithm that allows us to answer queries about the events in O(l) time. Our results make use of a novel embedding of the graphs on the plane that is of independent interest. Finally we argue that these results may be incorporated in general graphs representing temporal events by extending the approach of Gerevini and Schubert.

  20. What is the temporal analog of reflection and refraction of optical beams?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-10-28

    It is shown numerically and analytically that when an optical pulse approaches a moving temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes, it undergoes a temporal equivalent of reflection and refraction of optical beams at a spatial boundary. The main difference is that the role of angles is played by changes in the frequency. The frequency dependence of the dispersion of the material in which the pulse is propagating plays a fundamental role in determining the frequency shifts experienced by the reflected and refracted pulses. As a result, our analytic expressions for these frequency shifts allow us to find themore » condition under which an analog of total internal reflection may occur at the temporal boundary.« less

  1. What is the temporal analog of reflection and refraction of optical beams?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-10-28

    It is shown numerically and analytically that when an optical pulse approaches a moving temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes, it undergoes a temporal equivalent of reflection and refraction of optical beams at a spatial boundary. The main difference is that the role of angles is played by changes in the frequency. The frequency dependence of the dispersion of the material in which the pulse is propagating plays a fundamental role in determining the frequency shifts experienced by the reflected and refracted pulses. As a result, our analytic expressions for these frequency shifts allow us to find the condition under which an analog of total internal reflection may occur at the temporal boundary.

  2. MEASURING TEMPORAL PHOTON BUNCHING IN BLACKBODY RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, P. K.; Poh, H. S.; Kurtsiefer, C.; Yeo, G. H.; Chan, A. H. E-mail: phyck@nus.edu.sg

    2014-07-01

    Light from thermal blackbody radiators such as stars exhibits photon bunching behavior at sufficiently short timescales. However, with available detector bandwidths, this bunching signal is difficult to observe directly. We present an experimental technique to increase the photon bunching signal in blackbody radiation via spectral filtering of the light source. Our measurements reveal strong temporal photon bunching from blackbody radiation, including the Sun. This technique allows for an absolute measurement of the photon bunching signature g {sup (2)}(0), and thereby a direct statement on the statistical nature of a light source. Such filtering techniques may help revive the interest in intensity interferometry as a tool in astronomy.

  3. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance characterization efforts within the SunShot Systems Integration activities focus on collaborations with U.S. solar companies to:

  4. Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Operational Sea States Wave Environmental Characterization at Wave Test Sites The water power industry lacks a single information source with a well-documented and consistent ...

  5. Modeling Temporal Behavior in Large Networks: A Dynamic Mixed-Membership Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, R; Gallagher, B; Neville, J; Henderson, K

    2011-11-11

    Given a large time-evolving network, how can we model and characterize the temporal behaviors of individual nodes (and network states)? How can we model the behavioral transition patterns of nodes? We propose a temporal behavior model that captures the 'roles' of nodes in the graph and how they evolve over time. The proposed dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is scalable, fully automatic (no user-defined parameters), non-parametric/data-driven (no specific functional form or parameterization), interpretable (identifies explainable patterns), and flexible (applicable to dynamic and streaming networks). Moreover, the interpretable behavioral roles are generalizable, computationally efficient, and natively supports attributes. We applied our model for (a) identifying patterns and trends of nodes and network states based on the temporal behavior, (b) predicting future structural changes, and (c) detecting unusual temporal behavior transitions. We use eight large real-world datasets from different time-evolving settings (dynamic and streaming). In particular, we model the evolving mixed-memberships and the corresponding behavioral transitions of Twitter, Facebook, IP-Traces, Email (University), Internet AS, Enron, Reality, and IMDB. The experiments demonstrate the scalability, flexibility, and effectiveness of our model for identifying interesting patterns, detecting unusual structural transitions, and predicting the future structural changes of the network and individual nodes.

  6. Collector/Receiver Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities for collector/receiver characterization: determining optical efficiency, measuring heat loss, developing and testing concentrators, concentrating the sun's power, and optically characterizing CSP plants.

  7. Analysis of brain patterns using temporal measures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-08-11

    A set of brain data representing a time series of neurophysiologic activity acquired by spatially distributed sensors arranged to detect neural signaling of a brain (such as by the use of magnetoencephalography) is obtained. The set of brain data is processed to obtain a dynamic brain model based on a set of statistically-independent temporal measures, such as partial cross correlations, among groupings of different time series within the set of brain data. The dynamic brain model represents interactions between neural populations of the brain occurring close in time, such as with zero lag, for example. The dynamic brain model can be analyzed to obtain the neurophysiologic assessment of the brain. Data processing techniques may be used to assess structural or neurochemical brain pathologies.

  8. Materials Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Researchers in the Materials Characterization Research competency conduct studies of both natural and engineered materials from the micropore (nanometers) to macropore (meters) scale. Research includes, but is not limited to, thermal, chemical, mechanical, and structural (nano to macro) interactions and processes with regard to natural and engineered materials. The primary research investigation tools include SEM, XRD, micro XRD, core logging, medical CT, industrial

  9. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building Prev Next Title: Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental...

  10. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-resolution measurements...

  11. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distributio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions ...

  12. Use of volumetric features for temporal comparison of mass lesions in full field digital mammograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozek, Jelena Grgic, Mislav; Kallenberg, Michiel; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Temporal comparison of lesions might improve classification between benign and malignant lesions in full-field digital mammograms (FFDM). The authors compare the use of volumetric features for lesion classification, which are computed from dense tissue thickness maps, to the use of mammographic lesion area. Use of dense tissue thickness maps for lesion characterization is advantageous, since it results in lesion features that are invariant to acquisition parameters. Methods: The dataset used in the analysis consisted of 60 temporal mammogram pairs comprising 120 mediolateral oblique or craniocaudal views with a total of 65 lesions, of which 41 were benign and 24 malignant. The authors analyzed the performance of four volumetric features, area, and four other commonly used features obtained from temporal mammogram pairs, current mammograms, and prior mammograms. The authors evaluated the individual performance of all features and of different feature sets. The authors used linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross validation to classify different feature sets. Results: Volumetric features from temporal mammogram pairs achieved the best individual performance, as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A{sub z} value). Volume change (A{sub z} = 0.88) achieved higher A{sub z} value than projected lesion area change (A{sub z} = 0.78) in the temporal comparison of lesions. Best performance was achieved with a set that consisted of a set of features extracted from the current exam combined with four volumetric features representing changes with respect to the prior mammogram (A{sub z} = 0.90). This was significantly better (p = 0.005) than the performance obtained using features from the current exam only (A{sub z} = 0.77). Conclusions: Volumetric features from temporal mammogram pairs combined with features from the single exam significantly improve discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in FFDM mammograms

  13. Temporal Stability of Visual Search-Driven Biometrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Carmichael, Tandy; Tourassi, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have shown the potential of using an individual s visual search pattern as a possible biometric. That study focused on viewing images displaying dot-patterns with different spatial relationships to determine which pattern can be more effective in establishing the identity of an individual. In this follow-up study we investigated the temporal stability of this biometric. We performed an experiment with 16 individuals asked to search for a predetermined feature of a random-dot pattern as we tracked their eye movements. Each participant completed four testing sessions consisting of two dot patterns repeated twice. One dot pattern displayed concentric circles shifted to the left or right side of the screen overlaid with visual noise, and participants were asked which side the circles were centered on. The second dot-pattern displayed a number of circles (between 0 and 4) scattered on the screen overlaid with visual noise, and participants were asked how many circles they could identify. Each session contained 5 untracked tutorial questions and 50 tracked test questions (200 total tracked questions per participant). To create each participant s "fingerprint", we constructed a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) from the gaze data representing the underlying visual search and cognitive process. The accuracy of the derived HMM models was evaluated using cross-validation for various time-dependent train-test conditions. Subject identification accuracy ranged from 17.6% to 41.8% for all conditions, which is significantly higher than random guessing (1/16 = 6.25%). The results suggest that visual search pattern is a promising, fairly stable personalized fingerprint of perceptual organization.

  14. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurements & Characterization Home About Measurements & Characterization Analytical Microscopy Device Performance Measurement Electro-Optical Characterization Surface...

  15. CX-007894: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    894: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007894: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Wildlife Densities and Habitat Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Continental Shelf CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.2, B3.3, B3.16 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE is proposing to provide funding to Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) design and implement a research project to model wildlife densities and movements across spatial and temporal

  16. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  17. CX-010792: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-010792: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect - Task 8 CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08142013 ...

  18. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for determining formation quality factor ...

  19. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Hambarian, Artak

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  20. JANUS characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The JANUS Reactor was operated from 1965 to 1992. All of the fuel was removed and shipped offsite in 1993. To provide information for use in finalizing the planning for the decommissioning of the reactor, the Health Physics Section of Argonne National Laboratory performed a characterization of the facility in January and February 1996. The characterization included measurements for radioactivity, hazardous materials, lead in wall paint, and asbestos. Measurements and smear samples for surface contamination were collected from every wall, ceiling and floor of the facility. Samples to determine activity concentrations were collected from vertical and horizontal corings into the reactor shield and foundation, and from coring into walls of the high dose and low dose rooms. Soil samples were collected outdoors from two drill holes, one south and one north of the JANUS exhaust stack. The predominant radionuclides detected were {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The highest exposure rate was 175 mR/h at the center of the reactor core. No hazardous materials were found in pits or sumps. There are 20 identified areas with asbestos and 7 objects with lead based paint.

  1. Coping with temporal constraints in multimedia presentation planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andre, E.; Rist, T.

    1996-12-31

    Computer-based presentation systems enable the realization of effective and dynamic presentation styles that incorporate multiple media. Obvious examples are animated user interface agents which verbally comment on multimedia objects displayed on the screen while performing cross-media and cross-window pointing gestures. The design of such presentations must account for the temporal coordination of media output and the agent`s behavior. In this paper we describe a new presentation system which not only creates the multimedia objects to be presented, but also generates a script for presenting the material to the user. In our system, this script is forwarded to an animated presentation agent running the presentation. The paper details the kernel of the system which is a component for planning temporally coordinated multimedia.

  2. Detecting Temporal Precursor Words and Phrases Using a Learning Algorithm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Wavelet Analysis - Energy Innovation Portal Early Stage R&D Early Stage R&D Find More Like This Return to Search Detecting Temporal Precursor Words and Phrases Using a Learning Algorithm and Wavelet Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Most research on mammography focuses on image data, not textual reports. However, the reports associated with patient visits offer a valuable set of observations. To take advantage

  3. 1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.

    1989-07-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oregon Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Oregon. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 20, 2016 CX-100665 Categorical Exclusion Determination Model Validation and Site Characterization for Early Deployment Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Sites and Establishment of Wave Classification Scheme - Wave Instrumentation Deployment; NEPA Tracking No. 16-017 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: B3.16 National Renewable

  5. Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are the project presentations and respective peer reviewer comments for Reservoir Characterization.

  6. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Abstract Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs....

  7. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2012-08-28

    Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU

  8. Statistical Analysis of Demographic and Temporal Differences in LANL's 2014 Voluntary Protection Program Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Adam Christopher; Booth, Steven Richard

    2015-08-20

    Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) surveys were conducted in 2013 and 2014 to assess the degree to which workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory feel that their safety is valued by their management and peers. The goal of this analysis is to determine whether the difference between the VPP survey scores in 2013 and 2014 is significant, and to present the data in a way such that it can help identify either positive changes or potential opportunities for improvement. Data for several questions intended to identify the demographic groups of the respondent are included in both the 2013 and 2014 VPP survey results. These can be used to identify any significant differences among groups of employees as well as to identify any temporal trends in these cohorts.

  9. Plasmonic electromagnetic hot spots temporally addressed by photoinduced molecular displacement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan, M. L.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Vial, A.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Montgomery, J. M.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2009-04-23

    We report the observation of temporally varying electromagnetic hot spots in plasmonic nanostructures. Changes in the field amplitude, position, and spatial features are induced by embedding plasmonic silver nanorods in the photoresponsive azo-polymer. This polymer undergoes cis?trans isomerization and wormlike transport within resonant optical fields, producing a time-varying local dielectric environment that alters the locations where electromagnetic hot spots are produced. Finite-difference time-domain and Monte Carlo simulations that model the induced field and corresponding material response are presented to aid in the interpretation of the experimental results. Evidence for propagating plasmons induced at the ends of the rods is also presented.

  10. 1987 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.

    1990-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1987 and spatial patterns for 1987. The report investigates the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Data are from the Acid Deposition System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data which includes the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network, the Utility Acid Precipitation Study Program (UAPSP), the Canadian Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN), and the daily and 4-weekly Acidic Precipitation in Ontario Study (APIOS-D and APIOS-C). Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1987 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 39 sites over a 9-year (1979--1987) period and an expanded subset of 140 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 6-year (1982--1987) period. 68 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Longmire

    2002-09-01

    This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

  12. Temporal variation in the importance of a dominant consumer to stream nutrient cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Hill, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Animal excretion can be a significant nutrient flux within ecosystems, where it supports primary production and facilitates microbial decomposition of organic matter. The effects of excretory products on nutrient cycling have been documented for various species and ecosystems, but temporal variation in these processes is poorly understood. We examined variation in excretion rates of a dominant grazing snail, Elimia clavaeformis, and its contribution to nutrient cycling, over the course of 14 months in a well-studied, low-nutrient stream (Walker Branch, east Tennessee, USA). Biomass-specific excretion rates of ammonium varied over twofold during the study, coinciding with seasonal changes in food availabilitymore » (measured as gross primary production) and water temperature (multiple linear regression, R2 = 0.57, P = 0.053). The contribution of ammonium excretion to nutrient cycling varied with seasonal changes in both biological (that is, nutrient uptake rate) and physical (that is, stream flow) variables. On average, ammonium excretion accounted for 58% of stream water ammonium concentrations, 26% of whole-stream nitrogen demand, and 66% of autotrophic nitrogen uptake. Phosphorus excretion by Elimia was contrastingly low throughout the year, supplying only 1% of total dissolved phosphorus concentrations. The high average N:P ratio (89:1) of snail excretion likely exacerbated phosphorus limitation in Walker Branch. To fully characterize animal excretion rates and effects on ecosystem processes, multiple measurements through time are necessary, especially in ecosystems that experience strong seasonality.« less

  13. Temporal variation in the importance of a dominant consumer to stream nutrient cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Hill, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Animal excretion can be a significant nutrient flux within ecosystems, where it supports primary production and facilitates microbial decomposition of organic matter. The effects of excretory products on nutrient cycling have been documented for various species and ecosystems, but temporal variation in these processes is poorly understood. We examined variation in excretion rates of a dominant grazing snail, Elimia clavaeformis, and its contribution to nutrient cycling, over the course of 14 months in a well-studied, low-nutrient stream (Walker Branch, east Tennessee, USA). Biomass-specific excretion rates of ammonium varied over twofold during the study, coinciding with seasonal changes in food availability (measured as gross primary production) and water temperature (multiple linear regression, R2 = 0.57, P = 0.053). The contribution of ammonium excretion to nutrient cycling varied with seasonal changes in both biological (that is, nutrient uptake rate) and physical (that is, stream flow) variables. On average, ammonium excretion accounted for 58% of stream water ammonium concentrations, 26% of whole-stream nitrogen demand, and 66% of autotrophic nitrogen uptake. Phosphorus excretion by Elimia was contrastingly low throughout the year, supplying only 1% of total dissolved phosphorus concentrations. The high average N:P ratio (89:1) of snail excretion likely exacerbated phosphorus limitation in Walker Branch. To fully characterize animal excretion rates and effects on ecosystem processes, multiple measurements through time are necessary, especially in ecosystems that experience strong seasonality.

