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1

Steam reformer with catalytic combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

Voecks, Gerald E. (La Crescenta, CA)

1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Accelerated Weathering of Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Accelerated Weathering of Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation Material Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions by E.M. Pierce ...

3

Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer System. Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) More Documents & Publications Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

5

Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA); Whelan, James A. (Bricktown, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ratio Parameters in Steam-Reforming Hydrogen productionan Insufficient Parameter in the Steam-Reforming Process,”Impurities on the Methanol Steam-Reforming Process for Fuel

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Simulation of terrace wall methane-steam reforming reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrace wall arrangement is one of the most common arrangements for methane-steam reforming reactor furnaces. In this work, a mathematical model of heat transfer in terrace wall furnaces has been developed. The model has been coupled with a reliable ... Keywords: heat transfer modeling, methane-steam reforming, reformer simulation, terrace wall furnace

J. S. Soltan Mohammadzadeh; A. Zamaniyan

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Thermodynamic and Experimental Study on the Steam Reforming ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For improving hydrogen yield, a new system for steam reforming of bio-oil with site ... Kinetic Modeling Study of Oxy-methane Combustion at Ordinary Pressure.

11

Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Compatibility of selected ceramics with steam-methane reformer environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional steam reforming of methane to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}) hasa conversion efficiency of about 85%. Replacement of metal tubes in the reformer with ceramic tubes offers the potential for operation at temperatures high enough to increase the efficiency to 98-99%. However, the two candidate ceramic materials being given strongest consideration, sintered alpha Si carbide and Si carbide particulate-strengthened alumina, have been shown to react with components of the reformer environment. Extent of degradation as a function of steam partial pressure and exposure time has been studied, and results suggest limits under which these structural ceramics can be used in advanced steam-methane reformers.

Keiser, J.R.; Howell, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Williams, J.J.; Rosenberg, R.A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels  

SciTech Connect

Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state are discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H/sub 2/ + CO and 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed methanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol. 36 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Lalk, T.R.; McCall, D.M.; McCanlies, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating...

15

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Technology Overview  

Coal added as reductant and for energy • What happens inside the reformer? Water evaporates Nitrates reduced to nitrogen gas

16

Microchannel Process Technology for Compact Methane Steam Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of microchannel reaction engineering and applications to compact chemical reactors has expanded rapidly both academically and industrially in recent years. Velocys{reg_sign}, a spin-out company from Battelle Memorial Institute, is commercializing microchannel process technology for large-scale chemical processing. Hydrogen production at industrial rates in compact Velocys hardware is made possible through increases in both heat and mass transfer rates for highly active and novel catalysts. In one example, a microchannel methane steam reforming reactor is presented with integrated catalytic partial oxidation of methane prior to catalytic combustion with low excess air (25%) to generate the required energy for undothermic methane steam reforming in adjacent channels. Heat transfer rates from the exothermic reactions exceed 18 W/cm{sup 2} of interplanar heat transfer surface area and exceed 65 W/cm{sup 3} of total reaction volume for a methane steam reforming contact time near 4 milliseconds. The process intensity of the Velocys methane steam reformer well exceeds that of conventional steam reformers, which have a typical volumetric heat flux below 1 W/cm{sup 3}. The integration of multiple unit operations and improvements in process intensification result in significant capital and operating cost savings for commercial applications.

Tonkovich, A L.; Perry, Steve; Wang, Yong; Qiu, Dongming; LaPlante, Timothy J.; Rogers, William A.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

BANNING DL

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Performance comparison between partial oxidation and methane steam reforming processes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro combined heat and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance comparison between partial oxidation and methane steam reforming processes for solid recirculation are used along with steam methane reforming. Further Steam Methane Reforming process produces Cell fueled by natural gas with two different types of pre-reforming systems, namely Steam Reforming

Liso, Vincenzo

20

Combined Steam Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas under Electrical Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Steam Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas under Electrical production from simultaneous steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane using an ac corona discharge and steam reforming has a benefit in terms of balancing the heat load. Methane conversions can be achieved

Mallinson, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Catalysts for hydrogen production by steam reforming of dimethyl ether (DME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimethyl ether (DME) is expected as one of clean fuels. We have been studying on DME steam reforming for hydrogen production. Copper alumina catalysts prepared by a sol-gel method produced large quantities of H2 with DME steam reforming. The reason was ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, sol-gel method, steam reforming

Kaoru Takeishi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

None

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microchannel steam-methane reforming under constant and variable surface temperature distributions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Steam-methane reforming is a well understood industrial process used for generating hydrogen and synthesis gas. The reaction is generally carried out with residence times on… (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Mixed-Dimensionality Modeling Approach for Interaction of Heterogeneous Steam Reforming Reactions and Heat Transfer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen is most often produced on an industrial scale by catalytic steam methane reforming, an equilibrium-limited, highly endothermic process requiring the substantial addition of heat… (more)

Valensa, Jeroen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Pressure Steam Reforming of High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids S. Ahmed, S. Lee, D. Papadias, and R. Kumar November 6, 2007 Laurel, MD Research sponsored by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Rationale and objective Rationale „ Steam reforming of liquid fuels at high pressures can reduce hydrogen compression costs - Much less energy is needed to pressurize liquids (fuel and water) than compressing gases (reformate or H 2 ) „ High pressure reforming is advantageous for subsequent separations and hydrogen purification Objective „ Develop a reformer design that takes advantage of the savings in compression cost in the steam reforming bio-derived liquid fuels - Metric:

29

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4) durability must not be compromised--binding agent should not react with the NAS product and binding agent should not create an unfavorable pH environment that may cause accelerated leaching. It is the goal of the present study to survey cementitious waste forms based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Ceramicrete, and hydroceramic binders by correlating waste loading, density and compressive strength and then determine if these binders affect the product performance in terms of the PCT response. This will be done by making a one-to-one comparison of the PCT response measured on granular NAS mineral product (mixed bed and fines products) with the PCT response of the monolithed NAS product in the different binders. Future studies may include, refining the above binders, and examining other binders. It is likely that binders formed from kaolin would be most compatible with the chemistry of the THOR{reg_sign} mineral waste form which is made by steam reforming of kaolin and sodium rich wastes. The economics of production on a large scale have yet to be investigated for any of the binders tested.

Jantzen, C

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

30

EFFECT OF H2 PRODUCED THROUGH STEAM-METHANE REFORMING ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EFFECT OF H2 PRODUCED THROUGH STEAM-METHANE REFORMING ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY O. Le Corre1 , C@emn.fr ABSTRACT In-situ hydrogen production is carried out by a catalytic reformer kit set up into exhaust gases-thermal reforming process is achieved. Hydrogen production is mainly dependent on O2 content in exhaust gases

31

Catalysis Letters 59 (1999) 9394 93 Stepwise methane steam reforming: a route to CO-free hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalysis Letters 59 (1999) 93­94 93 Stepwise methane steam reforming: a route to CO-free hydrogen-free hydrogen. Keywords: methane decomposition, Ni/zirconia, steam gasification In order to utilize hydrogen of impurities, particularly carbon monoxide. Steam reforming, partial oxidation and au- tothermal reforming [1

Goodman, Wayne

32

Numerical simulation of micro/mini-channel based methane-steam reformer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Numerical modeling of methane-steam reforming is performed in a micro/mini-channel with heat input through catalytic channel walls. The low-Mach number, variable density Navier-Stokes equations together… (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Computational heterogeneous catalysis applied to steam methane reforming over nickel and nickel/silver catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction is the primary industrial means for producing hydrogen gas. As such, it is a critical support process for applications including petrochemical processing and ammonia synthesis. ...

Blaylock, Donnie Wayne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

Vojvodic, Aleksandra

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Dynamic response of steam-reformed, methanol-fueled, polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical models were developed for the dynamic response of steam-reformed, methanol-fueled, polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications. Focus is on heat transfer effects likely to limit rapid response of PEFC systems. Depending on the thermal mass, the heat exchangers and steam reformer can have time constants on the order of several seconds to many minutes. On the other hand, the characteristic time constants associated with pressure/density disturbances arising from flow rate fluctuations are on the order of milliseconds. In vehicular applications, the response time of the turbomachinery, which is determined by rotational inertia, can be on the order of seconds or less. Dynamic reformer model was used to examine methanol conversion efficiency and thermal performance during a cold start. Response times are determined to achieve 50-100% of the steady-state methanol conversion for two catalyst tube diameters. Thermal performance is considered in terms of the approach to steady-state temperature, possibility of catalyst overheating, and penalty in system efficiency incurred during startup time. For the complete reference PEFC system, various turn-down scenarios were simulated by varying the relative rates of change of fuel cell loading and system flows. Depending on relative rates of cell loading changes to flow rate changes, overheating of the catalyst can occur due to excess heat transfer in the reformer preheater; this can be controlled by an additional water quench between catalyst bed and preheater, but only if the flow rate change is sufficiently fast relative to load changes.

Geyer, H.K.; Ahluwalia, R.K.; Kumar, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A flexible computer software package for industrial steam reformers and methanators based on rigorous heterogeneous mathematical models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced software package for industrial steam reformers based upon heterogeneous models for the catalyst tube is developed and successfully checked against a number of top-fired and side-fired industrial reformers. The package is further developed ...

F. M. Alhabdan; M. A. Abashar; S. S. E. Elnashaie

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Engineering Study for a Full Scale Demonstration of Steam Reforming Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific's Mill in Big Island, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

Georgia-Pacific Corporation performed an engineering study to determine the feasibility of installing a full-scale demonstration project of steam reforming black liquor chemical recovery at Georgia-Pacific's mill in Big Island, Virginia. The technology considered was the Pulse Enhanced Steam Reforming technology that was developed and patented by Manufacturing and Technology Conversion, International (MTCI) and is currently licensed to StoneChem, Inc., for use in North America. Pilot studies of steam reforming have been carried out on a 25-ton per day reformer at Inland Container's Ontario, California mill and on a 50-ton per day unit at Weyerhaeuser's New Bern, North Carolina mill.

Robert De Carrera; Mike Ohl

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

38

Steam reforming as a method to treat Hanford underground storage tank (UST) wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Sandia program that included partnerships with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Synthetica Technologies, Inc. to design and test a steam reforming system for treating Hanford underground storage tank (UST) wastes. The benefits of steam reforming the wastes include the resolution of tank safety issues and improved radionuclide separations. Steam reforming destroys organic materials by first gasifying, then reacting them with high temperature steam. Tests indicate that up to 99% of the organics could be removed from the UST wastes by steam exposure. In addition, it was shown that nitrates in the wastes could be destroyed by steam exposure if they were first distributed as a thin layer on a surface. High purity alumina and nickel alloys were shown to be good candidates for materials to be used in the severe environment associated with steam reforming the highly alkaline, high nitrate content wastes. Work was performed on designing, building, and demonstrating components of a 0.5 gallon per minute (gpm) system suitable for radioactive waste treatment. Scale-up of the unit to 20 gpm was also considered and is feasible. Finally, process demonstrations conducted on non-radioactive waste surrogates were carried out, including a successful demonstration of the technology at the 0.1 gpm scale.

Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B. [eds.] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A novel technique for on-line coke gasification during propane steam reforming using forced CO2 cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Steam reforming is an important source of synthesis gas production that is used by major petrochemical processes such as ammonia, methanol and the Fisher-Tropsch process.… (more)

Alenazey, Feraih Sheradh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied.

Jantzen, C

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermodynamic investigation into steam-methane reforming and the synthesis of methane from carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

In this study the stream-methane equilibrium reaction was investigated by considering both methane synthesis from hydrogen and carbon monoxide and by considering steam-methane reforming from methane and steam. A FORTRAN computer program was written to carry out all the calculations over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and initial compositions. The products of each process as a function of pressure, temperature, and starting ratio of reactant gases were calculated, as well as the heats involved. In both processes the minimum ratios above which no carbon precipitates were determined as a function of temperature and pressure were given.

Wu, L.H.; Lietzke, M.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Steam reforming on transition-metal carbides from density-functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A screening study of the steam reforming reaction (CH_4 + H_2O -> CO + 3H_2) on early transition-metal carbides (TMC's) is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. The set of considered surfaces includes the alpha-Mo_2C(100) surfaces, the low-index (111) and (100) surfaces of TiC, VC, and delta-MoC, and the oxygenated alpha-Mo_2C(100) and TMC(111) surfaces. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities towards the steam reforming reaction, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. The reactivity is discussed in terms of the electronic structure of the clean surfaces. Two surfaces, the delta-MoC(100) and the oxygen passivated alpha-Mo_2C(100) surfaces, are identified as promising steam reforming catalysts. These findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

Vojvodic, Aleksandra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hydrogen production from the steam reforming of Dinethyl Ether and Methanol  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for fuel cell applications. Methanol has long been considered as a fuel for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds due to its high energy density, low reforming temperature, and zero impurity content. However, it has not been accepted as the fuel of choice due its current limited availability, toxicity and corrosiveness. While methanol steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds has been extensively studied, the steam reforming of DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + 3H{sub 2}O = 2CO{sub 2} + 6H{sub 2}, has had limited research effort. DME is the simplest ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) and is a gas at ambient conditions. DME has physical properties similar to those of LPG fuels (i.e. propane and butane), resulting in similar storage and handling considerations. DME is currently used as an aerosol propellant and has been considercd as a diesel substitute due to the reduced NOx, SOx and particulate emissions. DME is also being considered as a substitute for LPG fuels, which is used extensively in Asia as a fuel for heating and cooking, and naptha, which is used for power generation. The potential advantages of both methanol and DME include low reforming temperature, decreased fuel proccssor startup energy, environmentally benign, visible flame, high heating value, and ease of storage and transportation. In addition, DME has the added advantages of low toxicity and being non-corrosive. Consequently, DME may be an ideal candidate for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for both automotive and portable power applications. The steam reforming of DME has been demonstrated to occur through a pair of reactions in series, where the first reaction is DME hydration followed by MeOH steam reforming to produce a hydrogen rich stream.

Semelsberger, T. A. (Troy A.); Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorne Woods, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell is described capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Young, J.E.; Fraioli, A.V.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Methanol Steam Reforming Micro Reactor for Proton Exchange Membrane Micro Fuel Cell System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat, mass and momentum transfer from a fuel reforming packed bed to a surrounding silicon wafer has been simulated. Modeling showed quantitatively reasonable agreement with experimental data for fuel conversion efficiency, hydrogen production rate, outlet methanol mole fraction and outlet steam mole fraction. The variation in fuel conversion efficiency with the micro reformer thermal isolation can be used to optimize fuel-processing conditions for micro PEM fuel cells.

Park, H G; Piggott, W T; Chung, J; Morse, J D; Havstad, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Benett, W; Sopchak, D; Upadhye, R

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts Hua Song Lingzhi Zhang Umit S. Ozkan* November 6 th , 2007 Heterogeneous Catalysis Research Group Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 *Ozkan.1@osu.edu Biomass to Hydrogen (Environmentally Friendly) Plant cultivation Plant cultivation Saccharification Saccharification / / Fermentation Fermentation Anaerobic digestion Anaerobic digestion Residues of Residues of agroindustries agroindustries and cultivations and cultivations Municipal Solid Waste Municipal Solid Waste (organic fraction) (organic fraction) Distillation Distillation Reformation of ethanol

48

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING FOR TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

HEWITT WM

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

49

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Methanol synthesis gas from catalytic steam reforming of wood  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were successful in developing catalyst systems and operating conditions for generation of a methanol synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Some methane remained in the gas mixture. Wood was reacted with steam at a steam-to-wood weight ratio of about 0.9 and a temperature of 750/sup 0/C (1380/sup 0/F) in the presence of several catalysts. Results are presented for two different catalyst systems.

Mudge, L.K.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Weber, S.L.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Process and apparatus for the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of hydrocarbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the steam reforming of hydrocarbon, particularly methane, under elevated temperature and pressure to produce hydrogen, a feed of steam and hydrocarbon is fed into a first reaction volume containing essentially only reforming catalyst to partially reform the feed. The balance of the feed and the reaction products of carbon dioxide and hydrogen are then fed into a second reaction volume containing a mixture of catalyst and adsorbent which removes the carbon dioxide from the reaction zone as it is formed. The process is conducted in a cycle which includes these reactions followed by countercurrent depressurization and purge of the adsorbent to regenerate it and repressurization of the reaction volumes preparatory to repeating the reaction-sorption phase of the cycle.

Sircar, Shivaji (Wescosville, PA); Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond (Fogelsville, PA); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Steam Reforming and Autothermal Reforming for Fuel Cell Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the increasing demand for fuel cell applications in transportation, the performance of reformers using gasoline or diesel as the fuel needs to be optimized.… (more)

Shi, Liming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

T.A. Semelsberger

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preparation, characterization, and evaluation of Mg-Al mixed oxide supported nickel catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The conversion of ethanol to hydrogen or syngas can be achieved by reacting ethanol with water via steam reforming, CH3CH2OH + (1-x)H2O = (4-x)H2 +… (more)

Coleman, Luke James Ivor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Influence of Ceria and Nickel Addition to Alumina-Supported Rhodium Catalyst for Propane Steam Reforming at Low Temperatures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalyst composition-structure-activity relationships for propane steam reforming over supported Rh catalysts. The work investigates the… (more)

Li, Yan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rh and Co-based catalyst performance was compared for steam reforming of ethanol under conditions suitable for industrial hydrogen production. The reaction conditions were varied to elucidate the differences in reaction pathways on both catalysts. On Co/ZnO, CH4 is a secondary product formed through the methanation reaction, while it is produced directly by ethanol decomposition on Rh. The difference in the reaction mechanism is shown to favor Co-based catalysts for selective hydrogen production under elevated system pressures (up to 15 bar) of industrial importance. The carbon deposition rate was also studied, and we show that Co is more prone to coking and catalyst failure. However, the Co/ZnO catalyst can be regenerated, by mild oxidation, despite the high carbon deposition rate. We conclude that Co/ZnO is a more suitable catalyst system for steam reforming of ethanol due to the low methane selectivity, low cost and possibility of regeneration with mild oxidation.

Karim, Ayman M.; Su, Yu; Sun, Junming; Yang, Cheng; Strohm, James J.; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

INVESTIGATION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY AND BED PERFORMANCE IN A FLUIDIZED BED BLACK LIQUOR STEAM REFORMER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Utah project ''Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer'' (DOE award number DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation for projects to provide technical support for black liquor and biomass gasification. The primary focus of the project is to provide support for a DOE-sponsored demonstration of MTCI's black liquor steam reforming technology at Georgia-Pacific's paper mill in Big Island, Virginia. A more overarching goal is to improve the understanding of phenomena that take place during low temperature black liquor gasification. This is achieved through five complementary technical tasks: (1) construction of a fluidized bed black liquor gasification test system, (2) investigation of bed performance, (3) evaluation of product gas quality, (4) black liquor conversion analysis and modeling and (5) computational modeling of the Big Island gasifier. Four experimental devices have been constructed under this project. The largest facility, which is the heart of the experimental effort, is a pressurized fluidized bed gasification test system. The system is designed to be able to reproduce conditions near the black liquor injectors in the Big Island steam reformer, so the behavior of black liquor pyrolysis and char gasification can be quantified in a representative environment. The gasification test system comprises five subsystems: steam generation and superheating, black liquor feed, fluidized bed reactor, afterburner for syngas combustion and a flue gas cooler/condenser. The three-story system is located at University of Utah's Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility, and all resources there are available to support the research.

Kevin Whitty

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

University of Utah's project entitled 'Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer' (DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation released by the U.S. Department of Energy in December 2001, requesting proposals for projects targeted towards black liquor/biomass gasification technology support research and development. Specifically, the solicitation was seeking projects that would provide technical support for Department of Energy supported black liquor and biomass gasification demonstration projects under development at the time.

Kevin Whitty

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS A REPORT SUBMITTED;Abstract A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous ow of steam and water in porous media with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeability for steam phase

Stanford University

62

Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

Nicholas R. Soelberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR® steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR® steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR® technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR® can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR® can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR® process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Phase 2 TWR Steam Reforming Test for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste (SBW) is stored in stainless steel tanks a the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the SBW into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. Fluidized bed steam reforming technology, licensed to ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC (TWR) by Manufacturing Technology Conversion International, was tested in two phases using an INEEL (Department of Energy) fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, reductant stoichiometry, and process temperature were varied to identify and demonstrate how the process might be optimized to improve operation and product characteristics. The first week of testing was devoted primarily to process chemistry and the second week was devoted more toward bed stability and particle size control.

Nicholas R. Soelberg; Doug Marshall; Dean Taylor; Steven Bates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Temperature profiles determine HRSG steam production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examine how temperature profiles affect steam production in heat recovery steam generators(HRSG). A typical gas/steam temperature profile for a HRSG is shown. Heat balance equations for the superheater, evaporator, and the complete HRSG are given along with examples for calculating the HRSG temperature profiles after assuming the pinch and approach point temperatures.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Feasibility Analysis of Steam Reforming of Biodiesel by-product Glycerol to Make Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude glycerol is the major byproduct from biodiesel industry. In general, for every 100 pounds of biodiesel produced, approximately 10 pounds of crude glycerol are produced as a by-product. As the biodiesel industry rapidly expands in the U.S., the market is being flooded with this low quality waste glycerol. Due to its high impurities, it is expensive to purify and use in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics industries. Biodiesel producers should seek an alternative method which is economically and environmentally friendly. This research contains reforming process to covert waste glycerol from a biodiesel industry into sellable hydrogen. This process consists of 850oC reformer, 350oC and 210oC shift reactors for water gas shift reaction, flash tanks, and a separator. It is considered to be the least expensive method. At 850oC and 1 atm pressure, glycerol reacts with superheated steam to produce gaseous mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane. Reformer is a batch process where only 68% of waste glycerol is converted into gaseous mixture. The excess glycerol is recycled back as a feedstock. Water gas shift (WGS) reaction, further convert carbon monoxide into hydrogen and carbon dioxide which is further subjected to separation process to isolate hydrogen from CO2 and any other impurities. The final product stream consists of 68% of hydrogen, and 27% of CO2 based on molar flow rate.

Joshi, Manoj

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming of INEEL SBW Using THORsm Mineralizing Technology  

SciTech Connect

Sodium bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Many studies have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. DOE desired further experimental data, with regard to steam reforming technology, to make informed decisions concerning selection of treatment technology for SBW. Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was performed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel September 27 through October 1, 2004. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, and located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Personnel from Science Applications International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, operated the pilot plant. The pilot scale test was terminated as planned after achieving a total of 100 hrs of cumulative/continuous processing operation. About 230 kg of SBW surrogate were processed that resulted in about 88 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 62%. The process achieved about a 90% turnover of the starting bed. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. Results of product performance testing conducted by SRNL will be reported separately by SRNL.

Arlin L. Olson; Nicholas R. Soelberg; Douglas W. Marshall; Gary L. Anderson

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) WITH HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mathematical modelling of diffusion-reaction, and solution algorithm for complex reaction networks in porous catalyst pellets-steam reforming of natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three models of different degrees of rigor are developed for diffusion and reaction in porous catalyst pellets for the industrially important multicomponents' system with a multiple reversible reaction for the steam reforming of natural gas. The more ...

M. E. Abashar; S. S. Elnashaie

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWO-SPT-2007-00249 LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) For Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) November, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DEA-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, or product or process

73

Steam Reforming Solidification of Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is conducting research on aqueous separations processes for the nuclear fuel cycle. This research includes development of solvent extraction processes for the separation of cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions to reduce the short-term decay heat load. The cesium/strontium strip solution from candidate separation processes will require treatment and solidification for managed storage. Steam reforming is currently being investigated for stabilization of these streams because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach-resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. These ongoing experimental studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of steam reforming for this application.

Julia L. Tripp; T. G. Garn; R. D. Boardman; J. D. Law

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming of Hanford LAW Using THORsm Mineralizing Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a highly efficient cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.7 hrs of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved essentially complete bed turnover within approximately 40 hours. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. SRNL will report separately the results of product performance testing that were accomplished.