  14. Feature Characterization Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-03

    FCLib is a data analysis toolkit constructed to meet the needs of data discovery in large-scale, spatio-temporal data such as finite element simulation data. FCLib is a C library toolkit of building blocks that can be assembled into complex analyses. Important features of FCLib include the following: (1) Support of feature-based analysis, (2) minimization of low-oevel processing, (3) ease of use, and (4) applicable to the wide variety of science domains.

  15. Multiple soliton self-frequency shift cancellations in a temporally tailored photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lai; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qing; Gao, Xuejian; Qin, Guanshi E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn; Qin, Weiping E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn; Liao, Meisong; Hu, Lili; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2014-11-03

    We report the generation of multiple soliton self-frequency shift cancellations in a temporally tailored tellurite photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The temporally regulated group velocity dispersion (GVD) is generated in the fiber by soliton induced optical Kerr effect. Two red-shifted dispersive waves spring up when two Raman solitons meet their own second zero-dispersion-wavelengths in the PCF. These results show how, through temporally tailored GVD, nonlinearities can be harnessed to generate unexpected effects.

  16. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  17. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  18. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental...

  19. Renewable energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    1997-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describe the technical and economic status of the major emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  20. Battery Thermal Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxon, Aron; Powell, Mitchell; Shi, Ying

    2015-06-09

    This presentation provides an update of NREL's battery thermal characterization efforts for the 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Merit Reviews.

  1. Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Turner, D. L.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Nosé, M.; Koga, K.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-03-20

    Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ –40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within 10 min, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first one is a dispersionless, short-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a gradual dipolarization signature. We combined ground magnetometer data from various stations and in situ particle and magnetic field data from multiple satellites in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet to determine the spatial extent of these injections, their temporal evolution, and their effects in the inner magnetosphere. Our results indicate that there are different spatial and temporal scales at which injections can occur in the inner magnetosphere and depict the necessity of multipoint observations of both particle and magnetic field data in order to determine these scales.

  2. Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Turner, D. L.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Nosé, M.; Koga, K.; Rodriguez, J. V.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ –40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within 10 min, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first onemore » is a dispersionless, short-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a gradual dipolarization signature. We combined ground magnetometer data from various stations and in situ particle and magnetic field data from multiple satellites in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet to determine the spatial extent of these injections, their temporal evolution, and their effects in the inner magnetosphere. Our results indicate that there are different spatial and temporal scales at which injections can occur in the inner magnetosphere and depict the necessity of multipoint observations of both particle and magnetic field data in order to determine these scales.« less

  3. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 Existing Regulations B3.1: Site characterization and environmental monitoring Site characterization and environmental monitoring (including, but not limited to, siting, construction, modification, operation, and dismantlement and removal or otherwise proper closure (such as of a well) of characterization and monitoring devices, and siting, construction, and associated operation of a small-scale laboratory building or renovation of a room in an existing

  4. Spatio-temporal self-organization in mudstones.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewers, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Shales and other mudstones are the most abundant rock types in sedimentary basins, yet have received comparatively little attention. Common as hydrocarbon seals, these are increasingly being targeted as unconventional gas reservoirs, caprocks for CO2 sequestration, and storage repositories for waste. The small pore and grain size, large specific surface areas, and clay mineral structures lend themselves to rapid reaction rates, high capillary pressures, and semi-permeable membrane behavior accompanying changes in stress, pressure, temperature and chemical conditions. Under far from equilibrium conditions, mudrocks display a variety of spatio-temporal self-organized phenomena arising from nonlinear thermo-mechano-chemo-hydro coupling. Beginning with a detailed examination of nano-scale pore network structures in mudstones, we discuss the dynamics behind such self-organized phenomena as pressure solitons in unconsolidated muds, chemically-induced flow self focusing and permeability transients, localized compaction, time dependent well-bore failure, and oscillatory osmotic fluxes as they occur in clay-bearing sediments. Examples are draw from experiments, numerical simulation, and the field. These phenomena bear on the ability of these rocks to serve as containment barriers.

  5. The temporal patterns of disease severity and prevalence in schistosomiasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciddio, Manuela; Gatto, Marino Casagrandi, Renato

    2015-03-15

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread public health problems in the world. In this work, we introduce an eco-epidemiological model for its transmission and dynamics with the purpose of explaining both intra- and inter-annual fluctuations of disease severity and prevalence. The model takes the form of a system of nonlinear differential equations that incorporate biological complexity associated with schistosome's life cycle, including a prepatent period in snails (i.e., the time between initial infection and onset of infectiousness). Nonlinear analysis is used to explore the parametric conditions that produce different temporal patterns (stationary, endemic, periodic, and chaotic). For the time-invariant model, we identify a transcritical and a Hopf bifurcation in the space of the human and snail infection parameters. The first corresponds to the occurrence of an endemic equilibrium, while the latter marks the transition to interannual periodic oscillations. We then investigate a more realistic time-varying model in which fertility of the intermediate host population is assumed to seasonally vary. We show that seasonality can give rise to a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos for larger, though realistic, values of the amplitude of the seasonal variation of fertility.

  6. Turbulence transport modeling of the temporal outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Dosch, A.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be regarded as a turbulent magnetofluid, evolving in an expanding solar wind and subject to turbulent driving by a variety of in situ sources. Furthermore, the solar wind and the drivers of turbulence are highly time-dependent and change with solar cycle. Turbulence transport models describing low-frequency magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind have so far neglected solar cycle effects. Here we consider the effects of solar cycle variability on a turbulence transport model developed by Zank et al. This model is appropriate for the solar wind beyond about 1 AU, and extensions have described the steady-state dependence of the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature throughout the outer heliosphere. We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond ?10 AU, in the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are reasonable first approximations.

  7. TSAR2.3. Temporal Scattering And Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, R.R.; Ray, S.L.; Laguna, G.; Allison, M.; Cabral, B.

    1991-12-01

    TSAR2.3 (Temporal Scattering and Response) is a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics code suite. TSAR2.3 is a software package for simulating the interactions of electromagnetic waves with linear materials through the use of the finite-difference time-domain method. The code suite contains grid generation, grid verification, input-file creation and post-processing utilities. The physics package, written in Fortran 77, can be pre-processed to run on many different architectures including Cray, Vax and many Unix workstations. Tools are provided to easily port the code to new computers. The physics package is an efficient, flexible electromagnetic simulator. A body under study can be represented as a three-dimensional grid of materials with arbitrary linear properties. This grid can be simulated in a number of ways including incident plane waves, dipoles, and arbitrary incident fields. The grid can be terminated with numerous boundary conditions including free-space radiation, electric conductor, or magnetic conductor. Projection to the far-field in both the time and frequency domains is possible. This distribution includes make files for installing and maintaining the entire code suite.

  8. CX-001659: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1659: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001659: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Undissolved Solids from the Dissolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/08/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will characterize undissolved solids (UDS) from the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel used in a Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) demonstration of

  9. CX-014551: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    51: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-014551: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Environmental Characterization and Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.2 Date: 03/15/2016 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office This generic categorical exclusion covers: the characterization of sites including those with suspected or known contamination; the environmental monitoring of sites of suspected or known contamination; environmental monitoring in response to permit requirements or

  10. Temporal-contrast measurements of a white-light-seeded noncollinear optical parametric amplifier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bromage, J.; Dorrer, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-intense optical parametric chirped-pulse systems require front ends with broad bandwidth and high temporal contrast. Temporal cross-correlation measurements of a white-light–seeded noncollinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) show that its prepulse contrast exceeds the 120 dB dynamic range of the broadband NOPA-based cross-correlator.

  11. Characterizing electrodynamic shakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, D.O.

    1996-12-31

    An electrodynamic shaker is modeled as a mixed electrical/mechanical system with an experimentally derived two port network characterization. The model characterizes the shaker in a manner that the performance of the shaker with a mounted load (test item and fixture) can be predicted. The characterization depends on the measurements of shaker input voltage and current, and on the acceleration of the shaker armature with several mounted loads. The force into the load is also required, and can be measured directly or inferred from the load apparent mass.

  12. Panel 3 - characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Janghsing Hsieh; Lee, R.H.; Xian Zheng Pan; Deming Shu; Feldman, A.; Glass, J.T.; Kleimer, R.; Lawton, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The task of this panel was to identify and prioritize needs in the area of characterization of diamond and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films for use in the transportation industry. Until recent advances in production of inexpensive films of diamonds and DLC, it was not feasible that these materials could be mass produced. The Characterization Panel is restricting itself to identifying needs in areas that would be most useful to manufacturers and users in producing and utilizing diamond and DLC coatings in industry. These characterization needs include in-situ monitoring during growth, relation of structure to performance, and standards and definitions.

  13. Temporal trends in and influence of wind on PAH concentrations measured near the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes, D.R.; Basu, I.; Sweet, C.W.; Hites, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on temporal trends in gas- and particle-phase PAH concentrations measured at three sites in the Great Lakes' Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network: Eagle Harbor, near Lake Superior, Sleeping Bear Dunes, near Lake Michigan, and Sturgeon Point, near Lake Erie. While gas-phase concentrations have been decreasing since 1991 at all sites, particle-phase concentrations have been decreasing only at Sleeping Bear Dunes. To determine whether these results represent trends in background levels or regional emissions, the average concentrations are compared to those found in urban and rural studies. In addition, the influence of local wind direction on PAH concentrations is investigated, with the assumption that dependence on wind direction implies regional sources. Using these two methods, it is found that PAH concentrations at Eagle Harbor and Sleeping Bear Dunes represent regional background levels but that PAH from the Buffalo Region intrude on the background levels measured at the Sturgeon Point site. At this site, wind from over Lake Erie reduces local PAH concentrations.

  14. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; et al

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  15. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Bérard, Izabel; and others

    2013-12-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied.

  16. Tensor analysis methods for activity characterization in spatiotemporal data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haass, Michael Joseph; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Ochoa, Edward M.

    2014-03-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition offers unique advantages for activity characterization in spatio-temporal datasets because these methods are compatible with sparse matrices and maintain multiway structure that is otherwise lost in collapsing for regular matrix factorization. This report describes our research as part of the PANTHER LDRD Grand Challenge to develop a foundational basis of mathematical techniques and visualizations that enable unsophisticated users (e.g. users who are not steeped in the mathematical details of matrix algebra and mulitway computations) to discover hidden patterns in large spatiotemporal data sets.

  17. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  18. Expedited site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreary, I.; Booth, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) is being offered as a new, more cost-effective way to perform DOE environmental site characterizations. Site characterization of environmental cleanup sites can be costly and time consuming. {open_quotes}Traditional techniques,{close_quotes} though effective, are the outgrowth of cautious and often restrictive regulatory control. At some sites up to 40% of the funds and 70% of the time spent on cleanup operations have been devoted to characterization. More realistically, the DOE`s Ten Year Plan (TYP) Cost Rollup by Category (high budgetary version) budgets $1.34 billion to remedial action assessments out of a total of $9.7 billion in remedial actions - about 14% of the total TYP expenditures for this type of cleanup work. The expenditure percentage for characterization drops to a much lower 3% of total expenditures during outyears, after 2006, as most of the assessments will have been completed during the early TYP years. (The sampling and monitoring costs, however, rise from 7% of the budget during the TYP to 30% during the outyears as this activity continues and others decline. Improved characterizations could have the potential to reduce the need for some of these ongoing monitoring costs.) Fortunately, regulatory agencies have begun to relax many of the constraints on site characterization allowing more efficient and innovative approaches to be applied. Argonne National Laboratory`s Expedited Site Characterization is perhaps the best defined of these new approaches. ESC is founded on the premise that it is cheaper, faster, and more efficient to develop and test a conceptual model (or {open_quotes}hypothesis{close_quotes}) of contamination at a site than it is to collect data on a statistical basis and then attempt to model a site from those data. The difference between these two approaches has been described as a {open_quotes}scientific versus an engineering approach{close_quotes}.

  19. Temporal evolution of bubble tip velocity in classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability at arbitrary Atwood numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W. H.; HEDPS and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088; Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 ; He, X. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088

    2013-06-15

    In this research, the temporal evolution of the bubble tip velocity in Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at arbitrary Atwood numbers and different initial perturbation velocities with a discontinuous profile in irrotational, incompressible, and inviscid fluids (i.e., classical RTI) is investigated. Potential models from Layzer [Astrophys. J. 122, 1 (1955)] and perturbation velocity potentials from Goncharov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002)] are introduced. It is found that the temporal evolution of bubble tip velocity [u(t)] depends essentially on the initial perturbation velocity [u(0)]. First, when the u(0)determined by a numerical approach. The model proposed here agrees with hydrodynamic simulations. Thus, it should be included in applications where the bubble tip velocity plays an important role, such as the design of the ignition target of inertial confinement fusion where the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) can create the seed of RTI with u(0)?u{sup asp}, and stellar formation and evolution in astrophysics where the deflagration wave front propagating outwardly from the star is subject to the combined RMI and RTI.

  20. SU-E-J-60: Evaluation of Temporal Lag in Radiotherapy Gating for Tumor Motion Trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcher, AH; McCabe, B; Wiersma, RD

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Evaluating timing differences between LINAC beam ON/OFF and the estimation of tumor positioning using gating systems is essential for establishing confidence when treating with gating during radiotherapy, and is an annual requirement of TG-142. Temporal discrepancies between the trajectories of external marker surrogates and beam delivery may vary depending upon the type of external marker motion, which is quantified in this work for several trajectories. Methods: A precise robotic 3D motion stage performed several trajectories typically used for gating phantoms, including sinusoidal and Lujan-type motion; a commercial respiratory motion simulator was also employed. The true motions were monitored using variable resistors. The beam ON/OFF was controlled separately by two RPM (Varian) systems, an integrated version delivered by a Varian Truebeam LINAC and version 1.6 delivered by a Varian Trilogy, and measured using a diode. The resistor and diode signals were read by a multichannel digital oscilloscope, and timing differences between beam ON/OFF as measured by the diode and the phantom motion were determined using a peak detection algorithm. Results: Timing differences between beam ON/OFF and 3D stage motion peaks (diode—true motion timing) were computed to be 79.4 & 57.7ms for sinusoidal motion and 109.1 & 63.6ms for Lujan-type motion on the Truebeam LINAC, for beam ON and OFF, respectively. Timing differences for the Trilogy LINAC were 34.4 & 55.2ms for the sinusoidal motion and 29.0 & 26.3ms for the Lujan-type motion, for beam ON and OFF, respectively. With the commercial motion simulator, the timing differences were found to be −9ms and −78ms for beam ON/OFF, respectively, with the Truebeam, and −97.6ms and −60.9ms for beam ON/OFF, respectively, with the Trilogy. Conclusion: Setup-dependent temporal lags were found using this methodology. These discrepancies have the potential to influence quality assurance on gating systems and ultimately

  1. Site characterization handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Characterization and application of microearthquake clusters to problems of scaling, fault zone dynamics, and seismic monitoring at Parkfield, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeau, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    This document contains information about the characterization and application of microearthquake clusters and fault zone dynamics. Topics discussed include: Seismological studies; fault-zone dynamics; periodic recurrence; scaling of microearthquakes to large earthquakes; implications of fault mechanics and seismic hazards; and wave propagation and temporal changes.

  3. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  4. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ? materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  5. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  6. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  7. Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2001-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

  8. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  9. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G.; Gurary, Alexander I.; Boguslavskiy, Vadim

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  10. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the

  11. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

  12. NEPA Determination Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has determined that this proposed project is a major Federal action that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment. To comply with the National Environmental Policy Act ...

  13. CX-003173: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    73: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003173: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Phase III Test Well CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/28/2010 Location(s): Chester, Michigan Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The purpose of this action is to drill and characterize a stratigraphic well to determine if the potential formation in this region is suitable for a future Phase III carbon dioxide injection project. DOCUMENT(S)

  14. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  15. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  16. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  17. Diffusion Bonding Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diffusion Bonding Characterization - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  18. WRAP Module 1 waste characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayancsik, B.A.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this document is to present the characterization methodology for waste generated, processed, or otherwise the responsibility of the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility. The scope of this document includes all solid low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), mixed waste (MW), and dangerous waste. This document is not meant to be all-inclusive of the waste processed or generated within WRAP Module 1, but to present a methodology for characterization. As other streams are identified, the method of characterization will be consistent with the other streams identified in this plan. The WRAP Module 1 facility is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The facility`s function is two-fold. The first is to verify/characterize, treat and repackage contact handled (CH) waste currently in retrievable storage in the LLW Burial Grounds, Hanford Central Waste Complex, and the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF). The second is to verify newly generated CH TRU waste and LLW, including MW. The WRAP Module 1 facility provides NDE and NDA of the waste for both drums and boxes. The NDE is used to identify the physical contents of the waste containers to support waste characterization and processing, verification, or certification. The NDA results determine the radioactive content and distribution of the waste.

  19. Spatio-temporal evolution of the H ? L back transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miki, K.; Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiba 277-8587 ; Diamond, P. H.; Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 ; Schmitz, L.; McDonald, D. C.; Estrada, T.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Tynan, G. R.

    2013-06-15

    Since ITER will operate close to threshold and with limited control, the H ? L back transition is a topic important for machine operations as well as physics. Using a reduced mesoscale model [Miki et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 092306 (2012)], we investigate ELM-free H ? L back transition dynamics in order to isolate transport physics effects. Model studies indicate that turbulence spreading is the key process which triggers the back transition. The transition involves a feedback loop linking turbulence and profiles. The I-phase appears during the back transition following a slow power ramp down, while fast ramp-downs reveal a single burst of zonal flow during the back transition. The I-phase nucleates at the pedestal shoulder, as this is the site of the residual turbulence in H-mode. Hysteresis in the profile gradient scale length is characterized by the Nusselt number, where Nu=?{sub i,turb}/?{sub i,neo}. Relative hysteresis of temperature gradient vs density gradient is sensitive to the pedestal Prandtl number, where Pr{sub ped}=D{sub ped}/?{sub i,neo}. We expect the H-mode to be somewhat more resilient in density than in temperature.

  20. CX-001190: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a Reaction Transport Model that Couples Chemical Reactions of Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation with Spatial and Temporal Flow Variations in Carbon Dioxide/Brine/Rock SystemsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 03/21/2010Location(s): Minneapolis, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. CX-100032: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seismic Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Fracture Generation During EGS Resource Development CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/04/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Geothermal Technologies Award Number: DE-EE0006766

  2. CX-000433: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Prediction, Simulation and MonitoringCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 12/17/2009Location(s): West Lafayette, IndianaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-000429: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for Carbon Dioxide sequestration Prediction, Simulation and MonitoringCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): West Lafayette, IndianaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  5. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consolidated Business Service Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management Consolidated Business Service Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued ...

  7. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 Existing Regulations B3.7: New terrestrial infill exploratory and experimental wells Siting, construction, and operation of new terrestrial infill exploratory and experimental (test) wells, for either extraction or injection use, in a locally characterized geological formation in a field that contains existing operating wells, properly abandoned wells, or unminable coal seams containing natural gas, provided that the site characterization has verified

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B6.5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B6.5 Existing Regulations B6.5: Facilities for characterizing and sorting packaged waste and overpacking waste Siting, construction, modification, expansion, operation, and decommissioning of an onsite facility for characterizing and sorting previously packaged waste or for overpacking waste, other than high-level radioactive waste, provided that operations do not involve unpacking waste. These actions do not include waste storage (covered under B6.4,

  9. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed by the

  10. Temporal evolution characteristics of an annular-mode gliding arc discharge in a vortex flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Song, Yuan-Hong; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2014-05-15

    An annular-mode gliding arc discharge powered by a 50?Hz alternating current (ac) supply was studied in a vortex flow of dry and humid air. Its temporal evolution characteristics were investigated by electrical measurement, temporally resolved imaging, and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements. Three discharge stages of arc-ignition, arc-gliding, and arc-extinction were clearly observed in each half-cycle of the discharge. During the arc-gliding stage, the intensity of light emission from the arc root at the cathode was remarkably higher than that at other areas. The spectral intensity of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}?{sub u}?B{sup 3}?{sub g}) during the arc-ignition stage was much higher than that during the arc-gliding stage, which was contrary to the temporal evolutions of spectral intensities for N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}?{sub u}{sup +}?X{sup 2}?{sub g}{sup +}) and OH(A{sup 2}?{sup +}?X{sup 2}?{sub i}). Temporally resolved vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} were also presented and decreased with increasing the water vapor content.

  11. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  12. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  13. Measurements and Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Analytical Microscopy, Electro-Optical Characterization, Surface Analysis, and Cell and Module Performance.

  14. System for generating pluralities of optical pulses with predetermined frequencies in a temporally and spatially overlapped relationship

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Schmid, A.W.; Chuang, Y.

    1992-03-10

    Ultrashort (pico second and shorter) laser pulses having components of different frequency which are overlapped coherently in space and with a predetermined constant relationship in time, are generated and may be used in applications where plural spectrally separate, time-synchronized pulses are needed as in wave-length resolved spectroscopy and spectral pump probe measurements for characterization of materials. A Chirped Pulse Amplifier (CPA), such as a regenerative amplifier, which provides amplified, high intensity pulses at the output thereof which have the same spatial intensity profile, is used to process a series of chirped pulses, each with a different central frequency (the desired frequencies contained in the output pulses). Each series of chirped pulses is obtained from a single chirped pulse by spectral windowing with a mask in a dispersive expansion stage ahead of the laser amplifier. The laser amplifier amplifies the pulses and provides output pulses with like spatial and temporal profiles. A compression stage then compresses the amplified pulses. All the individual pulses of different frequency, which originated in each single chirped pulse, are compressed and thereby coherently overlapped in space and time. The compressed pulses may be used for the foregoing purposes and other purposes wherien pulses having a plurality of discrete frequency components are required. 4 figs.

  15. Spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation and biofilm formation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis and Clostridium thermocellum Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhiwu; Lee, Sueng-Hwan; Elkins, James G; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is one of the major bottlenecks of a consolidated bioprocess that employs cellulolytic bacterial cells as catalysts to produce biofuels from cellulosic biomass. In this study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, which does not produce cellulosomes, and Clostridium thermocellum, which does produce cellulosomes. Results showed that the degradation of either regenerated or natural cellulose was synchronized with biofilm formation, a process characterized by the formation and fusion of numerous crater-like depressions on the cellulose surface. In addition, the dynamics of biofilm formation were similar in both bacteria, regardless of cellulosome production. Only the areas of cellulose surface colonized by microbes were significantly degraded, highlighting the essential role of the cellulolytic biofilm in cellulose utilization. After initial attachment, the microbial biofilm structure remained thin, uniform and dense throughout the experiment. A cellular automaton model, constructed under the assumption that the attached cells divide and produce daughter cells that contribute to the hydrolysis of the adjacent cellulose, can largely simulate the observed process of biofilm formation and cellulose degradation. This study presents a model, based on direct observation, correlating cellulolytic biofilm formation with cellulose degradation.

  16. System for generating pluralities of optical pulses with predetermined frequencies in a temporally and spatially overlapped relationship

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerhofer, David D. (Spencerport, NY); Schmid, Ansgar W. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Chuang, Yung-ho (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01

    Ultra short (pico second and shorter) laser pulses having components of different frequency which are overlapped coherently in space and with a predetermined constant relationship in time, are generated and may be used in applications where plural spectrally separate, time-synchronized pulses are needed as in wave-length resolved spectroscopy and spectral pump probe measurements for characterization of materials. A Chirped Pulse Amplifier (CPA), such as a regenerative amplifier, which provides amplified, high intensity pulses at the output thereof which have the same spatial intensity profile, is used to process a series of chirped pulses, each with a different central frequency (the desired frequencies contained in the output pulses). Each series of chirped pulses is obtained from a single chirped pulse by spectral windowing with a mask in a dispersive expansion stage ahead of the laser amplifier. The laser amplifier amplifies the pulses and provides output pulses with like spatial and temporal profiles. A compression stage then compresses the amplified pulses. All the individual pulses of different frequency, which originated in each single chirped pulse, are compressed and thereby coherently overlapped in space and time. The compressed pulses may be used for the foregoing purposes and other purposes wherien pulses having a plurality of discrete frequency components are required.

  17. Award Fee Determination Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Final Fee Determination for Base funded Performance Measures Basis of Evaluation: Completion of Performance Measures contained in Section J, Attachment J.4, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan, according to the identified completion criteria. Evaluation Results: FY 2012 Base Period Fee Available Fee allocated to FY 2012* Performance Measures $10,399,033.60 Incremental Fee $4,490,000.00 Provisional Fee

  18. Award Fee Determination Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Contract Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788 Final Fee Determination for Base funded and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery) funded Performance Measures Basis of Evaluation: Completion of Performance Measures contained in Section J, AttachmentJ.4, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan, according to the identified completion criteria. Evaluation Results: Fiscal Year 2011 (Oct 1, 2010 - Sept 30, 2011) Base Funded Fee Recovery Funded Fee Available

  19. NEPA Determination Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    LA NEPA COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION FORM PRID - 09P-0059 V2 Page 1 of 8 Project/Activity Title: TA-3 Substation Replacement Project PRID: 09P-0059 V2 Date: February 16, 2016 Purpose: The proposed demolition and replacement of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-3 electrical power substation is needed to provide reliable and efficient electrical distribution systems with sufficient electrical capacity to support the national security missions. The electrical distribution

  20. Interim Action Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national security needs of the United States. Although the Deputy Secretary of Energy approved Critical

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Evaluation for Drum Characterization and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source Term Report | Department of Energy Evaluation for Drum Characterization and Source Term Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory Evaluation for Drum Characterization and Source Term Report This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Technical Assessment Team (TAT) has undertaken a deliberative investigation process to

  2. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  3. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  4. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  5. Characterizing Photometric Flicker

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2016, DOE published a report on the performance of three emerging flicker meters. The purpose of the study was to help specifiers determine the flicker behavior of lighting products, and to accelerate the development of standard test and measurement procedures.

  6. ON THE TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE DISK COUNTERPART OF TYPE II SPICULES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekse, D. H.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De Pontieu, B.

    2013-02-20

    The newly established type II spicule has been speculated to provide enough hot plasma to play an important role in the mass loading and heating of the solar corona. With the identification of rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) as the on-disk counterpart of type II spicules we have analyzed three different high-quality timeseries with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma and subjected to an automated detection routine to detect a large number of RBEs for statistical purposes. Our observations are of a quiet-Sun region at disk center and we find lower Doppler velocities, 15-40 km s{sup -1}, and Doppler widths, 2-15 km s{sup -1}, of RBEs than in earlier coronal hole studies, 30-50 km s{sup -1} and 7-23 km s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, we examine the spatial dependence of Doppler velocities and widths along the RBE axis and conclude that there is no clear trend to this over the field of view or in individual RBEs in the quiet Sun at disk center. These differences with previous coronal hole studies are attributed to the more varying magnetic field configuration in quiet-Sun conditions. Using an extremely high-cadence data set has allowed us to improve greatly on the determination of lifetimes of RBEs, which we find to range from 5 to 60 s with an average lifetime of 30 s, as well as the transverse motions in RBEs, with transverse velocities up to 55 km s{sup -1} and averaging 12 km s{sup -1}. Furthermore, our measurements of the recurrence rates of RBEs provide important new constraints on coronal heating by spicules. We also see many examples of a sinusoidal wave pattern in the transverse motion of RBEs with periods averaging 54 s and amplitudes from 21.5 to 129 km which agrees well with previous studies of wave motion in spicules at the limb. We interpret the appearance of RBEs over their full length within a few seconds as the result of a combination of three kinds of motions as is earlier reported for

  7. Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

  8. Letter Report for Characterization of Biochar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, James E.

    2013-04-09

    On 27 November 2012, a bulk biochar sample was received for characterization of selected physical and chemical properties. The main purpose of the characterization was to help determine the degree to which biochar would be suitable as a soil amendment to aid in growth of plants. Towards this end, analyses to determine specific surface, pH, cation-exchange capacity, water retention, and wettability (i.e. surface tension) were conducted. A second objective was to determine how uniform these properties were in the sample. Towards this end, the sample was separated into fractions based on initial particle size and on whether the material was from the external surface or the internal portion of the particle. Based on the results, the biochar has significant liming potentials, significant cation-retention capacities, and highly variable plant-available moisture retention properties that, under the most favorable circumstances, could be helpful to plants. As a consequence, it would be quite suitable for addition to acidic soils and should enhance the fertility of those soils.