Olson, Arlin L.; Nicholas R Soelberg; Douglas W. Marshall; Gary L. Anderson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) as the technology of choice for treatment of about one million gallons of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid and alkali and aluminum nitrates with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium. The steam reforming process will convert the SBW into dry, solid, carbonate and aluminate minerals supporting a preferred path for disposal as remote handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) will design, build, and operate an Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that will comprise an integrated THOR{sup R} process system that will utilize dual fluidized bed steam reformers (FBSR) for treatment of the SBW. Design of the IWTU is nearing completion. The IWTU will be constructed at INTEC, immediately east of the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF), with planned fabrication and construction to start in early 2007 upon receipt of needed permits and completion of design and engineering. This paper provides a project and process overview of the IWTU and discusses the design and construction status. IWTU equipment and facility designs and bases will be presented. (authors)

Landman, W.; Roesener, S. [CH2M WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mason, B.; Wolf, K.; Amaria, N. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste  

SciTech Connect

A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: (1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; (2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and (3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.; Wood, R.A.; Barnes, C.M.

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste  

SciTech Connect

A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: 1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; 2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and 3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Wood, Richard Arthur; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Catalytic Steam Reforming of Gasifier Tars: On-Line Monitoring of Tars with a Transportable Molecular-Beam Mass Spectrometer; Milestone Completion Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for evaluating catalytic tar decomposition in real time is presented. The effectiveness of two catalysts are compared. A key technical and economic barrier to commercialization of biomass gasification technologies is the removal of tars that are unavoidably formed in this thermochemical process. Tars contain fuel value; however, they are problematic in gas engines (both reciprocating and turbine) because they condense in the fuel delivery system, forming deposits that negatively affect operation and efficiency. These tars also combust with high luminosity, potentially forming soot particles. The conventional technology for tar removal is wet scrubbing. Although this approach has shown some success, there are significant equipment and operating costs associated with it. In order to prevent the generation of toxic wastewater, the tars must be separated and either disposed as hazardous waste or, preferably, combusted in the gasification plant. A conceptually better approach is catalytic steam reforming of the tars to hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), effectively increasing the gasification efficiency and eliminating the problems mentioned above. In FY2000, Battelle Columbus Laboratories attempted to demonstrate integrated gasification-gas turbine operation using catalytic steam reforming of tars. NREL participated in those tests using the transportable molecular-beam mass spectrometer (TMBMS) to monitor the catalytic reactor's performance on-line [10]. Unfortunately, the pilot plant tests encountered operational problems that prevented conclusive determination of the efficacy of the selected catalyst (Battelle's DN34). In FY2001, NREL performed on-site tar steam reforming tests using a slip-stream of hot pyrolysis gas from the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), which was directed to a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor system designed expressly for this purpose. Supporting this effort, the TMBMS was employed to provide on-line analysis of the tar conversion. The gas composition changes were monitored by two identical gas chromatographs (GCs), and modified method 5 sampling was performed to obtain gravimetric conversion data. The combination of these analytical techniques provided definitive catalyst performance data, as well as linkage to previous and on-going work elsewhere. Two catalysts were tested: nickel (Ni) on potassium promoted alumina (Sued-Chemie C11-NK), used commercially for naphtha steam reforming, and alumina (Battelle's DN34) claimed to be effective for gasifier tar decomposition. In addition, sand was tested as an inert reference material.

Carpenter, D.; Ratcliff, M.; Dayton, D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pyrolysis/Steam Reforming Technology for Treatment of TRU Orphan Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Certain transuranic (TRU) waste streams within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex cannot be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) because they do not meet the shipping requirements of the TRUPACT-II or the disposal requirements of the Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) in the WIPP RCRA Part B Permit. These waste streams, referred to as orphan wastes, cannot be shipped or disposed of because they contain one or more prohibited items, such as liquids, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen gas, corrosive acids or bases, reactive metals, or high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), etc. The patented, non-incineration, pyrolysis and steam reforming processes marketed by THOR Treatment Technologies LLC removes all of these prohibited items from drums of TRU waste and produces a dry, inert, inorganic waste material that meets the existing TRUPACT-II requirements for shipping, as well as the existing WAP requirements for disposal of TRU waste at WIPP. THOR Treatment Technologies is a joint venture formed in June 2002 by Studsvik, Inc. (Studsvik) and Westinghouse Government Environmental Services Company LLC (WGES) to further develop and deploy Studsvik's patented THORSM technology within the DOE and Department of Defense (DoD) markets. The THORSM treatment process is a commercially proven system that has treated over 100,000 cu. ft. of nuclear waste from commercial power plants since 1999. Some of this waste has had contact dose rates of up to 400 R/hr. A distinguishing characteristic of the THORSM process for TRU waste treatment is the ability to treat drums of waste without removing the waste contents from the drum. This feature greatly minimizes criticality and contamination issues for processing of plutonium-containing wastes. The novel features described herein are protected by issued and pending patents.

Mason, J. B.; McKibbin, J.; Schmoker, D.; Bacala, P.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the technology of choice for treatment of about one million gallons of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site 1. SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid and alkali and aluminum nitrates with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium. The steam reforming process will convert the SBW into dry, solid, carbonate and aluminate minerals supporting a preferred path for disposal as remote handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) will design, build, and operate an Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that will comprise an integrated THOR{sup R} process system that will utilize dual fluidized bed steam reformers (FBSR) for treatment of the SBW. The IWTU is being constructed at INTEC, immediately east of the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF). Detailed design of the IWTU has been completed and DOE has approved the CD-3 detailed design. The State of Idaho has approved the RCRA and construction air permits. Construction of the IWTU started in April 2007 with civil and foundation work. This paper provides a project and process overview of the IWTU and discusses the design and construction status. IWTU equipment and facility designs and bases will be presented. (authors)

Landman, W.; Roesener, S. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bradley Mason, J.; Bourgeois, T.; Amaria, N. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NiW and NiRu Bimetallic Catalysts for Ethylene Steam Reforming: Alternative Mechanisms for Sulfur Resistance  

SciTech Connect

Previous investigations of Ni-based catalysts for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons have indicated that the addition of a second metal can reduce the effects of sulfur poisoning. Two systems that have previously shown promise for such applications, NiW and NiRu, are considered here for the steam reforming of ethylene, a key component of biomass derived tars. Monometallic and bimetallic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Ni and W catalysts were employed for ethylene steam reforming in the presence and absence of sulfur. The NiW catalysts were less active than Ni in the absence of sulfur, but were more active in the presence of 50 ppm H{sub 2}S. The mechanism for the W-induced improvements in sulfur resistance appears to be different from that for Ru in NiRu. To probe reasons for the sulfur resistance of NiRu, the adsorption of S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on several bimetallic NiRu alloy surfaces ranging from 11 to 33 % Ru was studied using density functional theory (DFT). The DFT studies reveal that sulfur adsorption is generally favored on hollow sites containing Ru. Ethylene preferentially adsorbs atop the Ru atom in all the NiRu (111) alloys investigated. By comparing trends across the various bimetallic models considered, sulfur adsorption was observed to be correlated with the density of occupied states near the Fermi level while C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption was correlated with the number of unoccupied states in the d-band. The diverging mechanisms for S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption allow for bimetallic surfaces such as NiRu that enhance ethylene binding without accompanying increases in sulfur binding energy. In contrast, bimetallics such as NiSn and NiW appear to decrease the affinity of the surface for both the reagent and the poison.

Rangan, M.; Yung, M. M.; Medlin, J. W.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

86

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen production Reactors, M.S. Thesis, University ofREFORMATION: THE EFFECT OF REACTOR GEOMETRY David, R. ,have been manifest with reactors of different geometries. In

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Preparation and initial characterization of fluidized bed steam reforming pure-phase standards  

SciTech Connect

Hanford is investigating the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process for their Low Activity Waste. The FBSR process offers a low-temperature continuous method by which liquid waste can be processed with the addition of clay into a sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form. The NAS waste form is mainly comprised of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}), sodalite (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}Cl{sub 2}), and nosean (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}SO{sub 4}). Anions such as perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup -}), pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), and iodine (I{sup -}) are expected to replace sulfate in the nosean structure and/or chloride in the sodalite mineral structure (atomically bonded inside the aluminosilicate cages that these mineral structures possess). In the FBSR waste form, each of these phases can exist in a variety of solid solutions that differ from the idealized forms observed in single crystals in nature. The lack of understanding of the durability of these stoichiometric or idealized mineral phases complicates the ability to deconvolute the durability of the mixed phase FBSR product since it is a combination of different NAS phases. To better understand the behavior, fabrication and testing of the individual phases of the FBSR product is required. Analytical Development (AD) of the Science and Technology directorate of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to prepare the series of phase-pure standards, consisting of nepheline, nosean, and Cl, Re, and I sodalite. Once prepared, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to confirm the products were phase pure. These standards are being used for subsequent characterization studies consisting of the following: single-pass flow-through (SPFT) testing, development of thermodynamic data, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) calibration curves. In addition to the above mentioned phase-pure standards, AD was tasked with fabricating a mixed Tc-Re sodalite.

Missimer, D. M.; Rutherford, R. L.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Method and apparatus for determining quality and mass flow rate of flowing steam  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for determining the quality and the two-phase mass flow rate of steam containing both liquid and vapor components and flowing in an orifice-containing steam line. The apparatus consists of: steam sampling means for drawing off through an orifice-containing sample conduit from the steam line a sample of the steam having substantially the same quality as the line steam, means for measuring the temperature in the sample conduit, means for measuring the static pressure in the sample conduit, means for measuring the differential pressure across the sample conduit orifice, means connected to the sample conduit for measuring the two-phase mass flow rate of the drawn off sample of steam, such that the sample steam quality may be determined by means of an equation relating the measured sample conduit temperature, static pressure, differential pressure, and two-phase mass flow rate, the determined sample steam quality being substantially the same as the desired line steam quality, means for measuring the temperature in the steam line, means for measuring the static pressure in the steam line, and means for measuring the differential pressure across the steam line orifice, such that the line steam two-phase mass flow rate may be determined by means of an equation relating the measured steam line temperature, static pressure, and differential pressure, and the line steam quality which is substantially the same as the determined sample steam quality.

Huang, W.-S.; Mims, D.S.; Allen, R.S.

1986-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form ...  

Clay/Coal Superheated Steam (pyrolizes organics and catalyzes mineralization) CO2, N2, H2O CRR HVAC HTF PBF Feed Tank Sand Filter or Stack DISPOSAL ...

90

Development of Steam Reforming for the Solidification of the Cesium and Stronitum Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Steam reforming is one option currently being investigated for stabilization of the cesium/strontium strip products from spent fuel reprocessing solvent extraction processes because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. To produce pollucite and other mineral analogs of the alkaline metals, the feeds must be mixed with aluminosilicate compounds and thermally sintered or calcined to activate solid-state crystal formation. Scoping tests completed indicated that the cesium/strontium in these organic and acid solutions can be converted into aluminosilicate materials using steam reforming.

Julia L. Tripp; T. Garn; R. Boardman; J. Law

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR{sup R} steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR{sup R} technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR{sup R} can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR{sup R} can also produce a final end-product that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR{sup R} process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU. (authors)

Mason, J.B.; Wolf, K.; Ryan, K.; Roesener, S.; Cowen, M.; Schmoker, D.; Bacala, P. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, 106 Newberry St. SW, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Landman, B. [CH2M WG Idaho, LLC, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Minimizing the formation of coke and methane on Co nanoparticles in steam reforming of biomass-derived oxygenates  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental understanding and control of chemical transformations are essential to the development of technically feasible and economically viable catalytic processes for efficient conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach, we report high hydrogen selectivity and catalyst durability of acetone steam reforming (ASR) on inert carbon supported Co nanoparticles. The observed catalytic performance is further elucidated on the basis of comprehensive first-principles calculations. Instead of being considered as an undesired intermediate prone for catalyst deactivation during bioethanol steam reforming (ESR), acetone is suggested as a key and desired intermediate in proposed two-stage ESR process that leads to high hydrogen selectivity and low methane formation on Co-based catalysts. The significance of the present work also sheds a light on controlling the chemical transformations of key intermediates in biomass conversion such as ketones. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) project of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computing time was granted by the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL, and sponsored by the U.S. DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

Sun, Junming; Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Synthesis and characterization of 1D ceria nanomaterials for CO oxidation and steam reforming of methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel one-dimensional (1D) ceria nanostructure has been investigated as a promising and practical approach for the reforming of methanol reaction. Size and shape of the ceria nanomaterials are directly involved with the catalytic activities. Several ...

Sujan Chowdhury; Kuen-Song Lin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CX-000377: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000377: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas used for...

95

Effect of Nickel Microstructure on Methane Steam-Reforming Activity of Ni-YSZ Cermet Anode Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cermet anodes for the steam reforming of methane has been investigated in the absence of electrochemical effects. The cermet was prepared by co-milling and sintering NiO and 5YSZ powders at 1375oC in air. During the high temperature sintering step, NiO dissolved into the YSZ particles to form a solid NiO-YSZ solution. During the subsequent catalyst reduction step, Ni exolved from the YSZ. As a result, many small Ni particles on the order of 10-20 nm formed at the surface of the YSZ. These small particles contribute significantly to the overall reforming activity, along with the large bulk Ni particles within the Ni-YSZ cermet. We have observed high initial activity that decreases by as much as an order of magnitude with time on stream, until the anode catalyst reaches a stable steady state activity. The time to reach this stable activity is a function of the reaction conditions and feed gas composition. Higher temperature, hydrogen partial pressure, and space velocity all accelerated the deactivation rate at a constant steam-to-carbon ratio of 3. Initial and lined out activities and average turnover frequencies were obtained for both Ni-YSZ and bulk Ni, based on a rate expression that is first order in methane and zero order in steam. Comparative tests at 750oC show high initial activity on a per-Ni site basis with both materials, but these turnover rates decline over a period of a few hours. Following lineout, there appears to be a negligible effect of Ni particle size on turnover rate. These results indicate the presence of structure sensitivity for methane reforming, but only with freshly calcined and reduced catalysts that may contain highly coordinatively unsaturated sites. There is an apparent structure insensitivity with aged catalysts where Ni particle sizes are generally 50 nm and greater. Under reaction conditions that employ high space velocities and low methane conversions, the water-gas-shift reaction does not establish thermodynamic equilibrium.

King, David L.; Strohm, James J.; Wang, Xianqin; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Wang, Chong M.; Chin, Ya-Huei; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe; Rozmiarek, Robert T.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

Calibration of Instrumented Steam Separators to Determine Quality and Flow Distribution in an Operating Steam Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the feasibility of instrumenting steam separators on a steam generator as two-phase flowmeters to measure flow distributions and steam quality near the separator deck plate. Instrumented prototypical separators were tested in a laboratory under steam generator conditions, and test data correlations were developed. The usefulness of such data in the qualification of thermal-hydraulic computer codes was addressed.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Computational Modeling of Combined Steam Pyrolysis and Hydrogasification of Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is fed to the steam methane reformer from which we getis fed into the steam methane reformer where it is convertedis produced in the steam methane reformer. Fischer-Tropsch

Singh, S; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Process to Accomplish Autothermal or Steam Reforming Via a Reciprocating Compression Device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas from a variety of hydrocarbons. The apparatus (device) consists of a semi-batch, non-constant volume reactor to generate a synthesis gas. While the apparatus feeds mixtures of air, steam, and hydrocarbons into a cylinder where work is performed on the fluid by a piston to adiabatically raise its temperature without heat transfer from an external source.

Lyons, David K.; James, Robert; Berry, David A.; Gardern, Todd

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

EFFECT OF H2 PRODUCED THROUGH STEAM-METHANE REFORMING ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-situ hydrogen production is carried out by a catalytic reformer kit set up into exhaust gases for a CHP plant based on spark ignition engine running under lean conditions. An overall auto-thermal reforming process is achieved. Hydrogen production is mainly dependent on O2 content in exhaust gases. Experiments are conducted at constant speed at 2 air/fuel ratios and 4 additional natural gas flow rates. H2 content varies in the range 6 % to 10 % in vol. H2 content effect is analyzed with respect to performance and emissions. Comparing with EGR shows an increasing of electrical efficiency of 1 % whilst heat recovery decreases by 1%. NO and HC decrease by 18 % and 12%, but CO increases by 14%, respectively. The results show that: (i) graphite joints were destroyed under effect of H2 and high temperature; (ii) a cold spot appeared in the RGR line, and condensation has as consequence a carbon deposit; and (iii) no back-fire or knock occurred.

O. Le Corre; C. Rahmouni; K. Saikaly; I. Dincer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

MINERALIZING, STEAM REFORMING TREATMENT OF HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE (a.k.a. INEEL/EXT-05-02526)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.4 hours of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved essentially complete bed turnover within approximately 40 hours. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. SRNL will report separately the results of product performance testing that were accomplished.

A. L. Olson; N. R. Soelberg; D. W. Marshall; G. L. Anderson

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst - Energy ...  

A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and ...

110

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

DETERMINATION OF MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE LEAKAGE FROM THE HRT PROCESS STEAM SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Calculations were made to determine the radiation hazard to HRT personnel as a result of leakage to the atmosphere from the process steam system in the event of a heat exchanger tube rupture. These calculations show that with the present four-minute delay before dumping approximately 1020 lb of fuel solution may be transferred to the steam system. The radiation hazard from fission products in the atomosphere will be negligble if the steam killer blower is operating. If this blower is not operatin. a natural convection loop will be set up in the steam killer which will have a condensing capacity of 4 lb/min of steam at atmospheric pressure. In this latter case. the inhalation hazard will be negligible when the leak rate through the steam stop valves is less than 4lb/ min. (auth)

Gift, E.H.

1959-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Operation of a steam hydro-gasifier in a fluidized bed reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen from the steam methane reformer can be fed back toas feedstock for a steam methane reformer (SMR), which is aa downstream steam methane reformer (as will be described

Park, Chan Seung; Norbeck, Joseph N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

syngas in the Steam Methane Reformer (SMR) for syntheticabove 280?C. Steam methane reformer and heat recovery (AreaRecovery DSRP Steam Methane Reformer ZnO Sulfur polisher;

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER WASTE FORMS FOR SODIUM BEARING WASTE AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) processing of Sodium Bearing Waste simulants was performed in December 2006 by THOR{sup sm} Treatment Technologies LLC (TTT) The testing was performed at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) pilot plant facilities in Golden, CO. FBSR products from these pilot tests on simulated waste representative of the SBW at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) were subsequently transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and leach testing. Four as-received Denitration and Mineralization Reformer (DMR) granular/powder samples and four High Temperature Filter (HTF) powder samples were received by SRNL. FBSR DMR samples had been taken from the ''active'' bed, while the HTF samples were the fines collected as carryover from the DMR. The process operated at high fluidizing velocities during the mineralization test such that nearly all of the product collected was from the HTF. Active bed samples were collected from the DMR to monitor bed particle size distribution. Characterization of these crystalline powder samples shows that they are primarily Al, Na and Si, with > 1 wt% Ca, Fe and K. The DMR samples contained less than 1 wt% carbon and the HTF samples ranged from 13 to 26 wt% carbon. X-ray diffraction analyses show that the DMR samples contained significant quantities of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} startup bed. The DMR samples became progressively lower in starting bed alumina with major Na/Al/Si crystalline phases (nepheline and sodium aluminosilicate) present as cumulative bed turnover occurred but 100% bed turnover was not achieved. The HTF samples also contained these major crystalline phases. Durability testing of the DMR and HTF samples using the ASTM C1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT) 7-day leach test at 90 C was performed along with several reference glass samples. Comparison of the normalized leach rates for the various DMR and HTF components was made with the reference glasses and the Low Activity Waste (LAW) specification for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Vitrification Plant (WTP). Normalized releases from the DMR and HTF samples were all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}. For comparison, normalized release from the High-Level Waste (HLW) benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass for Si, Li, Na and B ranges from 2 to 8 g/m{sup 2}. The normalized release specification for LAW glass for the Hanford WTP is 2 g/m{sup 2}. The Toxicity Characteristic Leach Test (TCLP) was performed on DMR and HTF as received samples and the tests showed that these products meet the criteria for the EPA RCRA Universal Treatment Standards for all of the constituents contained in the starting simulants such as Cr, Pb and Hg (RCRA characteristically hazardous metals) and Ni and Zn (RCRA metals required for listed wastes).

Crawford, C; Carol Jantzen, C

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

Computational Model For Transient And Steady State Analysis Of A 1-dimensional Auto-thermal Reformer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kim, Daejong This study presents a 1-dimensional mathematical model of steam reformer to be used with high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Steam reforming… (more)

Honavara-Prasad, Srikanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK FARM BLEND) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at 6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biomass to hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil or its fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and reforming of the pyroligneous oils are being studied as a strategy for producing hydrogen. A process of this nature has the potential to be cost competitive with conventional means of producing hydrogen. The authors propose a regionalized system of hydrogen production, where small- and medium-sized pyrolysis units (catalytic reforming of model compounds to hydrogen using Ni-based catalysts have achieved essentially complete conversion to H{sub 2}. Existing data on the catalytic reforming of oxygenates have been studied to guide catalyst selection. A process diagram for the pyrolysis and reforming operations is discussed, as are initial production cost estimates. A window of opportunity clearly exists if the bio-oil is first refined to yield valuable oxygenates so that only a residual fraction is used for hydrogen production.

Wang, D.; Czernik, S.; Montane, D.; Mann, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Chornet, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)]|[Univ. de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Steam Reforming Technology Demonstration for Conversion of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory into a Leach-Resistant Alkali Aluminosilicate Waste Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The patented THOR{sup R} fluidized-bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), currently under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site.1 SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. The SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, and alkali and aluminum nitrates, along with many other inorganic compounds, including substantial levels of radionuclides. As part of the implementation of the THOR{sup R} process at INTEC, an engineering-scale technology demonstration (ESTD) was conducted using a specially designed pilot plant located at Hazen Research, Inc. in Golden Colorado. This ESTD confirmed the efficacy of the THOR{sup R} FBSR process to convert the SBW into a granular carbonate-based waste form suitable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE authorized, as a risk reduction measure, the performance of an additional ESTD to demonstrate the production of an insoluble mineralized product, in the event that an alternate disposition path is required. The additional ESTD was conducted at the Hazen Research facility using the THOR{sup R} process and the same SBW simulant employed previously. An alkali aluminosilicate mineral product was produced that exhibited excellent leach resistance and chemical durability. The demonstration established general system operating parameters for a full-scale facility; provided process off-gas data that confirmed operation within regulatory limits; determined that the mineralized product exhibits superior leach resistance and durability, compared to Environmental Assessment (EA) and Low-activity Reference Material (LRM) glasses, as indicated by the Product Consistency Test (PCT); ascertained that Cs and Re (a surrogate for Tc) were non-volatile and were retained in the mineral product; and showed that heavy metals were converted into mineral forms that were not leachable, as determined by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. (authors)

Ryan, K.; Bradley Mason, J.; Evans, B.; Vora, V. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States); Olson, A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Diesel Reforming for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This objective of this project was to develop technology suitable for onboard reforming of diesel. The approach was to examine catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming.