  9. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  10. CX-100662 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100662 Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermally Conductive Backsheets (TCB) for Reduced Operating Temperatures Award Number: DE-EE0007548 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 7/12/2016 Location(s): AZ Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Arizona State University (ASU) to fabricate, test, evaluate, and characterize lab-scale solar photovoltaic (PV)

  11. CX-003216: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    216: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003216: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Heat/Mass Exchanger Technology for Geothermal and Solar Renewable Energy Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/04/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Board of Regents, Nevada System of Higher Education on behalf of the University of Nevada in Reno proposes to use federal funds to design, develop, and characterize unique coating materials,

  12. CX-004375: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    75: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004375: Categorical Exclusion Determination Slim Well - Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe would characterize a geothermal reservoir using novel technologies and would then integrate this information into a numerical model

  13. CX-014421: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    421: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-014421: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase Three (Task Three) - Dover 33 Characterization Well CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 12/14/2015 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory Participate in drilling and logging, coring, and pressure testing/monitoring in ~6000 ft. deep test well in Dover Township, MI. Work part of ongoing MRCSP Task 3 research in this existing

  14. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.13 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.13 Existing Regulations B5.13: Experimental wells for injection of small quantities of carbon dioxide Siting, construction, operation, plugging, and abandonment of experimental wells for the injection of small quantities of carbon dioxide (and other incidentally co-captured gases) in locally characterized, geologically secure storage formations at or near existing carbon dioxide sources to determine the suitability of the formations for large-scale

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Mississippi | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 30, 2015 CX-013741: Categorical Exclusion Determination Statistical Analysis of ... March 30, 2015 CX-013758: Categorical Exclusion Determination Statistical Analysis of ...

  16. Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2012-02-01

    In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

  17. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  18. Data aNd Computation Reordering package using temporal and spatial hypergraphs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-08-01

    A package for experimentation with data and computation reordering algorithms. One can input various file formats representing sparse matrices, reorder data, and computation through the specification of command line parameters, and time benchmark computations that use the new data and computation ordering. The package includes existing reordering algorithms and new ones introduced by the authors based on the temporal and spatial locality hypergraph model.

  19. PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of solid liquid suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panetta, Paul D.

    2010-06-22

    Using an ultrasonic field, properties of a solid liquid suspension such as through-transmission attenuation, backscattering, and diffuse field are measured. These properties are converted to quantities indicating the strength of different loss mechanisms (such as absorption, single scattering and multiple scattering) among particles in the suspension. Such separation of the loss mechanisms can allow for direct comparison of the attenuating effects of the mechanisms. These comparisons can also indicate a model most likely to accurately characterize the suspension and can aid in determination of properties such as particle size, concentration, and density of the suspension.

  1. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  2. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for ...

  3. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization ...

  4. Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and their Piezoceramics Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and their Piezoceramics 2007 Diesel ...

  5. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for ...

  6. Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization; ...

  7. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight...

  8. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, F.; Bohler, D.; Ding, Y.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Ratner, D.; Vetter, S.

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  9. Analysis and Characterization | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis and Characterization NREL's team of bioenergy analysts takes a field-to-finished product approach to bringing biofuels and bioproducts to market. We use computational ...

  10. Collecting and Characterizing Validation Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterizing Validation Data to Support Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor ... Boiling Flow Model Bayesian Framework for Data Integration Nuclear System Analysis - ...

  11. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using three-color interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2012-06-15

    A new method for determining the plasma electron density using the fractional fringes on three-color interferometer is proposed. Integrated phase shift on each interferometer is derived without using the temporal history of the fractional fringes. The dependence on the fringe resolution and the electrical noise are simulated on the wavelengths of CO{sub 2} laser. Short-time integrations of the fractional fringes enhance the reliability of this method.

  12. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  13. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

    1995-01-16

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

  14. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  15. Temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions and ion charge states of Cr and Cr-Al pulsed arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Koichi; Anders, André

    2015-11-15

    To study the temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions, charge-state-resolved ion energy distribution functions of pulsed arc plasmas from Cr and Cr-Al cathodes were recorded with high time resolution by using direct data acquisition from a combined energy and mass analyzer. The authors find increases in intensities of singly charged ions, which is evidence that charge exchange reactions took place in both Cr and Cr-Al systems. In Cr-Al plasmas, the distributions of high-charge-state ions exhibit high energy tails 50 μs after discharge ignition, but no such tails were observed at 500 μs. The energy ratios of ions of different charge states at the beginning of the pulse, when less neutral atoms were in the space in front of the cathode, suggest that ions are accelerated by an electric field. The situation is not so clear after 50 μs due to particle collisions. The initial mean ion charge state of Cr was about the same in Cr and in Cr-Al plasmas, but it decreased more rapidly in Cr-Al plasmas compared to the decay in Cr plasma. The faster decay of the mean ion charge state and ion energy caused by the addition of Al into a pure Cr cathode suggests that the mean ion charge state is determined not only by ionization processes at the cathode spot but also by inelastic collision between different elements.

  16. Physical property characterization of 183-H Basin sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biyani, R.K.; Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-20

    This document describes the characterization of 183-H Basin sludge physical properties, e.g. bulk density of sludge and absorbent, and determination of free liquids. Calcination of crucible-size samples of sludge was also done and the resulting `loss-on-ignition` was compared to the theoretical weight loss based on sludge analysis obtained from Weston Labs.

  17. Tank characterization technical sampling basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-04-28

    Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis (this document) is the first step of an in place working process to plan characterization activities in an optimal manner. This document will be used to develop the revision of the Waste Information Requirements Document (WIRD) (Winkelman et al. 1997) and ultimately, to create sampling schedules. The revised WIRD will define all Characterization Project activities over the course of subsequent fiscal years 1999 through 2002. This document establishes priorities for sampling and characterization activities conducted under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Characterization Project. The Tank Waste Characterization Project is designed to provide all TWRS programs with information describing the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of the contents of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. These tanks contain radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons materials at the Hanford Site. The waste composition varies from tank to tank because of the large number of chemical processes that were used when producing nuclear weapons materials over the years and because the wastes were mixed during efforts to better use tank storage space. The Tank Waste Characterization Project mission is to provide information and waste sample material necessary for TWRS to define and maintain safe interim storage and to process waste fractions into stable forms for ultimate disposal. This document integrates the information needed to address safety issues, regulatory requirements, and retrieval, treatment, and immobilization requirements. Characterization sampling to support tank farm operational needs is also discussed.

  18. Corrosive amine characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, H.L. Jr.; McLaughlin, B.D.

    1996-08-01

    Amine solutions are used in the refinery to absorb sour gases from various refinery streams. Because of the variety of components in these streams, the solutions often become more corrosive than the amine solution by itself. A protocol has been developed to examine plant solutions for these corrosive materials. Both analytical and laboratory corrosion tests are used. Analyses are performed for light organic acids, such as formic, acetic, propionic and butyric. The amount of dissolved iron, in excess of about 50 ppm, indicates that the amine may contain chelating agents such as HEOZD, THEED, DEP. Once the causes of high corrosivity have been determined, recommendations are made to deal with the specific problem at each refinery system. An annual survey is useful in detecting problems which are not apparent in day-to-day operations.

  19. CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry LaboratoryCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/16/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-014564: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) Ventilation Modifications CX(s) Applied: B2.1Date: 02/12/2016 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  1. CX-007960: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy to Characterize Electrochemically Active Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/14/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. CX-010847: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Methanotrophs at the Old Integrated Demonstration Site, M Area CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/23/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  3. CX-012427: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alaska Hydrate Production Testing: Test Site Selection and Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41879 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-013851: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 06/23/2015 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-011565: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/18/2013 Location(s): Iowa Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  6. CX-009066: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Downgradient Volatile Organic Compounds Plume and Installation of Monitoring Well CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/24/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  7. CX-010313: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-012529: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Characterization of High Performance and Robust Mixed Conducting Cathodes Supportive.. CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41841 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-013717: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Design, Fabricate and Characterize High Temp and Pressure Microchannel HX for Carbon Dioxide Power Cycles CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/30/2015 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-012599: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) Vadose Zone Remedial Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 41823 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  11. CX-012320: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) Equipment Installation Project CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05/21/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  12. CX-011681: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glass Formulation, Testing, and Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/02/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  13. CX-011813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization and Analyses of Core Samples From 105-C Disassembly Basin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/30/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  14. CX-011828: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization and Analyses of Core Samples from the 105-C Disassembly Basin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/06/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  15. CX-006873: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Polyoxoniobates for Decontamination of Chemical Warfare AgentsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): Albuquerque, New MexicoOffice(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Golden Field Office

  16. CX-003551: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two Elk Energy Park Carbon Site Characterization Project - ExpandedCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Campbell County, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-008005: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  18. CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lurance Canyon Burn Site Soil and Groundwater Site CharacterizationCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 06/14/2010Location(s): New MexicoOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  19. CX-002539: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fast Neutron Irradiation and Subsequent Characterization of CarbidesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/05/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-010791: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-008297: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/27/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-000443: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide Site Characterization Mega TransectCX(s) Applied: A11, B3.1Date: 11/20/2009Location(s): Austin, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-002740: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coal Use By-Product Characterization Lab DecommissioningCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/17/2010Location(s): Morgantown, West VirginiaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-010257: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Fracture Properties Using Resistivity measured at Different Frequencies CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/03/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-013321: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MRCSP Phase III Task 1.6 Gifford #3 Well Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/27/2015 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-004280: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas ShalesCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/18/2010Location(s): Albuquerque, New MexicoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-013588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank 50 Quarterly Sample Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/24/2015Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-013475: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Bush #5 Well Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 03/11/2015Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-013751: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Bush#5 Well Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 03/11/2015 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-008912: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Advanced Joint Inversion System for Carbon Dioxide Storage Modeling with Large Data Sets for Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-008938: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Advanced Joint Inversion System for Carbon Dioxide Storage Modeling with Large Data Sets for Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/17/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal SystemsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 08/18/2010Location(s): NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. CX-010451: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles CX(s) Applied: B3.16 Date: 06/17/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.16 Date: 09/27/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-009329: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.16 Date: 09/27/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-006225: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Infrastructure Upgrades - Materials and Fuel Complex (MFC)- Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/07/2011Location(s): Idaho Falls, IdahoOffice(s): Nuclear Energy, Idaho Operations Office

  17. CX-013343: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of SRS Tank Farm Liquid, Salt cake, and Dilute Slurry Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/08/2014 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  18. CX-014396: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Deep Borehole Field Test Characterization Borehole Drilling and Testing, Pierce County North Dakota - Battelle Memorial Institute CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 12/07/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. CX-011585: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A Positron Microprobe Spectrometer for Defects and Nano-Vacancy Characterization in Materials CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  20. CX-011581: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Research and Teaching Equipment for Nuclear Materials Characterization CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  1. CX-011586: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A Positron Generator System in Support of High Brightness Materials Characterization at the Pulstar Reactor CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  2. CX-006990: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Synthesis and Characterization of Coatings by Chemical Solution Deposition MethodsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/13/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-011437: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): New York Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-012593: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Sector Characterization Soil Borings and Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation, Phase III CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 41829 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  5. CX-014292: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operation of 3-Flex Characterization Analyzer CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/31/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-013693: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Temperature Melt Solution Calorimeter: The Thermodynamic Characterization of Oxides in Nuclear Energy- Clemson University CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/10/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  7. CX-005869: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry LabCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/08/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-011666: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Building 690-N (Ford Building) and Ancillary Equipment CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/12/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. CX-009639: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization, Investigation, and Environmental Monitoring Activities CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/19/2012 Location(s): Tennessee, California, California, Virginia Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office

  10. CX-005052: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shoot 2-Dimensional Seismic at Characterization SiteCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 01/19/2011Location(s): Craig, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-006973: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 09/26/2011Location(s): Craig, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-005948: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region (Schlumberger)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/04/2011Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-012266: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles… CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/26/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-013477: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Clearwater BO #1 Well Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 03/11/2015 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-013753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Clearwater BO#1 Well Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 03/11/2015 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-006068: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization and Environmental MonitoringCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 06/20/2011Location(s): Richland, WashingtonOffice(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  17. CX-010356: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization Investigation and Environmental Monitoring Activities CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/19/2012 Location(s): Tennessee, California, Virginia Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  18. CX-004122: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biosafety Level-1 Laboratory in Building 898, Laboratory 1668 - Characterization of Interactions and Flocculation of CellCX(s) Applied: B3.12Date: 08/02/2010Location(s): New MexicoOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  19. CX-013876: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Design/Fab/Characterization of Near Surface Embedded Cooling Channel w ODS Layer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 07/01/2015 Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-012271: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quantitative Characterization of Impacts of Couple Geomechanics and Flow - Lab Experiments/Modeling CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-012270: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quantitative Characterization of Impacts of Couple Geomechanics and Flow - Lab Experiments/Modeling CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-004121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 840 Asbestos Characterization and AbatementCX(s) Applied: B1.16Date: 08/02/2010Location(s): New MexicoOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  3. CX-000450: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide Site Characterization Mega TransectCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 11/24/2009Location(s): Austin, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-006285: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Advanced Systems for Preprocessing and Characterizing Coal-Biomass MixturesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/01/2011Location(s): Blacksburg, VirginiaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-006286: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development of Advanced Systems for Preprocessing and Characterizing Coal-Biomass MixturesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/01/2011Location(s): Lexington, KentuckyOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-010995: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Climate Change CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-010993: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Climate Change CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-010962: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.11 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010961: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-000579: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Strategically Hardened Facility Defeat Project (Socorro, New Mexico)CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 12/04/2009Location(s): Socorro, New MexicoOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  11. CX-009845: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/30/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-009844: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/30/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-009846: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/30/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-004218: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recombinant Protein Expression, Purification, Characterization, and Immobilizations in Functionalized MaterialsCX(s) Applied: B3.12Date: 06/07/2010Location(s): New MexicoOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  15. CX-012265: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles… CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/26/2014 Location(s): California, California, California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-009686: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  17. CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal SystemsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 04/26/2011Location(s): NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. CX-001229: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Fluidized Beds by Pressure Fluctuation AnalysisCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy

  19. CX-014576: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho National Laboratory Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring (Overarching) - Rev. 2 CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 01/25/2016 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  20. CX-010792: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect - Task 8 CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-011682: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of SCO Sludge, Supernate, and Glass for Tank Farm Return CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/02/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. CX-009222: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company - Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 09/24/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  3. CX-011573: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Predictive Characterization of Aging and Degradation of Reactor Materials in Extreme Environments CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  4. Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaulis, L.; Wilson, G.; Jacobson, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer{trademark}, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made.