Borup, R.; Parkinson, W. J.; Inbody, M.; Brosha, E.L.; Guidry, D.R.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Final Report for "Investigation of reaction networks and active sites in bio-ethanol steam reforming over Co-based catalysts" with all publications attached.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This was a university-based research project in support of distributed reforming production technologies for hydrogen. Our objective was to examine the steam reforming of bio-ethanol and other related bio-derived liquids over non-precious metal catalyst systems to enable small-scale distributed hydrogen production technologies from renewable sources. The study targeted development of a catalytic system that does not rely on precious metals and that can be active in the 350-550 C temperature range, with high selectivity and high stability. To this end, we adopted a multi-prong research strategy, that included catalyst formulation and synthesis, detailed catalyst characterization, reaction kinetics and reaction engineering, molecular modeling and economic analysis studies. Our approach was an iterative one, where the knowledge gained in one aspect of the study was utilized to modify and fine-tune catalyst development. The research addressed many fundamental and inter-related phenomena involved in the catalytic steam reforming of ethanol that may not be readily studied in an industrial development setting. The outcome of the project was a catalytic system that was able to meet the DOE targets in hydrogen production, with high H{sub 2} yield, high selectivity and stability that could perform efficiently in the 350-550 C temperature range. In addition, we were able to answer many fundamental questions about the catalytic systems that could easily be translated to other catalytic systems. The study resulted in 14 refereed journal articles, with one more in preparation. The results were also shared broadly at many different national and international forums such as conferences of the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, North American Catalysis Society, International Congress on Catalysis and International Conference on Catalysis for Renewable Sources. There were 30 presentations given at various national and international meetings. The P.I. was also invited to give 11 lectures on the findings from this study at many universities and research centers in the USA and other countries. The knowledge base acquired through this study is expected to bring industry closer to designing catalytic systems that can be tailored for the specific hydrogen production applications, especially for distributed hydrogen production strategies.

Umit S. Ozkan

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK FARM BLEND) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

REFORMING PROCESSES FOR MICRO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM BASED ON SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy balance, different types of fuel reforming including steam reforming, autothermal reforming technologies. Steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming are the three major fuel of an activated carbon bed. Prior to enter the SOFC stack, the fuel is pre-reformed (methane is partially

Liso, Vincenzo

123

Determination of Applicability of EDF Steam Generator Monitoring Algorithm to Pressurized Water Reactors Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work undertaken by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricité de France (EDF) to determine the applicability of an EDF technique that estimates the level of deposit buildup on the steam generator's (SG's) tube support plates (TSPs) to plants worldwide.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cost Analysis of Bio-Derived Liquids Reforming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) steam reforming C2H5OH + H2O Ã? 2CO + 4H2 6) Water gas shift 7) Methanation 8) Coking from CH4 (methane Ethanol Reforming Options Gas Phase Liquid Phase Virent Steam Partial Oxidation Reforming GE (SCPO) decomposition C2H5OH Ã? CH4 + CO + H2 steam reforming CH4 + 2H2O Ã? 4H2 + CO2 3) C2H5OH dehydrogenation

125

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

BANNING DL

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hard or Soft? Institutional Reforms and Infrastructure Spending as Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft? Institutional Reforms and Infrastructure Spending aswe examine whether hard infrastructure in the form of moreand railroads or soft infrastructure in the form of more

Fung, K. C.; Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Iizaka, Hitomi; Siu, Alan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Integrated autothermal reactor concepts for oxidative coupling and reforming of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3 Oxidative coupling and steam reforming of methane . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.4 This thesis of methane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.4 Only steam reforming of methane#12;Integrated autothermal reactor concepts for oxidative coupling and reforming of methane #12

Twente, Universiteit

128

Modeling of Pressurized Electrochemistry and Steam-Methane Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and the Effects on Thermal and Electrical Stack Performance  

SciTech Connect

Summarizes work done to extend the electrochemical performance and methane reforming submodels to include the effects of pressurization and to demonstrate this new modeling capability by simulating large stacks operating on methane-rich fuel under pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. Pressurized operation boosts electrochemical performance, alters the kinetics of methane reforming, and effects the equilibrium composition of methane fuels. This work developed constitutive submodels that couple the electrochemistry, reforming, and pressurization to yield an increased capability of the modeling tool for prediction of SOFC stack performance.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas Flow and Heat Transfer in Methane Reforming Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation and analysis of gas flow and heat transfer affected by chemical reactions relating to steam reforming of methane in a compact reformer. The reformer conditions such as the combined thermal boundary conditions on solid walls, ...

Guogang Yang; Danting Yue; Xinrong Lv; Jinliang Yuan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Electricity Sector Reform in Developing Countries: A Survey of Empirical Evidence on Determinants and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, patronage, labour opposition to reducing waste, poor collection and other fiscal leakage. Simpler reforms, such as encouraging Independent Power Producers to enter into long-term Power Purchase Agreements with financially fragile counterparts, stored up...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Mota, Raffaella L; Newbery, David; Pollitt, Michael G.

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Earnings Determination and Taxes: Evidence from a Cohort-Based Payroll Tax Reform in Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pension outcomes i n Greece." British Jour¬ nal ofIndustrialL T A X R E F O R M IN GREECE Emmanuel Saez Manos MatsaganisBased Payroll Tax Reform in Greece Emmanuel Saez, Manos

Saez, Emmanuel; Matsaganis, Manos; Tsakloglou, Panos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Industrial Technologies Div.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effect of reformer conditions on catalytic reforming of biomass-gasification tars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric tests on catalytic reforming of tars produced in biomass gasification are performed using a bench-scale, fluid-bed catalytic reformer containing a commercial nickel-based catalyst. The product gas composition and yield vary with reformer temperature, space time, and steam: biomass ratio. Under certain catalytic tar reforming conditions, the gas yield increases by 70%; 97% of the tars are cracked into gases; and benzene and naphthalene, the predominant tar species, are virtually eliminated from the product gas.

Kinoshita, C.M.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Catalytic Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

Little, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Partial oxidation reforming of methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol is an attractive fuel for fuel cell-powered vehicles because it has a fairly high energy density, can be pumped into the tank of a vehicle mush like gasoline, and is relatively easy to reform. For on-board reforming, the reformer must be compact and lightweight, and have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Steam reforming reactors with the tube-and-shell geometry that was used on the prototype fuel cell-powered buses are heat transfer limited. To reach their normal operating temperature, these types of reactors need 45 minutes from ambient temperature start-up. The dynamic response is poor due to temperature control problems. To overcome the limitations of steam reforming, ANL explored the partial oxidation concept used in the petroleum industry to process crude oils. In contrast to the endothermic steam reforming reaction, partial oxidations is exothermic. Fuel and air are passed together over a catalyst or reacted thermally, yielding a hydrogen-rich gas. Since the operating temperature of such a reactor can be controlled by the oxygen-to- methanol ratio, the rates of reaction are not heat transfer limited. Start-up and transient response should be rapid, and the mass and volume are expected to be small by comparison.

Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Downhole steam quality measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.P Chan, J. M Norbeck, Steam hydrogasification of coal-woodet al. , Sulfur-deactivated steam reforming of gasifiedPark, S.P. Singh, J.M. Norbeck, Steam hydrogasification of

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Materials Performance in USC Steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Performance of Ni-Fe/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub2} anode supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells using steam reforming of methane  

SciTech Connect

Iron nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to NiO/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub 2} (GDC) anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) for the direct methane-water fuel operation. The cell was co-sintered at 1400 C, and the anode porosity is 31.8%. The main size corresponding to peak volume is around 1.5 {mu}m. When steam and methane directly fed to the cell, the power density is about 0.57 W cm{sup -2} at 650 C. It is the familiar performance for H{sub 2} operation (4 times of flow rate) with same fuel utilization. Compare with the testing temperature of 600 and 650 C, there is almost no carbon fiber deposition at 700 C with steam/methane (S/C) of 5. At the same time, fuel operation of high value of S/C (=3.3) resulted in fiber-like deposition and degradation of power performance based on loading test results.

Liang, B.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sumi, H.; Fujishiro, Y.; Ingram, B. J.; Carter, J. D. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration 46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas Overview DOE completed a final environmental assessment (EA) for a project under Area I of the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use . Based on the analyses in the EA DOE determined that its proposed action - awarding a grant to Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. to design and demonstrate a state-of-the-art system to concentrate carbon dioxide (CO,) from two steam

142

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK SX-105, TANK AN-103, AND AZ-101/102) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Hall, H.; Miller, D.; Missimer, D.; Nash, C.; Williams, F.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Controlling Activity and Stability of Ni-YSZ Catalysts for On-Anode Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purposes of the project are to develop an effective Ni-YSZ-based anode for on-anode reforming of methane and natural gas and develop methods to control endothermic steam reforming activity.

King, D.L.; Wang, Y.; Chin, Y-H.; Lin, Y.; Roh, H-S.; Rozmiarek, B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BestPractices Steam tip sheet regarding ways to assess steam system efficiency. To determine the effective cost of steam, use a combined heat and power simulation model that includes all the significant effects.

Papar, R. [U.S. Department of Energy (US)

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

Viscovich, Paul W. (Longwood, FL); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Applications of solar reforming technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in recent years has demonstrated the efficient use of solar thermal energy for driving endothermic chemical reforming reactions in which hydrocarbons are reacted to form synthesis gas (syngas). Closed-loop reforming/methanation systems can be used for storage and transport of process heat and for short-term storage for peaking power generation. Open-loop systems can be used for direct fuel production; for production of syngas feedstock for further processing to specialty chemicals and plastics and bulk ammonia, hydrogen, and liquid fuels; and directly for industrial processes such as iron ore reduction. In addition, reforming of organic chemical wastes and hazardous materials can be accomplished using the high-efficiency destruction capabilities of steam reforming. To help identify the most promising areas for future development of this technology, we discuss in this paper the economics and market potential of these applications.

Spiewak, I. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel); Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Langnickel, U. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Effect of Oxygen to Methane Ratio on the Methane-wet Air Autothermal Reforming and Carbon Deposition in the Micro-chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the problems of catalyst carbon deposition and reforming endothermic reaction in micro-reforming chamber, coupled methane catalyst partial oxidation and steam methane reforming can make the micro-reforming system auto-supply heat and inhibit ... Keywords: micro-chamber, autothermal reforming, carbon deposition, oxygen to methane ratio

Ran Jingyu; Tu Weifeng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

Parent, Yves O. (Golden, CO); Magrini, Kim (Golden, CO); Landin, Steven M. (Conifer, CO); Ritland, Marcus A. (Palm Beach Shores, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Update of Hydrogen from Biomass -- Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil. Hydrogen has the potential to be a clean alternative to the fossil fuels currently used in the transportation sector. This is especially true if the hydrogen is manufactured from renewable resources, primarily sunlight, wind, and biomass. Analyses have been conducted to assess the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via two thermochemical processes: (1) gasification followed by reforming of the syngas, and (2) fast pyrolysis followed by reforming of the carbohydrate fraction of the bio-oil. This study was conducted to update previous analyses of these processes in order to include recent experimental advances and any changes in direction from previous analyses. The systems examined were gasification in the Battelle/FERCO low pressure indirectly-heated gasifier followed by steam reforming, gasification in the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) high pressure direct-fired gasifier followed by steam reforming, and pyrolysis followed by coproduct separation and steam reforming. In each process, water-gas shift is used to convert the reformed gas into hydrogen, and pressure swing adsorption is used to purify the product. The delivered cost of hydrogen, as well as the plant gate hydrogen selling price, were determined. All analyses included Latin Hypercube sampling to obtain a detailed sensitivity analysis.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.; Amos, W. A.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Combining steam-methane reforming, water-gas shift, and CO{sub 2} removal in a single-step process for hydrogen production. Final report for period March 15, 1997 - December 14, 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research project was to determine the feasibility of a simpler, more energy-efficient process for the production of 95+% H{sub 2} from natural gas, and to collect sufficient experimental data on the effect of reaction parameters to guide additional larger-scale process development. The overall objectives were accomplished. 95+% H{sub 2} was produced in a single reaction step by adding a calcium-based CO{sub 2} acceptor to standard Ni-based reforming catalyst. The spent acceptor was successfully regenerated and used in a number of reaction steps with only moderate loss in activity as the number of cycles increased. Sufficient experimental data were collected to guide further larger-scale experimental work designed to investigate the economic feasibility of the process.

Alejandro Lopez Ortiz; Bhaskar Balasubramanian; Douglas P. Harrison

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Steam Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"STEAM QUALITY has been generally defined as the amount of moisture/vapor (or lack thereof) contained within steam produced from some form of boiler. It has long been used as the standard term for the measurement of ""wet or dry"" steam and as a means of measuring enthalpy. Totally dry steam is said to be ""saturated"" steam. It is sometimes defined as the ""dryness faction"". The term in its historical denotation refers to a physical attribute of the steam. That attribute being ""what is the percentage water vapor content of the steam"" as compared to the amount of steam. Dry saturated steam is steam which carries no water vapor with it and is defined as having a quality of 1.00 (100%). Since water vapor is always present at the interface between the water level and the steam in a boiler, some water vapor will always tend to pass through the system with the steam. Hence, a continuing problem. If steam does carry water vapor past the separators it will tend to coalesce as a liquid, and in doing so it also will carry boiler chemicals with it."

Johnston, W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

FM12 & rus Steam - Steam Users' Forums  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

STORE COMMUNITY ABOUT SUPPORT Steam Users' Forums > Steam Game Discussions > D - G > Football Manager series

157

Fuel Reformation: Microchannel Reactor Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel processing is used to extract hydrogen from conventional vehicle fuel and allow fuel cell powered vehicles to use the existing petroleum fuel infrastructure. Kilowatt scale micro-channel steam reforming, water-gas shift and preferential oxida-tion reactors have been developed capable of achieving DOE required system performance metrics. Use of a microchannel design effectively supplies heat to the highly endothermic steam reforming reactor to maintain high conversions, controls the temperature profile for the exothermic water gas shift reactor, which optimizes the overall reaction conversion, and removes heat to prevent the unwanted hydrogen oxidation in the prefer-ential oxidation reactor. The reactors combined with micro-channel heat exchangers, when scaled to a full sized 50 kWe automotive system, will be less than 21 L in volume and 52 kg in weight.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Davis, James M.; Fischer, Christopher M.; King, David L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Rawlings, Gregg C.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

Aldag, A.W. Jr.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluating Steam Trap Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data from these tests, which determined their relative efficiencies, were used in performing economic analyses to determine their equivalent uniform annual cost (EUAC). The comparison was made using a computer program written for the Apple II computer to evaluate overall steam trap economics. This program calculates the EUAC for any steam trap based on 12 input variables including capital, maintenance and steam costs, interest rate and trap life. After determinIng the EUAC, the program will perform sensitivity analyses on any of the twelve variables. (This computer program is available from the author.) This study shows that inverted bucket traps have lower EUAC's under more conditions than other types of traps. Also, this study shows that live steam loss is the heaviest contributor to the annual operating cost of any steam trap and that maintenance frequency and repair cost are also more important than a trap's first cost.

Fuller, N. Y.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Steam Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is used in many plants to furnish both heat and mechanical energy. It is typically produced in several fired boilers which may operate at different pressures and with different efficiencies. It is then distributed throughout the plant to the various users in steam distribution systems, each one operating at a different pressure and temperature. This paper examines various ways to cost steam and discusses the importance of proper costing. Specifically it addresses three types of steam costs; Marginal Costs, Project Evaluation Costs and Financial Costs.

Jones, K. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks and the Effects on Thermal, Electrical, and Mechanical Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect that varying the percent on-cell steam-methane reformation would have on the thermal, electrical, and mechanical performance of generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The study was performed using three-dimensional model geometries for cross-, co-, and counter-flow configuration stacks of 10x10- and 20x20-cm cell sizes. The analysis predicted the stress and temperature difference would be minimized for the 10x10-cm counter- and cross-flow stacks when 40 to 50% of the reformation reaction occurred on the anode. Gross electrical power density was virtually unaffected by the reforming. The co-flow stack benefited most from the on-cell reforming and had the lowest anode stresses of the 20x20-cm stacks. The analyses also suggest that airflows associated with 15% air utilization may be required for cooling the larger (20x20-cm) stacks.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

Misage, Robert (Manchester, CT); Scheffler, Glenn W. (Tolland, CT); Setzer, Herbert J. (Ellington, CT); Margiott, Paul R. (Manchester, CT); Parenti, Jr., Edmund K. (Manchester, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase II. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wright-Malta gasification process is characterized by low-temperature, catalyzed steam gasification in a pressurized rotary kiln. Fresh biomass moves slowly and continuously through the kiln, where it is gradually heated to around 1200/sup 0/F in an atmosphere of 300 psi steam. During its traverse, pyrolysis and reaction of steam with the nascent char convert nearly all of the organic solids to the gaseous phase. The volatile pyrolysis products pass through the kiln co-currently with the solids and are similarly cracked and steam-reformed within the kiln to fixed gases. Heat for the gasification process is provided by sensible heat recovered from the product gas and the wood decomposition exotherm, making the process inherently very energy-efficient. This report summarizes the work done during the experimental, laboratory-scale phase of development of the W-M biomass gasification process. Two bench-scale experimental gasifiers were constructed and tested: the ''minikiln'', a batch-feed, rotating autoclave; and the ''biogasser'', a stationary, continuous-feed, tubular reactor with zone heating and auger transport. Studies were carried out in these reactors to determine the extent of conversion of biomass solids to gas, and the makeup of the product gas, over a wide range of process conditions. The process variables that were investigated included reactor pressure and temperature, catalyst type and concentration, moisture content and type of biomass feed.

Hooverman, R.H.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Crude oil steam distillation in steam flooding. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Steam distillation yields of sixteen crude oils from various parts of the United States have been determined at a saturated steam pressure of 200 psig. Study made to investigate the effect of steam pressure (200 to 500 psig) on steam distillation yields indicates that the maximum yields of a crude oil may be obtained at 200 psig. At a steam distillation correlation factor (V/sub w//V/sub oi/) of 15, the determined steam distillation yields range from 12 to 56% of initial oil volume for the sixteen crude oils with gravity ranging from 12 to 40/sup 0/API. Regression analysis of experimental steam distillation yields shows that the boiling temperature (simulated distillation temperature) at 20% simulated distillation yield can predict the steam distillation yields reasonably well: the standard error ranges from 2.8 to 3.5% (in yield) for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ < 5 and from 3.5 to 4.5% for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ > 5. The oil viscosity (cs) at 100/sup 0/F can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 3.1 to 4.3%. The API gravity can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 4.4 to 5.7%. Characterization factor is an unsatisfactory correlation independent variable for correlation purpose.

Wu, C.H.; Elder, R.B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Liquid fuel reformer development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Argonne National Laboratory we are developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to a clean hydrogen feed for a fuel cell. The process incorporates a partial oxidation/steam reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. We have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, low-sulfur diesel fuel, and a regular diesel fuel. We achieved complete conversion of the feed to products. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 800 C. For the two diesel fuels, higher temperatures, >850 C, were required to approach similar levels of hydrogen in the product stream. At 800 C, hydrogen yield of the low sulfur diesel was 32%, while that of the regular diesel was 52%. Residual products in both cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, ethylene, and methane.

Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thomas Reddinger Director, Steam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Distribution) Deborah Moorhead Office Coordinator III Martin Bower Steam Plant Operator Richard Redfield SteamThomas Reddinger Director, Steam Operations Steven Richards Assistant Manager of Maintenance Plant Operator Bohdan Sawa Steam Plant Operator Robert Tedesco Steam Plant Operator James Bradley

Raina, Ramesh

167

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of Steam Generator Tube Plugs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Steam Generator Management Program guidelines require that utilities perform integrity assessments of all steam generator (SG) components, including tube plugs. SG inspection outages should specifically include monitoring of degradation in tube hardware such as plugs. This report provides guidance for utility engineers to use in determining tube plug inspection requirements, including scope, technique, and periodicity.BackgroundGenerally, utilities perform ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Distributed Ethanol Reforming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Bio-derived liquid fuels can be produced from renewable agricultural products, such as wood chips. Background Bio-derived renewable fuels are attractive for their high energy density and ease of transport. One scenario for a sustainable hydrogen economy considers that these bio-derived liquid fuels will be produced at plants close to the biomass resource, and then transported to distributed hydrogen production centers (e.g., hydrogen refueling stations), where the fuels will be reformed via the steam reforming process, similar to the current centralized production of hydrogen by the steam reforming of natural gas. Hydrogen produced by reforming these fuels must first be purified and compressed to appropriate storage and dispensing pressures. Compressing

171

Hydrogen Production via a High-Efficiency Low-Temperature Reformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells are promoted by the US government as a viable alternative for clean and efficient energy generation. It is anticipated that the fuel cell market will rise if the key technical barriers can be overcome. One of them is certainly fuel processing and purification. Existing fuel reforming processes are energy intensive, extremely complicated and capital intensive; these disadvantages handicap the scale-down of existing reforming process, targeting distributed or on-board/stationary hydrogen production applications. Our project involves the bench-scale demonstration of a high-efficiency low-temperature steam reforming process. Hydrogen production can be operated at 350 to 400ºC with our invention, as opposed to >800ºC of existing reforming. In addition, our proposed process improves the start-up deficiency of conventional reforming due to its low temperature operation. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the invented process concept via a bench scale unit and verify mathematical simulation for future process optimization study. Under this project, we have performed the experimental work to determine the adsorption isotherm, reaction kinetics, and membrane permeances required to perform the process simulation based upon the mathematical model developed by us. A ceramic membrane coated with palladium thin film fabricated by us was employed in this study. The adsorption isotherm for a selected hydrotalcite adsorbent was determined experimentally. Further, the capacity loss under cyclic adsorption/desorption was confirmed to be negligible. Finally a commercial steam reforming catalyst was used to produce the reaction kinetic parameters required for the proposed operating condition. With these input parameters, a mathematical simulation was performed to predict the performance of the invented process. According to our simulation, our invented hybrid process can deliver 35 to 55% methane conversion, in comparison with the 12 and 18-21% conversion of the packed bed and an adsorptive reactor respectively. In addition CO contamination with energy savings and ~50% capital savings over conventional reforming for fuel cell applications. The pollution abatement potential associated with the implementation of fuel cells, including the elimination of nitrogen oxides and CO, and the reduction in volatile organics and CO2, can thus be realized with the implementation of this invented process. The projected total market size for equipment sale for the proposed process in US is $1.5 billion annually.

Paul KT Liu; Theo T. Tsotsis

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Steam-flooding  

SciTech Connect

Steam-flooding has become an established recovery technique within the last 20 years. This overview discusses its evolution, methods for selecting and designing steam-floods, constraints, and possible improvements. The term steam-flooding is used here in a general sense. The discussion includes steam soak (cyclic steam injection) and steam drive.

Matthews, C.S.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Steam-channel-expanding steam form drive  

SciTech Connect

In a viscous oil reservoir in which the stratification of the rock permeability is insufficient to confine steam within the most permeable strata, oil can be produced by forming and expanding a steam channel through which steam is flowed and oil is produced. Steam is injected and fluid is produced at rates causing a steam channel to be extended between locations that are horizontally separated. A foam-forming mixture of steam, noncondensable gas and surfactant is then injected into the steam channel to provide foam and a relatively high pressure gradient within the channel, without plugging the channel. A flow of steam-containing fluid through the steam channel is continued in a manner such that the magnitudes of the pressure gradient, the rate of oil production, and the rate of steam channel expansion exceed those which could be provided by steam alone. 10 claims, 6 figures.

Dilgren, R.E.; Hirasaki, G.J.; Hill, H.J.; Whitten, D.G.

1978-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks: Thermal, Electrical and Stress Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a parametric analysis performed to determine the effect of varying the percent on-cell reformation (OCR) of methane on the thermal and electrical performance for a generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack design. OCR of methane can be beneficial to an SOFC stack because the reaction (steam-methane reformation) is endothermic and can remove excess heat generated by the electrochemical reactions directly from the cell. The heat removed is proportional to the amount of methane reformed on the cell. Methane can be partially pre-reformed externally, then supplied to the stack, where rapid reaction kinetics on the anode ensures complete conversion. Thus, the thermal load varies with methane concentration entering the stack, as does the coupled scalar distributions, including the temperature and electrical current density. The endotherm due to the reformation reaction can cause a temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet, resulting in large thermal gradients. This effect depends on factors that include methane concentration, local temperature, and stack geometry.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

511: Categorical Exclusion Determination 511: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Sample E CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford tank waste streams (AZ101 and AZ102). The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development labs. Approximately, 1.5 liters of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of ~15 runs ( DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

176

CX-004173: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004173: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Savannah River Site Low Activity Waste (LAW) (Module B) CX(s) Applied: B3/6 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on Savannah River Site Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste. The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing, C-wing, and in the Analytical Development laboratories. Approximately 2 liters of sample will be fed to the process.