  5. DSTiPE Algorithm for Fuzzy Spatio-Temporal Risk Calculation in Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2008-09-01

    Time and location data play a very significant role in a variety of factory automation scenarios, such as automated vehicles and robots, their navigation, tracking, and monitoring, to services of optimization and security. In addition, pervasive wireless capabilities combined with time and location information are enabling new applications in areas such as transportation systems, health care, elder care, military, emergency response, critical infrastructure, and law enforcement. A person/object in proximity to certain areas for specific durations of time may pose a risk hazard either to themselves, others, or the environment. This paper presents a novel fuzzy based spatio-temporal risk calculation DSTiPE method that an object with wireless communications presents to the environment. The presented Matlab based application for fuzzy spatio-temporal risk cluster extraction is verified on a diagonal vehicle movement example.

  6. "Method for Controlling of Spatial and Temporal Variations of Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties in Plasma Devices with Crossed Electric and Magnetic Fields" Inventors Yevgeny Raitses, Alexander Merzhevskiy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Method for Controlling of Spatial and Temporal Variations of Plasma Properties in Plasma Devices with Crossed Electric and Magnetic Fields" Inventors Yevgeny Raitses, Alexander Merzhevskiy A method of crafting spatial variations of the electron cross-field transport by means of localized current-conducting plasma structures such as

  7. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positive semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.

  8. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positivemore » semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.« less

  9. Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. I. Evolving Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Höhn, Philipp A.

    2014-08-15

    A temporally varying discretization often features in discrete gravitational systems and appears in lattice field theory models subject to a coarse graining or refining dynamics. To better understand such discretization changing dynamics in the quantum theory, an according formalism for constrained variational discrete systems is constructed. While this paper focuses on global evolution moves and, for simplicity, restricts to flat configuration spaces R{sup N}, a Paper II [P. A. Höhn, “Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. II. Local evolution moves,” J. Math. Phys., e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1401.7731 [gr-qc].] discusses local evolution moves. In order to link the covariant and canonical picture, the dynamics of the quantum states is generated by propagators which satisfy the canonical constraints and are constructed using the action and group averaging projectors. This projector formalism offers a systematic method for tracing and regularizing divergences in the resulting state sums. Non-trivial coarse graining evolution moves lead to non-unitary, and thus irreversible, projections of physical Hilbert spaces and Dirac observables such that these concepts become evolution move dependent on temporally varying discretizations. The formalism is illustrated in a toy model mimicking a “creation from nothing.” Subtleties arising when applying such a formalism to quantum gravity models are discussed.

  10. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization A new, non-electrical, remote radiation mapping device known as RadBall has been developed by the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) in the United Kingdom. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization (198.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 CX-005512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Storage R&D Core Characterization Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) Hydrogen Storage R&D Core Characterization Capabilities An NREL-led National Laboratory Collaboration between NREL, LBNL, PNNL, and NIST NREL CORE CHARACTERIZATION CAPABILITIES The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will offer specialized characterization for hydrogen storage materials through its DOE-FCTO core-capability validation laboratory. We offer PCT analysis of hydrogen storage materials to determine their gravimetric and volumetric

  12. Final report for the Iowa Livestock Industry Waste Characterization and Methane Recovery Information Dissemination Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, M.V.; Richard, Thomas L

    2001-11-13

    This report summarizes analytical methods, characterizes Iowa livestock wastes, determines fossil fuel displacement by methane use, assesses the market potential, and offers recommendations for the implementation of methane recovery technologies.

  13. System for measuring temporal profiles of scintillation at high and different linear energy transfers by using pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshimizu, Masanori Asai, Keisuke; Kurashima, Satoshi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kimura, Atsushi; Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-15

    We have developed a system for measuring the temporal profiles of scintillation at high linear energy transfer (LET) by using pulsed ion beams from a cyclotron. The half width at half maximum time resolution was estimated to be 1.5–2.2 ns, which we attributed mainly to the duration of the pulsed ion beam and timing jitter between the trigger signal and the arrival of the ion pulse. The temporal profiles of scintillation of BaF{sub 2} at different LETs were successfully observed. These results indicate that the proposed system is a powerful tool for analyzing the LET effects in temporal profiles of scintillation.

  14. CX-100633 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    include design and synthesis of self-assembling oligomers; thin-film deposition and characterization; and fabrication, characterization, and optimization of organic solar cells. ...

  15. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  16. Observation and characterization of laser-driven phase space electron holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarri, G.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hoarty, D. J.; James, S. F.; Jung, R.; Willi, O.; Schamel, H.

    2010-01-15

    The direct observation and full characterization of a phase space electron hole (EH) generated during laser-matter interaction is presented. This structure, propagating in a tenuous, nonmagnetized plasma, has been detected via proton radiography during the irradiation with a ns laser pulse (Ilambda{sup 2}approx =10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) of a gold hohlraum. This technique has allowed the simultaneous detection of propagation velocity, potential, and electron density spatial profile across the EH with fine spatial and temporal resolution allowing a detailed comparison with theoretical and numerical models.

  17. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  18. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  19. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  20. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  1. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, G.

    1990-05-01

    A method and means are disclosed for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived. 15 figs.

  2. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Guoying

    1990-05-01

    A method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived.

  3. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Pennsylvania | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... August 3, 2015 CX-014051: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Scaling Study of Microbially-Enhanced Coalbed Methane (MECBM): Optimizing Nutrient Delivery for Maximized Methane ...

  4. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Nationwide | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... February 18, 2016 CX-014630: Categorical Exclusion Determination Inspection and Repair of West Hackberry-Sun 42-Inch Crude Oil Pipeline CX(s) Applied: 0 Date: 02182016 ...

  6. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  7. Site Characterization Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Characterization Awards A description of projects for the Site Characterization Awards. The total funding value of the projects is approximately 75.5 million over three ...

  8. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign ...

  9. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted ... More Documents & Publications The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines ...

  10. Plant Phenotype Characterization System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Phenotype Characterization System Plant Phenotype Characterization System New X-Ray Technology Accelerates Plant Research The ability to analyze plant root structure and...

  11. Intel compiler performance optimization and characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compiler performance optimization and characterization Intel compiler performance optimization and characterization May 13, 2015 NERSC will host an in-depth training presentation...

  12. Development of spectral interferometry for shock characterization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interferometry for shock characterization in energetic materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of spectral interferometry for shock characterization in ...

  13. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: Surface...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HTML: SurfaceSub-surface dislocation density analysis of forming samples using advanced characterization techniques Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: Surface...

  14. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), ABD-WFM-006, Revision 2.1 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging ...

  15. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents ...

  16. characterizing lithium-ion electrode microstructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterizing lithium-ion electrode microstructures - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers characterizing lithium-ion electrode ...

  17. Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator ...

  18. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Measurement and Characterization ...

  19. Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue ...

  20. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS ... Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Seismic ...

  1. Temporal Entropy Generation in the Viscous Layers of Laterally-converging Duct Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald M. McEligot; Robert S. Brodkey; Helmut Eckelmann

    2008-12-01

    Since insight into entropy generation is a key to increasing efficiency and thereby reducing fuel consumption and/or waste and -- for wall-bounded flows -- most entropy is generated in the viscous layer, we examine the transient behavior of its dominant contributor there for a non-canonical flow. New measurements in oil flow are presented for the effects of favorable streamwise mean pressure gradients on temporal entropy generation rates and, in the process, on key Reynolds-stress-producing events such as sweep front passage and on the deceleration/outflow phase of the overall bursting process. Two extremes have been considered: (1) a high pressure gradient, nearing "laminarization," and (2), for comparison, a low pressure gradient corresponding to many earlier experiments. In both cases, the peak temporal entropy generation rate occurs shortly after passage of the ejection/sweep interface. Whether sweep and ejection rates appear to decrease or increase with the pressure gradient depends on the feature examined and the manner of sampling. When compared using wall coordinates for velocities, distances and time, the trends and magnitudes of the transient behaviors are mostly the same. The main effects of the higher pressure gradient are (1) changes in the time lag between detections -- representing modification of the shape of the sweep front and the sweep angle with the wall, (2) modification of the magnitude of an instantaneous Reynolds shear stress with wall distance and (3) enlarging the sweeps and ejections. Results new for both low and high pressure gradients are the temporal behaviors of the dominant contribution to entropy generation; it is found to be much more sensitive to distance from the wall than to streamwise pressure gradient.

  2. CX-003924: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delineation, Identification, Characterization, and Clean Up of Suspected Waste AreaCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B6.1Date: 09/23/2010Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-010312: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Characterization at the M-Area Settling Basin Western Sector Treatment System (WSTS) CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. CX-012267: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Storage Reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift Combining Geomechanical… CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 06/26/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-006598: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization, Monitoring, and General Research Activities, Fiscal Year 2012-2013CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.6, B3.8Date: 08/23/2011Location(s): Amarillo, TexasOffice(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Pantex Site Office

  6. CX-011639: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization, Monitoring, and General Research Activities for Pantex Plant for FY 2014 CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, B3.6, B3.8 Date: 09/26/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  7. CX-011596: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring under 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B, B3.1 for Calendar Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/02/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  8. CX-000752: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Pier F Drilling)CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/29/2010Location(s): Long Beach, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-012384: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eleven Soil Bores Along the M-Area Abandoned Process Sewer Line for Vadose Zone Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 05/19/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Socorro, New MexicoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-010629: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Sites for Near Miscible Carbon Dioxide Applications to Improve Oil Recovery in Arbuckle Reser CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 07/09/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-010628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Sites for Near Miscible Carbon Dioxide Applications to Improve Oil Recovery in Arbuckle... CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B4.4 Date: 07/09/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-004278: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/19/2010Location(s): Clarkstown, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-004277: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/19/2010Location(s): Clarkstown, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-003829: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): San Pedro, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Denver, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-003827: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): San Pedro, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-011548: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lower Length Scale Characterization and Validation of Formation and Stability of Helium Bubbles in Nano-structured Ferritic Alloys under Irradiation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  19. CX-013737: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Pattison Trust #1-D Well Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7Date: 04/02/2015 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-000750: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Terminal Island Drilling)CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/29/2010Location(s): San Pedro, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-000420: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-000418: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Poughkeepsie, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-000419: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Orangetown, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-000421: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-001057: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Fractures in Geyser's Geothermal Field by Micro-Seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave AnisotropyCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 03/10/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. CX-011808: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 01/27/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-002474: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full Scale Testing Characterization, System Optimization, Demonstration of Grid Connected Wind Turbines and Wind Powered Water Desalination ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9, B5.1Date: 05/28/2010Location(s): TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  8. CX-013845: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Impacts of High Temperatures and Pressures in Oxy-Coal Combustion Systems CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6Date: 06/24/2015 Location(s): UtahOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-100003: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surface and Subsurface Geodesy Combined with Active Borehole Experimentation for the Advanced Characterization of EGS Reservoirs Award Number: DE-EE0006761 CX(s) Applied: A9 Geothermal Technologies Date: 08/27/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Office(s): Golden Field Office

  10. CX-007493: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GoM Miocene Carbon Dioxide Site Characterization Mega Transect: High-Resolution 3-dimensional Seismic Acquisition Survey CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-000751: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Seismic)CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/29/2010Location(s): Long Beach, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-000753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Pilocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (Literature and Computer Review)CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 01/29/2010Location(s): Arcadia, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-000455: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focused Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage Along a Mount Simon Sandstone Fairway in the Michigan BasinCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/07/2009Location(s): Kalamazoo, MichiganOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.16 Date: 09/27/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-010994: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Climate Change CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.11, B3.16 Date: 09/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-010094: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Activity-Specific Categorical Exclusion for Deep Borehole Drilling, Sampling, and Characterization for the Proposed Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco, Washington to the Hanford Site 200 East Area CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/03/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  17. CX-002293: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization, Analysis and Simulation of Fine Coal Filtration Second Year of Two-Year ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/18/2010Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-010144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additional Characterization Sampling at the Coal Pile Ash Basin 788-3A and the Ash Pile 788-A CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03/06/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. CX-004698: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Potential Sites for Near Miscible Carbon Dioxide Applications in Arbuckle ReservoirsCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.6Date: 12/14/2010Location(s): Trego County, KansasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-000637: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Structural Controls of Enhanced Geothermal System-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended TerranesCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/28/2010Location(s): NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. CX-011807: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 01/27/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-012717: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Serial Sectioning Equipment for 3-D Characterization of Microstructure and Composition Effects on Mechanical Behavior of Enhanced Uranium Oxide Fuels - Arizona State University CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41844 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  3. CX-005942: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region - Drilling/Coring ActionsCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.8Date: 06/04/2011Location(s): Craig, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-003689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Site Characterization of Highest-Priority Geologic Formations for Carbon Dioxide Storage in WyomingCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6Date: 09/02/2010Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-000738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Site Characterization of the Highest-Priority Geologic Formations for Carbon Dioxide storage in WyomingCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7, B3.8Date: 01/22/2010Location(s): Sweetwater County, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-003714: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Site Characterization of Highest-Priority Geologic Formations for Carbon Dioxide Storage in WyomingCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7, B3.8Date: 09/02/2010Location(s): Sweetwater County, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-000739: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Site Characterization of the Highest-Priority Geologic Formations for Carbon Dioxide storage in WyomingCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6Date: 01/22/2010Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-003825: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): Long Beach, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-003818: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): Long Beach, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-000414: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Denver, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain RegionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Tucson, ArizonaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-003814: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles for Large Scale Geologic Storage of Carbon DioxideCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): Arcadia, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-006461: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Production and Characterization of Novel Photovoltaic Materials? A Minority University Research Associates Program at North Carolina Central UniversityCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 08/11/2011Location(s): St. Durham, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  16. CX-010906: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research and Development (R&D) to Prepare and Characterize Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-010599: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    R&D to Prepare and Characterize Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/25/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-011424: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research and Development (R&D) to Prepare and Characterize Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/06/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-010907: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research and Development (R&D) to Prepare and Characterize Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-013806: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth in Alloy 709 and Prediction of Service Lives in Nuclear Reactor Components - University of Idaho CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/29/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  1. CX-008301: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-011371: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of New Analytical Capabilities for the Characterization and Measurement of Solid Actinide-Containing Materials Supporting Fuel Cycle Research and Development at Clemson University CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/21/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  3. CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials Characterization Laboratory & Radiological/Environment, Safety and Health Training Facility Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.16, B1.17, B1.23, B1.33, B3.15 Date: 02/18/2014 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

  4. CX-010922: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, Other: Bench Scale Laboratory Research Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-009225: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Z-064, Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B2.1 Date: 09/05/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  6. CX-009693: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company - Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring, December 2012 to December 2013 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  7. CX-009657: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring under 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/05/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  8. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bostick, William D.; Denton, Mark S.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.