177

CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67: Categorical Exclusion Determination 67: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on two caustic Hanford waste streams (SX-105 and An-103). The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development laboratories. Approximately, 1 Liter of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of 8 runs (250 milliliter of waste per run). DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

178

CX-003960: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60: Categorical Exclusion Determination 60: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003960: Categorical Exclusion Determination Benchscale Steam Reformer Simulant Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/08/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Benchscale steam reforming testing (BSR) will be performed on various simulants in a hood in 735-11A, laboratory 130. Approximately 250 millimeters of simulant will be fed to the BSR process during each run. The process operates 650-750 degrees Celsius at -2 to -6 inch of water column pressure. Each BSR run will produce about 150-250 grams of solid clay product, which will be further processed into geopolymer monoliths, and about 1 liter of condensate. The clay product and condensate will contain Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals from the simulant. Off-gases

179

CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Categorical Exclusion Determination 45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves (HLC), A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs.

180

CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size gasification for syngas, substitute natural gas, andfor Biomass-Derived Syngas. NREL/ TP-510-34929. Golden, CO:either converted into syngas in the Steam Methane Reformer (

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Novel Catalytic Fuel Reforming Using Micro-Technology with Advanced Separations Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the combustion of membrane raffinate for the production of clean hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas primary fuel sources from existing production and distribution networks ­ i.e. natural gas, gasoline gas -- optimize catalyst composition and evaluate reforming conditions. · Hydrogen purification using

183

Determining Thermal Conductivity of Simulated Feed for High Level ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

184

Solar Reforming of Carbon Dioxide to Produce Diesel Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the demonstration of an innovative technology, referred to as the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer, which utilizes waste CO2 as a feedstock for the efficient and economical production of synthetic diesel fuel using solar thermal energy as the primary energy input. The Sunexus technology employs a two stage process for the conversion of CO2 to diesel fuel. A solar reforming system, including a specially designed reactor and proprietary CO2 reforming catalyst, was developed and used to convert captured CO2 rich gas streams into syngas (primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide) using concentrated solar energy at high conversion efficiencies. The second stage of the system (which has been demonstrated under other funding) involves the direct conversion of the syngas into synthetic diesel fuel using a proprietary catalyst (Terra) previously developed and validated by Pacific Renewable Fuels and Chemicals (PRFC). The overall system energy efficiency for conversion of CO2 to diesel fuel is 74%, due to the use of solar energy. The results herein describe modeling, design, construction, and testing of the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer. Extensive parametric testing of the solar reformer and candidate catalysts was conducted and chemical kinetic models were developed. Laboratory testing of the Solar Reformer was successfully completed using various gas mixtures, temperatures, and gas flow rates/space velocities to establish performance metrics which can be employed for the design of commercial plants. A variety of laboratory tests were conducted including dry reforming (CO2 and CH{sub 4}), combination dry/steam reforming (CO2, CH{sub 4} & H{sub 2}O), and tri-reforming (CO2, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}O & O{sub 2}). CH{sub 4} and CO2 conversions averaged 95-100% and 50-90% per reformer cycle, respectively, depending upon the temperatures and gas space velocities. No formation of carbon deposits (coking) on the catalyst was observed in any of these tests. A 16 ft. diameter, concentrating solar dish was modified to accommodate the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer and the integrated system was installed at the Pacific Renewable Fuels and Chemicals test site at McClellan, CA. Several test runs were conducted without catalyst during which the ceramic heat exchanger in the Sunexus Solar Reformer reached temperatures between 1,050 F (566 C) and 2,200 F (1,204 C) during the test period. A dry reforming mixture of CO2/CH{sub 4} (2.0/1.0 molar ratio) was chosen for all of the tests on the integrated solar dish/catalytic reformer during December 2010. Initial tests were carried out to determine heat transfer from the collimated solar beam to the catalytic reactor. The catalyst was operated successfully at a steady-state temperature of 1,125 F (607 C), which was sufficient to convert 35% of the 2/1 CO2/CH{sub 4} mixture to syngas. This conversion efficiency confirmed the results from laboratory testing of this catalyst which provided comparable syngas production efficiencies (40% at 1,200 F [650 C]) with a resulting syngas composition of 20% CO, 16% H{sub 2}, 39% CO2 and 25% CH{sub 4}. As based upon the laboratory results, it is predicted that 90% of the CO2 will be converted to syngas in the solar reformer at 1,440 F (782 C) resulting in a syngas composition of 50% CO: 43% H{sub 2}: 7% CO2: 0% CH{sub 4}. Laboratory tests show that the higher catalyst operating temperature of 1,440 F (782 C) for efficient conversion of CO2 can certainly be achieved by optimizing solar reactor heat transfer, which would result in the projected 90% CO2-to-syngas conversion efficiencies. Further testing will be carried out during 2011, through other funding support, to further optimize the solar dish CO2 reformer. Additional studies carried out in support of this project and described in this report include: (1) An Assessment of Potential Contaminants in Captured CO2 from Various Industrial Processes and Their Possible Effect on Sunexus CO2 Reforming Catalysts; (2) Recommended Measurement Methods for Assessing Contaminant Levels in Captured CO2 Streams; (3) An Asse

Dennis Schuetzle; Robert Schuetzle

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thomas Reddinger Director, Steam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supervisor (Distribution) Deborah Moorhead Office Coordinator III Martin Bower Steam Plant Operator RichardThomas Reddinger Director, Steam Operations Steven Richards Assistant Manager of Maintenance Redfield Steam Plant Operator SU Steam Station/Chilled Water Plant Bohdan Sawa Steam Plant Operator Robert

McConnell, Terry

187

Steam Basics: Use Available Data to Lower Steam System Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial steam users recognize the need to reduce system cost in order to remain internationally competitive. Steam systems are a key utility that influence cost significantly, and represent a high value opportunity target. However, the quality of steam is often taken for granted, even overlooked at times. When the recent global recession challenged companies to remain profitable as a first priority, the result was that maintenance budgets were cut and long term cost reduction initiatives for steam systems set aside due to more pressing issues. One of the regrettable results of such actions is that knowledgeable personnel are re-assigned, retired, or released when necessary steam system cost reduction programs are eliminated. When the time arrives to refocus on long term cost reduction by improving the steam system, some programs may have to start from the beginning and a clear path forward may not be evident. New personnel are often tasked with steam improvements when the programs restart, and they may experience difficulty in determining the true key factors that can help reduce system cost. The urgency for lowering long term fuel use and reducing the cost of producing steam is near for each plant. Population growth and resultant global demand are inevitable, so the global economy will expand, production will increase, more fossil fuel energy will be needed, and that fuel will become scarce and more costly. Although fuel prices are low now, energy costs can be expected to trend significantly upward as global production and demand increase. Now is the time for plants to make certain that they can deliver high quality steam to process equipment at lowest system cost. There are three stages to help optimize plant steam for best performance at a low system cost; Phase 1: Manage the condensate discharge locations (where the steam traps & valves are located), Phase 2: Optimize steam-using equipment, and Phase 3: Optimize the entire steam system. This presentation will focus primarily on management of the condensate discharge locations (CDLs) and show sites how to use readily available data to more efficiently achieve goals; but will also provide insight into how the three stages interact to reduce system cost and improve process performance.

Risko, J. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ULTRA-SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency increases in fossil energy boilers and steam turbines are being achieved by increasing the temperature and pressure at the turbine inlets well beyond the critical point of water. To allow these increases, advanced materials are needed that are able to withstand the higher temperatures and pressures in terms of strength, creep, and oxidation resistance. As part of a larger collaborative effort, the Albany Research Center (ARC) is examining the steam-side oxidation behavior for ultrasupercritical (USC) steam turbine applications. Initial tests are being done on six alloys identified as candidates for USC steam boiler applications: ferritic alloy SAVE12, austenitic alloy Super 304H, the high Cr-high Ni alloy HR6W, and the nickel-base superalloys Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Inconel 740. Each of these alloys has very high strength for its alloy type. Three types of experiments are planned: cyclic oxidation in air plus steam at atmospheric pressure, thermogravimetric ana lysis (TGA) in steam at atmospheric pressure, and exposure tests in supercritical steam up to 650 C (1202 F) and 34.5 MPa (5000 psi). The atmospheric pressure tests, combined with supercritical exposures at 13.8, 20.7, 24.6, and 34.5 MPa (2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 psi) should allow the determination of the effect of pressure on the oxidation process.

Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Bullard, S.B.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Steam System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most plant steam systems are complex systems. Usually the fuel required to produce the steam represents a major expense for manufacturing facilities. By properly operating and maintaining the steam system and making minor improvements, significant savings can be realized.

Aegerter, R. A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SteamMaster: Steam System Analysis Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As director of Oregon's Industrial Assessment Center, I have encountered many industrial steam systems during plant visits. We analyze steam systems and make recommendations to improve system efficiency. In nearly 400 industrial assessments, we have recommended 210 steam system improvements, excluding heat recovery, that would save $1.5 million/year with a 0.4-year payback. 75% of those recommendations have been implemented for $1.1 million annual savings with 0.3-year payback. Recently I have developed a tool to facilitate the process. SteamMaster is based on an Excel spreadsheet with a Visual Basic interface to simplify system modeling and analysis. SteamMaster has many features and capabilities, including energy and cost savings calculations for five steam recommendations. This presentation will demonstrate SteamMaster software applied to one or more industrial steam systems. Software will be made available on a national web site at no cost.

Wheeler, G.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Steam driven markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for steam equipment has been relatively level. Looking ahead, manufacturers anticipate steady market growth worldwide. Steam equipment manufacturers share a similar view of the market for next few years - upward. The steady upward climb is being attributed to a number of factors that will benefit steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) makers.

Anderson, J.L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Increase of Steam Moisture in the BWR-Facility KKP 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main steam moisture in a BWR facility is determined by steam quality at core outlet and efficiency of steam separators and steam dryers. Transport of water with steam is accompanied by transport of radionuclides out of RPV resulting in enhanced radiation level in the main steam system. A remarkable increase of main steam moisture started at KKP 1 in 1997. In the following years increase of steam outlet moisture started at lower and lower core mass flow rates. Dose rate in main steam system increased simultaneously. Core mass flow rate and thus thermal power had to be reduced during stretch out operation to keep the main steam moisture below the specified boundary of 0.2 %. This boundary also guarantees, that radiological exposure remains far below approved values. The increase of main steam moisture corresponds with the application of low leakage core loading. Low leakage core loading results in enhanced steam generation in the center and in reduced steam generation in the outer zones of the core. It can be shown, that the uneven steam generation in the core became stronger over the years. Therefore, steam quality at inlet of the outer steam separators was getting lower. This resulted in higher carry over of water in this steam separators and steam dryers, thus explaining the increasing main steam moisture. KKP 1 started in 2000 with spectral shift operation. As one should expect, this resulted in reduced steam moisture. It remains the question of steam moisture in case of stretch out operation. Countermeasures are briefly discussed. (authors)

Noack, Volker [EnBW Kraftwerke AG (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Method for improving the steam splits in a multiple steam injection process using multiple steam headers  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for enhancing the uniformity of steam distribution in a multiple steam injection system comprising a steam generator, a primary steam header, at least one secondary steam header, a primary steam line connecting the generator to the primary header, at lease one secondary steam line connecting the primary header to the secondary steam header, and a plurality of tertiary steam lines connecting the secondary steam header to a plurality of stem injection wells. It comprises injecting a surfactant into the primary steam line, mixing the surfactant and steam in the primary steam line sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the primary steam header as a foam, and mixing the surfactant and steam in the secondary steam lines sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the secondary steam header as a foam.

Stowe, G.R.

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Phase III Xlerator Program Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000397 Applicant Name: Innovatek, Inc. Location: Richland, WA Project Title Power Generation from an integrated Biomass Reformer and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Proposed Action or Project Description American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: To help meet America's needs for improved energy security and reduced environmental impacts, InnovaTek will demonstrate a power system for distributed energy generation from non-food renewable biomass sources using its proprietary steam reforming process with a solid oxide fuel cell in the Richland

195

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the eighth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005 and includes an entire review of the progress for year 2 of the project. This year saw progress in eight areas. These areas are: (1) steam reformer transient response, (2) steam reformer catalyst degradation, (3) steam reformer degradation tests using bluff bodies, (4) optimization of bluff bodies for steam reformation, (5) heat transfer enhancement, (6) autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (7) autothermal catalyst degradation, and (8) autothermal reformation with bluff bodies. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set in accordance with quantitative results from the steam path audit. As a result of optimized repair decisions, turbine efficiency increases, emissions decrease, and maintenance expenses decrease. These benefits can be achieved by using a computer program Encotech, Inc. developed for the utility industry to perform steam path audits. With the increased emphasis on industrial turbine efficiency, and as a result of the experience with the Destec Operating Company, Encotech is adapting the computer program to respond to the needs of the industrial steam turbine community. This paper describes the results of using the STPE computer program to conduct a steam path audit at Destec Energy's Lyondell Cogeneration power plant.

Mitchell, D. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Process for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reforming process is disclosed wherein hydrogen and light hydrocarbons generated in the catalytic reaction zone are passed to a hydrogen production/purification zone and and reacted and processed therein to produce substantially pure hydrogen. A portion of the hydrogen is then admixed with the charge stock to the catalytic reforming zone to provide the hydrogen requirements of the catalytic reforming reaction zone.

James, R. B. Jr.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Systemic Reform Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(5) support local initiatives and model sites; (6) align state policy; (7) reform higher education and teacher preparation; and (8) mobilize public and professional...

199

Plasma—Methane Reformation  

INL thermal plasma methane reformation process produces hydrogen and elemental carbon from natural gas and other hydrocarbons, such as natural gas or ...

200

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming process is disclosed in which substantially all of the heat requirements of the product stabilizer column is supplied by multiple indirect heat exchange.

Peters, K.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

High performance steam development  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

ProSteam- A Structured Approach to Steam System Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal operation of site utility systems is becoming an increasingly important part of any successful business strategy as environmental, legislative and commercial pressures grow. A reliable steam model allows a clear understanding of the system and of any operational constraints. It can also be used to determine the true cost of improvement projects, relating any changes in steam demand back to purchased utilities (fuel, power, and make-up water) at the site boundary. Example projects could include improved insulation, better condensate return, increased process integration, new steam turbines or even the installation of gas-turbine based cogeneration. This approach allows sites to develop a staged implementation plan for both operational and capital investment projects in the utility system. Steam system models can be taken one step further and linked to the site DCS data to provide real-time balances and improve the operation of the system, providing an inexpensive but very effective optimizer. Such a model ensures that the steam system is set in the optimum manner to react to current utility demands, emissions regulations, equipment availability, fuel and power costs, etc. This optimization approach typically reduces day-to-day utility system operating costs by between 1% and 5% at no capital cost.

Eastwood, A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, EPRI has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Security and Suitability Process Reform  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security and Suitability Process Reform December 2008 Provided by the Joint Security and Suitability Reform Team EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET...

207

Downhole steam quality measurement  

SciTech Connect

An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Muir, James F. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Steam Digest 2001  

SciTech Connect

Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Steam Champions in Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally, industrial steam system management has focused on operations and maintenance. Competitive pressures, technology evolution, and increasingly complex regulations provide additional management challenges. The practice of operating a steam system demands the managerial expertise of a "Steam Champion," which will be described in this paper. Briefly, the steam champion is a facility professional who embodies the skills, leadership, and vision needed to maximize the effectiveness of a plant's steam system. Perhaps more importantly, the steam champion's definitive role is that of liaison between the manufacturer's boardroom and the plant floor. As such, the champion is able to translate the functional impacts of steam optimization into equivalent corporate rewards, such as increased profitability, reliability, workplace safety, and other benefits. The prerequisites for becoming a true steam champion will include engineering, business, and management skills.

Russell, C.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Steam Digest 2001  

SciTech Connect

Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system can increase energy efficiency, reduce air emissions and qualify the equipment for a Capital Cost tax Allowance. As a result, such a system benefits the stakeholders, the society and the environment. This paper describes briefly the types of steam turbine classified by their conditions of exhaust and review quickly the fundamentals related to steam and steam turbine. Then the authors will analyze a typical steam turbine co-generation system and give examples to illustrate the benefits of the System.

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Copyright reform step zero  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'A reasonable person might well think it's a fool's errand to contemplate a [copyright] reform project of any sort.' The US Copyright Act of 1976 and its subsequent amendments is contained in over 200 pages of incomprehensible, sometimes inconsistent, ... Keywords: US copyright law, administrative law, copyright reform, institutional frameworks

Terry Hart

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming process is disclosed wherein the reboiler heat requirements of the stabilizer column are supplied by means of indirect heat exchange with hot combustion gases in the reforming reactants fired heater convection heating section. Heat in excess of the reboiler requirements is passed to the stabilizer column with control being effected by removal of excess heat from the column.

James, R.B. Jr.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

Autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based fuel processor, method for improving catalyst function in autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based processors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a fuel processor comprising a linear flow structure having an upstream portion and a downstream portion; a first catalyst supported at the upstream portion; and a second catalyst supported at the downstream portion, wherein the first catalyst is in fluid communication with the second catalyst. Also provided is a method for reforming fuel, the method comprising contacting the fuel to an oxidation catalyst so as to partially oxidize the fuel and generate heat; warming incoming fuel with the heat while simultaneously warming a reforming catalyst with the heat; and reacting the partially oxidized fuel with steam using the reforming catalyst.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon H. D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

Steam Trap Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effective application of steam traps encompasses three primary areas which are the selection and sizing, the installation, and the monitoring of the steam trapping system. Proper application of steam traps will improve production rates, product quality, and reduce energy and maintenance costs.

Murphy, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Steam System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery and chemical plant steam systems are complex and the fuel required to produce the steam represents a major expense. The incremental cost for generating a 1,000 lb./hr. of steam is typically $45,000 - $60,000/year. Most plants have numerous low/

Aegerter, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

Ryan, M.J.

1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Steam turbine control  

SciTech Connect

In a power plant which includes a steam turbine with main control valves for admitting steam into the steam turbine and a steam bypass with bypass control valves for diverting steam around the steam turbine directly into a condenser, it is necessary to coordinate the operation of the respective valves so that the steam turbine can be started, brought up to speed, synchronized with a generator and then loaded as smoothly and efficiently as possible. The present invention provides for such operation and, in addition, allows for the transfer of power plant operation from the so-called turbine following mode to the boiler following mode through the use of the sliding pressure concept. The invention described is particularly applicable to combined cycle power plants.

Priluck, D.M.; Wagner, J.B.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Catalytic reforming methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Petroleum Refinery Catalytic Reforming -- Cutting High Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon reforming involves a variety of chemical reactions at high temperatures and pressures in the presence of suitable catalysts. The conversion of naptha to high octane aromatics requires high energy to initiate and sustain the reaction at temperatures of 850-950oF. Hydrogen - rich off - gases are fired in combinations of process furnaces. Heat is transferred to hydrocarbon fluids by radiation, principally. Feed or return stream temperatures determine the need for convection sections. It is essential that the operation and maintenance of these furnaces be optimized to minimize production costs. This paper describes the performance testing and evaluation of a set of ten refinery furnaces used to thermally drive several reforming reactors and to regenerate catalysts. Firing rates provide an input of 216.2 x 106 Btu/hr. to the furnaces, at $1.90 per 106 Btu. The units are fitted with multiple natural draft burners. There is insufficient turbulence and swirl in the burners. Operators manually set up the burners with excessive airflows for normal, full-load firing. These furnaces represent production limits. Products of combustion exhaust at high thermal levels - the range is from 985-1700oF. The mixed gases flow through a "waste heat" boiler, or they bypass the boiler and enter a single stack. Steam generation at 150 psig averages 38,200 lb/hr. Heat is wasted via the bypass at a rate of 41.1x106 Btu /hr. at 1240oF. When airflows are reduced (to 15% excess air) the loss will be 18.7x106 Btu/hr. at 1180oF. Installation of a second, parallel waste heat boiler will result in a saving of l3.4x106 Btu/hr. Energy savings at this furnace complex will be equivalent to $628,700 per year. Investment costs were estimated to be less than $250,000 for the proposed heat trap addition.

Viar, W. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development Task 8.3 - autothermal fuel reformer (ATR). Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autothermal fuel reforming (ATR) consists of reacting a hydrocarbon fuel such as natural gas or diesel with steam to produce a hydrogen-rich {open_quotes}reformed{close_quotes} fuel. This work has been designed to investigate the fuel reformation and the product gas combustion under gas turbine conditions. The hydrogen-rich gas has a high flammability with a wide range of combustion stability. Being lighter and more reactive than methane, the hydrogen-rich gas mixes readily with air and can be burned at low fuel/air ratios producing inherently low emissions. The reformed fuel also has a low ignition temperature which makes low temperature catalytic combustion possible. ATR can be designed for use with a variety of alternative fuels including heavy crudes, biomass and coal-derived fuels. When the steam required for fuel reforming is raised by using energy from the gas turbine exhaust, cycle efficiency is improved because of the steam and fuel chemically recuperating. Reformation of natural gas or diesel fuels to a homogeneous hydrogen-rich fuel has been demonstrated. Performance tests on screening various reforming catalysts and operating conditions were conducted on a batch-tube reactor. Producing over 70 percent of hydrogen (on a dry basis) in the product stream was obtained using natural gas as a feedstock. Hydrogen concentration is seen to increase with temperature but less rapidly above 1300{degrees}F. The percent reforming increases as the steam to carbon ratio is increased. Two basic groups of reforming catalysts, nickel - and platinum-basis, have been tested for the reforming activity.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hydrogen Production via a High-Efficiency Low-Temperature Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are promoted by the US government as a viable alternative for clean and efficient energy generation. It is anticipated that the fuel cell market will rise if the key technical barriers can be overcome. One of them is certainly fuel processing and purification. Existing fuel reforming processes are energy intensive, extremely complicated and capital intensive; these disadvantages handicap the scale-down of existing reforming process, targeting distributed or on-board/stationary hydrogen production applications. Our project involves the bench-scale demonstration of a high-efficiency low-temperature steam reforming process. Hydrogen production can be operated at 350 to 400ºC with our invention, as opposed to >800ºC of existing reforming. In addition, our proposed process improves the start-up deficiency of conventional reforming due to its low temperature operation. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the invented process concept via a bench scale unit and verify mathematical simulation for future process optimization study. Under this project, we have performed the experimental work to determine the adsorption isotherm, reaction kinetics, and membrane permeances required to perform the process simulation based upon the mathematical model developed by us. A ceramic membrane coated with palladium thin film fabricated by us was employed in this study. The adsorption isotherm for a selected hydrotalcite adsorbent was determined experimentally. Further, the capacity loss under cyclic adsorption/desorption was confirmed to be negligible. Finally a commercial steam reforming catalyst was used to produce the reaction kinetic parameters required for the proposed operating condition. With these input parameters, a mathematical simulation was performed to predict the performance of the invented process. According to our simulation, our invented hybrid process can deliver 35 to 55% methane conversion, in comparison with the 12 and 18-21% conversion of the packed bed and an adsorptive reactor respectively. In addition CO contamination with <10 to 120 ppm is predicted for the invented process depending upon the cycle time for the PSA type operation. In comparison, the adsorption reactor can also deliver a similar CO contaminant at the low end; however, its high end reaches as high as 300 ppm based upon the simulation of our proposed operating condition. Our experimental results for the packed bed and the membrane reactor deliver 12 and 18% conversion at 400°C, approaching the conversion by the mathematical simulation. Due to the time constraint, the experimental study on the conversion of the invented process has not been complete. However, our in-house study using a similar process concept for the water gas shift reaction has demonstrated the reliability of our mathematical simulation for the invented process. In summary, we are confident that the invented process can deliver efficiently high purity hydrogen at a low temperature (~400°C). According to our projection, the invented process can further achieve 5% energy savings and ~50% capital savings over conventional reforming for fuel cell applications. The pollution abatement potential associated with the implementation of fuel cells, including the elimination of nitrogen oxides and CO, and the reduction in volatile organics and CO2, can thus be realized with the implementation of this invented process. The projected total market size for equipment sale for the proposed process in US is $1.5 billion annually.