    1982-01-01

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  9. CX-004395: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experimental Characterization of Carbon Capture and Storage Materials to Support Geological and Environmental Sciences & Energy System Dynamics AreasCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/05/2010Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-005957: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Hydrocarbon Samples and/or Qualitative/Quantitative Analysis of Hydrocarbon MixturesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/26/2011Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-005634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Hydrocarbon Samples and/or Qualitative/Quantitative Analysis of Hydrocarbon MixturesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/19/2011Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-012101: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Phase I & Phase II Site Characterization for the Proposed Environmental Management Disposal Facility for Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act-Generated Wastes CX(s) Applied: B1.13, B3.1 Date: 02/10/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office

  13. CX-005949: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region- TerraTekCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/04/2011Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-003553: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scale-up of Indium Nitride Process and Characterization of ProductCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Bethlehem, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. Spectral and temporal characteristics of a supercontinuum in tapered optical fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagaev, Sergei N; Denisov, Vladimir I; Zakharyash, Valerii F; Klementyev, Vasilii M; Korel', I I; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Pivtsov, V S; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Kukarin, S V; Smirnov, Sergei V; Fateev, N V

    2004-12-31

    The emission spectrum of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser broadened in a tapered optical fibre and the shape of its envelope are studied as functions of the waist diameter and the laser power coupled to the fibre. By varying the fibre parameters and characteristics of coupled pulses, the envelope of the broadened emission spectrum can be shaped, which is important in using a femtosecond comb for precision measurements. The results of experimental studies of the temporal structure of a supercontinuum in a tapered fibre obtained by using the sum frequency generation are presented for the first time and theoretically interpreted. (optical metrology and quantum frequency standards)

  16. Cancellation of dispersion and temporal modulation with nonentangled frequency-correlated photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres-Company, Victor; Valencia, Alejandra; Hendrych, Martin; Torres, Juan P.

    2011-02-15

    The observation of the so-called dispersion cancellation of paired photons is generally attributed to the presence of frequency entanglement between two frequency anticorrelated photons. In this paper, it is shown that by introducing the appropriate amount of chromatic dispersion or phase modulation between nonentangled photons, it is also possible to observe these effects. Indeed, it is found that the relevant characteristic required for the observation of dispersion cancellation or the cancellation of temporal phase modulation is the presence of certain frequency correlations between the photons and not necessarily the presence of entanglement.

  17. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  18. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark A. King, Lyon B.

    2014-05-15

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations.

  19. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  20. Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SP Reidel

    2000-08-10

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

  1. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  2. CX-100665 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100665 Categorical Exclusion Determination Model Validation and Site Characterization for Early Deployment Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Sites and Establishment of Wave Classification Scheme - Wave Instrumentation Deployment; NEPA Tracking No. 16-017 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: B3.16 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 07/13/2016 Location(s): OR Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to

  3. CX-100274 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100274 Categorical Exclusion Determination An Integrated Approach to Offshore Wind Energy Assessment: Great Lakes 3D Wind Experiment Award Number: DE-EE0005379 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Water Power Program Date: 06/12/2015 Location(s): NY Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Cornell University to develop best practices for offshore wind measurements that are used to characterize

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.3 Existing Regulations B5.3: Modification or abandonment of wells Modification (but not expansion) or plugging and abandonment of wells, provided that site characterization has verified a low potential for seismicity, subsidence, and contamination of freshwater aquifers, and the actions are otherwise consistent with best practices and DOE protocols, including those that protect against uncontrolled releases of harmful materials. Such wells may include,

  5. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-05-15

    This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  6. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-01-19

    This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  7. Characterization and basic research investigations at PEFC electrodes and MEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, M.; Wagner, N.; Steinhilber, G.

    1996-12-31

    For the study of electrochemical and transport mechanisms in polymere electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) electrodes and for a further development of PEFC electrodes it is important to characterize these electrodes. The characterization of the electrodes was performed by electrochemical analytical as well as physical methods on both single electrodes and electrode-membrane assemblies (NEA). In addition to voltage-current characteristics the electrodes were electrochemically measured by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronopotentiometry. To determine the pore systems nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry were used. Chemical composition and microstructure of the electrodes were studied by surface science methods like scanning electron microscopy or X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of characterization are the base for theoretical simulation of fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

  8. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol.

  9. Temporal and spatial study of neon ion emission from a plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuyan, M.; Neog, N. K.; Mohanty, S. R. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur, Kamrup 782402 (India); Rao, C. V. S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Raole, P. M. [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 342044 (India)

    2011-03-15

    The temporal and spatial characteristics of the neon ion beam emissions from a low energy plasma focus device have been studied by employing a multiple Faraday cup assembly and the CR-39 track detectors at different angular and axial positions. In addition, the operating gas pressures were also varied to study the temporal and spatial characteristics of the neon ion beam emissions. The Faraday cup analyses show that the ion flux strongly depends on the operating gas pressure as well as the angular positions. The estimated ion energy measurements at the aperture of the Faraday cup indicate that the plasma focus device is a source of polyenergetic ions ranging from approximately a few keV to a few hundreds of keV, irrespective of the angular positions. The exposed CR-39 detectors have shown the formation of multiple ion tracks with diameter ranging from 2 to 13 {mu}m. The populations of lower diameter tracks (2-6 {mu}m) are observed to be more at 0 deg. and 10 deg. angles. It is also noticed that the most populated track counts have shifted toward the higher diameter as the angular positions change from 0 deg. to 70 deg. The present study enables us to predict a clear picture of ion flux and energy distribution inside the plasma focus chamber that will help to use the device for material irradiation application in a more controlled manner.

  10. The Importance of High Temporal Resolution in Modeling Renewable Energy Penetration Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolosi, Marco; Mills, Andrew D; Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-10-08

    Traditionally, modeling investment and dispatch problems in electricity economics has been limited by computation power. Due to this limitation, simplifications are applied. One common practice, for example, is to reduce the temporal resolution of the dispatch by clustering similar load levels. The increase of intermittent electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E) changes the validity of this assumption. RES-E already cover a certain amount of the total demand. This leaves an increasingly volatile residual demand to be matched by the conventional power market. This paper quantifies differences in investment decisions by applying three different time-resolution residual load patterns in an investment and dispatch power system model. The model optimizes investment decisions in five year steps between today and 2030 with residual load levels for 8760, 288 and 16 time slices per year. The market under consideration is the four zone ERCOT market in Texas. The results show that investment decisions significantly differ across the three scenarios. In particular, investments into base-load technologies are substantially reduced in the high resolution scenario (8760 residual load levels) relative to the scenarios with lower temporal resolution. Additionally, the amount of RES-E curtailment and the market value of RES-E exhibit noteworthy differences.

  11. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination- Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting Technical Document for the Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

  12. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  13. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  14. System and technique for ultrasonic characterization of settling suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Pappas, Richard A.

    2006-11-28

    A system for determining properties of settling suspensions includes a settling container, a mixer, and devices for ultrasonic interrogation transverse to the settling direction. A computer system controls operation of the mixer and the interrogation devices and records the response to the interrogating as a function of settling time, which is then used to determine suspension properties. Attenuation versus settling time for dilute suspensions, such as dilute wood pulp suspension, exhibits a peak at different settling times for suspensions having different properties, and the location of this peak is used as one mechanism for characterizing suspensions. Alternatively or in addition, a plurality of ultrasound receivers are arranged at different angles to a common transmitter to receive scattering responses at a variety of angles during particle settling. Angular differences in scattering as a function of settling time are also used to characterize the suspension.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of a Nanocrystalline Thoria Aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reibold, R A; Satcher, Jr, J H; Baumann, T F; Simpson, R L; Poco, J F

    2004-02-04

    We report the synthesis and characterization for the first example of a low-density nanocrystalline thoria aerogel. The monolithic aerogels were prepared through the solgel polymerization of hydrated thorium nitrate in ethanol using ammonium hydroxide and propylene oxide as gelation initiators. The dried ThO{sub 2} aerogel was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The aerogel network was determined to be composed of spherical primary particles with features in the 5-20 nm range. These particles were also determined to be highly crystalline as evidenced by the higher magnification TEM examination. The thoria aerogel possesses high surface area (120 m{sup 2}/g) and pore diameters in the micro- and mesoporous range.

  16. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL.

  17. Cementitious barriers partnership concrete mixture characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Protiere, Yannick

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage.

  18. Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action, Certification | Department of Energy Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) (2.36 MB) More Documents &

  19. Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

    2007-02-26

    The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

  20. Means and method for characterizing high power, ultra short laser pulses in a real time, on line manner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra short (<10 ps), high power laser pulse is temporally characterized by a system that uses a physical measurement of a wavefront that has been altered in a known manner. The system includes a first reflection switch to remove a portion of a pulse from a beam of pulses, then includes a second reflection switch, operating in a mode that is opposite to the first reflection switch, to slice off a portion of that removed portion. The sliced portion is then directed to a measuring device for physical measurement. The two reflection switches are arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the beam of ultra short pulses such that physical measurement of the sliced portion is related to the temporal measurement of the ultra short pulse by a geometric or trigonometric relationship. The reflection switches are operated by a control pulse that is directed to impinge on each of the reflection switches at a 90.degree. angle of incidence.

  1. Apparatus and method for characterizing conductivity of materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1988-04-13

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 8 figs.

  2. High-Resolution Residential Feeder Load Characterization and Variability Modelling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential Feeder Load Characterization and Variability Modelling Andrew Pohl, Jay Johnson, Santiago Sena, Robert Broderick, and Jimmy Quiroz Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, USA Abstract - Data from of a highly instrumented residential feeder in Ota City, Japan was used to determine 1 second load variability for the aggregation of 50, 100, 250, and 500 homes. The load variability is categorized by binning the data into seasons, weekdays vs. weekends, and time of day to

  3. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-008905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-012121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Notice of Preliminary Determination of Energy Savings for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 CX(s) Applied: A6 Date: 04/25/2014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-004264: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phase II, Determination of Uranium in GroundwaterCX(s) Applied: B3.8Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Richland, WashingtonOffice(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  7. CX-010493: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determining Distribution Coefficients by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-014390: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Environmental Policy Act Determination at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 12/03/2015 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Fermi Site Office

  9. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Louisiana | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... April 24, 2014 CX-011646: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rework West Hackberry 36" Crude Oil Pipeline Mainline Valves CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12102013 Location(s): ...

  10. CX-000768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determining the Variability of Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury LevelsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/07/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-014511: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Density Determination by Gas Displacement Picnometry CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 10/05/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  12. CX-100604 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Determination of Coverage for Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products RIN 1904-AC66 CX(s) Applied: A6 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 05/04/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-100474 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Determination of Coverage for Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products RIN 1904-AC66 CX(s) Applied: A6 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 02/18/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  14. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  15. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, D.T.; Jubin, R.T.; Schmidt, T.W.

    2001-06-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc. (Participant) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) was the measurement of the formation of solids in crude oils and petroleum products that are commonly transported through pipelines. This information is essential in the proper design, operation and maintenance of the petroleum pipeline system in the United States. Recently, new petroleum discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico have shown that there is a potential for plugging of undersea pipeline because of the precipitation of wax. It is important that the wax points of the expected crude oils be well characterized so that the production facilities for these new wells are capable of properly transporting the expected production. The goal of this work is to perform measurements of solids formation in crude oils and petroleum products supplied by the Participant. It is

  16. Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. . Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. ); Hills, R.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

  17. Characterizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farrens 1 , Dipak Ghosal 1 , Eric Pouyoul 2 and Brian Tierney 2 1 Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, CA, nhanford, vahuja, mkfarrens,dghosal@ucdavi...

  18. Temporal evolution of solar wind ion composition and their source coronal holes during the declining phase of cycle 23. I. Low-latitude extension of polar coronal holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Wang, Yi-Ming; Muglach, Karin; Young, Peter R.; Lepri, Susan T.

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed 27 solar wind (SW) intervals during the declining phase of cycle 23, whose source coronal holes (CHs) can be unambiguously identified and are associated with one of the polar CHs. We found that the SW ions have a temporal trend of decreasing ionization state, and such a trend is different between the slow and fast SW. The photospheric magnetic field, both inside and at the outside boundary of the CH, also exhibits a trend of decrease with time. However, EUV line emissions from different layers of the atmosphere exhibit different temporal trends. The coronal emission inside the CH generally increases toward the CH boundary as the underlying field increases in strength and becomes less unipolar. In contrast, this relationship is not seen in the coronal emission averaged over the entire CH. For C and O SW ions that freeze-in at lower altitude, stronger correlation between their ionization states and field strength (both signed and unsigned) appears in the slow SW, while for Fe ions that freeze-in at higher altitude, stronger correlation appears in the fast SW. Such correlations are seen both inside the CH and at its boundary region. On the other hand, the coronal electron temperature correlates well with the SW ion composition only in the boundary region. Our analyses, although not able to determine the likely footpoint locations of the SW of different speeds, raise many outstanding questions for how the SW is heated and accelerated in response to the long-term evolution of the solar magnetic field.

  19. Barron: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-5402) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-5402) Barron: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-5402) December 17, 2015 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Barron ...

  20. Shandong Hongtai: Noncompliance Determination (2016-SE-42010...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Noncompliance Determination (2016-SE-42010) Shandong Hongtai: Noncompliance Determination (2016-SE-42010) January 6, 2016 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to ...

  1. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  2. Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. II. Local evolution moves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Höhn, Philipp A.