Paul KT Liu; Theo T. Tsotsis

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nanocomposite catalysts for soot combustion and propane steam reforming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nanocomposite system, CuO-Ag/CeO 2, has been successfully developed to complete carbon black combustion by 400*C. This novel catalyst has excellent potential for application in the emission control of soot particulates ...

He, Hong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at high pressures yields more methane, less hydrogen at thermodynamic equilibrium Coke formation tendency increases with increasing pressures Coking tendency can be...

228

CX-004158: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004158: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Generation From an Integrated Biomass Reformer and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/14/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy To help meet America?s needs for improved energy security and reduced environmental impacts, InnovaTek will demonstrate a power system for distributed energy generation from non-food renewable biomass sources using its proprietary steam reforming process with a solid oxide fuel cell in the Richland Renewable Energy Park. The Phase III project will involve several system demonstrations starting in the laboratory and culminating in a field prototype system that produces up to 10 kilowatts of electricity for a City

229

Multizone naphtha reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalytic reforming process for conversion of a naphtha hydrocarbon at reforming conditions having at least two segregated catalyst zones. The improvement comprises contacting the hydrocarbon in a first zone with a first catalyst comprising tin and at least one platinum group metal deposited on a solid catalyst support followed by contacting in a second zone with a second catalyst comprising at least one metal selected from the group consisting of platinum group metals deposited on a solid catalyst support.

Fleming, B.

1987-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling of On-Cell Reforming Reaction for Planar SOFC Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack is known to suffer thermal problem from high stack temperature during operation to generate high current. On-Cell Reforming (OCR) phenomenon is often used to reduce stack temperature by an endothermic reaction of steam-methane reforming process. RIST conducted single-cell experiment to validate modeling tool to simulate OCR performance including temperature measurement. 2D modeling is used to check reforming rate during OCR using temperature measurement data, and 3D modeling is used to check overall thermal performance including furnace boundary conditions.

Yang, Choongmo; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Hwang, Soon Cheol; Kim, Dohyung; Lai, Canhai; Koeppel, Brian J.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Steam generator support system  

SciTech Connect

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

234

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

Moldenhauer, J.E.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

Flash Steam Recovery Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the goals of Vulcan's cost reduction effort is to reduce energy consumption in production facilities through energy optimization. As part of this program, the chloromethanes production unit, which produces a wide variety of chlorinated organic compounds, was targeted for improvement. This unit uses a portion of the high-pressure steam available from the plant's cogeneration facility. Continuous expansions within the unit had exceeded the optimum design capacity of the unit's steam/condensate recovery system, resulting in condensate flash steam losses to the atmosphere. Using computer simulation models and pinch analysis techniques, the Operational Excellence Group (Six Sigma) was able to identify a project to recover the flash steam losses as a supplemental low-pressure steam supply. The project was designed and implemented at no capital cost using existing instrumentation and controls. On an annualized basis steam usage per ton of product fell by about three percent. Absolute savings were about 15,800 million Btu.

Bronhold, C. J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the tenth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2006. This quarter saw progress in six areas. These areas are: (1) The effect of catalyst dimension on steam reforming, (2) Transient characteristics of autothermal reforming, (3) Rich and lean autothermal reformation startup, (4) Autothermal reformation degradation with coal derived methanol, (5) Reformate purification system, and (6) Fuel cell system integration. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Steam Generator Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 24th EPRI Steam Generator NDE Workshop took place in San Diego, California, July 1113, 2005. It covered one full day and two half days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and overseas nuclear utilities, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generator NDE iss...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Downhole steam injector  

SciTech Connect

An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

Donaldson, A. Burl (Albuquerque, NM); Hoke, Donald E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Steam Turbine Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...O. Jonas, Corrosion of Steam Turbines, Corrosion: Environments and Industries, Vol 13C, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2006, p 469â??476...

240

Steam and Condensate Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the late 60's and early 70's oil was plentiful and steam was relatively inexpensive. The switch to low sulphur fuel oil and the oil embargo suddenly changed the picture. The cost of steam rose from about $0.50 per 1,000# to $3.00 or more. Many see costs of $5.00 per 1,000# by 1980. These tremendous increases have caused steam systems, steam traps and condensate systems to become a major factor in overall plant efficiency and profit.

Yates, W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Steam and Condensate Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the late 60's and early 70's oil was plentiful and steam was relatively inexpensive. The switch to low sulphur fuel oil and the oil embargo suddenly changed the picture. The cost of steam rose from $0.50 per 1,000# to today's cost of $4.00 or more. Many see costs of $6.00/$7.00 in the near future. These tremendous increases have caused steam systems, steam traps and condensate systems to become a major factor in overall plant efficiency and profit.

Yates, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Boiler steam engine with steam recovery and recompression  

SciTech Connect

A boiler type of steam engine is described which uses a conventional boiler with an external combustion chamber which heats water in a pressure chamber to produce steam. A mixing chamber is used to mix the steam from the boiler with recovered recompressed steam. Steam from the mixing chamber actuates a piston in a cylinder, thereafter the steam going to a reservoir in a heat exchanger where recovered steam is held and heated by exhaust gases from the combustion chamber. Recovered steam is then recompressed while being held saturated by a spray of water. Recovered steam from a steam accumulator is then used again in the mixing chamber. Thus, the steam is prevented from condensing and is recovered to be used again. The heat of the recovered steam is saved by this process.

Vincent, O.W.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Steam in Distribution and Use: Steam Quality Redefined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam quality is an important measurement in steam generation. It's a measurement of steam to moisture ratio. In use, steam quality takes on a different meaning- steam which maximizes energy transfer. To do this, the steam must be clean, dry, of desired pressure and free of air and non-condensible gases. Objectives in these areas should be set and an action plan implemented. Typical objectives could be to specify steam pressure delivery of maximum pressure and to use steam at the lowest pressure possible. Steam velocity ranges and maximum system pressure drops should be set. Cleaning steam and protecting control devices is an important means of maintaining quality. Draining condensate and venting air and other gases preserves the steam quality at the point of use. Poor pressure control yields poor operation and efficiency. Dirty steam causes valve leaks and maintenance problems. Improper drainage and venting can cause premature corrosion and poor heat transfer.

Deacon, W. T.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Steam in Distribution and Use: Steam Quality Redefined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Steam quality is an important measurement in steam generation. It's a measurement of steam to moisture ratio. In use, steam quality takes on a different meaning - steam which maximizes energy transfer. To do this, the steam must be clean, dry, of desired pressure and free of air and non-condensable gases. Objectives in these areas should be set and an action plan implemented. Typical objectives could be to specify steam pressure delivery of maximum pressure and to use steam at the lowest pressure possible. Steam velocity ranges and maximum system pressure drops should be set. Cleaning steam and protecting control devices is an important means of maintaining quality. Draining condensate and venting air and other gases preserves the steam quality at the point of use. Poor pressure control yields poor operation and efficiency. Dirty steam causes valve leaks and maintenance problems. Improper drainage and venting can cause premature corrosion and poor heat transfer."

Deacon, W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Control system for fluid heated steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

Boland, James F. (Bonneville County, ID); Koenig, John F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Control system for fluid heated steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

Improving steam turbine-gas turbine plants  

SciTech Connect

Leningrad Polytechnic Institute investigated the main characteristics of combined plants according to their structure, determined by very important parameters. The following parameters were selected: utilization factor (ratio of heat added to the steam-water working medium from the heat of the exhaust gases to the entire amount of heat added to the steam-water working medium) and fuel consumption factor (ratio of heat from fuel added to the steam-water working medium to the entire consumption of heat in the combined plant). It is concluded that steam turbine-gas turbine plants working at comparatively low gas temperatures (about 800/sup 0/C) must be constructed as plants of maximum capacity, i.e., with large steam flows. Gas turbine-steam turbine plants with high-temperature gas turbines operating at a high utilization factor (approaching binary plants) ensure a qualitative rise in efficiency and have high flexibility characteristics. They are the most promising power plants. A long-term plan for development of combined plants on the basis of standard steam turbine and gas turbine equipment, the production of which is planned in the USSR and in Comecon countries, is required. This plan must be closely connected with solution of the problem of using coals for gas turbine plants.

Kirillov, I.I.; Arsen' ev, L.V.; Khodak, E.A.; Romakhova, G.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

1963-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

Combined cycle electric power plant and heat recovery steam generator having improved multi-loop temperature control of the steam generated  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube and a steam drum from which heated steam is directed through the superheater to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner serves to further heat the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube and a bypass conduit is disposed about the superheater tube whereby a variable steam flow determined by a bypass valve disposed in the bypass conduit may be directed about the superheater tube to be mixed with the superheated steam therefrom, whereby the temperature of the superheated steam supplied to the steam turbine may be accurately controlled. Steam temperature control means includes a first control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for regulating the position of the bypass valve with respect to a first setpoint, and a second control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for controlling the fuel supply to the afterburner with respect to a second setpoint varying in accordance with the bypass valve position. In particular, as the bypass valve position increases, the second setpoint, originally higher, is lowered toward a value substantially equal to that of the first setpoint.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H.; Singer, J.G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

1989-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Streams of Steam The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streams of Steam ­ The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study Manfred Broy, Franz Regensburger-tuned con- cepts of FOCUS by its application of the requirements specification of a steam boiler, see [Abr96-studies. In this context, applying FOCUS to the steam boiler case study ([Abr96]) led us to a couple of questions re- #12

Cengarle, María Victoria

254

Process Reform, Security and Suitability - December 17, 2008 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Reform, Security and Suitability - December 17, 2008 Process Reform, Security and Suitability - December 17, 2008 Process Reform, Security and Suitability - December 17, 2008 December 17, 2008 This is to report on the progress made to improve the timeliness and effectiveness of our hiring and clearing decisions and the specific plan to reform the process further, in accordance with our initial proposals made in April ofthis year. In response to significant, continuing security clearance timeliness concerns, Congress called for improvements and established specific timeliness goals as part of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA). Since the enactment of IRTPA, average timeliness for 90 percent of all clearance determinations reported has been substantially improved, from 265 days (in 2005) to 82 days (4th Quarter,

255

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Steam generator replacement overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since nuclear power began to be widely used for commercial purposes in the 1960s, unit operators have experienced a variety of problems with major components. Although many of the problems have diminished considerably, those associated with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators persist. Steam generator problems rank second, behind refueling outages, as the most significant contributor to lost electricity generation. As of December 31, 1995, 38 steam generators had been replaced in 13 of the 72 operating PWRs, and three units had been shut down prematurely, due primarily (or partially) to degradation of their steam generators: Portland General Electric`s Trojan unit, located in Prescott, OR, in 1992; Southern California Edison`s San Onofre 1, located in San Clemente, CA, in 1992; and Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s Rancho Seco unit in 1989. In the coming years, operators of PWRs in the US with degraded steam generators will have to decide whether to make annual repairs (with eventual derating likely), replace the generators or shut the plants down prematurely. To understand the issues and decisions utility managers face, this article examines problems encountered at steam generators over the past few decades and identifies some of the remedies that utility operators and the nuclear community have employed, including operational changes, maintenance, repairs and steam generator replacement.

Chernoff, H. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Wade, K.C. [USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally applicable to other sources of steam. The interaction of the recovery system with the plant's steam/power system has been included. Typical operating economics have been prepared. It was found that the profitability of most recovery schemes is generally dependent on the techniques used, the existing steam/power system, and the relative costs of steam and power. However, there will always be site-specific factors to consider. It is shown that direct heat exchange and thermocompression will always yield an energy profit when interacting with PRVs in the powerhouse. A set of typical comparisons between the three recovery techniques, interacting with various powerhouse and plant steam system configurations, is presented. A brief outline of the analysis techniques needed to prepare the comparison is also shown. Only operating costs are examined; capital costs are so size - and site-specific as to be impossible to generalize. The operating cost savings may be used to give an indication of investment potential.

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ukraine Steam Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Ukraine Steam Partnership program is designed to implement energy efficiency improvements in industrial steam systems. These improvements are to be made by the private plants and local government departments responsible for generation and delivery of energy to end-users. One of the activities planned under this program was to provide a two-day training workshop on industrial steam systems focusing on energy efficiency issues related to the generation, distribution, and consumption of steam. The workshop was geared towards plant managers, who are not only technically oriented, but are also key decision makers in their respective companies. The Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology (ARENA-ECO), a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization founded to promote energy efficiency and environmental protection in Ukraine, in conjunction with the Alliance staff in Kiev sent out invitations to potential participants in all the regions of Ukraine. The purpose of this report is the describe the proceedings from the workshop and provide recommendations from the workshop's roundtable discussion. The workshop was broken down into two main areas: (1) Energy efficient boiler house steam generation; and Energy efficient steam distribution and consumption. The workshop also covered the following topics: (1) Ukrainian boilers; (2) Water treatment systems; (3) A profile of UKRESCO (Ukrainian Energy Services Company); (4) Turbine expanders and electricity generation; (5) Enterprise energy audit basics; and (6) Experience of steam use in Donetsk oblast.

Gurvinder Singh

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Steam deflector assembly for a steam injected gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A steam injected gas turbine engine is described having a combustor, a casing for the combustor and an annular manifold comprising a part of the casing, the annular manifold having an exterior port formed therein and a plurality of holes formed in the manifold leading to the interior of the combustor, the improvement comprising a steam carrying line connected to the port and a steam deflector means for protecting the casing from direct impingement by the steam from the steam line and for distributing the steam about the annular manifold, the steam deflector means being mounted adjacent the port and within the manifold.

Holt, G.A. III.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Steam generator tube failures  

SciTech Connect

A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Initial steam flow regulator for steam turbine start-up  

SciTech Connect

In a combined steam generator-turbine system, a drain type is provided in front of the stop valve to drain the first steam supply with the stop valve closed until the temperature of the valve and/or the temperature of the steam exceeds the temperature of saturation by a predetermined amount, and logic circuitry is provided to generate permissive signals which combine to allow successive admission of steam to the gland seal and to the steam turbine.

Martens, A.; Hobbs, M. M.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Design and Performance Aspects of Steam Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packaged steam generators are widely used in process and power plants. They are also used as standby boilers in cogeneration/combined cycle plants. The general feeling among consultants, plant engineers and end users is that packaged steam generators are "standard" or "off-the-shelf items", that there exists a model number for a given steam capacity and one has to live with whatever performance is offered by the boiler vendor. Unfortunately, boiler suppliers also encourage specifying of steam generators based on standard, pre-packaged designs. A "standard" boiler has several limitations such as pre-determined furnace dimensions, tube length, surface area, tube spacings etc, which may or may not be the optimum choice for a given steam demand, particularly when today's emission levels have to be met. Also, operating costs, which form a significant portion of overall costs, are ignored by consultants when evaluating various designs for possible purchase. This paper highlights the importance of custom designing packaged steam generators and the resulting benefits from boiler performance viewpoint.

Ganapathy, V.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CYCLIC STEAM STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CYCLIC STEAM STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) This method is sometimes applied to heavy-oil reservoirs to boost recovery during the primary production...

264

Steam purity in PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impurities enter the secondary loop of the PWR through both makeup water from lake or well and cooling-water leaks in the condenser. These impurities can be carried to the steam generator, where they cause corrosion deposits to form. Corrosion products in steam are swept further through the system and become concentrated at the point in the low-pressure turbine where steam begins to condense. Several plants have effectively reduced impurities, and therefore corrosion, by installing a demineralizer for the makeup water, a resin-bed system to clean condensed steam from the condenser, and a deaerator to remove oxygen from the water and so lower the risk of system metal oxidation. 5 references, 1 figure.

Hopkinson, J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy Efficient Steam Trapping of Trace Heating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since as many as 40-60% of a plant's steam traps may be used on steam tracer lines, it is essential to select the correct, properly sized 'traps'; to optimize the efficient removal of condensate while providing maximum heat transfer to maintain desired product temperatures and greatly reduce steam losses. Factors related to achieving uniform product temperatures and maximum heat transfer rates and energy efficiency are: 1.Types and Methods used for Steam Tracing; 2. Systematic heat balance required to achieve economic tracer lengths; 3. Maximum allowable trapping distance for specific applications 4.Data important to determine condensate loads; 5. Trap selection, sizing, good installation practices, and proper maintenance. Using an engineered approach to steam trapping of trace heating systems have resulted in stable tracer line temperatures while reducing steam consumption 10-50% with minimum maintenance.

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Engineered Approach to Energy and Maintenance Effective Steam Trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The engineered approach to steam trap sizing, selection and application has proven effective in significantly reducing a plant's fuel consumption, maintenance and trap replacement costs while improving thermal efficiency and overall steam system performance. New field test procedures for measuring condensate load and steam loss have proven valuable in sizing traps and to determine which trap is the most energy efficient. The combination of using the engineered approach to steam trapping, field tests to verify trap performance and good maintenance practices has contributed to a major reduction in energy consumption of 10-50% in many industrial plants.

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Steam-injected gas turbines uneconomical with coal gasification equipment  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Electric Power Research Institute conducted a series of engineering and economic studies to assess the possibility of substituting steam-injected gas (STIG) turbines for the gas turbines currently proposed for use in British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi coal gasification-combined cycle plants. The study sought to determine whether steam-injected gas turbines and intercooled steam-injected gas turbines, as proposed by General Electric would be economically competitive with conventional gas and steam turbines when integrated with coal gasification equipment. The results are tabulated in the paper.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Multifuel reformer R D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The on-board fuel for fuel cell powered vehicles may be one or more of hydrogen, methanol, ethanol, natural gas, propane, or other liquified petroleum gases. To use hydrogen as the fuel, suitable means of storing, and subsequently delivering, adequate quantities of the gas must be developed. For all other fuels suitable reformers must be developed to convert the fuel to hydrogen or a hydrogen-rich gas mixture at rates corresponding to the varying power demand rates of the automotive system; this is especially true for the lower temperature fuel cells, such as the polymer electrolyte fuel cell which operates at 80{degrees}C and the phosphoric acid fuel cell which operates at 190{degrees}C. This paper discusses the key design and performance characteristics of such hydrogen storage and fuel reformer systems for use in stand-alone fuel cell automotive applications.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Catalytic reforming catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

Steam Heat: Winter Fountains in the City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Brigham Steam Heat: Winter Fountains int h e City Steam is a phenomenon of the winter city. Iteven when the surging steam temporarily blinds them. When I

Brigham, Joan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Steam Distribution Losses Module 1 June 29, 2010 Steam EndUser Training Steam Distribution System Losses Module Slide 1 Steam Distribution System Losses Module The steam distribution system typically consists of main steam

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

275

Development, construction, and use of pneumometric tubes for measurement of steam flow in the steam lines of PVG-1000 at NPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for the direct measurement of steam flow in steam lines after a steam generator, which utilizes a special design of pneumometric tubes and a computing unit that accounts for variation in steam pressure, has been developed to improve the quality of water-level regulation in the steam generators of VVER-1000 power-generating units in the stationary and transitional modes. The advantage of the pneumometric tubes consists in their structural simplicity, high erosion resistance, and absence of irrevocable losses during measurement of steam flow. A similar measurement system is used at foreign NPP. The measurement system in question has been placed in experimental service at the No. 3 unit of the Balakovo NPP, and has demonstrated its worthiness. This measurement system can also be used to determine steam flow in the steam lines of NPP units with VVER-1000 and VVER-440 reactors, and PBMK-1000 power-generating units.

Gorbunov, Yu. S.; Ageev, A. G.; Vasil'eva, R. V.; Korol'kov, B. M. [FGUP 'Elektrogorsk Scientific-Research Center for NPP Safety' (Russian Federation)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dupont's Marshall Laboratory is an automotive paint research and development facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The campus is comprised of several buildings that are served by Trigen-Philadelphia Energy Corporation's district steam loop. In 1996 Dupont management announced that it was considering moving the facility out of Philadelphia primarily due to the high operating cost compared to where they were considering relocating. The city officials responded by bringing the local electric and gas utilities to the table to negotiate better rates for Dupont. Trigen also requested the opportunity to propose energy savings opportunities, and dedicated a team of engineers to review Dupont's steam system to determine if energy savings could be realized within the steam system infrastructure. As part of a proposal to help Dupont reduce energy costs while continuing to use Trigen's steam, Trigen recommended modifications to increase energy efficiency, reduce steam system maintenance costs and implement small scale cogeneration. These recommendations included reducing the medium pressure steam distribution to low pressure, eliminating the medium pressure to low pressure reducing stations, installing a back pressure steam turbine generator, and preheating the domestic hot water with the condensate. Dupont engineers evaluated these recommended modifications and chose to implement most of them. An analysis of Dupont's past steam consumption revealed that the steam distribution system sizing was acceptable if the steam pressure was reduced from medium to low. After a test of the system and a few modifications, Dupont reduced the steam distribution system to low pressure. Energy efficiency is improved since the heat transfer losses at the low pressure are less than at the medium pressure distribution. Additionally, steam system maintenance will be significantly reduced since 12 pressure reducing stations are eliminated. With the steam pressure reduction now occurring at one location, the opportunity existed to install a backpressure turbine generator adjacent to the primary pressure reducing station. The analysis of Dupont's steam and electric load profiles demonstrated that cost savings could be realized with the installation of 150 kW of self-generation. There were a few obstacles, including meeting the utility's parallel operation requirements, that made this installation challenging. Over two years have passed since the modifications were implemented, and although cost savings are difficult to quantify since process steam use has increased, the comparison of steam consumption to heating degree days shows a reducing trend. Dupont's willingness to tackle energy conservation projects without adversely affecting their process conditions can be an example to other industrial steam users.

Larkin, A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND ON-CELL REFORMATION MODELING FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL STACKS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Providing adequate and efficient cooling schemes for solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) stacks continues to be a challenge coincident with the development of larger, more powerful stacks. The endothermic steam-methane reformation reaction can provide cooling and improved system efficiency when performed directly on the electrochemically active anode. Rapid kinetics of the endothermic reaction typically causes a localized temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet. It is desirable to extend the endothermic effect over more of the cell area and mitigate the associated differences in temperature on the cell to alleviate subsequent thermal stresses. In this study, modeling tools validated for the prediction of fuel use, on-cell methane reforming, and the distribution of temperature within SOFC stacks, are employed to provide direction for modifying the catalytic activity of anode materials to control the methane conversion rate. Improvements in thermal management that can be achieved through on-cell reforming is predicted and discussed. Two operating scenarios are considered: one in which the methane fuel is fully pre-reformed, and another in which a substantial percentage of the methane is reformed on-cell. For the latter, a range of catalytic activity is considered and the predicted thermal effects on the cell are presented. Simulations of the cell electrochemical and thermal performance with and without on-cell reforming, including structural analyses, show a substantial decrease in thermal stresses for an on-cell reforming case with slowed methane conversion.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Korolev, Alexander; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2009 2, 2009 CX-000062: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenville's SMART Building Program CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1, B2.2 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Greenville, Mississippi Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 12, 2009 CX-000379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sweeney Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle/Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project - Carbon Dioxide Pipeline and Storage CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Sweeney, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 12, 2009 CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Feasibility Study (for Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production)

279

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 23, 2010 September 23, 2010 CX-004179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing on the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Evaporator (CNP) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office September 23, 2010 CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office September 23, 2010 CX-004176: Categorical Exclusion Determination Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

280

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 25, 2010 October 25, 2010 CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 15, 2010 CX-004450: Categorical Exclusion Determination Plutonium Glass Sectioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/15/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 15, 2010 CX-004449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing to Provide Data on Precipitation Control in the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/15/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 15, 2010

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided by Fundamental Atomistics Insights  

SciTech Connect

Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a novel hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, Sn/Ni alloy as a potential carbon tolerant reforming catalyst. Sn/Ni alloy was synthesized and tested in steam reforming of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalyst is carbon-tolerant under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by a few characteristics: (a) Knowledge-based, bottom-up approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) The focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

Suljo Linic

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights  

SciTech Connect

Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

Suljo Linic

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method for improving the steam splits in a multiple steam injection process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for enhancing the uniformity of steam distribution in a multiple steam injection system comprising a steam generator, a steam header, a primary steam line connecting the generator to the header, and secondary steam lines connecting the header to steam injection wells. It comprises: injecting a surfactant into the primary steam line, and mixing the surfactant and steam sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the header as a foam.

Stowe, G.R. III.

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chemical Looping Reforming for H2, CO and Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that the extension of CLC onto oxidants beyond air opens new, highly efficient pathways for production of ultra-pure hydrogen, activation of CO{sub 2} via reduction to CO, and are currently working on production of syngas using nanocomposite Fe-BHA. CLR hold great potential due to fuel flexibility and CO{sub 2} capture. Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is a novel clean combustion technology which offers an elegant and highly efficient route for fossil fuel combustion. In CLC, combustion of a fuel is broken down into two spatially separated steps. In the reducer, the oxygen carrier (typically a metal) supplies the stoichiometric oxygen required for fuel combustion. In the oxidizer, the oxygen-depleted carrier is then re-oxidized with air. After condensation of steam from the effluent of the reducer, a high-pressure, high-purity sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is obtained. In the present study, we apply the CLC principle to the production of high-purity H{sub 2}, CO, and syngas streams by replacing air with steam and/or CO{sub 2} as oxidant, respectively. Using H{sub 2}O as oxidant, pure hydrogen streams can be obtained. Similarly, using CO{sub 2} as oxidant, CO is obtained, thus opening an efficient route for CO{sub 2} utilization. Using steam and CO{sub 2} mixtures for carrier oxidation should thus allow production of syngas with adjustable CO:H{sub 2} ratios. Overall, these processes result in Chemical Looping Reforming (CLR), i.e. the net overall reaction is the steam and/or dry reforming of the respective fuel.

Bhavsar,Saurabh; Najera,Michelle; Solunke,Rahul; Veser,Götz

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Engineering Training Course 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides training material that was prepared for the first of three Steam Generator Engineer Training Program courses. The Steam Generator Engineer Training Program is a comprehensive training program of the Steam Generator Management Program. The content of this course is based on an industry-developed job analysis for a steam generator engineer. The job analysis resulted in eight high-level tasks; therefore, eight training modules will be developed over a three-year period beginni...

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Risks From Severe Accidents Involving Steam Generator Tube Leaks or Ruptures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The various types of corrosion observed in PWR steam generator tubes prompted the nuclear industry to initiate a program of Steam Generator Degradation Specific Management (SGDSM). This program's objective is to develop a cost-effective means to maintain plant safety while improving steam generator reliability. Critical to this program is an assessment of the impact of steam generator tube leakage or rupture during severe accidents. This study determined the contributions of these types of severe acciden...

1998-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on deaerators in industrial steam systems provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inspect and Repair Steam Traps  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Steam generator tube rupture study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes our investigation of steam generator behavior during a postulated tube rupture accident. Our study was performed using the steam generator, thermal-hydraulic analysis code THERMIT-UTSG. The purpose ...

Free, Scott Thomas

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

Thomas, Andrew

291

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

Thomas, Andrew

292

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

Thomas, Andrew

293

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Novel Reforming Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

295

NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

defining early what contractors should accomplish < establishing contracts ahead of time < minimizing cost while maintaining quality by * maximizing competition and use of incentives * using past performance information in awarding work * managing the NEPA process as a project This guidance provides: < model statements of work < information on contract types and incentives < direction on effective NEPA contract management by the NEPA Document Manager < a system for measuring NEPA process costs < NEPA contractor evaluation procedures < details on the DOE NEPA Web site U.S. Department of Energy, Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance, December 1996 NEPA CONTRACTING REFORM GUIDANCE Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

296

Multizone catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons comprising contacting the hydrocarbon feed in two sequential catalyst zones. It comprises: a first catalyst zone contains a first catalytic composite consisting essentially of a platinum component, a germanium component, a refractory inorganic oxide, and a halogen component; and a second catalyst zone contains a second catalytic composite comprising a platinum component, a germanium component, a refractory inorganic oxide, a halogen component, and catalytically effective amounts of a metal promoter selected from rhenium, rhodium, ruthenium, cobalt, nickel, and iridium, and mixtures thereof.

Moser, M.C.; Lawson, R.J.; Antos, G.J.; Wang, L.; Parulekar, V.N.

1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Patent Counsel - Patent Reform | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patent Counsel - Patent Reform Patent Counsel - Patent Reform America invents Act 20112.pdf More Documents & Publications PETITION FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS Office of...

298

Fuzzy control of steam turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: PID control, comparison of PID and fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, robustness, speed control, steam turbine control

N. Kiupel; P. M. Frank; O. Bux

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide is meant to present the steam turbine performance engineer with the expected and important functions and responsibilities necessary to succeed in this position that are not necessarily taught in college. The instructions and recommendations in this guide, when properly executed, will improve the effectiveness of steam turbine performance engineers, positively affecting both the performance and reliability of the steam turbines under their care.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Options for Generating Steam Efficiently  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes how plant engineers can efficiently generate steam when there are steam generators and Heat Recovery Steam Generators in their plant. The process consists of understanding the performance characteristics of the various equipment as a function of load and operating them close to the maximum efficiency point.

Ganapathy, V.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Deliberate ignition of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures in condensing steam environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of thermal glow plug igniters to burn hydrogen in a condensing steam environment due to the presence of water sprays. The experiments were designed to determine if a detonation or accelerated flame could occur in a hydrogen-air-steam mixture which was initially nonflammable due to steam dilution but was rendered flammable by rapid steam condensation due to water sprays. Eleven Hydrogen Igniter Tests were conducted in the test vessel. The vessel was instrumented with pressure transducers, thermocouple rakes, gas grab sample bottles, hydrogen microsensors, and cameras. The vessel contained two prototypic engineered systems: (1) a deliberate hydrogen ignition system and (2) a water spray system. Experiments were conducted under conditions scaled to be nearly prototypic of those expected in Advanced Light Water Reactors (such as the Combustion Engineering (CE) System 80+), with prototypic spray drop diameter, spray mass flux, steam condensation rates, hydrogen injection flow rates, and using the actual proposed plant igniters. The lack of any significant pressure increase during the majority of the burn and condensation events signified that localized, benign hydrogen deflagration(s) occurred with no significant pressure load on the containment vessel. Igniter location did not appear to be a factor in the open geometry. Initially stratified tests with a stoichiometric mixture in the top showed that the water spray effectively mixes the initially stratified atmosphere prior to the deflagration event. All tests demonstrated that thermal glow plugs ignite hydrogen-air-steam mixtures under conditions with water sprays near the flammability limits previously determined for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures under quiescent conditions. This report describes these experiments, gives experimental results, and provides interpretation of the results. 12 refs., 127 figs., 16 tabs.

Blanchat, T.K.; Stamps, D.W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

STEAM GENERATOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual study on design of sodium-cooled reactor steam generators was conducted. Included is a detailed description of the preliminary design and analysis, based on the use of known materials and existing methods of fabrication. (See also APAE-41 Vols. I and III.) (J.R.D.)

1959-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Steam purity in PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports that 2 EPRI studies of PWRs prove that impure steam triggers decay of turbine metals. Reveals that EPRI is attempting to improve steam monitoring and analysis, which are key steps on the way to deciding the most cost-effective degree of steam purity, and to upgrade demineralizing systems, which can then reliably maintain that degree of purity. Points out that 90% of all cracks in turbine disks have occurred at the dry-to-wet transition zone, dubbed the Wilson line. Explains that because even very clean water contains traces of chemical impurities with concentrations in the parts-per-billion range, Crystal River-3's secondary loop was designed with even more purification capability; a deaerator to remove oxygen and prevent oxidation of system metals, and full-flow resin beds to demineralize 100% of the secondary-loop water from the condenser. Concludes that focusing attention on steam and water chemistry can ward off cracking and sludge problems caused by corrosion.

Hopkinson, J.; Passell, T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Catalytic reforming optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have previously examined correlations between catalytic reforming parameters for an L-35-6 unit at the Gor'knefteorgsintez Industrial Association. Experimental design was used to derive polynomial equations describing the correlations for each reactor. Further research on optimizing the reforming has been based on these results. They adopted the following strategy to define the best working parameters: they define a temperature that would provide the maximum target-product yield while maintaining a given working life. Most of the aromatic hydrocarbons are formed by the naphthene dehydrogenation, which is endothermic, so the greater the temperature drop over the height, the more rapid the process. The temperature difference thus indicates the current catalyst activity. To increase the target-product yield, one must raise the inlet temperature and ensure the largest drop across the catalyst. They examined an algorithm with fixed inlet conditions as regards flow rate and raw material composition. This algorithm provides the basis of software for the automatic control of the L-35-6 reactor unit at the Gor'knefteorgsintez Industrial Association. The system has been checked out and put into experimental operation.

Mazina, S.G.; Rybtsov, V.V.; Priss-Titarenko, T.A.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Method of optimizing the efficiency of a steam turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for improving the operational efficiency of a steam turbine power plant by governing the adjustment of the throttle steam pressure of a steam turbine at a desired power plant output demand value. In the preferred embodiment, the impulse chamber pressure of a high pressure section of the steam turbine is measured as a representation of the steam flow through the steam turbine. At times during the operation of the plant at the desired output demand value, the throttle pressure is perturbed. The impulse chamber pressure is measured before and after the perturbations of the throttle pressure. Because changing thermodynamic conditions may occur possibly as a result of the perturbations and provide an erroneous representation of the steam flow through the turbine, the impulse chamber pressure measurements are compensated for determined measurable thermodynamic conditions in the steam turbine. A compensated change in impulse chamber pressure measurement in a decreasing direction as a result of the direction of perturbation of the steam throttle pressure may indicate that further adjustment in the same direction is beneficial in minimizing the steam flow through the steam turbine at the desired plant output demand value. The throttle steam pressure adjustment may be continually perturbed in the same direction until the compensated change in impulse chamber pressure before and after measurements falls below a predetermined value, whereby the steam flow is considered substantially at a minimum for the desired plant output demand value.

Silvestri, G.J.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Experimental investigation of over-expanded supersonic steam jet submerged in quiescent water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was designed to determine the behaviour of an over-expanded supersonic steam jet in quiescent water. Only two shapes of steam plume were observed and an analytical model was constructed. The axial and radial temperature distributions were measured in the steam plume and in the surrounding water. The flow pattern and temperature distributions were influenced mainly by steam mass flux and water temperature. The results confirmed the occurrence of compression and expansion waves in the steam plume, and indicated that the temperature distributions reflected the steam plume shapes. The axial temperature distributions in the forepart of the steam plume were independent of water temperature. Empirical correlations were found that predicted the dimensionless axial and radial temperatures of the turbulent jet region. Moreover, prediction of the steam plume length by the dimensionless axial temperature showed good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

Wu, Xin-Zhuang; Yan, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jun; Pan, Dong-Dong; Liu, Guang-Yao [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high temperature process heat. The overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. An overview of high temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic thermodynamics, experimental methods, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

James E. O'Brien

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Feasibility Study (for Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Desktop studies performed by Gulf Coast Carbon Center primarily at the University of Texas Austin facility; a trip to the Plano offices of Denbury Resources for a planning meeting and a site survey at Oyster Bayou field. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000378.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000327: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination

309

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demands, and cogeneration. The Steam Distribution System Losses module will cover steam leaks, steam traps Analysis ­ (SSAT) Fuel selection Steam demands Cogeneration Steam Distribution System Losses - (3EDOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Welcome Module - 1 8

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

310

Steam assisted gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is disclosed which has an integral steam power system consisting of heat absorbing boilers which convert an unpressurized liquid into an expanded and heated steam by utilizing heat normally lost through component cooling systems and the exhaust system. Upon completion of the steam power cycle, the steam is condensed back to a liquid state through a condensing system located within the compressor and other functional components of the gas turbine engine. A system of high pressure air and friction seals restrict steam or liquid condensate within designed flow bounds. The gas turbine engine disclosed is designed to give improved fuel efficiency and economy for aircraft and land use applications.

Coronel, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Economic Study of Geothermal Steam Production and Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the study to determine the required selling price of geothermal flash steam in order for Phillips Petroleum Company to obtain a rate of return on investment of 10, 15 or 20% on its discovery in Nevada. The economic evaluations are based on an order-of-magnitude type of estimate of capital costs for the flash steam production, steam gathering and brine reinjection system to supply steam to a 55 MW (Gross) geothermal power generating plant, using mixed pressure (double flash steam) and turbine design. Geothermal well costs, brine quality and well productivity data were provided by Phillips Petroleum Company and are based on the discovery wells in Nevada. Power plant costs are based on current technology and available hardware, under construction at the present time. Costs have been escalated to 1977.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Steam System Balancing and Tuning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing and Steam System Balancing and Tuning Building America Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX Jayne Choi, Energy Analyst, CNT Energy March 2, 2012 PARR Current collaboration with GTI as a part of the PARR Building America team - Steam Systems Balancing and Tuning Study - Heating season 2011-2012 Background In Chicago, heating is the focus of residential energy use Of the 470,000 multifamily units in the Chicago region, at least 70,000 of those are steam heated Old steam systems invariably suffer from imbalance - Tenants must use supplemental heat or open their windows to cool their apartments during the heating season Buildings are often overheated Problem Statement (CNT Energy) Steam Heating Steam heat was the best option for buildings constructed between 1900 and 1930

313

High severity catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-severity catalytic reforming process is described comprising: (a) passing a mixture comprising a catalytic reforming feed stream and a recycle stream into a catalytic reforming reaction zone which is maintained at high-severity reforming conditions; (b) cooling an effluent stream comprising hydrogen and hydrocarbonaceous catalytic reforming reaction products which is withdrawn from the reaction zone; (c) passing the cooled effluent stream into a vapor-liquid separation zone and recovering therefrom a liquid stream comprising hydrocarbons and a hydrogen-rich gas stream; (d) passing the hydrogen-rich gas stream through an adsorption zone wherein the gas is contacted with a treating material which removes polycyclic aromatic compounds from the gas stream, the compounds remaining in the adsorption zone; (e) mixing a portion of the hydrogen-rich gas stream, which is the recycle stream, with the feed stream to form the charge stock mixture and withdrawing the balance of the hydrogen-rich gas stream, which is denoted as net hydrogen, from the catalytic reforming area, all of the hydrogen-rich gas stream being substantially free of polycyclic aromatic compounds; and (f) fractionating the liquid stream and recovering an overhead product comprising light hydrocarbons and a bottoms product comprising reformate.

Bennett, R.W.; Cottrell, P.R.; Gilsdorf, N.L.; Winfield, M.D.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

ADVANCED STEAM GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultra-low or ''zero''-emissions power generation systems. In some proposed concepts, nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with another diluent such as carbon dioxide or steam. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO{sub 2} and steam or water streams. The concentrated CO{sub 2} stream could then serve as input to a CO{sub 2} sequestration process or utilized in some other way. Some of these concepts are illustrated in Figure 1. This project is an investigation of one approach to ''zero'' emission power generation. Oxy-fuel combustion is used with steam as diluent in a power cycle proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) [1,2]. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to produce nearly pure oxygen for combustion. In this particular concept, the combustion temperatures are moderated by steam as a diluent. An advantage of this technique is that water in the product stream can be condensed with relative ease, leaving a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Because most of the atmospheric nitrogen has been separated from the oxidant, the potential to form any NOx pollutant is very small. Trace quantities of any minor pollutants species that do form are captured with the CO{sub 2} or can be readily removed from the condensate. The result is a nearly zero-emission power plant. A sketch of the turbine system proposed by CES is shown in Figure 2. NETL is working with CES to develop a reheat combustor for this application. The reheat combustion application is unusual even among oxy-fuel combustion applications. Most often, oxy-fuel combustion is carried out with the intent of producing very high temperatures for heat transfer to a product. In the reheat case, incoming steam is mixed with the oxygen and natural gas fuel to control the temperature of the output stream to about 1480 K. A potential concern is the possibility of quenching non-equilibrium levels of CO or unburned fuel in the mixing process. Inadequate residence times in the combustor and/or slow kinetics could possibly result in unacceptably high emissions. Thus, the reheat combustor design must balance the need for minimal excess oxygen with the need to oxidize the CO. This paper will describe the progress made to date in the design, fabrication, and simulation of a reheat combustor for an advanced steam generator system, and discuss planned experimental testing to be conducted in conjunction with NASA Glenn Research Center-Plumb Brook Station.

Richards, Geo. A.; Casleton, Kent H.; Lewis, Robie E.; Rogers, William A. (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory); Woike, Mark R.; Willis; Brian P. (NASA Glenn Research Center)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Steam generator tube rupture effects on a LOCA  

SciTech Connect

A problem currently experienced in commercial operating pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the United States is the degradation of steam generator tubes. Safety questions have arisen concerning the effect of these degraded tubes rupturing during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). To determine the effect of a small number of tube ruptures on the behavior of a large PWR during a postulated LOCA, a series of computer simulations was performed. The primary concern of the study was to determine whether a small number (10 or less of steam generator tubes rupturing at the beginning surface temperatures. Additional reflood analyses were performed to determine the system behavior when from 10 to 60 tubes rupture at the beginning of core reflood. The FLOOD4 code was selected as being the most applicable code for use in this study after an extensive analysis of the capabilities of existing codes to perform simulations of a LOCA with concurrent steam generator tube ruptures. The results of the study indicate that the rupturing of 10 or less steam generator tubes in any of the steam generators during a 200% cold leg break will not result in a significant increase in the peak cladding temperature. However, because of the vaporization of the steam generator secondary water in the primary side of the steam generator, a significant increase in the core pressure occurs which retards the reflooding process.

LaChance, J.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multizone catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons comprising contacting the hydrocarbon feed in two sequential catalyst zones. It comprises: an initial catalyst zone which is a fixed-bed system and contains an initial catalytic composite comprising a platinum component, a germanium component, a refractory inorganic oxide, and a halogen component; and a terminal catalyst zone which is a moving-bed system with associated continuous catalyst regeneration and contains a terminal catalytic composite having the essential absence of germanium and comprising a platinum component, a refractory inorganic oxide, a halogen component, and catalytically effective amounts of a metal promoter selected from one or more of the rhenium, tin, indium, rhodium, ruthenium, cobalt, nickel, and iridium.

Moser, M.; Lawson, R.J.; Wang, L.; Parulekar, V.; Peer, R.L.; Hamlin, C.R.

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

318

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

319

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

320

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

dist_steam.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Steam Usage Form District Steam Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may c

322

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Steam separator latch assembly  

SciTech Connect

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Kobsa, Irvin R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Steam separator latch assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Steam Condensation Induced Waterhammer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the type of waterhammer that kills people. It's initiating mechanism is much different than the image most engineers have of what causes waterhammer-- i.e. fast moving steam picking up a slug of condensate and hurling it downstream against an elbow or a valve. Condensation Induced Waterhammer can be 100 times more powerful than this type of waterhammer. Because it does not require flowing steam, it often occurs during relatively quiescent periods when operators least expect it. It's most often initiated by opening a valve, even a drain valve to remove condensate. The overpressure from an event can easily exceed 1000 psi. This is enough pressure to fracture a cast iron valve, blow out a steam gasket, or burst an accordion type expansion joint. And, in fact, failure of each of these components in separate condensation induced waterhammer accidents has resulted in operator fatalities. Operators and engineers need to understand this type of waterhammer so they can avoid procedures which can initiate it and designs which are susceptible to it.

Kirsner, W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-003968: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phosphate Glass Development and Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office September 3, 2010 CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office September 3, 2010 CX-003966: Categorical Exclusion Determination Irradiation of Materials in Containers in Savannah River National Laboratory Cobalt-60 Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office September 3, 2010 CX-003965: Categorical Exclusion Determination

327

Steam Generator Management Program: Alloy 800 Steam Generator Tubing Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear grade (NG) Alloy 800 has been used for steam generator tubing since 1972 in over 50 nuclear power plants worldwide. The operational performance of this alloy has been very good, although some degradation modes have recently been observed. This report describes worldwide operating experience for Alloy 800 steam generator tubing along with differences in tubing material, plant design, and operating conditions that can affect tube degradation. The various types of plants with Alloy 800 steam generat...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hiring Reform | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hiring Reform Hiring Reform Hiring Reform President Obama's Memorandum dated May 11, 2010, Improving the Federal Recruitment and Hiring Process, is Phase I of the Administration's comprehensive initiative to address major, long-standing impediments to recruiting and hiring the best and the brightest into the Federal civilian workforce. The Memorandum is based on issues that DOE and others brought to the attention of OPM, and it is designed to help Agencies build the workforce you need to achieve your goals. The Presidential Memorandum launches the Obama Administration's flagship personnel policy reform initiative. It builds on a nearly year-long collaboration between OPM and Agencies aimed at streamlining the hiring process and recruiting top talent, especially for mission-critical jobs.

329

Steam condensate leakage  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a multi-program research and development center owned by the United States Department of Energy and operated by the University of Chicago. The majority of the buildings on site use steam for heating and other purposes. Steam is generated from liquid water at the site`s central boiler house and distributed around the site by means of large pipes both above and below the ground. Steam comes into each building where it is converted to liquid condensate, giving off heat which can be used by the building. The condensate is then pumped back to the boiler house where it will be reheated to steam again. The process is continual but is not perfectly efficient. A substantial amount of condensate is being lost somewhere on site. The lost condensate has both economic and environmental significance. To compensate for lost condensate, makeup water must be added to the returned condensate at the boiler house. The water cost itself will become significant in the future when ANL begins purchasing Lake Michigan water. In addition to the water cost, there is also the cost of chemically treating the water to remove impurities, and there is the cost of energy required to heat the water, as it enters the boiler house 1000 F colder than the condensate return. It has been estimated that only approximately 60% of ANL`s steam is being returned as condensate, thus 40% is being wasted. This is quite costly to ANL and will become significantly more costly in the future when ANL begins purchasing water from Lake Michigan. This study locates where condensate loss is occurring and shows how much money would be saved by repairing the areas of loss. Shortly after completion of the study, one of the major areas of loss was repaired. This paper discusses the basis for the study, the areas where losses are occurring, the potential savings of repairing the losses, and a hypothesis as to where the unaccounted for loss is occurring.

Midlock, E.B.; Thuot, J.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Agenda for Tuesday, November 6, 2007 Location: BCS Incorporated, 8929 Stephens Road, Laurel, MD. 20723 410-997-7778 8:30 - 9:00 Continental Breakfast 9:00 DOE Targets, Tools and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI, Brian James 10:00 Research Review o Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production Systems, H2Gen, Sandy Thomas o Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator, GE Global Research, Wei Wei o Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar

331

Steam Power Partnership: Improving Steam System Efficiency Through Marketplace Partnerships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alliance to Save Energy, a national nonprofit organization based in Washington DC, and the U.S. Department of Energy are working with energy efficiency suppliers to promote the comprehensive upgrade of industrial steam systems. Like EPA's Green Lights and DOE's Motor Challenge, the Steam Power Partnership program will encourage industrial energy consumers to retrofit their steam plants wherever profitable. The Alliance has organized a "Steam Team" of trade associations, consulting engineering firms, and energy efficiency companies to help develop this public- private initiative.

Jones, T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Experimental investigation of caustic steam injection for heavy oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to compare the effect of steam injection and caustic steam injection in improving the recovery of San Ardo and Duri heavy oils. A 67 cm long x 7.4 cm O.D (outer diameter), steel injection cell is used in the study. Six thermocouples are placed at specific distances in the injection cell to record temperature profiles and thus the steam front velocity. The injection cell is filled with a mixture of oil, water and sand. Steam is injected at superheated conditions of 238oC with the cell outlet pressure set at 200 psig, the cell pressure similar to that found in San Ardo field. The pressure in the separators is kept at 50 psig. The separator liquid is sampled at regular intervals. The liquid is centrifuged to determine the oil and water volumes, and oil viscosity, density and recovery. Acid number measurements are made by the titration method using a pH meter and measuring the EMF values. The interfacial tensions of the oil for different concentrations of NaOH are also measured using a tensionometer. Experimental results show that for Duri oil, the addition of caustic results in an increase in recovery of oil from 52% (steam injection) to 59 % (caustic steam injection). However, caustic has little effect on San Ardo oil where oil recovery is 75% (steam injection) and 76 % (caustic steam injection). Oil production acceleration is seen with steam-caustic injection. With steam caustic injection there is also a decrease in the produced oil viscosity and density for both oils. Sodium hydroxide concentration of 1 wt % is observed to give the lowest oil-caustic interfacial tension. The acid numbers for San Ardo and Duri oil are measured as 6.2 and 3.57 respectively.