    2014-10-15

    Several quantum gravity approaches and field theory on an evolving lattice involve a discretization changing dynamics generated by evolution moves. Local evolution moves in variational discrete systems (1) are a generalization of the Pachner evolution moves of simplicial gravity models, (2) update only a small subset of the dynamical data, (3) change the number of kinematical and physical degrees of freedom, and (4) generate a dynamical (or canonical) coarse graining or refining of the underlying discretization. To systematically explore such local moves and their implications in the quantum theory, this article suitably expands the quantum formalism for global evolution moves, constructed in Paper I [P. A. Höhn, “Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. I. Evolving Hilbert spaces,” J. Math. Phys. 55, 083508 (2014); e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1401.6062 [gr-qc

  3. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Rob [University of Colorado] [University of Colorado

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  4. Spatial and temporal evolution of filamentation instability in a current-carrying plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammadhosseini, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the nonlinear regime. Using the magnetohydrodynamic equations, a nonlinear diffusion equation for the magnetic field in the plasma is obtained. This nonlinear equation is numerically solved and the spatiotemporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields and the electron density distribution are plotted. It is shown that as the time passes, the profile of the electric and magnetic fields changes from a sinusoidal shape to a saw-tooth one and the electron density distribution becomes very steepened. Also, the mechanism of the filament formation is then discussed. Furthermore, the effects of the thermal motion, collisions, and ion mass on growth rate of filaments as well as the saturation time are argued. Finally, it is found that the energy dissipation is associated with the aforementioned effects and strong plasma density gradient.

  5. Temporal and Spatial Comparison of Gridded TMY, TDY, and TGY Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Lopez, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2014-02-01

    Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) data sets provide industry standard resource information for building designers and are commonly used by the solar industry to estimate photovoltaic and concentrating solar power system performance. Historically, TMY data sets were only available for certain station locations, but current TMY data sets are available on the same grid as the National Solar Radiation Database data and are referred to as the gridded TMY. In this report, a comparison of TMY, typical direct (normal irradiance) year (TDY), and typical global (horizontal irradiance) year (TGY) data sets were performed to better understand the impact of ancillary weather variables upon them. These analyses identified geographical areas of high and low temporal and spatial variability, thereby providing insight into the representativeness of a particular TMY data set for use in renewable energy as well as other applications.

  6. Following Dynamic Processes by X-ray Tomographic Microscopy with Sub-second Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokso, R.; Marone, F.; Mikuljan, G.; Isenegger, A.; Haberthuer, D.; Schittny, J. C.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-09

    Several non-destructive imaging techniques offer the possibility to observe rapid phenomena in real time, yet most of these techniques fail when it comes to bulky samples and micrometer precision in three dimensions. Therefore there is clearly a need to develop approaches that address such conditions. We identified the large potential that lies in synchrotron-based x-rays as a probe and developed a direct-space tomographic instrument suitable to provide sub-second temporal resolution with several-micrometers spatial resolution. Selected applications from the field of biology and material science are shown in order to demonstrate the unique capabilities in generating three-dimensional images with very high quality making image segmentation and analysis possible for samples that could, until now, only be studied in two dimensions due to the occurrence of rapid structural changes.

  7. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-28

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  8. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knight, Rob [University of Colorado

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  9. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weis, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Yue Ying; Rittersdorf, Ian; Zier, Jacob; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2014-12-17

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Then, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. Thus the general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces.more » The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Those previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.« less

  10. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weis, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Yue Ying; Rittersdorf, Ian; Zier, Jacob; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2014-12-17

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Then, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. Thus the general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces. The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Those previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.

  11. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (∼20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (∼10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ∼70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  12. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  13. AFIP-6 Characterization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Dennis D. Keiser

    2011-12-01

    The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size-plate In center flux trap Position) Characterization Summary Report outlines the fresh fuel characterization efforts performed during the AFIP-6 experiment. The AFIP-6 experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel plates (45-inches long). The AFIP-6 test was the first test with plates that were swaged into the rails of the assembly. This test served to examine the effects of a plate in a swaged condition with longer fuel zones (22.5-inches long), that were centered in the plate. AFIP-6 test plates employed a zirconium interlayer that was co-rolled with the fuel foil. Previous mini-plate and AFIP irradiation experiments performed in ATR have demonstrated the stable behavior of the interface between the U-Mo fuel and the zirconium interlayer.

  14. Microstructure Characterization of RERTR Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Gan; B. D. Miller; D. D. Keiser; T. R. Allen; D. M. Wachs

    2008-09-01

    A variety of phases have the potential to develop in the irradiated fuels for the reduced enrichment research test reactor (RERTR) program. To study the radiation stability of these potential phases, three depleted uranium alloys were cast. The phases of interest were identified including U(Si,Al)3, (U,Mo)(Si,Al)3, UMo2Al20, UAl4, and U6Mo4Al43. These alloys were irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 200ºC up to 3.0 dpa. The microstructure is characterized using SEM and TEM. Microstructural characterization for an archive dispersion fuel plate (U-7Mo fuel particles in Al-2%Si cladding) was also carried out. TEM sample preparation for the irradiated dispersion fuel has been developed.

  15. Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

    2009-03-09

    The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite

  16. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  17. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R.; Alford, W. J.; Gruetzner, James K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  18. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  19. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatnikov, A.N. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TANK 18F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Click, D.; Diprete, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 18F closure samples. Tank 18F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the 'as-received' slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 18F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 18F in March 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 18F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one North Tank 18F Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one South Tank 18F Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 18F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the minimum detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 18F, some were not met due to spectral interferences. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  2. Temporal profile measurements of relativistic electron bunch based on wakefield generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bettoni, S.; Craievich, P.; Lutman, A. A.; Pedrozzi, M.

    2016-02-25

    A complete characterization of the time-resolved longitudinal beam phase space is important to optimize the final performances of an accelerator, and in particular this is crucial for Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. In this study we propose a novel method to characterize the profile of a relativistic electron bunch by passively streaking the beam using its self-interaction with the transverse wakefield excited by the bunch itself passing off-axis through a dielectric-lined or a corrugated waveguide. Results of a proof-of-principle experiment at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility are discussed.

  3. CX-100267 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100267 Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Logistics Systems for Delivering Optimal Biomass Feedstocks to Biorefining Industries in...

  4. CX-100144 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100144 Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar and Distributed Generation as Key Elements in Meeting Vermont's Comprehensive Energy Plan...

  5. CX-007711: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    711: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007711: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production via a Novel Low Pressure, Magnetically Stabilized, ...

  6. EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    35: Environmental Assessment Determination EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project ...

  7. CX-005728: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    28: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005728: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Rural Electric Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric and Agriculture ...

  8. CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine Algae Industrialization Consortium (MAGIC): Combining biofuel and high-value bioproducts to...

  9. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Civilian Radioactive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Civilian ...

  10. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Carlsbad Field Office ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carlsbad Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Carlsbad Field Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Carlsbad Field Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR ...

  11. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: West Valley Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Valley Demonstration Project Categorical Exclusion Determinations: West Valley Demonstration Project Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by West Valley Demonstration ...

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carolina Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in North Carolina. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD ...

  13. Concepts Associated with Transferring Temporal and Spatial Boundary Conditions between Modules in the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2006-10-03

    This document describes concepts associated with transferring temporal and spatial boundary conditions between modules in FRAMES and how FRAMES might consider dynamic feedback.

  14. CX-008738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determination of Microstructure and Chemical State Changes in Ion-Irradiated Fuels and Structural Components with a High Kinetic Energy Electron Detector – Illinois Institute of Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  15. CX-100558 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Determination of Coverage for Portable Air Conditioners (1904-AD02) RIN 1904-AD02 CX(s) Applied: A6 EERE-Buildings Technology Program Date: 03/03/2016 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-100312 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Withdrawal of Proposed Determination Regarding Energy Conservation Program: Natural Draft Commercial Boilers RIN: 1904-AD01 CX(s) Applied: A5 EERE- Buildings Technology Program Date: 07/20/2015 Location(s): Nationwide Office(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-013440: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Record of Categorical Exclusion Determination to Replace Piping Header at Bryan Mound RWIS and RWIP (BM-MM-1027) CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/18/2015 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  18. CX-012693: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experimental Determination and Mechanistic Modeling of Used Fuel Drying by Vacuum and Gas Circulation for Dry Cask Storage – University of South Carolina CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41869 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. CX-000373: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measurements of 222 Radon, 220 Radon, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Natural Carbon Dioxide Fields in Wyoming: Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock IntegrityCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, B3.8Date: 11/20/2009Location(s): Laramie, WyomingOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-002602: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Minneapolis, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-002600: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Minneapolis, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-002599: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Berkeley, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-002598: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Morris, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-002601: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of OpportunityCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Fridley, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-011193: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination for Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B3.6, B3.10, B3.12, B3.15, B5.1, B5.15 Date: 08/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  6. CX-100019: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Determination of Rare Earths in Geothermal Brines and Evaluation of Potential Extraction Techniques CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 08/18/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Geothermal Technologies Award Number: DE-EE0006750

  7. Plasma digital density determining device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien C.; Lovell, Thomas W.; Holly, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

  8. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-03-28

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  9. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  10. Degradative and Morphological Characterization of POSS Modified...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Degradative and Morphological Characterization of POSS Modified Nanohybrid Polyurethane Elastomers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Degradative and Morphological ...

  11. Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (BCCL) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  12. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  13. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting Materials Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus Lightweighting Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  14. CNEA Fresh Fuel Plate Characterization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Keiser; F. Rice

    2012-02-01

    Characterization summary report outlining the findings of the fresh fuel examinations of the plates received from CNEA.

  15. Advanced optical measurements for characterizing photophysical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for future improvements for multiplex nanoparticle synthesis and characterization. ... in diffusionhydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions, and identifying mobile ...

  16. Spatio-Temporal Signal Twice-Whitening Algorithms on the hx3100 Ultra-Low Power Multicore Processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humble, Travis S; Mitra, Pramita; Barhen, Jacob; Schleck, Bryan; Polcari, John; Traweek, Michael

    2010-01-01

    While modern signal detection theory fully accounts for spatially distributed sensors, exploiting these techniques for real-time sensing using large, underwater acoustic arrays requires advances in the spatio-temporal signal processing algorithms. In particular, the computational complexity of many spatio-temporal processing techniques is so large that conventional computer processors lack sufficient throughput to provide real-time processing of large spatio-temporal data sets. These limits are exacerbated when constraints, such as power consumption or footprint, reduce the available computational resources. In this report, we demonstrate an implementation of a signal twice-whitening algorithm that is better suited for processing spatio-temporal data in real time. We emphasize these advances by implementing data whitening on the Coherent Logix hx3100 processor, a programmable multicore processor intended for low-power and high-throughput signal processing. These results serve as an example of how the novel capabilities available from emerging multicore processor platforms can provide real-time, software-defined processing of large data sets acquired by spatially distributed sensing.

  17. Advanced Fine Particulate Characterization Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Benson; Lingbu Kong; Alexander Azenkeng; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Edwin Olson; Jill MacKenzie; A.M. Rokanuzzaman

    2007-01-31

    The characterization and control of emissions from combustion sources are of significant importance in improving local and regional air quality. Such emissions include fine particulate matter, organic carbon compounds, and NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} gases, along with mercury and other toxic metals. This project involved four activities including Further Development of Analytical Techniques for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} Characterization and Source Apportionment and Management, Organic Carbonaceous Particulate and Metal Speciation for Source Apportionment Studies, Quantum Modeling, and High-Potassium Carbon Production with Biomass-Coal Blending. The key accomplishments included the development of improved automated methods to characterize the inorganic and organic components particulate matter. The methods involved the use of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for the inorganic fraction and a combination of extractive methods combined with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure to characterize the organic fraction. These methods have direction application for source apportionment studies of PM because they provide detailed inorganic analysis along with total organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) quantification. Quantum modeling using density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to further elucidate a recently developed mechanistic model for mercury speciation in coal combustion systems and interactions on activated carbon. Reaction energies, enthalpies, free energies and binding energies of Hg species to the prototype molecules were derived from the data obtained in these calculations. Bimolecular rate constants for the various elementary steps in the mechanism have been estimated using the hard-sphere collision theory approximation, and the results seem to indicate that extremely fast kinetics could be involved in these surface reactions. Activated carbon was produced from a blend of lignite coal from the Center Mine in North Dakota and

  18. Means of determining extrusion temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, Robert E.; Canonico, Domenic A.

    1977-01-01

    In an extrusion process comprising the steps of fabricating a metal billet, heating said billet for a predetermined time and at a selected temperature to increase its plasticity and then forcing said heated billet through a small orifice to produce a desired extruded object, the improvement comprising the steps of randomly inserting a plurality of small metallic thermal tabs at different cross sectional depths in said billet as a part of said fabricating step, and examining said extruded object at each thermal tab location for determining the crystal structure at each extruded thermal tab thus revealing the maximum temperature reached during extrusion in each respective tab location section of the extruded object, whereby the thermal profile of said extruded object during extrusion may be determined.