Madhavan, Rajiv

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six  

SciTech Connect

Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Before House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Before House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Before House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform By: Secretary...

335

Before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight and Government Reform Before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives...

336

Air-cooled vacuum steam condenser  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a steam powered system. It comprises: a turbine for converting steam energy into mechanical energy upon expansion of steam therein, a boiler for generating steam to be fed to the turbine, and a conduit arrangement coupling the boiler to the turbine and then recoupling the turbine exhaust to the boiler through steam condensing mechanisms.

Larinoff, M.W.

1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

Stanford University

338

Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Steam pretreatment is the reaction of coal with steam at temperatures well below those usually used for solubilization. The objective of the proposed work is to test the application of steam pretreatment to coal liquefaction. This quarter, a 300 ml stirred autoclave for liquefaction tests were specified and ordered, procedures for extraction tests were reestablished, and the synthesis of four model compounds was completed. Two of these compounds remain to be purified.

Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Process for purifying geothermal steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

Li, Charles T. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Steam Pressure Reduction: Opportunities and Issues; A BestPractices Steam Technical Brief  

SciTech Connect

A BestPractices Technical Brief describing industrial steam generation systems and opportunities for reducing steam system operating pressure.

Not Available

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cheng Cycle Brings Flexibility to Steam Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1983 Frito-Lay embarked on building a new 160,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in Kern County California. Based upon an estimated steam load between 5,000 and 50,000 lb/hr and an electrical load of approximately 1500 KW, the Engineering Department examined several energy optimization systems for this site. It was determined that a modified gas turbine cogeneration system was the best overall option. This system is unique in that it injects superheated steam from the waste heat boiler back into the gas turbine. When steam is injected into the turbine combustor, electrical output increases due to the increased mass flow and specific heat of the steam/air mixture. Electrical output ranges from 3.5 KW without injection to a theoretical 6.0 KW at maximum injection. Despite the volatility of nuclear power in California, project risk was low because the implementation of nuclear power would increase retail rates whereas the avoidance of nuclear power would increase avoided costs (buyback rates). When Frito-Lay decided, in 1983, to build a new snack food plant in Kern County, Calif., its main concern was to minimize the plant's total energy costs. The company therefore evaluated the various cogeneration options available and, for each option, conducted an energy-cost analysis. However, plant performance was not to be sacrificed in order to reduce the overall energy costs. After technical and economic analysis had been completed, Frito-Lay chose a cogeneration system using the Cheng Cycle---a gas-turbine system using steam injection that allows for efficient thermal tracking and simultaneous electrical generation. The company began construction of the Kern County plant to produce corn, tortilla, and potato chips in October 1984. Preliminary operation began in April 1986. The plant encompasses 160,000 ft, and is located just outside the city of Bakersfield. Steam is used for space heating as well as process applications. Total steam demand is expected to vary between 5000 and 55,000 lb/hr, depending on production and seasonal variations. The electrical usage of the plant is anticipated to fall between 1000 and 2500 kW, again depending on plant operations. Current utility energy costs are on the order of 50¢/therm for natural gas and 9¢/kWh for electricity. Cogeneration technology involves the simultaneous production of thermal and electrical energy. In Frito-Lay's case, the cogeneration system supplies steam for plant process needs and generates electricity for plant consumption and sale to the local utility. The modified gas turbine used in the plant is a Cheng Cycle Series Seven, Figure 1. It is a product of International Power Technology (IPT) of Palo Alto, Calif., which has patented the steam injection and control systems. The system is unique in that it injects superheated steam from the waste heat boiler back into the gas turbine. This steam injection process increases the electrical output of the turbine and improves cycle performance compared to traditional gas turbine systems.

Keller, D. C.; Bynum, D.; Kosla, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Deliberate ignition of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures under conditions of rapidly condensing steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was conducted to determine hydrogen combustion behavior under conditions of rapidly condensing steam caused by water sprays. Experiments were conducted in the Surtsey facility under conditions that were nearly prototypical of those that would be expected in a severe accident in the CE System 80+ containment. Mixtures were initially nonflammable owing to dilution by steam. The mixtures were ignited by thermal glow plugs when they became flammable after sufficient steam was removed by condensation caused by water sprays. No detonations or accelerated flame propagation was observed in the Surtsey facility. The combustion mode observed for prototypical mixtures was characterized by multiple deflagrations with relatively small pressure rises. The thermal glow plugs were effective in burning hydrogen safely by igniting the gases as the mixtures became marginally flammable.

Blanchat, T.; Stamps, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Degradation of Steam Generator Internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Regulatory Perspective on Industry's Response to Generic Letter 97-06, " Degradation of Steam Generator Internals" by S. Coffin, M. Subudhi, ...

344

Downhole steam injector. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

Donaldson, A.B.; Hoke, E.

1981-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Steam Generator Management Program: PWR Steam Generator Tube Wear - Alloy 690/Foreign Objects, Alloy 600/Carbon Steel, Alloy 690/Car bon Steel Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wear at tube support plates and wear resulting from foreign objects (FOs) can damage tubes in replacement steam generators. To date, however, limited data have been available on wear rates for Alloy 690 tubing. Under the Steam Generator Management Program, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has sponsored a series of experiments to determine the wear coefficients between combinations of Alloy 690 steam generator tube material and relevant support and FO materials. This report describes the test ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

346

Influence of Reduction Pretreatment and Methane Reforming on Nickel Solubility in YSZ Grains and Nickel Sintering within Ni-YSZ SOFC Anode Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels (e.g. methane or natural gas) can improve the thermal efficiency of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) by balancing exothermic electrochemical oxidation of H2 and CO at the anode/cathode interface with endothermic steam reforming reactions on the anode1. Generally the rate of reforming is much greater than the rate of H2 and CO oxidation leading to extensive thermal gradients across the cell that can compromise the physical integrity of the cell. Therefore, methods to control reformation activity and predict thermal gradients are needed. Computational modeling is used to predict thermal gradients and fuel conversion profiles across the cell, thus accurate and predictable methane reforming kinetics are required. Significant discrepancies in activation energy, rate expressions, and rate constants for methane reforming over nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) are reported in the open literature1-4. The objective of this work is to provide clarity on factors leading to discrepancies in kinetic information reported in the literature and identify potential methods to control reforming rates over NiYSZ anodes. Effects of pretreatment and reforming on Ni microstructure and activity of NiYSZ anodes for methane reforming were examined under open-circuit conditions.

Strohm, James J.; King, David L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Lea, Alan S.; Wang, Chong M.; Singh, Prabhakar

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator Layup: Corrosion Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work completed on a project to evaluate the current PWR steam generator layup guidance based on corrosion mitigation of steam generator components. It was performed in three phases. Phase 1 of this project included an extensive literature review of the corrosion test data, and development of a gap analysis to determine additional data needed to update the current guideline recommendations. Phase 2 was a corrosion test measurement program to evaluate the general corrosion rate...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Proceedings: Support-Structure Corrosion in Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an EPRI workshop held in Boston in May 1982 to discuss support structure corrosion in steam generators. Designed to present information on available materials and designs for support structures and to determine utility needs, the workshop covered crevice corrosion rates for alloy steels and carbon steel, results from examinations of support plate segments removed from steam generators, and models for corrosion and salt hideout in crevices.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2011 10, 2011 CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Sample E CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office February 10, 2011 CX-005197: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deployment Testing of Alternative-Fuel Fuel Cell Technologies for Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office February 4, 2011 CX-005513: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Chemical Cleaning of Waste Tanks to Improve Actinide Solubility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/04/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina

350

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 2010 25, 2010 CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 25, 2010 CX-004349: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near Zero Carbon Footprint Energy Creation through Thermal Oxidation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Allentown, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 25, 2010 CX-004332: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Incentive Program - Old Lyme High School Geothermal CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Old Lyme, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

351

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2009 2, 2009 CX-000379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sweeney Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle/Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project - Carbon Dioxide Pipeline and Storage CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Sweeney, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 12, 2009 CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Feasibility Study (for Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 12, 2009 CX-000061: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenville's Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning and Boiler Retrofit

352

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fossil Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 12, 2009 November 12, 2009 CX-000376: Categorical Exclusion Determination Boise White Paper Mill Carbon Capture and Sequestration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 12, 2009 CX-000379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sweeney Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle/Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project - Carbon Dioxide Pipeline and Storage CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Sweeney, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 12, 2009 CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Feasibility Study (for Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process

353

Practical aspects of steam injection processes: A handbook for independent operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 80% of the total steam injection process operating costs are for the production of steam and the operation of surface and subsurface equipment. The proper design and operation of the surface equipment is of critical importance to the success of any steam injection operation. However, the published monographs on thermal recovery have attached very little importance to this aspect of thermal oil recovery; hence, a definite need exists for a comprehensive manual that places emphasis on steam injection field practices and problems. This handbook is an attempt to fulfill this need. This handbook explores the concept behind steam injection processes and discusses the information required to evaluate, design, and implement these processes in the field. The emphasis is on operational aspects and those factors that affect the technology and economics of oil recovery by steam. The first four chapters describe the screening criteria, engineering, and economics of steam injection operation as well as discussion of the steam injection fundamentals. The next four chapters begin by considering the treatment of the water used to generate steam and discuss in considerable detail the design, operation and problems of steam generations, distribution and steam quality determination. The subsurface aspects of steamflood operations are addressed in chapters 9 through 12. These include thermal well completion and cementing practices, insulated tubulars, and lifting equipment. The next two chapters are devoted to subsurface operational problems encountered with the use of steam. Briefly described in chapters 15 and 16 are the steam injection process surface production facilities, problems and practices. Chapter 17 discusses the importance of monitoring in a steam injection project. The environmental laws and issues of importance to steam injection operation are outlined in chapter 18.

Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Turbocompressor downhole steam-generating system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a downhole steam-generating system comprising: an air compressor; a steam generating unit, including: a combustor for combusting fuel with the compressed air from the compressor producing combustor exhaust products; and steam conversion means, in indirect heat-exchange relationship with the combustor, for converting water which is fed into the steam-conversion means into steam; a turbine which is rotated by the combustor exhaust products and steam from the steam-generating unit, the rotational motion of the turbine is mechanically coupled to the air compressor to drive the air compressor; and control bypass means associated with the steam generating unit and turbine for regulating the relative amounts of the combustor exhaust product and steam delivered to the turbine from the steam generating unit. The air compressor and turbine form an integral turbocompressor unit. The turbocompressor unit, steam-generating unit and control bypass means are located downhole during operation of the steam-generating system.

Wagner, W.R.

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

356

High Efficiency Steam Electrolyzer  

SciTech Connect

A novel steam electrolyzer has been developed. In conventional electrolyzers, oxygen produced from electrolysis is usually released in the air stream. In their novel design, natural gas is used to replace air in order to reduce the chemical potential difference across the electrolyzer, thus minimizing the electrical consumption. The oxygen from the electrolysis is consumed in either a total oxidation or a partial oxidation reaction with natural gas. Experiments performed on single cells shown a voltage reduction as much as 1 V when compared to conventional electrolyzers. Using thin film materials and high performance cathode and anode, electrolysis could be done at temperatures as low as 700 C with electrolytic current as high as 1 A/cm{sup 2} at a voltage of 0.5 V only. The 700 C operating temperature is favorable to the total oxidation of natural gas while minimizing the need for steam that is otherwise necessary to avoid carbon deposition. A novel tubular electrolyzer stack has been developed. The system was designed to produce hydrogen at high pressures, taking advantage of the simplicity and high efficiency of the electrochemical compressors. A complete fabrication process was developed for making electrolyzer tubes with thin film coatings. A 100 W stack is being built.

Pham, A.Q.

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Reduction in Unit Steam Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001 the company's Arch-Brandenburg facility faced increased steam costs due to high natural gas prices and decreased production due to shutdown of a process. The facility was challenged to reduce unit steam consumption to minimize the effects of thes

Gombos, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Go Steam for Green Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Railroads are very fuel-efficient in moving freight by land. The history of rail begins with steam power, moving to eventual dieselization. Some components, advantages and disadvantages of internal combustion engines (gasoline, diesel) and external combustion ... Keywords: diesel engine, steam engine, biocoal, biofuel, computer control, internal combustion, external combustion

Paul Fred Frenger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hartford Steam Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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360

Combustion gas turbine/steam generator plant  

SciTech Connect

A fired steam generator is described that is interconnected with a gas turbine/steam generator plant having at least one gas turbine group followed by an exhaust-gas steam generator. The exhaust-gas steam generator has a preheater and an evaporator. The inlet of the preheater is connected to a feedwater distribution line which also feeds a preheater in the fired steam generator. The outlet of the preheater is connected to the evaporator of the fired steam generator. The evaporator outlet of the exhaust-gas steam generator is connected to the input of a superheater in the fired steam generator.

Aguet, E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DEVELOPMENT OF A CATALYST/SORBENT FOR METHANE REFORMING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has led to the initial development of a very promising material that has the potential to greatly simplify hydrocarbon reforming for the production of hydrogen and to improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. This material, which was derived from an advanced calcium-based sorbent, was composed of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consisted of a CaO core and an alumina-based shell. By incorporating a nickel catalyst in the shell, a combined catalyst and sorbent was prepared to facilitate the reaction of hydrocarbons with steam. It was shown that this material not only catalyzes the reactions of methane and propane with steam, it also absorbs CO{sub 2} simultaneously, and thereby separates the principal reaction products, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the absorption of CO{sub 2} permits the water gas shift reaction to proceed much further towards completion at temperatures where otherwise it would be limited severely by thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, an additional water gas shift reaction step would not be required to achieve low concentrations of CO. In a laboratory test of methane reforming at 600 C and 1 atm it was possible to produce a gaseous product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} (dry basis) while also achieving a H{sub 2} yield of 95%. Methane reforming under these conditions without CO{sub 2} absorption provided a H{sub 2} concentration of 75 mole% and yield of 82%. Similar results were achieved in a test of propane reforming at 560 C and 1 atm which produced a product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was being absorbed but which contained only 69 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was not being absorbed. These results were achieved with an improved catalyst support that was developed by replacing a portion of the {alpha}-alumina in the original shell material with {gamma}-alumina having a much greater surface area. This replacement had the unfortunate consequence of reducing the overall compressive strength of the core-in-shell pellets. Therefore, a preliminary study of the factors that control the surface area and compressive strength of the shell material was conducted. The important factors were identified as the relative concentrations and particle size distributions of the {alpha}-alumina, {gamma}-alumina, and limestone particles plus the calcination temperature and time used for sintering the shell material. An optimization of these factors in the future could lead to the development of a material that has both the necessary mechanical strength and catalytic activity.

B.H. Shanks; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus A. Satrio; Timothy Diehl; Brigitte Vollmer

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluate deaerator steam requirements quickly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam plant engineers frequently have to perform energy balance calculations around the deaerator to estimate the steam required to preheat and deaerate the make-up water and condensate returns. This calculation involves solving two sets of equations, one for mass and the other for energy balance. Reference to steam tables is also necessary. However, with the help of this program written in BASIC, one can arrive at the make-up water and steam requirements quickly, without referring to steam tables. This paper shows the mass and energy balance equations for the deaerator. This paper gives the program listing. An number of condensate returns can be handled. An example illustrates the use of the program.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Before the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations, and Procurement Reform Before the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy,...

364

Experimental and computational investigations of sulfur-resistant bimetallic catalysts for reforming of biomass gasification products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experimental studies of supported catalysts was used to identify H{sub 2}S-resistant biomass gasification product reforming catalysts. DFT calculations were used to search for bimetallic, nickel-based (1 1 1) surfaces with lower sulfur adsorption energies and enhanced ethylene adsorption energies. These metrics were used as predictors for H{sub 2}S resistance and activity toward steam reforming of ethylene, respectively. Relative to Ni, DFT studies found that the Ni/Sn surface alloy exhibited enhanced sulfur resistance and the Ni/Ru system exhibited an improved ethylene binding energy with a small increase in sulfur binding energy. A series of supported bimetallic nickel catalysts was prepared and screened under model ethylene reforming conditions and simulated biomass tar reforming conditions. The observed experimental trends in activity were consistent with theoretical predictions, with observed reforming activities in the order Ni/Ru > Ni > Ni/Sn. Interestingly, Ni/Ru showed a high level of resistance to sulfur poisoning compared with Ni. This sulfur resistance can be partly explained by trends in sulfur versus ethylene binding energy at different types of sites across the bimetallic surface.

Rangan, Meghana; Yung, Matthew M.; Medlin, J. William (NREL); (Colorado)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Safety and Security Directives Reform  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reforming a "Mountain" of Policy Reforming a "Mountain" of Policy Beginning with his confirmation hearings in January 2009, Energy Secretary Steven Chu challenged the Department of Energy to take a fresh look at how we conduct business. This challenge provided the opportunity for DOE to put in place the most effective and efficient strategies to accomplish the Department's missions safely and securely. In response to the Secretary's challenge and building on the results of Deputy Secretary Poneman's Safety and Security Reform studies, the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) broadened its directives review activities during 2009. By November 2009 HSS had initiated a disciplined review of all health, safety, and security directives, which included a systematic review of the Department's safety and security regulatory model.

366

Evaluate reformer performance at a glance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic reforming is becoming increasingly important in replacing octane lost as the removal of lead from worldwide gasoline pools continues. A method has been developed that can quickly evaluate the performance of any catalytic reformer. The catalytic naphtha reforming process primarily involves three well-known reactions. These are aromatization of naphthenes, cyclization of paraffins and hydrocracking of paraffins. Hydrogen is produced in the process of aromatization and dehydrocyclization of paraffins. Reformer performance is normally evaluated with a reformate analysis (PONA) and yield of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate. This method of quick evaluation of reformer performance is based upon the main assumption that the increase in hydrocarbon moles in the process is equal to the number of C{single_bond}C bond ruptures and one mole of hydrogen is absorbed to saturate the same. This new method calculates aromatization efficiency, paraffin conversion, aromatic selectivity and finally the paraffin, naphthene and aromatic content of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate.

Nag, A. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., Gujarat (India)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Bringing electricity reform to the Philippines  

SciTech Connect

Electricity reforms will not translate to competition overnight. But reforms are inching their way forward in institutions and stakeholders of the Philippine electricity industry, through regulatory and competition frameworks, processes, and systems promulgated and implemented. (author)

Fe Villamejor-Mendoza, Maria

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Steam Generator Modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the use of different Artificial Intelligence methods to predict the values of several continuous variables from a Steam Generator. The objective was to determine how the different artificial intelligence methods performed in making predictions on the given dataset. The artificial intelligence methods evaluated were Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems. The types of neural networks investigated were Multi-Layer Perceptions, and Radial Basis Function. Bayesian and committee techniques were applied to these neural networks. Each of the AI methods considered was simulated in Matlab. The results of the simulations showed that all the AI methods were capable of predicting the Steam Generator data reasonably accurately. However, the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference system out performed the other methods in terms of accuracy and ease of implementation, while still achieving a fast execution time as well as a reasonable training time.

Wright, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Olefins from High Yield Autothermal Reforming Process ...  

Isobutylene is used to produce fuel additives. The autothermal reforming process can produce isobutylene and requires no external energy input ...

370

Continuing Management Reform | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Continuing Management Reform | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

371

Clean gasoline reforming with superacid catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to: (a) determine if a coal-derived naphtha can be hydrotreated to produce a product with a sufficiently low heteroatom content that can be used for reforming, (b) identify hydrocarbon compounds in the naphtha with concentrations greater than 0.5 wt %, (c) develop a Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] heavily chlorided catalyst and determine the activity, selectivity and deactivation of this catalyst using model compounds and the hydrotreated naphtha, and (d) develop both a sulfated Pt/ZrO[sub 2] and Fe/Mn/ZrO[sub 2] catalyst formulations and determine the activity, selectivity and deactivation of these catalysts using model compounds and d warranted, the hydrotreated naphtha.

Davis, B.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE Prepared For: California Energy REPORT (FAR) INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE CYCLES EISG AWARDEE University://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Integral Catalytic Combustion/Fuel Reforming for Gas Turbine Cycles EISG Grant # 99

373

GCFR steam generator conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) steam generators are large once-through heat exchangers with helically coiled tube bundles. In the GCFR demonstration plant, hot helium from the reactor core is passed through these units to produce superheated steam, which is used by the turbine generators to produce electrical power. The paper describes the conceptual design of the steam generator. The major components and functions of the design are addressed. The topics discussed are the configuration, operating conditions, design criteria, and the design verification and support programs.

Holm, R.A.; Elliott, J.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. The integrity assessments are normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow the guidance in this report will have satisfied the requirements for degradation assessments, condition monitoring, and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Steam Generator Program Guidelin...

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report: Revision 18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundSince 1985, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities. This document was published once a year and distributed via hardcopy. Until 1998, the method of acquiring data for this report had been to issue annual survey forms to all PWR and pressurized heavy water reactor nuclear utilities worldwide. The information included in ...

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use at the Steam Plant #12;· Flagship campus region produce 14% of US coal (TN only 0.2%) Knoxville and the TN Valley #12;· UT is one of about 70 U.S. colleges and universities w/ steam plant that burns coal · Constructed in 1964, provides steam for

Dai, Pengcheng

377

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

378

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation The Department of Energy (DOE) today publishes a final statement of policy on intergovernmental consultation under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995. The policy reflects the guidelines and instructions that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided to each agency to develop, with input from State, local, and tribal officials, an intergovernmental consultation process with regard to significant intergovernmental mandates contained in a notice of proposed rulemaking. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Key Documents

379

NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contracting Reform Guidance Contracting Reform Guidance NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance This documents provides guidance on NEPA contracting strategy, including: defining the work of the contractor; establishing contracts ahead of time; minimizing cost while maintaining quality. Guidance also provides: model statements of work, direction on NEPA contract management by NEPA Document Manager; a system for measuring NEPA costs and for evaluating contractor procedures; details on the DOE NEPA website. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance More Documents & Publications NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance (December 1996) Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support Services Acquisition: Preparation and Review of Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Assessments, Environmental Reports, and other Environmental

380

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation The Department of Energy (DOE) today publishes a final statement of policy on intergovernmental consultation under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995. The policy reflects the guidelines and instructions that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided to each agency to develop, with input from State, local, and tribal officials, an intergovernmental consultation process with regard to significant intergovernmental mandates contained in a notice of proposed rulemaking. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Key Documents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Steam distillation effect and oil quality change during steam injection  

SciTech Connect

Steam distillation is an important mechanism which reduces residual oil saturation during steam injection. It may be the main recovery mechanism in steamflooding of light oil reservoirs. As light components are distilled the residual (initial) oil, the residuum becomes heavier. Mixing the distilled components with the initial oil results in a lighter produced oil. A general method has been developed to compute steam distillation yield and to quantify oil quality changes during steam injection. The quantitative results are specific because the California crude data bank was used. But general principles were followed and calculations were based on information extracted from the DOE crude oil assay data bank. It was found that steam distillation data from the literature can be correlated with the steam distillation yield obtained from the DOE crude oil assays. The common basis for comparison was the equivalent normal boiling point. Blending of distilled components with the initial oil results in API gravity changes similar to those observed in several laboratory and field operations.