  19. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  20. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas D.; Burgard, Anthony R.; Pharkya, Priti

    2011-09-27

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  1. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  2. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

    2013-06-04

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  3. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  4. Performance of Linear and Nonlinear Two-Leaf Light Use Efficiency Models at Different Temporal Scales

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Xiaocui; Ju, Weimin; Zhou, Yanlian; He, Mingzhu; Law, Beverly E.; Black, T. Andrew; Margolis, Hank A.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Gu, Lianhong; Montagni, Leonardo; et al

    2015-02-25

    The reliable simulation of gross primary productivity (GPP) at various spatial and temporal scales is of significance to quantifying the net exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. This study aimed to verify the ability of a nonlinear two-leaf model (TL-LUEn), a linear two-leaf model (TL-LUE), and a big-leaf light use efficiency model (MOD17) to simulate GPP at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales using GPP derived from 58 eddy-covariance flux sites in Asia, Europe and North America as benchmarks. Model evaluation showed that the overall performance of TL-LUEn was slightly but not significantly better than TL-LUE at half-hourlymore » and daily scale, while the overall performance of both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE were significantly better (p < 0.0001) than MOD17 at the two temporal scales. The improvement of TL-LUEn over TL-LUE was relatively small in comparison with the improvement of TL-LUE over MOD17. However, the differences between TL-LUEn and MOD17, and TL-LUE and MOD17 became less distinct at the 8-day scale. As for different vegetation types, TL-LUEn and TL-LUE performed better than MOD17 for all vegetation types except crops at the half-hourly scale. At the daily and 8-day scales, both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 for forests. However, TL-LUEn had a mixed performance for the three non-forest types while TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 slightly for all these non-forest types at daily and 8-day scales. The better performance of TL-LUEn and TL-LUE for forests was mainly achieved by the correction of the underestimation/overestimation of GPP simulated by MOD17 under low/high solar radiation and sky clearness conditions. TL-LUEn is more applicable at individual sites at the half-hourly scale while TL-LUE could be regionally used at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales. MOD17 is also an applicable option regionally at the 8-day scale.« less

  5. Performance of Linear and Nonlinear Two-Leaf Light Use Efficiency Models at Different Temporal Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaocui; Ju, Weimin; Zhou, Yanlian; He, Mingzhu; Law, Beverly E.; Black, T. Andrew; Margolis, Hank A.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Gu, Lianhong; Montagni, Leonardo; Noormets, Asko; Griffis, Timothy J.; Pilegaard, Kim; Varlagin, Andrej; Valentini, Riccardo; Blanken, Peter D.; Wang, Shaoquiang; Wang, Huimin; Han, Shijie; Yan, Junhau; Li, Yingnian; Zhou, Bingbing; Liu, Yibo

    2015-02-25

    The reliable simulation of gross primary productivity (GPP) at various spatial and temporal scales is of significance to quantifying the net exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. This study aimed to verify the ability of a nonlinear two-leaf model (TL-LUEn), a linear two-leaf model (TL-LUE), and a big-leaf light use efficiency model (MOD17) to simulate GPP at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales using GPP derived from 58 eddy-covariance flux sites in Asia, Europe and North America as benchmarks. Model evaluation showed that the overall performance of TL-LUEn was slightly but not significantly better than TL-LUE at half-hourly and daily scale, while the overall performance of both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE were significantly better (p < 0.0001) than MOD17 at the two temporal scales. The improvement of TL-LUEn over TL-LUE was relatively small in comparison with the improvement of TL-LUE over MOD17. However, the differences between TL-LUEn and MOD17, and TL-LUE and MOD17 became less distinct at the 8-day scale. As for different vegetation types, TL-LUEn and TL-LUE performed better than MOD17 for all vegetation types except crops at the half-hourly scale. At the daily and 8-day scales, both TL-LUEn and TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 for forests. However, TL-LUEn had a mixed performance for the three non-forest types while TL-LUE outperformed MOD17 slightly for all these non-forest types at daily and 8-day scales. The better performance of TL-LUEn and TL-LUE for forests was mainly achieved by the correction of the underestimation/overestimation of GPP simulated by MOD17 under low/high solar radiation and sky clearness conditions. TL-LUEn is more applicable at individual sites at the half-hourly scale while TL-LUE could be regionally used at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales. MOD17 is also an applicable option regionally at the 8-day scale.

  6. FY2001 Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis & Waste Information Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-08-02

    The Fiscal Year 2001 Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis and Waste Information Requirements Document (TSB-WIRD) has the following purposes: (1) To identify and integrate sampling and analysis needs for fiscal year (FY) 2001 and beyond. (2) To describe the overall drivers that require characterization information and to document their source. (3) To describe the process for identifying, prioritizing, and weighting issues that require characterization information to resolve. (4) To define the method for determining sampling priorities and to present the sampling priorities on a tank-by-tank basis. (5) To define how the characterization program is going to satisfy the drivers, close issues, and report progress. (6)To describe deliverables and acceptance criteria for characterization deliverables.

  7. Ultrasound nondestructive characterization of transparent spinel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottiglieri, S.; Portune, A. R.; Haber, R. A.

    2011-06-23

    Ceramic materials have attractive attributes for applications that experience high stresses or strain rates. Compared to metal-based systems, ceramics offer a lower areal density which reduces weight, but do not depreciate the integrity of other properties. The ability to tailor the microstructure of ceramics used in armor systems is a common way to increase specific mechanical properties or obtain certain material characteristics. Properties such as elastic modulus, hardness, and density are those that are typically desired to be enhanced. By modifying the microstructure one can obtain a ceramic with these enhanced properties as well as high optical transmission across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. The testing of these properties and ballistic performance is usually destructive, expensive, and time consuming. Common assessments using ultrasonic NDE usually include spatially locating large flaws, sonic velocity measurements, and elastic property measurements. The use of acoustic spectroscopy to go beyond typical ultrasonic NDE in structural ceramics and allow for the use of a microstructural characterization tool is investigated in this paper. Ultrasound absorption by lithium fluoride precipitates in aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) present as defined spectral peaks. Average heterogeneity size determination in magnesium aluminate spinel MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} by method of acoustic spectroscopy is shown.

  8. Modeling and characterization of recompressed damaged materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, R; Cazamias, J U; Kalantar, D H; LeBlanc, M M; Springer, H K

    2004-02-11

    Experiments have been performed to explore conditions under which spall damage is recompressed with the ultimate goal of developing a predictive model. Spall is introduced through traditional gas gun techniques or with laser ablation. Recompression techniques producing a uniaxial stress state, such as a Hopkinson bar, do not create sufficient confinement to close the porosity. Higher stress triaxialities achieved through a gas gun or laser recompression can close the spall. Characterization of the recompressed samples by optical metallography and electron microscopy reveal a narrow, highly deformed process zone. At the higher pressures achieved in the gas gun, little evidence of spall remains other than differentially etched features in the optical micrographs. With the very high strain rates achieved with laser techniques there is jetting from voids and other signs of turbulent metal flow. Simulations of spall and recompression on micromechanical models containing a single void suggest that it might be possible to represent the recompression using models similar to those employed for void growth. Calculations using multiple, randomly distributed voids are needed to determine if such models will yield the proper behavior for more realistic microstructures.

  9. Environmental data energy technology characterizations: coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This document describes the activities leading to the conversion of coal to electricity. Specifically, the activities consist of coal mining and beneficiation, coal transport, electric power generation, and power transmission. To enhance the usefulness of the material presented, resource requirements, energy products, and residuals for each activity area are normalized in terms of 10/sup 12/ Btus of energy produced. Thus, the total effect of producing electricity from coal can be determined by combining the residuals associated with the appropriate activity areas. Emissions from the coal cycle are highly dependent upon the type of coal consumed as well as the control technology assigned to the activity area. Each area is assumed to be equipped with currently available control technologies that meet environmental regulations. The conventional boiler, for example, has an electrostatic precipitator and a flue gas desulfurization scrubber. While this results in the removal of most of the particulate matter and sulfur dioxide in the flue gas stream, it creates other new environmental residuals -- solid waste, sludge, and ash. There are many different types of mined coal. For informational purposes, two types from two major producing regions, the East and the West, are characterized here. The eastern coal is typical of the Northern Appalachian coal district with a high sulfur and heat content. The western coal, from the Powder River Basin, has much less sulfur, but also has a substantially lower heating value.

  10. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  11. Finite Bandwidth Related Errors in Noise Parameter Determination of PHEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiatr, Wojciech

    2005-08-25

    We analyze errors in the determination of the four noise parameters due to finite measurement bandwidth and the delay time in the source circuit. The errors are especially large when characterizing low-noise microwave transistors at low microwave frequencies. They result from the spectral noise density variation across the measuring receiver band, due to resonant interaction of the highly mismatched transistor input with the source termination. We show also effects of virtual de-correlation of transistor's noise waves due to finite delay time at the input.

  12. Modeling Temporal-Spatial Earthquake and Volcano Clustering at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Parsons; G.A. Thompson; A.H. Cogbill

    2006-05-31

    The proposed national high-level nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain is close to Quaternary faults and cinder cones. The frequency of these events is low, with indications of spatial and temporal clustering, making probabilistic assessments difficult. In an effort to identify the most likely intrusion sites, we based a 3D finite element model on the expectation that faulting and basalt intrusions are primarily sensitive to the magnitude and orientation of the least principal stress in extensional terranes. We found that in the absence of fault slip, variation in overburden pressure caused a stress state that preferentially favored intrusions at Crater Flat. However, when we allowed central Yucca Mountain faults to slip in the model, we found that magmatic clustering was not favored at Crater Flat or in the central Yucca Mountain block. Instead, we calculated that the stress field was most encouraging to intrusions near fault terminations, consistent with the location of the most recent volcanism at Yucca Mountain, the Lathrop Wells cone. We found this linked fault and magmatic system to be mutually reinforcing in the model in that dike inflation favored renewed fault slip.

  13. Temporal Development of Ion Beam Mean Charge State in PulsedVacuum Arc Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2007-06-21

    Vacuum arc ion sources, commonly also known as "Mevva" ionsources, are used to generate intense pulsed metal ion beams. It is knownthat the mean charge state of the ion beam lies between 1 and 4,depending on cathode material, arc current, arc pulse duration, presenceor absence of magnetic field at the cathode, as well background gaspressure. A characteristic of the vacuum arc ion beam is a significantdecrease in ion charge state throughout the pulse. This decrease can beobserved up to a few milliseconds, until a "noisy" steady-state value isestablished. Since the extraction voltage is constant, a decrease in theion charge state has a proportional impact on the average ion beamenergy. This paper presents results of detailed investigations of theinfluence of arc parameters on the temporal development of the ion beammean charge state for a wide range of cathode materials. It is shown thatfor fixed pulse duration, the charge state decrease can be reduced bylower arc current, higher pulse repetition rate, and reduction of thedistance between cathode and extraction region. The latter effect may beassociated with charge exchange processes in the dischargeplasma.

  14. Supercritical carbon dioxide tubular flow under temporally varying thermal boundary condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, H. M.; Halimi, B.; Suh, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    During transient operation of fusion power plants the amount of thermal energy transferred from plasma to surrounding blanket modules will be varied over time, and will affect behavior of the working fluid inside the blanket and power conversion system where the coolant is in a supercritical state. Transient behavior of the power is in pulsed state in tokamak. The Optimized Supercritical Cycle Operation (OSCO) loop is constructed to investigate the thermohydraulic characteristics of the supercritical fluid under temporally varying thermal boundary condition. In this study the tube outer wall temperature data are measured for abrupt change in thermal power as a preliminary power transient test. The OSCO test conditions are selected to include the erratic behavior of the supercritical fluid under pseudo-critical condition during transient. In order to incorporate the delayed response of utilized thermocouples, a time constant is applied to adjust the obtained results. Along with the experimental study, computational fluid dynamic software is used to perform detailed analysis over the test section geometry. The preliminary test results are presented for comparison against the available correlations from the literature. (authors)

  15. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  16. CORRELATED SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF LATE-TIME AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2012-12-20

    The cannonball (CB) model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts that the asymptotic behavior of the spectral energy density of GRB afterglows is a power law in time and in frequency, and the difference between the temporal and spectral power-law indices, {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X}, is restricted to the values 0, 1/2, and 1. Here we report the distributions of the values {alpha}{sub X} and {beta}{sub X}, and their difference for a sample of 315 Swift GRBs. This sample includes all Swift GRBs that were detected before 2012 August 1, whose X-ray afterglow extended well beyond 1 day and the estimated error in {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} was {<=}0.25. The values of {alpha}{sub X} were extracted from the CB-model fits to the entire light curves of their X-ray afterglow while the spectral index was extracted by the Swift team from the time-integrated X-ray afterglow of these GRBs. We found that the distribution of the difference {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} for these 315 Swift GRBs has three narrow peaks around 0, 1/2, and 1 whose widths are consistent with being due to the measurement errors, in agreement with the CB-model prediction.

  17. Decreasing the temporal complexity for nonlinear, implicit reduced-order models by forecasting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlberg, Kevin; Ray, Jaideep; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart

    2015-02-14

    Implicit numerical integration of nonlinear ODEs requires solving a system of nonlinear algebraic equations at each time step. Each of these systems is often solved by a Newton-like method, which incurs a sequence of linear-system solves. Most model-reduction techniques for nonlinear ODEs exploit knowledge of system's spatial behavior to reduce the computational complexity of each linear-system solve. However, the number of linear-system solves for the reduced-order simulation often remains roughly the same as that for the full-order simulation. We propose exploiting knowledge of the model's temporal behavior to (1) forecast the unknown variable of the reduced-order system of nonlinear equationsmore » at future time steps, and (2) use this forecast as an initial guess for the Newton-like solver during the reduced-order-model simulation. To compute the forecast, we propose using the Gappy POD technique. As a result, the goal is to generate an accurate initial guess so that the Newton solver requires many fewer iterations to converge, thereby decreasing the number of linear-system solves in the reduced-order-model simulation.« less

  18. Decreasing the temporal complexity for nonlinear, implicit reduced-order models by forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Kevin; Ray, Jaideep; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart

    2015-02-14

    Implicit numerical integration of nonlinear ODEs requires solving a system of nonlinear algebraic equations at each time step. Each of these systems is often solved by a Newton-like method, which incurs a sequence of linear-system solves. Most model-reduction techniques for nonlinear ODEs exploit knowledge of system's spatial behavior to reduce the computational complexity of each linear-system solve. However, the number of linear-system solves for the reduced-order simulation often remains roughly the same as that for the full-order simulation. We propose exploiting knowledge of the model's temporal behavior to (1) forecast the unknown variable of the reduced-order system of nonlinear equations at future time steps, and (2) use this forecast as an initial guess for the Newton-like solver during the reduced-order-model simulation. To compute the forecast, we propose using the Gappy POD technique. As a result, the goal is to generate an accurate initial guess so that the Newton solver requires many fewer iterations to converge, thereby decreasing the number of linear-system solves in the reduced-order-model simulation.

  19. Disentangling multidimensional spatio-temporal data into their common and aberrant responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Young Hwan; Korkola, James; Amin, Dhara N.; Moasser, Mark M.; Carmena, Jose M.; Gray, Joe W.; Tomlin, Claire J.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-04-22

    With the advent of high-throughput measurement techniques, scientists and engineers are starting to grapple with massive data sets and encountering challenges with how to organize, process and extract information into meaningful structures. Multidimensional spatio-temporal biological data sets such as time series gene expression with various perturbations over different cell lines, or neural spike trains across many experimental trials, have the potential to acquire insight about the dynamic behavior of the system. For this potential to be realized, we need a suitable representation to understand the data. A general question is how to organize the observed data into meaningful structures and how to find an appropriate similarity measure. A natural way of viewing these complex high dimensional data sets is to examine and analyze the large-scale features and then to focus on the interesting details. Since the wide range of experiments and unknown complexity of the underlying system contribute to the heterogeneity of biological data, we develop a new method by proposing an extension of Robust Principal Component Analysis (RPCA), which models common variations across multiple experiments as the lowrank component and anomalies across these experiments as the sparse component. We show that the proposed method is able to find distinct subtypes and classify data sets in a robust way without any prior knowledge by separating these common responses and abnormal responses. Thus, the proposed method provides us a new representation of these data sets which has the potential to help users acquire new insight from data.

  20. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; et al

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnifiedmore » x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.« less