Lim, K.T.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Introduction, Steam Generation Efficiency Resource Utilization Analysis, and Steam Distribution System Losses Stack Losses Resource Utilization Analysis Steam Distribution System Losses Conclusion Quiz If youDOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Navigational Tutorial - 1 8

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

383

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizontal runs of steam distribution piping from a common header. Steam distribution piping is insulatedDOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Introduction Module - 1 8/27/2010 Steam End User Training Introduction Module Slide 1 - Introduction Title Page Hello, and welcome

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

384

Steam turbine for geothermal power generation  

SciTech Connect

A steam turbine comprises a casing; turbine vanes rotatably set in the casing; a plurality of partition walls which extend along radial directions from the rotation center of the turbine vanes to define a plurality of steam valve chambers in the casing; steam supply pipes respectively connected to the corresponding steam valve chambers; and regulating valves which are fitted to the respective steam supply pipes to regulate respectively the flow rate of steam streams supplied to the respective steam valve chambers. At least one partition wall for dividing the interior space of the steam turbine into adjacent steam valve chambers is provided with at least one penetrating hole for causing the steam valve chambers to communicate with each other.

Tsujimura, K.; Hadano, Y.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Simplify heat recovery steam generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in process and power plants, refineries and in several cogeneration/combined cycle systems. They are usually designed for a set of gas and steam conditions but often operate under different parameters due to plant constraints, steam demand, different ambient conditions (which affect the gas flow and exhaust gas temperature in a gas turbine plant), etc. As a result, the gas and steam temperature profiles in the HRSG, steam production and the steam temperature differ from the design conditions, affecting the entire plant performance and economics. Also, consultants and process engineers who are involved in evaluating the performance of the steam system as a whole, often would like to simulate the performance of an HRSG under different gas flows, inlet gas temperature and analysis, steam pressure and feed water temperature to optimize the entire steam system and select proper auxiliaries such as steam turbines, condensers, deaerators, etc.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Steam Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Steam Field Dictionary.png Steam Field: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Steam field reservoirs are special cases where the fluid is predominantly found in a gas phase between 230°C to 240°C. "This special class of resource needs to be recognized, its uniqueness being the remarkably consistent initial temperature and pressure

387

The Elimination of Steam Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How would you like to have a share of $154,000,000,000 a year? According to the Department of Energy that is roughly what was spent for creating steam in 1978. Steam generation accounts for fully one half of the industrial and commercial energy dollar. That figure could be reduced by 10-20% or more by the simple elimination of steam traps. Recent engineering developments show that steam traps can be eliminated. Documented results demonstrate that the retrofitting of existing facilities to alternative methods of condensate removal is simple and economically feasible, with paybacks of less than 12 months. Advantages obtained in the first year remain consistent for several years after conversion with virtual elimination of maintenance.

Dickman, F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Computer Optimization of Steam Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As fuel costs continued to rise sharply during the 1970' s, the staff at Exxon's Benicia Refinery realized there was a growing economic incentive to optimize the production of high pressure steam. A significant percentage of the Refinery's total energy is consumed in generating high pressure steam. Recently, a computer program was implemented to optimize high pressure steam production. The first challenge in developing the program was to provide reliable analog and digital instrumentation allowing simultaneous analog header control along with effective digital steam flow control. Once appropriate instrumentation became available, the effort focused on identifying the best approach for developing the computer control program. After screening several alternatives, it became apparent that we were dealing with an allocation problem which could be effectively handled with a linear program. The control program has performed well since it was commissioned. It has experienced a service factor of greater than 95% while reducing energy consumption of the boilers by over 500 million Btu's per day.

Todd, C. H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The steam engine and industrialization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simon Schaffer in York Rail Museum talks to the camera about the relationship between the steam engine and industrialization and whatsteam meant; a regular supply of moving power for workshops and factories....

Dugan, David

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs of the process plant, cogeneration or combined cycle plant. There is no need to design the HRSG per se and hence simulation is a valuable tool for anyone interested in evaluating the HRSG performance even before it is designed. It can also save a lot of time for specification writers as they need not guess how the steam side performance will vary with different gas/steam parameters. A few examples are given to show how simulation methods can be applied to real life problems.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Steam Generator Management Program: Flaw Handbook Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Degradation Specific Flaw Handbook v1.0 defines burst pressure equations for steam generator tubes with various degradation morphologies, and the EPRI Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines (1019038) describes a probabilistic evaluation process which can be used to account for key input parameter uncertainties. The Flaw Handbook Calculator software is an automated Microsoft Excelspreadsheet which cal...

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Steam turbine gland seal control system  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure steam turbine having a sealing gland where the turbine rotor penetrates the casing of the turbine. Under certain conditions the gland is sealed by an auxiliary steam supply, and under other conditions the gland is self sealed by turbine inlet steam. A control system is provided to modify the temperature of the auxiliary steam to be more compatible with the self sealing steam, so as to eliminate thermal shock to the turbine rotor.

Martin, H. F.

1985-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Field Guide: Turbine Steam Path Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam path damage, particularly of blades, has long been recognized as a leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel plants. Damage to steam path components by various mechanisms continues to result in significant economic impact domestically and internationally. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report TR-108943, Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, was prepared to compile the most recent knowledge about turbine steam path damage: identifying th...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. This integrity assessment is normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow this document's guidelines will have satisfied their requirements for condition monitoring and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) initiative, Steam Generator Program Guidelines, NEI 97-06.

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to make additional steam for the steam turbine cycle. Thein multi-pressure-level steam turbines to produce additionalthe superheated steam to the steam turbine cycle. The most

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Feasibility Study of H{sub 2}S Abatement by Incineration of Noncondensable Gases in Vented Steam Flow from Davies-State 5206-1 Geothermal Steam Well, Geysers Geothermal Steam Field, Lake County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine feasibility of using an incineration-type device to accomplish the required reduction in vent steam H{sub 2}S content to meet ICAPCO rules. This approach is to be the only method considered in this feasibility study.

None

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

DOE BestPractices Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE BestPractices Steam End User Training Guide Alternate Text Narratives and Graphic will discuss fuel selection, steam demands, and cogeneration. The Steam Distribution System Losses module

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

398

Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

399

Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices tip sheet on improving efficiency of industrial steam systems by recovery latent heat from low-pressure steam.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices tip sheet on improving efficiency of industrial steam systems by recovery latent heat from low-pressure steam.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of UHT milk processed by direct steam injection and steam infusion technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??UHT direct steam injection and steam infusion are widely used; however there is no comparison of their impact on milk components. This study evaluates the… (more)

Malmgren, Bozena

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Change steam tapping to save energy  

SciTech Connect

Induction turbines are common in large plants. They use both high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) steam and exhaust into a surface condenser operating under vacuum. Induction turbines are especially useful since they use maximum available LP steam with a balanced amount of HP steam and thus, achieve the best overall thermodynamic efficiency. LP steam is generally available as flash steam for boiler blow down, exhausts from back pressure turbines, process waste-heat recovery, etc. Typically, an LP steam header is routed around the plant with several connections to receive and supply steam. Therefore, it is common to connect each steam user/supplier to the nearest point on the main header. The portion of the header where steam turbine exhausts are connected has superheated LP steam and the header portion which receives steam from waste heat recovery, boiler blow down, etc., has saturated LP steam. Some portion of the header has mixed steam. Thus, the temperature of LP steam in the header varies over its length.

Antony, S.M.; Joshi, G.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Griffin, Mr. Bob [Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc.; Wright, Anthony L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermochemical Fuel Reformer Development Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical Fuel Reforming (TCFR) is the recovery of internal combustion engine exhaust heat to chemically convert natural gas into a higher calorific flow fuel stream containing a significant concentration of hydrogen. This technique of recycling the engine exhaust heat can reduce fuel use (heat rate). In addition, the hydrogen enhanced combustion also allows stable engine operation at a higher air-fuel ratio (leaner combustion) which results in very low NOx production. This interim report covers two...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

405

CX-006717: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006717: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Oil Recovery Steam Generator CX(s) Applied: Date: 03302011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming...

406

Modular pebble-bed reactor reforming plant design for process heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary design study of a Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor System Reforming (MPB-R) Plant. The system uses one pressure vessel for the reactor and a second pressure vessel for the components, i.e., reformer, steam generator and coolant circulator. The two vessels are connected by coaxial pipes in an arrangement known as the side-by-side (SBS). The goal of the study is to gain an understanding of this particular system and to identify any technical issues that must be resolved for its application to a modular reformer plant. The basic conditions for the MPB-R were selected in common with those of the current study of the MRS-R in-line prismatic fuel concept, specifically, the module core power of 250 MWt, average core power density of 4.1 w/cc, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel with a /sup 235/U content of 20% homogeneously mixed with thorium, and a target burnup of 80,000 MWD/MT. Study results include the pebble-bed core neutronics and thermal-hydraulic calculations. Core characteristics for both the once-through-then-out (OTTO) and recirculation of fuel sphere refueling schemes were developed. The plant heat balance was calculated with 55% of core power allotted to the reformer.

Lutz, D.E.; Cowan, C.L.; Davis, C.R.; El Sheikh, K.A.; Hui, M.M.; Lipps, A.J.; Wu, T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) Agency/Company /Organization: Global Subsidies Initiative (GSI), International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), World Bank Phase: Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs References: Environmental fiscal reform - What should be done and how to achieve it[1] Reforming fiscal policies to close the gap between economic and ecological efficiencies[2] Overview "The term environmental fiscal reform (EFR) refers to: a range of taxation or pricing instruments that can raise revenue, while simultaneously furthering environmental goals. This is achieved by providing economic

409

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina A cementitious waste form (Cast Stone) is one of the alternatives being considered for Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW), along with vitrification, bulk vitrification, and fluidized bed steam reforming. A testing program will be conducted in FY13 and FY14 to obtain additional information on the Cast Stone option for immobilizing the LAW. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in waste composition, waste concentration, dry materials sources, and free water (in the waste liquid)-to-dry blend mix ratios.

410

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina A cementitious waste form (Cast Stone) is one of the alternatives being considered for Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW), along with vitrification, bulk vitrification, and fluidized bed steam reforming. A testing program will be conducted in FY13 and FY14 to obtain additional information on the Cast Stone option for immobilizing the LAW. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in waste composition, waste concentration, dry materials sources, and free water (in the waste liquid)-to-dry blend mix ratios.

411

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina A cementitious waste form (Cast Stone) is one of the alternatives being considered for Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW), along with vitrification, bulk vitrification, and fluidized bed steam reforming. A testing program will be conducted in FY13 and FY14 to obtain additional information on the Cast Stone option for immobilizing the LAW. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in waste composition, waste concentration, dry materials sources, and free water (in the waste liquid)-to-dry blend mix ratios.

412

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Supplemental Immobilization of Simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina A cementitious waste form (Cast Stone) is one of the alternatives being considered for Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW), along with vitrification, bulk vitrification, and fluidized bed steam reforming. A testing program will be conducted in FY13 and FY14 to obtain additional information on the Cast Stone option for immobilizing the LAW. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in waste composition, waste concentration, dry materials sources, and free water (in the waste liquid)-to-dry blend mix ratios.

413

Distribution of fluid phases within the steam zone in steam injection processes  

SciTech Connect

The saturation distribution of steam, water, and oil within the steam zone in a steam injection process at constant injection rates is examined. It is shown theoretically that for typical values of injection parameters the oil saturation in the steam zone rapidly reaches its residual value at steam zone conditions. This result, which corroborates previous experimental evidence, is a consequence of the relatively fast changes in phase saturations compared to the rate of the advance of the steam front. Explicit expressions for the steam saturation distribution are obtained. It is shown that the average steam saturation is a slightly decreasing function of time and approaches a limiting value which is a nearly constant fraction of the steam saturation at the injection point. This result provides theoretical justification for the often made assumption of constant average steam saturation in steam injection calculations.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

IMPROVEMENTS IN STEAM GENERATING PLANT AND AN IMPROVED METHOD OF GENERATING STEAM  

SciTech Connect

A steam generating plant, designed for heat transfer from a liquid metal (potassium, sodium, or their alloy) with reduced danger of explosion, is based on the fact that, if steam (especially superheated) rather than water contacts the liquid metal, the risk of explosion is much reduced. In this plant steam is superheated by heat transfer from liquid metal, the steam bsing generated by heat transfer between the superheated steam and water. Diagrams are given for the plant, which comprises a series of heat exchangers in which steam is superheated; part of the superheated steam is recycled to convert water into steam. Apart from the danger of a steam--liquid metal contact, the main danger is that the superheated steam might cool, coming to the saturated condition; this danger can be averted by setting up mceans for detecting low steam temperatures. (D.L.C.)

Zoller, R.E.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

CX-001034: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Solar Reforming of Carbon Dioxide to Produce Diesel Fuel CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03022010 Location(s): Sacramento, California...

416

Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Bob Evans at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's distributed bio-oil reforming efforts.

Evans, R. J.; Czernik, S.; French, R.; Ratcliff, M.; Marda, J.; Dean, A. M.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Generating Steam by Waste Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustible waste is a significant source of steam at the new John Deere Tractor Works assembly plant in Waterloo, Iowa. The incinerators, each rated to consume two tons of solid waste per hour, are expected to provide up to 100 percent of the full production process steam requirements. The waste incineration system consists of a wood dunnage shredder, two Skid-Steer Loaders for incinerator charging, two incinerators, and a wet ash conveyor. The equipment is housed in a building with floor space to accommodate loads of combustible waste delivered for incineration. Incombustible material is segregated at the source. A review of operational experience and the results of a study on actual steam production costs will be presented with the intent that others will be able to use the information to advance the state of the art of high volume controlled air waste incineration.

Williams, D. R.; Darrow, L. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fast fluidized bed steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

Bryers, Richard W. (Flemington, NJ); Taylor, Thomas E. (Bergenfield, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Optimized Control Of Steam Heating Coils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam has been widely used as the source of heating in commercial buildings and industries throughout the twentieth century. Even though contemporary designers have moved to hot water as the primary choice for heating, a large number of facilities still use steam for heating. Medical campuses with on-site steam generation and extensive distribution systems often serve a number of buildings designed prior to the mid-1980s. The steam is typically used for preheat as its high thermal content helps in heating the air faster and prevents coils from freezing in locations with extreme weather conditions during winter. The present work provides a comprehensive description of the various types of steam heating systems, steam coils, and valves to facilitate the engineer's understanding of these steam systems. A large percentage of the steam coils used in buildings are provided with medium pressure steam. Veterans Integrated Service Network and Army Medical Command Medical Facilities are examples which use medium pressure steam for heating. The current design manual for these medical facilities recommends steam at 30psig be provided to these coils. In certain cases although the steam heating coil is designed for a 5psig steam pressure, it is observed that higher pressure steam is supplied at the coil. A higher steam pressure may lead to excessive heating, system inefficiency due to increased heat loss, simultaneous heating and cooling, and increased maintenance cost. Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of lowering steam pressure on the system performance. A 16% reduction in temperature rise across the coil was found when the steam pressure in the coil was reduced from 15psig to 5psig. The rise in temperature with lower pressure steam was sufficient to prevent coil freeze-up even in the most severe weather conditions. Additional benefits of reduced steam pressure are reduced flash steam losses (flash steam is vapor or secondary steam formed when hot condensate from the coil is discharged into a lower pressure area, i.e., the condensate return line) and radiation losses, increased flow of air through the coil thereby reducing air stratification and reduced energy losses in the event of actuator failure. The work also involved evaluating the existing control strategies for the steam heating system. New control strategies were developed and tested to address the short comings of existing sequences. Improved temperature control and occupant comfort; elimination of valve hunting and reduced energy consumption were benefits realized by implementing these measures.

Ali, Mir Muddassir

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Steam Boiler Control Specification Problem:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our solution to the specification problem in the specification language TLA+ is based on a model of operation where several components proceed synchronously. Our first specification concerns a simplified controller and abstracts from many details given in the informal problem description. We successively add modules to build a model of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed controller specification and prove that it refines the abstract controller. We also address the relationship between the physical state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss the reliability of failure detection. Finally, we discuss the implementability of our specification.

Tla Solution Frank; Frank Le Ke; Stephan Merz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

TransForum v4n2 - Diesel Reformer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ARGONNE SCIENTISTS TEAM UP TO DEVELOP NEW DIESEL REFORMER Liu tests diesel reformer Argonne's Di-Jia Liu conducted extensive testing of the diesel reformer; his experiments are...

423

Steam Generator Management Program: Dynamic Analysis of a Steam Generator: Part 2 – Stability Analysis of Representative Steam Gener ators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project that examined the effect of tube support plate blockage in recirculating steam generators on water level stability. This report builds upon Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1025134.BackgroundWater level oscillations in recirculating steam generators occur due to hydrodynamic instabilities in the natural circulation system. Utilities have reported water level oscillations in operating steam ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gamma-Ray Exposure Rate Distribution in a Steam Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma-ray exposure rate measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the relative contribution of various surface areas in a steam generator to the overall radiation levels. The measurements were compared with analytic predictions based on discrete ordinates and point kernel techniques, and assessments of the radiation source inventory of the various surfaces were developed.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Shutdown Protection of Steam Turbines Using Dehumidified Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI research has determined that proper protection of the steam turbine during shutdown periods is essential to the prevention of damage by stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. This report provides information on both the incipient damage of improper shutdown and techniques for assessing and applying dehumidified air for shutdown protection.

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Steam-system upgrades | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Page Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Steam-system upgrades Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Steam-system...

429

Insulate Steam Distribution and Condensate Return Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on insulating steam distribution and condensate return lines provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

What is needed for the steam revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In four sequences, standing beside a huge steam wheel, Simon Schaffer discusses some of the things that are needed for the development of the steam revolution. These include reliable cylinders (from gun manufacture), good boilers ( from brewing...

Dugan, David

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

The steam engine and what it needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simon Schaffer explains that to produce an effective steam engine you do not just need specific inventions, such as the separate condenser of James Watt, but also skills from clockworking, distillation, metal working and so on. Then the steam power...

Dugan, David

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

FEMP-FTA--Steam Trap Performance Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam Trap Function Steam Trap Function Steam traps are automatic valves used in every steam system to remove conden- sate, air, and other non-condensable gases while preventing or minimizing the passing of steam. If condensate is allowed to collect, it reduces the flow capacity of steam lines and the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. In addition, excess condensate can lead to "water hammer," with potentially destructive and dangerous results. Air that remains after system startup reduces steam pressure and temperature and may also reduce the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. Non-condensable gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, cause corrosion. Steam that passes through the trap provides no heating ser- vice. This effectively reduces the heating capacity

433

Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm or Steaming Ground Warm or Steaming Ground Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Warm or Steaming Ground Dictionary.png Warm or Steaming Ground: An area where geothermal heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Steam rising from the ground at Eldvorp, a 10 km row of craters, in Southwestern Iceland. http://www.visiticeland.com/SearchResults/Attraction/eldvorp Warm or steaming ground is often an indicator of a geothermal system beneath the surface. In some cases a geothermal system may not show any

434

Constant-pressure measurement of steam-water relative permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of steady-state experiments have established relative permeability curves for two-phase flow of water in a porous medium. These experiments have minimized uncertainty in pressure, heat loss, and saturation. By attempting to maintain a constant pressure gradient, the experiments have provided a baseline from which to determine the effect of temperature on relative permeability. The use of a flexible heater with an automatic control system made it possible to assume negligible phase change for the mobile fluid. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954) for the simultaneous flow of nitrogen and water. Close agreement between the curves by Satik (1998), Mahiya (1999), and this study establishes the reliability of the experimental method and instrumentation adopted in these experiments, though some differences may bear further investigation. In particular, the steam phase relative permeability appears to vary much more linearly with saturation than does the water phase relative permeability.

O'Connor, Peter A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Identifying Steam Opportunity "Impact" Inputs for the Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE BestPractices Steam "Steam System Assessment Tool" (SSAT) is a powerful tool for quantifying potential steam improvement opportunities in steam systems. However, all assessment tools are only as good as the validity of the modeling inputs.

Harrell, G.; Jendrucko, R.; Wright, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Vapor generator steam drum spray head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A. (Massillon, OH)

1978-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Steam Generator Vibration and Wear Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed and validated a steam generator flow-induced tube vibration and wear prediction methodology.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

438

97e Intermediate Temperature Catalytic Reforming of Bio-Oil for Distributed Hydrogen Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the world's energy demands rapidly increasing, it is necessary to look to sources other than fossil fuels, preferably those that minimize greenhouse emissions. One such renewable source of energy is biomass, which has the added advantage of being a near-term source of hydrogen. While there are several potential routes to produce hydrogen from biomass thermally, given the near-term technical barriers to hydrogen storage and delivery, distributed technologies such that hydrogen is produced at or near the point of use are attractive. One such route is to first produce bio-oil via fast pyrolysis of biomass close to its source to create a higher energy-density product, then ship this bio-oil to its point of use where it can be reformed to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This route is especially well suited for smaller-scale reforming plants located at hydrogen distribution sites such as filling stations. There is also the potential for automated operation of the conversion system. A system has been developed for volatilizing bio-oil with manageable carbon deposits using ultrasonic atomization and by modifying bio-oil properties, such as viscosity, by blending or reacting bio-oil with methanol. Non-catalytic partial oxidation of bio-oil is then used to achieve significant conversion to CO with minimal aromatic hydrocarbon formation by keeping the temperature at 650 C or less and oxygen levels low. The non-catalytic reactions occur primarily in the gas phase. However, some nonvolatile components of bio-oil present as aerosols may react heterogeneously. The product gas is passed over a packed bed of precious metal catalyst where further reforming as well as water gas shift reactions are accomplished completing the conversion to hydrogen. The approach described above requires significantly lower catalyst loadings than conventional catalytic steam reforming due to the significant conversion in the non-catalytic step. The goal is to reform and selectively oxidize the bio-oil and catalyze the water gas shift reaction without catalyzing methanation or oxidation of CO and H{sub 2}, thus attaining equilibrium levels of H{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} at the exit of the catalyst bed. Experimental Bio-oil (mixed with varied amounts of methanol to reduce the viscosity and homogenize the bio-oil) or selected bio-oil components are introduced at a measured flow rate through the top of a vertical quartz reactor which is heated using a five zone furnace. The ultrasonic nozzle used to feed the reactants allows the bio-oil to flow down the center of the reactor at a low, steady flow rate. Additionally, the fine mist created by the nozzle allows for intimate mixing with oxygen and efficient heat transfer, providing optimal conditions to achieve high conversion at relatively low temperatures in the non-catalytic step thus reducing the required catalyst loading. Generation of the fine mist is especially important for providing good contact between non-volatile bio-oil components and oxygen. Oxygen and helium are also delivered at the top of the reactor via mass flow meters with the amount of oxygen being varied to maximize the yields of H{sub 2} and CO and the amount of helium being adjusted such that the gas phase residence time in the hot zone is {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.45 s for bio-oil and methanol experiments, respectively. A catalyst bed can be located at the bottom of the reactor tube. To date, catalyst screening experiments have used Engelhard noble metal catalysts. The catalysts used for these experiments were 0.5 % rhodium, ruthenium, platinum, and palladium (all supported on alumina). Experiments were performed using pure alumina as well. Both the catalyst type and the effect of oxygen and steam on the residual hydrocarbons and accumulated carbon containing particulates were investigated. The residence time before the catalyst is varied to determine the importance of the non-catalytic step and its potential effect on the required catalyst loading. Non-catalytic experiments (primarily homogeneous cracking) use a bed of quartz p

Marda, J. R.; Dean, A. M.; Czernik, S.; Evans, R. J.; French, R.; Ratcliff, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

An update on catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UOP Platforming process is a catalytic reforming process in widespread use throughout the petroleum and petrochemical industries. Since the first unit went onstream in 1949, the process has become a standard feature in refineries worldwide. Over the years, significant improvements have been made in process catalysts and process design. The most recent improvement is the combination of a catalyst called R-72 with a new patented flow scheme, R-72 staged loading, which gives significantly higher yields and provides increased catalyst stability. In this article, the authors describe two types of Platforming processes and the new R-72 staged loading scheme.

Wei, D.H.; Moser, M.D.; Haizmann, R.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the energy savings potential of steam traps and present the energy, economic, and environmental reason why an active steam trap maintenance program is good for the company's bottom line. Several case studies will be discussed to demonstrate the merits of steam trap technology.

Bockwinkel, R. G.; French, S. A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination steam reforming" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.